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KUDOS IS A PUBLICATION OF THE UNIVERSITY OF KANSAS SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE & DESIGN, FALL 2017


Arc/D FACULTY AND STAFF - FALL 2017

Kathy AchelpohlTodd AchelpohlDavid AdamsKadim Al AsadyMohammed AlshayebAlex AndersonGavin AngellAlejandro AptilonCJ ArmstrongPatti Baker Richard BranhamPeter BroederBen BrownLauren BrownHui CaiTad CarpenterRoberto CastilloApril CzarnetzkiJae ChangPok Chi LauDaniel Coburn Joe ColistraShannon CrissMahesh DaasPatrick Dooley Michael EckersleyGera ElliottSteve FairBarry FitzgeraldJohn GauntNicholas GillilandAmber GoodvinNils GoreStephen GrabowLois GreeneAmy HardmanSteve HarringtonJason HascallStephen Hassard David HerronAndrea HerstowskiMike HinkJonathan HolleyAnn HosslerTim HosslerThomas HuangCamille JeanAnthony Johnson-PowellStephen JohnsonWhitney JuneauFarhan KarimMatthew Keys Elise KirkMatt KirklandChad KrausSienna Leon Marie-Alice L’HeureuxCharles LinnAdam LongGil ManaloCarl MastersScott McCarthyMatt McKillip Jeremy MohlerRoberto MuntoreanuTanvi Nimkar Meredith O’NeillSteve PadgetAnne Patterson Jason PittmanMahbub RashidLance RakeDan RockhillDan RolfDavid SainLinda Samson-TalleurSebastian SanchezDennis SanderPaola SanguinettiBarb Seba Sabrina ShafiqueJeremy ShellhornHugo Sheward Zach ShieldsKapila SilvaMike SinclairKent Smith Kent SpreckelmeyerMichael SwannJuniper Tangpuz Gregory ThomasJohn TrefryHenry TroyerMay Tveit Nilou VakilAmy Van de RietKeith Van de RietRichard VarneyBruce WagmanKathleen WendlingJane Wong June YouFrank Zilm. 2 KUDOS 2 017 - SCHO O L O F ARCH I TECTU R E AN D DE SI GN


© STEVE PUPPE

Dear friends of Arc/D, Welcome to the second issue of our School’s annual news magazine, KUDOs! You may be asking yourselves what that egg is doing on the cover. Among other things, it symbolizes new beginnings, and we are at just such a point in the history of the School. Let me explain. I’m sure most of you remember the Computing-Tabulating-Recording Company. No? It was the company renamed as the International Business Machines Corporation by Thomas J. Watson. Suddenly, a company that once manufactured meat slicers, coffee grinders, and time clocks had a name that could describe the powerhouse of innovation and design it was well on its way to becoming. It is possibly the greatest rebrand in corporate history. In the past few months, we, too, have rebranded ourselves. Today, we are the School of Architecture & Design, or Arc/D for short. Arc/D simply describes what we do exceptionally well: design. I like to call our School a 105-yearold startup, but we were already one of the most comprehensive D-schools in the country. Located at one of 36 public institutions that are members of the Association of American Universities — and the only one in Kansas — we offer teaching and pursue scholarship in nine disciplines: architecture, design management and strategy, industrial design, interaction and user-experience design, interior architecture and design, illustration and animation, photography, urban design, and visual communication design. Our 105-year-old startup is off to a great start for the next 105 years! Over the last two years, we have undertaken a major reorganization involving an internal audit, administrative, academic, and budget restructurings, and community-building activities. A “Fly High” visioning retreat in 2015 and a “Think Wrong” retreat in 2017 generated our collective vision, to be “The Pioneering Force for Global Impact through Design.” And we identified eight strategic initiatives to become that force: academics, research, communications, alumni engagement, fundraising, global engagement, diversity, and long-range resource planning. A distinctive example of Arc/D’s new direction is the formation of the new interdisciplinary institutes that play to our strengths as a School, a University, and the State of Kansas. These organizational changes are designed to bring industry, professions, communities, faculty, and students together around a collaborative, self-sustaining business model and affiliate structure. May the pioneering global force be with you! Rock Chalk

