Issuu on Google+

RESEARCH CAPABILITIES PRIORITY RESEARCH CENTRES Advanced Particle Processing ARC Centre for Complex Dynamic Systems and Control Bioinformatics, Biomarker Discovery and Information-Based Medicine Energy Geotechnical and Materials Modelling

FACULTY RESEARCH Bulk Solids and Particulate Technologies Centre for Interdisciplinary Built Environment Control and Systems Automation Data Mining and Bioinformatics Embedded Systems Energy Technology Environmental Engineering and Water Resources Fluid Mechanics and Turbulence Geotechnical Engineering Machine Learning and Robotics Materials Engineering Multiphase Processes Particle Technology and Interface Science Process Safety and Environmental Protection Smart Structures Spatial Visualisation Group Structural Engineering Surveying Telecommunications


Advanced Particle Processing

The Centre for Advanced Particle Processing will address important problems for the mineral industry, the largest single contributor to Australia’s exports. The processing of particles is a significant part of the operations of the Australian coal and minerals industries. These industries face significant challenges that will require solutions in the future. They are heavy users of water and energy, and also major emitters of greenhouse gases. With current pressure on water supplies and energy consumption, improvements are needed to reduce water and power consumption. The Centre for Advanced Particle Processing will investigate innovative ways of separating valuable particles from waste material, which do not involve water. It will also investigate ways of separating different mineral species that eliminate the need for fine grinding, thereby reducing energy consumption. Further research will investigate flotation in saline water, and new gel explosives.

Key achievements of researchers in the Centre of Advanced Particle Processing: Development of the Reflux Classifier – separating different kinds of particles to recover valuable product from lower quality coal deposits. n

n New technology for flotation separations – The Jameson Cell – already saving millions of dollars for the mineral processing industry.

Contacts details Centre Director Professor Kevin Galvin T +61 2 4921 6194 E Kevin.Galvin@newcastle.edu.au

The University of Newcastle – Faculty of Engineering and Built Environment I CRICOS Provider 00109J


ARC Centre for Complex Dynamic Systems and Control The Centre for Complex Dynamic Systems and Control is an Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence in analysis, design, optimization and control of dynamic systems. The Centre’s expertise in fundamental research of complex systems, coupled with the active pursuit of industrial linkages, will enable new technology-based industries, reducing pollution, improving production and efficiency and allowing safer operation of complex processes. The Centre’s Research Capabilities involve the following areas of research: Control System Design Control System Design is a mature discipline, although the existing methodologies tend to be limited to relative standard problems. Unfortunately many real world problems are non-standard, exhibiting such features as nonlinear and non-smooth behaviour, high state dimension and lack of convexity. This Programme is aimed at addressing these issues using alternative theoretical tools and in the context of modern computational methods. There is also the active development of Virtual Laboratories for Control System Design, which aims to broaden the exposure of control issues in secondary and tertiary education.

Bayesian Learning The Bayesian Learning Programme comprises researchers from Engineering, Mathematics, Machine Learning and Statistics backgrounds, reflecting the strong interdisciplinary nature of the Centre. The Programme focuses on the following four research themes: Parametric Bayesian Modelling, Bayesian Nonparametrics, Complex Systems and Bayesian Computation. Applications of this research included problems in genetics, environment, medicine, finance and robotics. Signal Processing This programme focuses on model-based signal processing. Research problems include physical modelling, system identification, model validation, prediction, filtering, and signal recovery. Examples of this type of signal processing are adaptive control, Kalman filtering, communications channel equalization, and multi-user detection for wireless communications. Much of the fundamental research for model-based signal processing is related to other programmes. However the aim of this programme is to promote applications of modelling, control and estimation in various signal processing problems.

Mathematical Systems The object of the Mathematical Systems programme is to investigate mathematical models of dynamic systems which exhibit complex behaviour, exploiting our expertise in modern functional analysis.

The University of Newcastle – Faculty of Engineering and Built Environment I CRICOS Provider 00109J

Mechatronics Many technical processes and products in the area of mechanical and electrical engineering show an increasing integration of mechanics with electronics and information processing. The development of mechatronic systems involves finding an optimal balance between the basic mechanical structure, sensor and actuator implementation, automatic digital information processing and overall control, and this synergy results in innovative solutions. These complicated interactions generate a rich and complex set of dynamic behaviours to be analysed and controlled. This programme is aimed at investigating such multidisciplinary analysis and control questions in emerging mechatronic systems.


ARC Centre for Complex Dynamic Systems and Control Distributed Sensing and Control This programme aims to investigate the areas of sensor networks, network control and multi-agent processes. These areas involve multidisciplinary research, and will utilise applications such as medical imaging and robotics as test-beds for research results. Industrial Control and Optimisation The partnerships between researchers and industry enable reciprocal transfer of knowledge and new ideas of great potential impact on the community and economy. This programme encompasses three main research projects motivated by and in collaboration with industrial partners. The main underlying theme of these projects is the application of advanced control and optimisation techniques to maximise asset utilisation and production in selected industrial processes of significant complexity. The complexity of the dynamics of such processes arise from factors including model errors, unknown disturbances, nonlinearities, distributed parameter systems, elements of Human-Machine Interaction and hybrid (Discrete and Continuous State) components. Expected outcomes of the programme include high quality research solutions and human resources tailored to the needs of Australian industry.

Contacts details School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science The University of Newcastle Callaghan NSW 2308 Australia T +61 2 4921 7072 F +61 2 4960 1712 E cdsc@newcastle.edu.au W http://livesite.newcastle.edu.au/cdsc Centre Director Professor Graham Goodwin T +61 2 4921 7378 E Graham.Goodwin@newcastle.edu.au Associate Director Professor Minyue Fu T +61 2 4921 7730 E Minyue.Fu@newcastle.edu.au Associate Director Professor Reza Moheimani T +61 2 4921 6030 E Reza.Moheimani@newcastle.edu.au

Projects studied: n

Integrated Mine Planning (BHP Billiton)

Optimisation Based Operator Guidance Schemes (BHP Billiton Innovation)

n

n Next Generation Model-Based Control Tools (Matrikon) n

Marine Cybernetics (Halcyon International)

n

Evaporator control in sugar milling (CSR)

Synchronous Machine estimation (Connell Wagner)

n

Rolling mill control (IAS).

The University of Newcastle – Faculty of Engineering and Built Environment I CRICOS Provider 00109J

UoN 2008/0158

n


Bioinformatics, Biomarker Discovery and Information-Based Medicine The Priority Research Centre for Bioinformatics, Biomarker Discovery and Information-Based Medicine (CIBM) was established by the Deputy Vice-Chancellor Research in August 2006 and brings together more than 29 academics from the Faculty of Engineering and Built Environment and the Faculty of Health and draws together the often disparate disciplines of bioinformatics, molecular and genetic analysis, clinical information and population data. The CIBM works in collaboration with the Hunter Medical Research Institute’s Information Based Medicine Program. Bioinformatics is an exciting new frontier in delivering with bench to bedside research in the development of patient tailored treatment to a host of diseases with a genetic involvement. Such as breast cancer, prostate cancer, melanoma, schizophrenia and potential applications for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Researchers in the Centre are utilising advanced and powerful computer technology and complex mathematical formulas to extract meaningful information from overwhelming amounts of data to identify genetic patterns. Applications in Clinical Practice There are many challenges facing medical practice and none more so than in the field of cancer. Currently whilst an armament of therapies exists for people with cancer, many treatments are not designed to target specific disease – some will work on some people, while others will not work at all. The aim is to provide patients with an optimal treatment to maximise their chances of a good outcome.