Dr. Mahesh Daas, Dean

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We are Arc/D

The School of Architecture & Design The University of Kansas

With 1,000 Students And 11,000 Alumni We are a School of 12,000 DEGREES Bachelor of Fine Arts degrees with concentrations in _ Illustration & Animation _ Industrial Design _ Photography _ Visual Communications Design Bachelor of Science in _Interior Architecture & Design Graduate programs _ Master of Architecture _ Master of Arts in Architecture _ Master of Arts in Design Management and Strategy _ Master of Arts in Interaction and User Experience Design _ PhD in Architecture FACILITIES _ 156,000 square feet of instructional, lab and research space _ 30 labs, workshops and support centers including 10 computer labs _ 65,000-square-foot Design-Build Center (the largest in the U.S.) GLOBAL IMPACT 2017 _ Internships in Korea, Singapore, China, Malaysia, and France _ Global Studies have taken students to more than 12 countries _ Student exchange program with Nanjing Tech in China _ Among Azure magazine’s 15 top architecture schools internationally CAREER SUCCESSES 2017 _ 94% of our students were employed or accepted into the graduate school of their choice within two months of graduation _ 75% of our graduates were employed when they received their diplomas _ 80% of our students went on an internship before graduation

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Š2013 UNIVERSITY OF KANSAS/JON BLUMB

KU is the only Kansas university that is a member of the Association of American Universities, an elite group of 62 U.S. public and private research institutions.

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Fabbing the Future

Unique roboFab Lab sets Arc/D apart

A new lab in Marvin Studios that is home to a pair of versatile KUKA industrial robots is rapidly expanding Arc/D students’ skills and ingenuity. Associate Professor of Architecture Paola Sanguinetti started electives in digital fabrication several years ago. Until 2015 students could use only 3-D printers, laser cutters, and a huge CNC router for their work. “In a school with a strong tradition of hands-on education and designbuild, robotics would be the next natural step,” she said. But, where to get the robots? That’s when Arc/D alum Jordan Brandt, an architecture industry software developer and self-described serial entrepreneur, stepped forward and helped fund the two state-of-the-art industrial robots. “The role of architects and designers has already progressed from drawing 2-D representations to 3-D modeling,” said Jordan. “The KUKA robots allow our students to get to the next frontier: orchestrating machine instructions for our built environment.” “Jordan’s gift was a huge breakthrough for us,” said Dean Daas, who is also a robotics expert. He is coeditor of “Towards a Robotic Architecture,” which will be published by ORO Editions in the spring of 2018. Paola and two engineers from Zahner, Inc., a Kansas City, Mo.-based metal fabricating company, collaborated to start the first roboFab class. “Using robotics does give our students a competitive edge,” she says, “but it is not only about fabrication; it is also about how robotics will transform the AEC industry, and what is now labeled BuildTECH.” So far students using the robots have done shot-wire foam cutting and six-axis milling. But new tools Paola has begun developing allow for the 3D printing of soft clay — concrete and compacted earth are next. She and Assistant Professor Keith Van de Riet have also submitted an NSF pre-proposal to expand the lab and acquire an even larger robot.

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CHARLES LINN

T HE U N IV E RSIT Y OF KAN SAS

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East Hills Design-Build Center Where big problems are no problem

The sheer size of Arc/D’s 65,000 square-foot East Hills Design-Build Center with its 20-foot ceilings gives our faculty and students the unique ability to teach and learn to design and make projects at scales that exceed those of any other design school. Located at Lawrence’s East Hills Industrial Park, the building is filled with industrial-grade wood- and metalworking machines, construction equipment, and tons of building materials — and there’s still plenty of room to build full-size building prototypes. But above all else, what fills East Hills is the excitement that comes from students who are engaged in design-make studios in all of our design disciplines that would otherwise not be possible. Recent projects made in this facility and featured in this issue of KUDOs include the Mobile Market and a canoe construction class taught in collaboration with the Lawrence Arts Center. Currently, the Institute for Smart Cities is building a full-sized senior living smart home as a research project here. Studio 804 has used East Hills as its base for years. East Hills provides the capacity for unique building research and sponsored research that can occur only where largescale projects can be built. Sponsors who have provided grants and services include Prosoco, Cerner, the Mozilla Gigabit Community Fund, the Howard Nearing/NSP Housing Studio Fund, and Sunlite Science and Technology. Grants have also included funds from an American Institute of Architects Upjohn Grant, a KU Provost’s Strategic Research Grant, Humana, Episcopal Community Services, and the Wyandotte County Community Health Council.

COURTESY OF STUDIO 804

The East Hills Design-Build Center lets Arc/D dream big because we can build big.

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1330 Brook Street Studio 804, Professor Dan Rockhill

The 1330 Brook Street House maintains a high level of sustainable design as well as remaining contextually sensitive to the East Lawrence community. By choosing an urban infill site, the Studio welcomed the opportunity to integrate the house into the existing neighborhood fabric. The house is also reminiscent of the well-known Lustron houses developed in the U.S. in post-World War II in response to the shortage of housing for returning veterans. The use of a sophisticated high-performance metal skin accomplishes a contemporary and energy-efficient interpretation of the Lustrons of 70 years ago. The house was designed toward the U.S. Green Building Council’s Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design Platinum standards by integrating passive strategies for daylighting and sun shading into the architecture. With an exterior screening system and concrete floor for thermal mass, the southwest glazing provides passive heating and cooling throughout the year, optimizing temperatures year-round as well as creating a visual connection to the outdoor patio. Materials selection was based on a desire for longevity and ease of maintenance, including the repurposed metal panel cladding system and insulated glass units for the southwest glazing. The result is an attractive, adaptable, and affordable dwelling, which will act as a template for other low-income, sustainable housing projects. The house adheres to the neighborhood’s traditional lot size of 40-by132 feet, leading to its narrow footprint. Bedrooms were arranged along the south wall so that daylight fills the occupied spaces. By utilizing space-efficient programming and elevating the grade several feet, the house’s footprint is well above the former floodplain, which passed across the northwest corner of the lot.

1330 Brook Street was designed and built by: Matthew Phillip Anderson, Faysal Karim Bhuiyan, John Joseph Coughlin, Abigail Rose Davis, Caitlin Fitzgerald, Brittany C. Hediger, Evan Taylor Liles, Chris Roybal, Charles Christian Rotter, Emily Renee Stockwell.

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T HE U N IV E RSIT Y OF KAN SAS

© EWING COREY PHOTOGRAPHY GAFFER PHOTOGRAPHY JAMES

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Canoes = Community Associate Professor Tom Huang

For the second summer in a row, Associate Professor of Design Tom Huang has taught a class in canoe construction for the Lawrence Arts Center. It was hosted by Arc/D at its East Hills Design-Build Center. His collaboration with the Arts Center helps fulfill one of Arc/D’s goals, which is to create engagement between the School and the local community. This also meshes nicely with his research interests. “My research in the field of studio-craft has moved into the realm of social practice and how an artist builds an engaged community that helps with its members’ growth and enlightenment in a specific subject matter,” he said. “In this particular class I wanted to build awareness not only of canoe construction but also things like the intersection of craft and technology, and water resources like the Kansas River.” Students in his class built their canoes of bamboo fastened to CNC-cut plywood frames. These, in turn, were skinned with layers of plastic shopping bags. At the end of August, 14 students launched five canoes on the Kansas River upstream from Lawrence, and paddled a little over a mile.

© JACK HAZFELD

“One of the most exciting and thrilling things about making a vessel is that you get in and it magically transports you on top of the water,” concluded Tom. “Without a doubt, people work together and communities are quickly formed and drawn into this romantic experience. That, as an artist, is something I am hoping to tap into.”