The CIBM is the first of its type in Australia and the researchers are intensifying their focus on the potential of personalised medicine. By individualising patient treatment benefits will be maximised and adverse side-effects minimised, potentially saving the healthcare industry millions of dollars. Research Themes 1. Complex Genetics of common diseases 2. Molecular mechanisms of disease 3. Artificial Intelligence and signal and image processing 4. Biochemistry and cell biology 5. Information Based Medicine Associations and Funding The CIBM hosts the Newcastle node of the Australian Research Centre of Excellence in Bioinformatics. The Centre also obtains funding from industry partnerships, the Australian Research Council in the form of Discovery Projects and the National Health and Medical Research Council and other funding bodies such as the National Breast Cancer Foundation. Members publish primarily in relevant, mainstream and top-ranked peer-reviewed journals. For further information visit: http://livesite.newcastle.edu.au/cibm The Hunter Medical Research Institute (HMRI) is a partnership between the University of Newcastle, Hunter New England Health and the community. www.hmri.net.au

The University of Newcastle – Faculty of Engineering and Built Environment I CRICOS Provider 00109J

Professor Rodney Scott Co-Director Priority Research Centre for Bioinformatics, Biomarker Discovery and Information Based Medicine Faculty of Health The University of Newcastle Callaghan, NSW, Australia 2308 T + 61 2 4921 4974 F + 61 2 4921 4253 E Rodney.Scott@newcastle.edu.au Associate Professor Pablo Moscato Co-Director Priority Research Centre for Bioinformatics, Biomarker Discovery and Information Based Medicine Faculty of Engineering and Built Environment The University of Newcastle Callaghan, NSW, Australia 2308 T + 61 2 4921 6056 F + 61 2 4921 6929 E Pablo.Moscato@newcastle.edu.au Lee-Anne Marsh Centre Manager Priority Research Centre for Bioinformatics, Biomarker Discovery and Information Based Medicine Faculty of Engineering and Built Environment The University of Newcastle Callaghan, NSW, Australia 2308 T + 61 2 4921 6956 F + 61 2 4921 6929 E Lee-Anne.Marsh@newcastle.edu.au


ENERGY Clean Energy Technology

A leader in research The University of Newcastle consistently ranks in the top 10 research higher education institutions in Australia. World-class facilities and talent, teamed with forward-thinking local and global corporate partners are a key part of the University’s research success. The University’s Priority Research Centres focus resources into our research strengths across a range of areas, including energy. Focusing on clean and renewable energy The Priority Research Centre (PRC) for Energy focuses on one of the most challenging contemporary issues – the management of Greenhouse Gas Emissions (GHG). Through its research themes, the PRC Energy members are undertaking cutting edge research and development across a range of fields including clean coal, renewable energy and other GHG abatement technologies. The PRC Director is Professor Bogdan Dlogogorski (TTSE), a world leader in energy and environmental research.

Clean coal Program leader: Professor Terry Wall Oxyfuel Chemical looping CO2 capture especially mineralisation of CO2 and postcombustion capture Fundamentals of turbulent combustion Renewable energy Program leader: Professor Behdad Moghtaderi

Energy and the environment Program leader: Associate Professor John Lucas Environmental technologies (soil treatment, desalination, synthetic greenhouse gases, pollution abatement) Energy efficiency (energy efficient buildings and retrofitting, urban regeneration and renewal, transformation of inefficient structures into green buildings, flow control strategies)

Biomass (gasification, charcoal, co-firing, toxic products)

Knowledge systems, resilience, life cycle analysis, well-to-wheel

Wind

Knowledge supply chain system development for energy: knowledge acquisition, representation, storage and usage

Geothermal Transportation fuels and energy conversion Program Co-Leaders: Associate Professor Scott Donne and Dr Michael Stockenhuber Ammonia and methanol Hydrogen Electrical energy (batteries, generation and transmission) Biodiesel and value added products from glycerol

The University of Newcastle – Faculty of Engineering and Built Environment I CRICOS Provider 00109J


ENERGY

Real world application The PRC for Energy brings together key people and skills harnessing and focusing the extensive expertise in energy across the University. Researchers work alongside process developers and commercialisation specialists offering the unique ability to take a concept from its theoretical beginnings through to commercialisation.

A snapshot of projects CS Energy Callide Oxy-fuel Demonstration Funded by Low Emissions Technology Development Fund

The University’s work emphasises quality and impact delivering results which are making a real difference in energy efficient housing, energy recovery from co-utilisation of biomass and coal, energy recovery from refuse-derived fuels, geothermal energy and energy efficient desalination plants, energy storage and many other areas.

State of the art facilities Computational Surface Physics laboratory

The University of Newcastle’s PRC for Energy is unique in its breadth of expertise and the comprehensive service it offers from concept through to commercialisation. This approach is unmatched anywhere in Australia.

of Solid Materials at High Pressures

Chemical Looping with the Newcastle Port Corporation Geothermal power generation Synthetic GHG emissions (eg CFC)

Clean Coal Research laboratory Scale-up and Pilot Plant facility Chemical Analysis facility Turbulence Research laboratory Facility for Analysis of Thermal decomposition

Our partners Centre for Coal in Sustainable Development Newcastle Port Corporation Tomago Aluminium BHP Billiton Proactive Energy Xstrata Delta Electricity 3M Wormald Anglo Coal CS Energy Clay Brick and Paver Institute Hunter Water Corporation HIsmelt

Integrated Particle Image Thermometry/ Velocimetry facility Advanced Surface and Porosity Characterisation facility

The University of Newcastle – Faculty of Engineering and Built Environment I CRICOS Provider 00109J

UoN 2008/0158

Cone Calorimeter – mass spectrometer combustion facility


Geotechnical and materials modelling A leader in research The University of Newcastle consistently ranks in the top 10 research higher education institutions in Australia, while the Faculty of Engineering and Built Environment is rated in the world’s top 100 by the influential Jiao Tong rankings. In establishing its Priority Research Centres, the University is focusing its resources into areas of existing research strength with a view to developing these areas further. The Priority Research Centre for Geotechnical and Materials Modelling focuses on the development of new models and innovative computational methods for predicting the behaviour of geomaterials, metals, ceramics and composites. The PRC Director is Professor Scott Sloan, a Federation Fellow and world leader in geotechnical research. Some research rhemes are: 1. Multi-scale modelling of geomaterials 2. Stability and shakedown analysis of geomaterials 3. Mechanics of multiphase soils 4. Contact mechanics at large deformation

Real world application The PRC for Geotechnical and Materials Modelling brings together key people and harnesses a broad range of expertise across the University. Researchers work closely with government agencies and private industry and offer the unique ability to provide practical solutions to geotechnical and materials problems using advanced software for limit analysis, shakedown analysis, finite element analysis, molecular dynamics, and Monte Carlo simulation. A snapshot of projects Remediation of fluoride and cyanide contaminated groundwater for the Kurri Kurri aluminium smelter

n

n

NEWSYD Geotechnical Testing

n

Limit analysis of tunnels and harbour walls

Behaviour of embankments on soft soil State of the art facilities

n

n

Georemediation research facility

n

Mobile soil testing facility

n

Advanced soil testing laboratory.

n

Advanced environmental testing laboratory

Computational laboratory with high- performance multiprocessor workstations

n

5. Atomistic modelling of hollow nanocrystals 6. Embankments on soft soil

The University of Newcastle – Faculty of Engineering and Built Environment I CRICOS Provider 00109J

Our partners The CGMM has collaborated with a wide range of industry partners on research and consulting projects including the RTA, Hydro Aluminium, Datamine, the Mine Subsidence Board, Geosciences Australia, Douglas Partners, and Coffey Geotechnics. Contact details Director: Professor Scott Sloan Federation Fellow T +61 2 4921 6059 E Scott.Sloan@newcastle.edu.au


Bulk Solids and Particulate Technologies A demand for improved performance, reliability and efficiency of operations Bulk solids and particulate materials play a central role in Australia’s land-based industries. They range from coal, minerals and aggregates in the resource industries to pharmaceuticals, chemicals, dyes, pigments and food in the process industry. Most modern industry handle or process bulk solids or powders in some form. Relative costs of storing, handling and transporting bulk materials are increasingly recognised as a crucial factor in manufacturing and processing competitiveness. The level of sophistication required by industry often demands a better understanding of bulk solids and particulate technologies and the associated performance criteria for handling plant design. Much progress to date has been made in the theory and practice of bulk solids handling and particulate technologies. However despite this it is becoming increasingly clear that there are many gaps in the present state of knowledge where further research is necessary. Researchers in the School of Engineering are aiming to gain a better understanding of bulk solids and powder behaviour based on their measurable physical properties. They will then apply this knowledge to a wide range of bulk solids handling and processing operations to improve performance, reliability and efficiency in a manner which is safe and environmentally sustainable.

Key areas of expertise are: constituency relationships that describe the complex stress states in bulk solids during storage and flow

n

n

pulsating loads in bins and silos

n

feeder performance and interfacing

n

conveyor performance

n

high pressure/temperature operations

n

prediction of pneumatic conveyor/gas

n

solid flow in pipelines

n

screening

n

blending and mixing

n

solid/fluid separation

n

instrumentation and control

‘World recognised applied research’ Because the Group operates at the cutting edge of knowledge through a world recognised applied research and development program, it is uniquely equipped to assist processors and manufacturers with industrial troubleshooting and technical assistance. Comprehensive laboratory test facilities have been established to aid the research and consulting activities that encompass storage, flow and handling, instrumentation and control, belt conveying and mechanical handling and industrial fluid mechanics. The Group offers specialist consultancy and is committed to providing industry with technical assistance in the handling and processing of all types of powders and bulk solid materials. Currently, approximately 100 projects are completed each year for mining, minerals, chemical and food processing, power generation, bulk transport, agricultural and pharmaceutical companies.

The University of Newcastle – Faculty of Engineering and Built Environment I CRICOS Provider 00109J

If you would like to engage in consulting with the Faculty or would like to find out more about research collaboration please contact the school for more information. Contact details Professor Mark Jones School of Engineering The University of Newcastle Callaghan NSW 2308 AUSTRALIA T +61 2 4921 6067 F + 61 2 4921 6021 E Mark.Jones@newcastle.edu.au


Centre for Interdisciplinary Built Environment Research a space for multidisciplinary research for those involved in making things... Improving and creating innovative business environments for architectural and construction professionals’ The property and construction industry is unquestionably one of the most significant industry contributors to the Australian economy in terms of GDP and employment. The construction cluster comprising supply networks, property sector and project - based design and construction firms contributes 14.4% to Australia’s GDP through 230,000 firms employing 730,000 people. Added to this is the public sector service which operates in all states at three tiers of government with significant levels of involvement in all infrastructure development. One of the key factors that impacts upon the quality of the built environment is the performance of the people and the processes who are involved in the creation of facilities. More recently, globalisation, climate change, information technology and a general level of increased complexity in building design and industrial organisation have impacted on the Australian property and construction industry through changes in policy, process and practice. CIBER, a multi disciplinary research group lead by the School of Architecture And Built Environment, seeks to address the issue of industry performance by investigating the policy, processes and practices that architectural and construction professionals are engaged in. This involves studies related to industry policy, business processes and project development and design and construction practices. CIBER have been successful in winning research grants in the areas of e-business, policy analysis, supply chain sustainability, construction supply chain economics, IT communication and collaboration, design evaluation, education, internationalisation and development approvals.

The group has been a member of the CRC for Construction Innovation – a national research, development and implementation centre focused on the needs of the property, design, construction and facility management sectors and has had over $1.5M in grant success from 2003-2007. The group respond to problems in the built environment on many levels and in many ways. They conduct a range of different type of research drawing upon their practical professional disciplinary knowledge and experiences and their capabilities in interdisciplinary research practice – in particular the ability to synthesise diverse theory and methods and produce innovative research solutions. Key areas of research include: n

Construction supply chain economics

n

E-business adoption for SME’s

Team collaboration in high band width environments

n

Internationalisation of design firms Supply chain sustainability

n

Policy, process and practice conflicts in development approval decision making

n

n

International supply networks

policy harmonisation for improved construction industry business environments

n

ethical behaviour in the construction procurement process

n

‘‘Using e-business technology to create a more viable and competitive construction industry’ Research has been conducted into determining the barriers and drivers to the adoption of e-business technology in design and construction teams. Outcomes of the research will develop a greater awareness in the construction industry of the value of e-business in maintaining international

The University of Newcastle – Faculty of Engineering and Built Environment I CRICOS Provider 00109J

competitiveness and increased participation in innovative e-business technologies. The research is aimed at identifying the social, cultural and economic characteristics of adoption towards the development of an e-business industry adoption profile. This innovative profile will assist the industry and government in benchmarking uptake and ultimately improve the long term effectiveness, competitiveness and dynamics of a viable construction industry in the Australian and international contexts. ‘Working with government and industry to develop and implement policy to create sustainable supply chains’ An action research project has been completed with government and industry aimed at the development, trial and documentation of innovative supply chain policy to improve economic and environmental sustainability. Outcomes of the research will involve increased business process efficiencies in government agencies program delivery, better communication between firms in the supply chains and improved information flow between government and industry. It will also achieve improved levels of environmental and productivity performance. A more competitive and sustainable Australian construction industry will be the outcome. The School of Architecture and Built Environment has an established reputation for working with industry on collaborative research projects and professional consulting. For more information please contact the School. Contact details Prof Michael Ostwald School of Architecture and Built Environment The University of Newcastle Callaghan NSW 2308 AUSTRALIA T +61 2 4921 5778 F + 61 2 4921 6913 E Michael.Ostwald@newcastle.edu.au


Control and Systems Automation Intelligent innovation that provides important industrial and manufacturing performance advances

An internationally recognised group of researchers in the Faculty of Engineering and Built Environment is focused on developing intelligent methods and innovations in modelling, control, design and decision-making in systems. This group has a mission to carry out high level research in systems and control theory and to support industry in the area of process optimisation and control. The group has attracted international recognition for world leading research in this area and forms the core of the Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence ‘The Centre for Complex Dynamic Systems and Control’ (CDSC). Other participants are the Queensland University of Technology, Matrikon, BHP Billiton and the NSW Department of State and Regional Development. The broad aim of the research is to provide important industrial and manufacturing performance advances in areas such as automotive, information technology, power systems, mining and materials processing, by working on approaches to control and scheduling. These approaches aim to unify the use of disparate technologies, namely, mathematical modelling through to computer systems, electromechanical machinery, scheduling systems and automation. This is aimed at an increase in the performance of industry in key areas including product quality, plant efficiency, safety, productivity, waste minimisation, pollution control and operational flexibility.

The key areas of research are: Switching, Discrete Event and Hybrid Systems

n

n

Process Control Applications

n

Control of Time Delay Systems

Fundamental limitations on performance of feedback systems

n

n

Control of Electromechanical Systems

n

Nonlinear Model Predictive Control

Feedback control systems involving communications constraints n

n

n

Finite Alphabet Systems and Control Marine Cybernetics

‘Strong interactions with industry’ The strong interactions with industry have also included work on cross directional control, food processing and vibration suppression. Some of the projects being conducted in the group include: n

Electromagnetic mineral exploration

n

Optimal mine planning

n

New tools for advanced control

n

Control of copper leaching

n

Marine vessel ride control

n

Sugar mill co-generation

Other research in the Centre includes: Inverse problems with constraints (a fundamental area that underpins much of control and signal processing). n

Performance and Sensitivity Analysis of Novel control configurations

n

n

Micro-Actuators and control systems

n

Learning and Adaptive Systems

The University of Newcastle – Faculty of Engineering and Built Environment I CRICOS Provider 00109J

The Centre has had much success in receiving ARC grant funding and offers consultation and opportunities for collaboration. If you are interested in obtaining more information, please contact the Director. Contact details Professor Graham Goodwin Director CDSC School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science The University of Newcastle Callaghan NSW 2308 AUSTRALIA T +61 2 4921 7378 F + 61 2 4960 1712 E Graham.Goodwin@newcastle.edu.au W livesite.newcastle.edu.au/cdsc


Data Mining and Bioinformatics Developing methods based on new revolutionary algorithms for some of the most challenging problems in the life sciences

Bioinformatics was identified as one of Australia’s National Research priorities in 2002. It is the “first defence” against the deluge of data that is expected to overwhelm both researchers and decision makers in the 21st century as biology and medicine will increasingly depend on information extraction from databases and become large-scale, data-driven sciences. Research in bioinformatics is tightly related with the development of powerful algorithmic methods for knowledge extraction from computer databases. As a consequence, mathematical methods developed in this field are applicable to a large variety of problems in industrial, commercial and governmental areas. Associations and funding In August 2006, the Priority Research Centre for Bioinformatics, Biomarker Discovery and Information-Based Medicine (CIBM) replaced the Newcastle Bioinformatics Initiative (NBI). CIBM is a multidisciplinary research group that works at the interface of Computer Science, Information Technologies, Mathematics, Physics and Chemistry to analyse information produced by new revolutionary biotechnologies. CIBM links their activities with that of researchers at the ARC Centre of Excellence in Bioinformatics and overseas partners. In 2012 CIBM is going to relocate to the new Hunter Medical Research Institute (HMRI) building under construction at the Rankin Park Campus of Hunter New England Health.