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Global Engagement Given that global impact is such an important element of

Global Studies

Arc/D’s vision, we have long been dedicated to preparing Jayhawks for design careers the world over. The School is now shifting its study abroad paradigm from study abroad

Our faculty-led study-abroad programs have taken students all

to global engagement by partnering with educational

over the world so they may be exposed to historic and modern

institutions overseas.

architecture and design. In recent years Arc/D students have visited Australia, China, Cuba, Dubai, Denmark, England,

In addition to our academic programs in France and

Finland, France, Germany, India, Italy, Japan, Malaysia,

Germany, we are now creating joint degrees, research,

Singapore, South Korea, Sweden, Switzerland, Thailand,

and design-build programs with universities in Brazil, Chile,

Vietnam, and other countries.

China, Costa Rica, India, and South Korea. These initiatives are in different stages of development from expressions of interest to the signing of memoranda of understanding. These efforts are already bearing fruit. A Technical, Cultural, Educational and Scientific Cooperation Memorandum of Understanding was signed by Arc/D and Nanjing Tech last year. In July, the Institute for Smart Cities signed a similar agreement with Universidade de Pernambuco, Recife, Brazil.

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Global Outreach The construction of a community birthing center

global practice, natural building methods, and

in rural Haiti by our students and faculty is

project management.

experience focused on the programming, design,

Ten students from the architecture and design

documentation, prototyping, and transfer of

programs are working this fall on the design of the

knowledge. Offered in partnership with Haiti Tec

3,000-square-foot center, exploring the potential

in Port-au-Prince, the Business and Technology

of utilizing ecologically-sound, local building

Institute in Les Cayes, and the Maison de

materials, including bamboo and rammed earth.

Naissance in Torbeck, students participating in

Associate Professor Chad Kraus, Professors

this program not only will learn how to design a

of Architecture Kent Spreckelmeyer and Frank

building from conception through construction

Zilm, and Professor of Design Lance Rake are

documentation, but also will learn valuable skills in

supporting the design process by providing

cross-cultural communication, community building,

expertise in issues and applicable techniques.

Š TYRELL ROBERSON

providing a unique, multi-term course and applied

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VAN LAL LIAN M.Arch student

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RUSTY STEWART (HAFTONE IMAGE), BRUCE WAGMAN

I want to make change happen With so much of the news coming out of Myanmar

at his studies at Wyandotte High School. A CAD

focused on the mass brutalization of Rohingya

teacher told him about the architecture program at KU,

Muslims, many people are unaware that the Rohingya

and with the blessings and support of his mother, he

are not the only ethnic minority in Myanmar that has

entered Arc/D in 2015, the same year he became a

been persecuted in recent years.

Gates Millennial Scholar.

Third-year architecture student Van Lal Lian is Chin,

“I didn’t know what architecture was when I came to

and a Christian, other groups that have suffered

this country. Since a child I had been interested in

ethnic and religious persecution under the country’s

sustainable housing — houses with roofs that did not

repressive military regime.

leak when it rained — and urban planning, but I didn’t know how to get there,” he said.

When soldiers came to his home in the town of Tamu on the India-Burma border more than a decade

Along with supportive Arc/D faculty, Van has found

ago and demanded his father, his mother and three

success through Arc/D’s Multicultural Architectural

siblings knew that they had to leave quickly or face

Scholars Program, KU’s Multicultural Scholars and

imprisonment, or worse. Van was just nine years old.

TRIO Search Talent Programs, and the Writing Center. “They have all been very good for me,” Van said.

Van’s father transported vegetables by bicycle to India and was away from home. Unable to wait for his return,

But he is not able to participate as much as he would

Van’s mother sold their house. The family packed their

like. Instead, he has been helping young Burmese

clothes and took a bus to the border of Thailand.

students through the Myanmar Academic Center, which he founded last year. Students travel from all

“When we left Burma we had no idea what was going

over the Kansas City-metro area to Johnson County

to happen. We just needed to go forward and keep

Community College to participate. So far, 30 students

moving, and whatever came to our path we would try

have registered for tutoring and other kinds of

and make the best out of it,” said Van, who visited Tamu

assistance provided by Van and volunteers from other

during winter break this year for the first time since he

area colleges.

fled. He does not know what became of his father. “Basically, the program was created because Without documentation, the family turned to smugglers