A leader in research Core areas of expertise include: n

Information visualization

n

Computational Molecular Biology

n

Data Mining and Machine Learning

n

Molecular classification of diseases

Design and analysis of optimization algorithms

n

n

Bioinformatics for genetics

Mathematical Modelling and algorithm development

n

n

Applications of optimization methods

The challenge for bioinformatics is that microarray and other similar techniques generate such massive amounts of data that current techniques are inadequate to cope with their analysis. Among the new techniques targeted at meeting this challenge is mathematical modelling and powerful optimization metaheuristics, in particular “memetic algorithms”, which was introduced by A/Prof. Moscato in 1989 and is used in many industrial applications. These techniques are applied to the problem of finding structure in a seemingly uninformative amount of data with great success. The CIBM has also recently introduced a novel approach for pattern recognition that has been tested in a large variety of domains. In the area of Bioinformatics and Medical Research, it has been applied to: find genetic signatures for a number of neurological diseases (Schizophrenia, Alzheimer and Parkinson Diseases)

n

to analysis of EEG records (detecting the absence of epilepsy from clinical EEG)

n

and to the molecular classification of Melanoma, Colon and Breast Cancer.

n

The University of Newcastle – Faculty of Engineering and Built Environment I CRICOS Provider 00109J

State of the art techniques and equipment The CIBM has recently started analysing Genome Wide Association studies with the Data Mining techniques described above, and some novel algorithms being developed in-house. Since its inception, the CIBM has been assembling a state-of-the-art HPC computing cluster, consisting of a grid of more than 130 cores, enhanced by the recent acquisition of several GPU supercomputing nodes. This allows the CIBM to tackle huge datasets produced by today’s high throughput genomics and proteomics experiments. For further information visit: http://livesite.newcastle.edu.au/cibm Contact details Associate Professor Pablo Moscato School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science The University of Newcastle Callaghan NSW 2308 AUSTRALIA T + 61 2 4921 6056 F + 61 2 4921 7058 E Pablo.Moscato@newcastle.edu.au W www.cs.newcastle.edu.au/~nbi


Embedded Systems Developing advance methods for new standards

Embedded systems have already begun filtering into every aspect of our daily lives. Recent advances in information and microelectronic technologies offer the potential to create a new generation of the embedded systems that can help improving human experience and quality of life, and reshaping our work patterns, education and communication. As computing devices become smaller and more powerful, and with the rapid growth of wireless technologies, there is a greater need for computing devices that can be extensively embedded in the environment, are intuitive, portable and constantly available. Researchers in the School of Engineering are working on creating smart environments in which any possible device, from human body, clothing, tools, appliances, buildings, cars, workplaces and whole city areas, can be equipped with embedded systems to connect the device to a network of other devices. Some members of the group have worked with a variety of industry including the Nissan Motor Company, Ford Motor Company, Blue Circle Southern Cement, Factory Controls, and DECOi Architects. Key focus areas of research include: n

Application-specific integrated circuitry

n

System on a chip

Reconfigurable and adaptive architectures and algorithms

n

n

n

n

Security and fault tolerance

n

Speech and video processing

n

Signal/image/video processing platforms

n

Household appliances

n

Microelectromechanical systems

n

Security and surveillance

n

Textiles machinery

n

Biotechnology equipment

System-level specification, design, and Synthesis

n

Capabilities offered to industry include: Design, implementation, verification, and support of custom advanced embedded systems

n

Review of breakthrough technologies and make recommendations on the selection of the state-of-the-art technologies

n

n

Collaborative research work, which may take the form of government supported research, fully funded contract research, or consultancy, will enable industry to: n

Improve productivity

n

Enhance international reputation

n

Increase awareness of advanced technology

n

Speed up release of a product to market

‘Smart devices to improve our lifestyle’ It is envisaged that the research will create smart computing devices that can be embedded in objects and environment to significantly improve our lifestyles. Such devices will be able to be used in a large variety of very important applications including:

Distributed real-time techniques

n

Mobile systems and wireless networks

n

Intelligent sensors, biosensors, and measurement devices Autonomous cooperating multi agents

Visualisation, interaction, and perceptive interfaces

Factory automation

Exploration and mining of mineral deposits and oil

n

n

Delivery of training courses and workshops

n

Medical instruments

n

Environmental monitoring

n

Agricultural machinery

n

Transportation

n

n

Design tools and environments

n

Vehicle guidance

n

Hardware/software co-design

n

Robotics

n

Power-aware methods

n

Search and rescue

The University of Newcastle – Faculty of Engineering and Built Environment I CRICOS Provider 00109J

The Group maintains strong interaction with industry through collaboration. If you are interested in obtaining more information please contact the School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science. Contact details School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science The University of Newcastle Callaghan NSW 2308 AUSTRALIA T +61 2 4921 6084 F + 61 2 4921 6993


Energy Technology Cleaner methods of energy generation

Consumption of fuel and its related energy generation is an important issue for many industries and governments around the world. This issue has intensified due to the impacts of the greenhouse effect. The Energy Research Group (ERG) is exploring the development of advance technologies for cleaner energy production and the impact energy related activities have on the environment. The ERG research activities involve: Conducting basic fundamental and applied research on thermal conversion of solid fuels (coal, biomass, RDF, etc) for energy generation

n

‘Providing real solutions to overcoming challenges’ Innovative research into Energy Technology has many positive applications to industry through providing solutions to overcoming challenges such as reducing levels of carbon dioxide and other chemical emissions in industry processes. Examples of projects recently completed or being investigated by the ERG researchers are: Zero emission CO2 technology for coal combustion

n

Oxy-fuel combustion of solid fuels (in collaboration with Japan)

n

Demonstrating the applications of its work

n

Investigating the environmental impact of energy-related activities.

n

n

n

ERG enjoys strong links with Industry and Government. The group collaborates in these endeavours with the Cooperative Research Centre for Coal in Sustainable Development; The Australian Research Council (through various funding schemes); state, and local governments; private industry; public utilities; community groups; and universities and research institutes throughout the world, especially in Japan, Europe and North America. The ERG has an exceptional record of achievement and capabilities in: n

Coal utilization

Developing technologies to use biomass for energy, charcoal, and high-value chemicals

n

Advanced analytical techniques for solid fuels Pilot-scale trials of coal/biomass cofiring

Burnout and ash issues related to cofiring of coal and biomass in PF boilers n

Combustion characteristics of biomass chars in pressurised circulating fluidised beds

n

The effects of pyrolysis conditions on combustion and gasification reactivities of biomass chars and the quality of their ash

n

Gasification characteristics of Australian biomass species in fluidised bed reactors

n

Production of hydrogen by low temperature catalytic steam gasification of biomass

n

The School of Engineering has had much success in receiving ARC Linkage grants. It also has numerous opportunities for industry in collaborative research projects and consulting. Please contact the School for more information.

The University of Newcastle – Faculty of Engineering and Built Environment I CRICOS Provider 00109J

Contact details Professor Terry Wall School of Engineering The University of Newcastle Callaghan NSW 2308 AUSTRALIA T +61 2 4921 6179 F + 61 2 4921 6920 E Terry.Wall@newcastle.edu.au


Environmental Engineering and Water Resources Developing computer models to assess environmental impact There are significant pressures on Australia’s surface water and groundwater resources to satisfy a wide range of competing economic, social and environmental needs for water. Industrial development and population growth will continue to put pressure on environmental systems and on vital natural resources such as water resources. In their quest to address these issues engineers in the School of Engineering are developing new innovative computer and other models to provide methods of assessment of environmental impacts and management of disturbed ecosystems. This will be achieved through understanding the fundamental principles which describe the hydrologic, environmental and ecological processes observed in natural and disturbed catchments. The Group has expertise and capabilities in: n

Catchment and river management

Assessment of climate variability and its impacts

n

management options and help make good decisions in the context of multiple objectives sensitive to environmental, economic and social needs. Some of the projects that are currently being researched in the Faculty are: n Development of multi-site stochastic models for annual hydrological data

Development of a spatial rainfall model using weather radar data Improved understanding of long-term climate variability and its impacts

It also has numerous opportunities for industry in collaborative research projects and consulting.

n

Pool-riffle design for the naturalization of urban streams

Please contact the School for more information.

Mean flow and turbulence characteristics of pool-riffle structures in low-gradient streams.

Contact details Professor George Kuczera School of Engineering

Estuarine wetland rehabilitation and ecohydraulics

The University of Newcastle Callaghan NSW 2308 AUSTRALIA T +61 2 4921 6038 F + 61 2 4921 6991 E George.Kuczera@newcastle.edu.au

n

n

n

n

n

n

Urban water infrastructure: simulation and multi-criterion optimization

n

n

n

Groundwater management

‘Building strong relationships with Industry and Government’ The Environmental Engineering and Water Resources Group have built up a strong research profile and are competitive and respected both nationally and internationally. It maintains close links with the Hunter Water Corporation in Newcastle as well as with the water industry outside the Hunter and is also a partner node in the eWater CRC. ‘A need for improved methods’ There is an urgent need to develop improved methods that will predict the hydrological consequences of a range of water

Large-scale testing of permeable reactive barriers to remove groundwater contaminants n

The School of Engineering is very competitive and respected both nationally and internationally and has had much success in receiving national grants.

Extreme events: Drought and flood risk analysis

n

Bayesian total error analysis in environmental model calibration, prediction and regionalization

n

Integrated urban water cycle modelling

Multi-criteria optimisation of the urban water cycle Multi-criteria assessment tools and techniques

n

Scaling and assimilation of soil moisture.

Use of remote sensing based actual evapotranspiration estimates and water delivery data for assessing water use efficiency in an irrigated landscape.

n

Carbon, nutrient and sediment dynamics in a semi-arid catchment.

n

High resolution mapping of surface and rootzone soil moisture

n

Airborne laser scanning for advanced environmental monitoring

n

Investigation of vegetation and carbon dynamics using remote sensing and groundbased observations

n

The University of Newcastle – Faculty of Engineering and Built Environment I CRICOS Provider 00109J


Fluid Mechanics and Turbulence Applying expertise and knowledge of turbulence to improve the management and control of turbulent flows

Management and control of fluid flows is currently of major international focus in turbulence research primarily due to its wide spread technological, economic and environmental implications. Turbulence management aims to enhance or attenuate turbulence levels using appropriate techniques. Research over the past half century has resulted in significant advances in understanding the physics of turbulence, which is one of the most complex problems in physics. Researchers in the School of Engineering are taking this knowledge and applying resources and expertise to make significant contributions to improving management and control of turbulence. Key areas of focus include: n Turbulence control and management boundary layer control, Jet flow control and wake control

Fundamental of turbulence – small scale turbulence, mixing, modelling and homogeneous isotropic turbulence.

n

n Turbulence computation – direct numerical simulation, lattice Boltzmann simulation.

The Turbulence Group is well established for its research using: n

Wind and water tunnels

n

Hot wire and laser Doppler systems

n

Flow visualization

Turbulence management concepts can be applied in any industry/technology dealing with fluids. Typical examples are process, material transport, power, aerospace, marine industries and environmental aerodynamics. Thus there is enormous significance in developing and applying turbulence management strategies both from local and global perspectives. The economic benefits and environmental advantages of such an approach can lead to significant improvement in the quality of life. Research in Turbulence will also benefit industry as it will provide improved processes that will be energy and cost efficient. ‘Using computer technology for solutions with industrial benefit’ The group has developed expertise in the new computational fluid dynamics (CFD) method called lattice Boltzmann method (LBM). LBM is used to simulate complex turbulent flows and has significant industrial applications. The LBM has been successfully used to simulate macroflows (e.g. grid-generated turbulence, flow behind parallel cylinders) and microflows (e.g. flow in microchannels and mixing in a microreactor). The LBM simulations are carried out either on a single PC or using a PC cluster of 17 dual processors for parallel computations. The group offers expert advice to industry and currently collaborates with overseas groups. If you are interested in obtaining more information in regards to collaboration opportunities or consultancy please contact the School.

The University of Newcastle – Faculty of Engineering and Built Environment I CRICOS Provider 00109J

Contact details A/Prof. Lyazid Djenidi School of Engineering The University of Newcastle Callaghan NSW 2308 AUSTRALIA T +61 2 4921 6184 F + 61 2 4921 6946 E lyazid.djenidi@newcastle.edu.au


Geotechnical Engineering

‘Delivering a modern standard of living in a safe environment’ Geotechnical engineering is an integral part of civil engineering and plays a key role in delivering a modern standard of living in a healthy and safe environment. It is central to the engineering of buildings, roads, bridges, tunnels and underground space. It is also important to highway engineering, and to harbour and port engineering. Common issues that often need to be considered are landfill design and remediation of contaminated sites, the behaviour of soils and the prevention of soil erosion. Understanding the mechanics of soil and rock and its application to building roads, bridges and other infrastructure is one of the key focuses of The Geotechnical Group in the School of Engineering at the University of Newcastle. The Group is one of the most active of its kind in Australia, and has built up an international reputation for its research on computational geomechanics, environmental geotechnics, and in situ soil testing. The key research areas of expertise are: n

Non-linear finite element modelling

n

Stability analysis

n The formation of elastic plastic constitutive laws for saturated and unsaturated soils

The field and laboratory behaviour of expansive clays

n

‘Assisting industry in safer design through advanced methods’ Experts in the Faculty are working on providing solutions to difficult problems presented to industry in Geotechnical engineering. Their aim is to develop new methods and advanced computer software that will result in cheaper and safer designs of civil infrastructure. The group has developed mathematical models that will accurately predict the long term effectiveness of clay barriers for resisting the dispersion of fluoride contaminated waste. The ultimate objective is to assist practising geotechnical engineers in the design of waste containment systems. This environmentally important research is being conducted in the Groups new Georemediation test facility. Other current projects being actively researched include: Investigating a novel clean-up strategy for a fluoride polluted aquifer

n

Improving design procedures for foundations on expansive (reactive) soils

n

n

In situ soil testing

Using numerical methods to predict the shakedown limit of a given pavement with known geometry and material properties

n

Understanding and quantifying risks of instability in the sedimentary rocks of Eastern Australia n

The behaviour of embankments on soft clays

n

n

Soil-structure interaction

n

Environmental geotechnics

n

Chemo-mechanics

n

In situ testing

The University of Newcastle – Faculty of Engineering and Built Environment I CRICOS Provider 00109J

‘State of the art resources’ Industry ties are essential to the Geotechnical Group and research. As part of a longstanding collaborative project on expansive soils, the group maintains a network of field sites throughout the Newcastle region. There are also testing facilities available for a limited amount of commercial consulting. The NEWSYD Geotechnical in situ testing facility is just one of the state of the art resources on offer which presents industry and researchers with advanced testing techniques. Laboratory based facilities include advanced triaxial testing, consolidation testing and large shear box testing. The School of Engineering has numerous opportunities for industry in collaborative research projects and consulting. Please contact the School for more information. Contact details Professor Scott Sloan School of Engineering The University of Newcastle Callaghan NSW 2308 AUSTRALIA T + 61 2 4921 6059 F + 61 2 4921 6991 E Scott.Sloan@newcastle.edu.au


Machine Learning and Robotics Developing high performance computing concepts and applying them to challenging real world tasks

The availability and affordability of fast workstations and new robotic and sensor hardware has created a significant demand of new research in machine learning and robotics. The Machine Learning and Robotics Research Concentration addresses this research direction in several projects and three specialised expert laboratories: n

Interdisciplinary Machine Learning Group

Laboratory for Anthropocentric Biocybernetic Computing

n

n

Robotics Laboratory

Interdisciplinary Machine Learning (IMLRG) – advanced learning algorithms for scientific computing and interdisciplinary projects The IMLRG investigates different aspects of machine learning and data mining in theory, experiments and applications. The emphasis is on the development, implementation, and evaluation of evolutionary algorithms, neural networks, kernel methods and non-linear dimensionality reduction techniques. The potential of these methods is demonstrated in new interdisciplinary applications in areas such as architecture, biology, finance, health, image processing, politics, robotics, and signal processing. Research directions currently being addressed by the IMLRG include: Applications of machine learning in computer vision, image analysis, and robotics

n

n

Classification of extreme data sets

Data mining and application of kernel methods

n

n

Geometric data analysis and visualisation

Manifold learning and non-linear dimensionality reduction

n

Laboratory for Anthropocentric Biocybernetic Computing (LABC) – gaining a deeper understanding of the nature of human information processing. Anthropocentric biocybernetic computing views humans as complex information processing systems and investigates information processing on different levels, including the cell level, body level, language level and interaction with the environment. It also models and analyses what impact these processes have on social factors and health. Project areas addressed by LABC are: Application of computer visualisation and machine learning techniques to the design of architectural and urban spaces.

n

n

Audio analysis of soundscapes

n

Brain theory

n

Creative Computing

n

Dynamic language processing

n

Face detection and emotion classification

n

Human-robot interaction

Spiking neural networks for control of simulated humanoid walk

n

n

Streetscape analysis

The Robotics Lab – new concepts in robotics changing the future The Robotics Lab conducts innovative research in intelligent robotics and control and is supported by researchers from different disciplines such as computer science, electrical engineering and statistics. In the period 2002-2007 the NUbot robot soccer team used Sony AIBO robots and participated in the international RoboCup robot soccer competition. In 2006 the NUbots became the world champion in the RoboCup Four-Legged League. The year 2006 marked 50 years of artificial intelligence research, 10 years of RoboCup and it was the peak year of the Four-Legged League where the end of the production of the Sony AIBO robot was announced.

The University of Newcastle – Faculty of Engineering and Built Environment I CRICOS Provider 00109J

Current work in the robotics lab includes interdisciplinary robotics research linking artificial intelligence, control, machine learning, software engineering, and statistics. Projects include research on autonomous multiagent systems, humanoid robots, robot vision, robot simulations, and development of companion robots for human-robot interaction. The developed control and machine learning methods have application to the real world and will be essential for autonomous vehicles, companion robots, household robots, medical robots (e.g. for surgery), nursebots, rescue robots as well as for transport and traffic automation of the future. The Machine Learning and Robotics Research Concentration offers expertise and consulting in a wide range of relevant techniques. There are numerous opportunities for collaboration in new research projects. Prospective industry or research partners are welcome to contact the Discipline of Computer Science and Software Engineering. Contact details Dr Stephan Chalup Discipline of Computer Science and Software Engineering School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science The University of Newcastle Callaghan NSW 2308 AUSTRALIA T +61 2 4921 6080 F +61 2 4921 6929 E Stephan.Chalup@newcastle.edu.au


Materials Engineering Research with a wide range of application

Materials are crucial to most aspects of our lives. Products such as computer chips, jet engines, surgical tools and solar cells are directly related to the engineering of materials. Materials engineering encompasses a range of materials: metals, ceramics, polymers (plastics), semiconductors, and composites. The ability to manipulate the properties, behaviour and structure of a material to enhance its performance is of interest to materials engineers. The School of Engineering has broad expertise in this area. Research into materials such as metals and alloys has significant benefits to industry. Metals are used widely in industry because they possess unique combinations of mechanical properties such as strength, ductility and toughness. The relationship between to material synthesis, forming properties and performance allow for development of innovative new materials that can be used for a wide range of applications. Research in the school also encompasses refractory and ternary carbide ceramics, large piezoelectric response materials and materials for the encapsulation of electronics for bio implantation. The key areas of research in the School focus on: The development of the theory an computer simulation of atomic diffusion and thermodynamics in solids particularly in metal and ceramics n

n

Synthesis of ternary carbide ceramics

n

Failure mechanics

Microstructural and crystal structure analysis of materials

n

n

Failure prediction/prevention and lifetime enhancement

n

n

Mechanical properties

n

Modelling

n

Neutron diffraction

n

Residual stress measurement

‘Solving real problems with innovative research’ Research of interest particularly to industry is the deterioration of structural materials under adverse conditions such as the corrosion of steel in seawater environments. Researchers in the School of Engineering are studying how much corrosion is likely to occur under given (uncertain) conditions after a period of time. The present project uses available data to construct a series of probabilistic models for the corrosion rate process under different conditions and to use this to predict the likelihood of structural failure. Both general corrosion and pitting corrosion are being considered in the modelling of seawater corrosion for offshore structures. The spatial variability of material, dimensional and environmental variables is under analysis also. The proportion of a concrete deck that cracks at any point in time due to corrosion damage is one of the outcomes that provide information that can be used to predict expected maintenance costs and to optimise maintenance and repair strategies. The School of Engineering has numerous opportunities for industry in collaborative research projects and consulting. Please contact the School for more information.

Corrosion analysis

The University of Newcastle – Faculty of Engineering and Built Environment I CRICOS Provider 00109J

Contact details Professor Erich Kisi School of Engineering The University of Newcastle Callaghan NSW 2308 AUSTRALIA T +61 2 4921 6213 F + 61 2 4921 6946 E Erich.Kisi@newcastle.edu.au


MULTIPHASE PROCESSES Expertise to solve industrial problems using the latest instrumentation and techniques

The Australian mineral industry is technically well advanced and is always seeking new ideas. The industry is structured to be able to appreciate and absorb innovative research ideas generated in universities. The University of Newcastle through its research in particle and bubble technology maintains a significant role in providing new solutions and quality information to industries such as the high-tech industries, mineral industry, and food and beverage industry that essentially improves their processes and outputs. Innovative research into this area has led to the establishment of the Centre for Multiphase Processes, the University’s key research centre for studying the science and technology of fine particles and bubbles. Centre for Multiphase Processes The key areas of expertise include: n Bubble hydrodynamics n

Flotation

n

Mass transfer to bubbles and droplets

n

Interface science

Thin film drainage and stability of flowing foams

n

n

Triboelectric processing

Applied research focuses on mineral processing, industrial emulsions, and nanotechnology. The high quality research activities in particle technology and interface science are concerned with the fundamental understanding and subsequent exploitation of physical systems composed of bubbles, particles, droplets and foams. Current research projects include: n Flotation of coarse particles – to reduce energy costs n Flotation of ultrafines – to improve the recovery of micro-particles

n

Behaviour of particles in flotation froths

Triboelectric separation of coal and sulfide minerals from waste materials

n

n

Fluidization and sedimentation

‘Solutions with strategic importance to the Australian economy’ Research in multiphase processes has many diverse applications to industries. Some processes that have been developed are now in use world-wide. The Jameson Cell has reached an exponential growth phase, with a contribution to Australian export income approaching $5 billion a year. Some of the current ground-breaking projects being undertaken that have important strategic and economic benefits to industry include: n A new process for improving the capture of ultrafine platinum and gold minerals in flotation A radical new device for the capture of coarse base metal particles in a fluidized bed n

A new method for introducing wash water into flotation froths

n

n

Nano particles at interfaces

Projects like these have created strong collaborative ties and partnerships with industry and have resulted in the purchase of state-of-art equipment and facilities allowing the Centre to further explore innovative techniques in Multiphase Processes and remain in a strong position to further receive significant Government grants. The Centre for Multiphase Processes has been highly successful in attracting competitive grants over many years. It also has numerous opportunities for industry in collaborative research projects and consulting. Please contact the Centre for more information.

Capture of particles in a shock wave in an aerated suspension

n

n

Bubble-particle collection in a fluidized bed

The University of Newcastle – Faculty of Engineering and Built Environment I CRICOS Provider 00109J

Contact details Laureate Professor Graeme J Jameson AO Centre for Multiphase Processes The University of Newcastle Callaghan NSW 2308 AUSTRALIA T +61 2 4921 6181 F + 61 2 4960 1445 E graeme.jameson@newcastle.edu.au


Process Safety and Environment Protection Leading edge industry focused research Industrial processes often involve a certain level of inherent risk, with one of the most significant being associated with fires and explosions. The Process Safety and Environment Protection Research Group has expertise in quantitative assessment of hazards related to these phenomena in real industrial operations. To address the need for development of advanced and safe technologies, the Group is researching chemical and physical processes that occur in fires and explosions. The Group has won many prizes and enjoys an international reputation for excellence in research attracting around $8.2 Million from industry and nationally competitive grant schemes. The group is a leader in its field with many of the projects providing scientific underpinning for the development of new processes and improving existing process. The key research activities of the group explore the fundamental understanding of flame ignition, fire development, its spread and extinction. These activities include the application and exploitation of this fundamental knowledge toward fire prevention and fire control. The main areas of expertise and study are: Kinetics of chemical reactions in combustion systems: reaction mechanisms and rates, formation of toxic by-products in fires; smoke generation; removal of combustion propagating radicals from flames, chain initiation and break-up; flame ignition; spontaneous combustion.

n

n

Extinction of flames and mitigation of fires: interaction between fires and water mist; behaviour of foams, gels and powders in fires; gaseous suppressants, their global- warming and ozone-depletion properties; flame quenching; flammability limits; burning velocities and combustion waves. Mass and heat transfer in fires; emission of thermal radiation and its mitigation; thermodynamic and transport properties of flame radicals; heat release and cone calorimetry; thermal decomposition and stability of materials.

Fluid mechanics in fires; mixing and buoyancy; fire spread; movement of smoke and toxic chemicals; large scale natural and industrial fires; pre and post-flashover fires

n

‘Addressing real problems’ The group tackles practical problems in industry from a fundamental perspective and has a number of projects in progress aimed at addressing important issues connected with process safety and the environment. Examples of current projects undertaken by the Group include: Formation of dioxin and furans during combustion of treated and contaminated wood

n

n

Spontaneous ignition of zinc dust

n

Chemical gassing of emulsion explosives

n

Contamination of soil in Newcastle

n

Conversion of halons into useful products

n

Toxic products from bushfires

n

If you are interested in obtaining more information on consulting or research collaboration, please contact the School.

The University of Newcastle – Faculty of Engineering and Built Environment I CRICOS Provider 00109J

Contact details Professor Bogdan Dlugogorski School of Engineering The University of Newcastle Callaghan NSW 2308 AUSTRALIA T +61 2 4921 6176 F + 61 2 4921 6920 E Bogdan.Dlugogorski@newcastle.edu.au


Smart Structures Developing new technologies that can improve the design of smart structures

A Smart Structure is constructed by integrating the functions of sensing, actuation, logic and control within a structure. The resulting structure can adaptively respond to changes in its condition or the environment to which it is exposed. Smart Structures are finding increasing applications in areas such as control of flutter in aircraft wings, condition monitoring of structures, Tele-actuation in robotics, shape control in antennas, active vibration control, micro electromechanical systems, etc. An important and challenging part of the operation of a Smart Structure is the control algorithm that guarantees stability and performance of the whole system. The Smart structure group in the School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science is interested in exploring the development of new technologies that can improve the design of smart structures and systems to optimize their performance, and safety by employing advanced feedback control design techniques. The group researchers have already made substantial contributions to the field as evidenced by research publications and patented innovative ideas. They have gained international recognition for their research, and are well positioned to lead the field in Australia and at an international level. The Group will be looking to expand its horizons in the near future. This will involve new research in areas including:

n

n

Development of high-stroke actuators made of smart materials such as: controllable fluids, shape memory alloys, and magnetostrictive materials. The Group has already developed strong international recognition for their work on piezoelectric transducers. For applications that require higher levels of force alternative technologies will be needed. Dynamics and control of micro- and nano- scale measurement and positioning systems. Smart materials, particularly piezoelectric transducers can be used in construction of micro- and nono- positioning and measurement devices. The developed technology will find applications in scanning probe microscopy and high-precision medical devices.

‘One of the best equipped laboratories in Australia’ The group has access to one of the best equipped laboratories in Australia, Laboratory for Dynamics and Control of Smart Structures. The laboratory is equipped with state of the art signal processing and control software, a laser scanning vibrometer, sound and vibration measurement instruments, and real-time control system hardware. The group can offer a range of services to industry: n

Vibration monitoring and control

n

Active control of noise and vibration

System identification and development of models for flexible structures

n

n

High-precision systems.

If you would like more information please contact the School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science.

The University of Newcastle – Faculty of Engineering and Built Environment I CRICOS Provider 00109J

Contact details Professor Reza Moheimani School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science The University of Newcastle Callaghan NSW 2308 AUSTRALIA T +61 2 4921 6030 F + 61 2 4960 1712 E Reza.Moheimani@newcastle.edu.au


Spatial Visualisation Group

‘Combining technology and design practice’ Over the last few decades State and National Governments have come to understand the financial and other benefits that arise from the creation of high quality architecture and urban design. Despite this positive shift of values, the methods of assessment and prediction employed in urban and architectural design have remained constant (expert evaluation) for many years and have not developed in parallel with the growth of technical innovation seen in other fields. However, the application of technological methods of objective assessment for urban and architectural design may now become possible through pioneering research being conducted in the School of Architecture and Built Environment at the University of Newcastle. The School has undertaken studies in Urban and Architectural Design visualisation to develop new tools that will ultimately improve the quality of the built environment through advanced assessment and prediction techniques. ‘Cutting edge research’ Although in the past there has been some limited research on digital image processing techniques used in design, the research undertaken by the Spatial Visualisation Group at Newcastle has a range of new concepts and techniques. The School of Architecture has identified this unique research and consultancy opportunity of combining software engineering with urban and spatial design to produce new and innovative methods of assessment, prediction and analysis.

The research focuses on three key areas: n

Complex architectural projects

n

Neighbourhood character and streetscape

n

Urban and public space design

The Group aims to develop more sophisticated tools that will meet industry needs, exploiting leading edge technology to produce work that is sensitive to, and values, social, cultural and environmental issues. ‘Real world application’ The real world application and practical benefits to industry from the research are: Using computer software to produce comparative data for urban and architectural assessment and prediction

n

Professionals involved in the planning process will have access to a visual measure that is comparable across a variety of urban conditions and geographic regions

n

Assist design evaluation to improve council assessment (DAs, SEPP 65 compliance etc.) n

n To inform industry of complex or sensitive master-planning approaches to architecture and urban design

The School of Architecture and Built Environment through its research has developed capabilities in: n

High level architectural and urban design

3D computer modelling and visual simulation

n

Urban pattern recognition and space syntax analysis

n

Detailed knowledge of history of the built environment

n

n

Specialised software development

The University of Newcastle – Faculty of Engineering and Built Environment I CRICOS Provider 00109J

The School of Architecture and Built Environment has had much national success in receiving ARC Discovery projects on Digital Architectural design and ARC Linkage grants on Architectural analysis and assessment. It has an established reputation for working with industry on collaborative research projects and professional consulting. Please contact the School for more information. Contact details Professor Michael Ostwald School of Architecture and Built Environment The University of Newcastle Callaghan NSW 2308 AUSTRALIA T +61 2 4921 5771 F + 61 2 4921 7408 E architecture@newcastle.edu.au


Structural Engineering

‘Using innovative computer methods for evaluating structure reliability’ The reliability, strength and durability of materials used in construction, particularly in our urban landscape is critical in the design and mechanics of structures, their performance in withstanding loads and their behaviour in a variety of conditions like soil/ ground movement or seismic activity. Currently, there is an urgent national need for rational assessment procedures, techniques and criteria for the assessment of the remaining life performance of infrastructure of all types. For example, it’s considered that more than $700 million is required in NSW alone just to maintain the existing road bridges at their present safety and performance level. Similar orders of magnitude exist for most other infrastructure systems. Researchers in the Centre for Infrastructure Performance and Reliability are involved in pioneering studies, developing an understanding of the performance, reliability and durability of infrastructure and material characteristics. They are formulating new computational methods for evaluating the reliability of structures and systems with application to structural aspects of buildings, bridges, ships, off-shore structures and in relation to earthquake design for intra-plate regions. The key areas of expertise include: n

Assessment of the performance of existing and deteriorating or ageing infrastructure, including buildings, bridges, mining equipment, roads, pipelines, power transmission towers, shipping, aircraft and railway systems

n The reliability evaluation of complex structures and systems

performance, durability and reliability of structural masonry

n

Material and structural deterioration processes

n

n

energy performance of buildings

‘Research that provides input into Australian and International standards’ Researchers in the Centre for Infrastructure Performance and Reliability belong to international bodies and are part of a group with internationally recognized excellence. The Centre has forged many strong links with industry and government in its research. Many of the projects are industry or government funded with outcomes of the research providing input to Australian and international standards. Some of the current topics being studied include: Seismic protection of masonry buildings using fibre reinforced polymers

n

Risk and security assessment of explosive blast damage to built infrastructure

n

Structural reliability analysis of corroding concrete and steel structures

n

Hurricane/Cyclone hazard analysis and structural vulnerability

n

n

Stochastic material deterioration modelling

Efficient computational methods for structural reliability

n

n

Structural reliability of masonry structures

The design of residential slabs and footings for reactive soil conditions

n

n

Fire performance of reinforced concrete

Thermal and energy performance of masonry housing

n

The Centre for Infrastructure Performance and Reliability provides an extensive range of research, consulting services and independent testing to support the development of better building products and systems and improve the competitiveness of Australia’s building and construction industry.

The University of Newcastle – Faculty of Engineering and Built Environment I CRICOS Provider 00109J

The Faculty has a well equipped laboratory, which together with the skills and expertise of academic staff has been used to solve a range of industrial problems ranging from simple material or structural tests to complex tests. Additionally, the Centre is home to Australia’s largest Structural Masonry Group who are actively involved in expert consulting and testing with a long history of assisting industry with product development. The Centre for Infrastructure Performance and Reliability has had much success in receiving ARC Linkage grants. If you would like to engage in consulting with the Centre for Infrastructure Performance and Reliability or would like to find out more about research collaboration please contact Professor Mark Stewart for more information. Contact details Professor Mark Stewart Centre for Infrastructure Performance and Reliability School of Engineering The University of Newcastle Callaghan NSW 2308 AUSTRALIA T +61 2 4921 6027 F +61 2 4921 6991 E Mark.Stewart@newcastle.edu.au


Surveying Developing a new generation of technology for improved practices

Surveying enables us to obtain information about the size and shape of objects in our world, through precise measurement. Surveying is mostly used for creating maps of urban and rural areas, providing topographic, land boundary and other spatial information that can be used for planning and property conveyancing but also other uses like emergency services. Surveying is also used for engineering and industrial purposes, including the setting out of roads, railways, buildings, and the measurement of objects under construction (such as ships) or which have been constructed (such as processing plants). It also has application for measurement in sciences, including biomedicine and forensic sciences. Today, new technology in surveying is changing the nature of the work of surveyors. The School of Engineering is conducting innovative research in photogrammetry and geodesy. The Surveying group has been carrying out photogrammetric research since the 1980s into developments of analytical and digital photogrammetric plotting equipment and automated image matching and into a variety of applications of close-range photogrammetry, for engineering, topographic, biological, medical, and forensic studies. Current research in the photogrammetry and spatial information area lies in applications of automated image matching and of automated surface shape registration without the use of control points. Applications under study include medical studies of human anatomy and dental erosion research.

‘Research with a wide range of application’ In geodesy the main area of research is satellite radar altimetry. This research has relevant industry applications, especially in understanding of the mesoscale ocean currents in coastal zones, sea level changes, and marine gravity field. Ongoing research includes: Data quality improvement from retracking satellite radar altimeter waveforms n Geodetic estimation of the Leeuwin Current characteristics n Determination of the marine gravity field from multi-altimeter data n Recovery of the mean dynamic topography from satellite geodetic and oceanographic data sources n

Proposed research includes the exploitation of satellite altimetry for surface hydrological flux mapping. The specific region and objectives include the quantification of the seasonal water storage over the Australian continent using data from satellite altimetry (radar and laser) and spaceborne gravimetry such as the NASA/GFZ mission Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE). The School of Engineering has an established reputation for working with industry on collaborative research projects and professional consulting, forging strong links with many national and international industry and government bodies. If you are interested in obtaining more information please contact the School.

The University of Newcastle – Faculty of Engineering and Built Environment I CRICOS Provider 00109J

Contact details Dr Harvey Mitchell School of Engineering The University of Newcastle Callaghan NSW 2308 AUSTRALIA T +61 2 4921 6055 F + 61 2 4921 6991 E Harvey.Mitchell@newcastle.edu.au


Telecommunications Creating innovative algorithms, devices and systems for dynamic and effective communication

The Federal Government recognises the significance of information and communications technologies (ICT) on the economic and social fabric of Australia. These technologies are drivers of the information economy and the creation of many new businesses and forms of employment. Telecommunications engineering is one of the most important areas of information and communication technology (ICT). ICT areas are dominated by global standards where international research work has lead to the development of new technologies relevant to both Australian and International industry sectors. Relevant applications of telecommunications technology that impact on our society include satellites, digital broadcasting, mobile telephone and wireless networks and the high speed internet infrastructure. Researchers in the School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science are active in developing, designing, implementing and managing telecommunications hardware, software and systems for processing and transmitting information. They are generating innovative ideas which are published in international journals and conferences. The world class research works leads to the development of new telecommunication systems. The group is involved in a range of research areas in telecommunications engineering. Key focus areas of research are: n

Channel Coding

n

Information theory

n

Signal Processing

n

Multi-Input-Multi-Output (MIMO) systems

n

Advanced Modulation Techniques

n

Multiple Access Techniques

n

Wireless Networks

n

Wireless Sensor Networks

n

Medical/Body Area Networks

n

Internet Protocol (IP)

n

Microelectronics

‘Research highly relevant to the development of new technologies on an international level’ Industry and society depends heavily on the breakthroughs in telecommunications engineering. Research work carried out within the telecommunications research group is highly relevant for development of new knowledge and technology from national and international perspective. The group is studying various complex problems related to the development of next generation telecommunications technology. An example of ground breaking research being conducted is the development of new methods and microelectronics for wireless communications systems. Global demand for high quality wireless communications poses significant challenges. The physical layer in wireless communications is crucial as this is where the erratic actions of the wireless channel including interference and limited bandwidth, are moderated by sophisticated signal processing. Research works are also undertaken on higher layers such as Link and Network layers which utilizes the physical layer to support multiuser systems such mobile phone networks, internet, etc. A number of research works are concentrating on wireless access and network architectures. The Telecommunications engineering area is highly cross disciplinary. As a result, the nature of research works carried out within the group ranges from theoretical to applied research which is directly relevant to current industry practices. The group has access to world class computer simulation tools and several hardware test facilities which are used to develop and test new ideas.

The University of Newcastle – Faculty of Engineering and Built Environment I CRICOS Provider 00109J

The Group has had much success in receiving ARC grant funding and maintains strong interaction with industry through collaboration. If you are interested in obtaining more information please contact the School. Contact details Dr Jamil Khan School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science The University of Newcastle Callaghan NSW 2308 AUSTRALIA T +61 2 4921 6077 F + 61 2 4921 6993 E Jamil.Khan@newcastle.edu.au


Faculty of Engineering and Built Environment Research Capabilities