Burmese often is spoken at home, and parents are not

to get to Malaysia, taking a dangerous overnight trip in

able to help students with their homework. We help

a small boat so leaky that water and spilled diesel fuel

them with that and also with college and financial aid

came up to their knees. Van called the ride to Thailand

applications,” he said. “Anything they need. The goal

“the most difficult, most challenging moment of my life.”

is to create leaders in the community, not only for the Burmese who live here but also for those who live in

After three days of lying beneath tarps in the backs of

the greater community.”

trucks, the family finally arrived in Malaysia, where they made their way to a United Nations Human Rights

Despite the current situation in Myanmar, Van is

Council refugee center and applied for refugee status.

optimistic about its future. “I am particularly interested in working in developing countries. I want to finish

After appearing at the center daily for two years and

my masters, start my own firm, and possibly return to

filling out mountains of paperwork, Van and his family

Burma and work. There are no building codes there

were allowed to leave Malaysia. In 2010 they moved to

and no urban planning. We need to focus on building

the Kansas City area.

and how to improve.”

Van entered eighth grade at the age of 13 with a

“I want to make change happen. I know it will be

minimal grasp of English but worked hard, excelling

difficult, but I have a community-oriented mind.”

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Designing for change

DOCTORAL STUDENT MATT KLEINMANN AND PROFESSOR NIL GORE’S MOBILE MARKET COULD SOLVE KCK FOOD DESERT CRISIS

With perishable inventory and slim profit margins, the grocery business is notoriously

It all began as a project of the Dotte Agency, founded in 2013 by Nils, Matt, and

tough. The mobile grocery business is even tougher. In fact, two entities that in

Associate Professor of Architecture Shannon Criss. The storefront in downtown

recent years ran mobile groceries in the Kansas City area have shut down.

Kansas City, Kansas, serves as a base for the public-interest design work of the principals and their students.

But Arc/D’s doctoral student Matt Kleinmann (left in photo, opposite page) and Matt said that in early 2016 Jerry S. Jones Jr., Executive Director of the nonprofit

soon-to-hit-the-streets mobile market they’ve built from a beer truck. It has been

Wyandotte County Community Health Council, invited him to a meeting with

under construction at the East Hills Design-Build Center since spring of 2017.

representatives of Humana health insurance company.

Although transforming the truck was an important step, Nils says the greater

“They said they’d like to do a mobile market and asked whether I was interested. I said

contribution is the work Matt, whose educational focus is on public health, has

yes. We spent six months brainstorming. I met with people who run mobile markets like

done over the past 18 months studying the food-desert landscape and lining up

Harvesters, grocers, and community groups.” Matt continued, “There is a huge amount

partners from both the nonprofit and for-profit worlds. “It’s interdisciplinary,” Matt

of need, specifically in northeast Kansas City, Kansas, where more than 21,000 people

said. “It’s a little business, a little design, a little public health, a little bit law.”

have low incomes and low access to fresh foods. They live in a food desert.”

“This type of research is about prototyping things, developing new business

And yet, Matt noted, mobile markets “fail all the time. It’s not a totally sustainable

models,” Nils said. “That’s where the innovation is. They are micro changes on

business. When we can’t get grocery stores built — whatever the reason — do we

a lot of different levels, but if you add them up, they could be significant.”

wait or do we find other ways to get food to people?”

© MATT KLEINMANN (UPPER ROW, LEFT AND MIDDLE), NILS GORE (ALL OTHERS)

Professor of Architecture Nils Gore (right) think they’ve cracked the code with a

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Part of the problem, Matt said, is the $30,000 fee the area’s dominant grocery

The truck will be owned by the nonprofit ECS. The Health Care Foundation

supplier charges customers to join its cooperative. Also, for grocery stores to join

of Greater Kansas City has provided ECS with a $75,000 grant that the

the federal government’s WIC (Women, Infants & Children) nutrition program,

mobile market will use to employ two staffers — one to drive and stock the

which Matt called “the easiest thing we can do to increase public health,” a grocer

truck and another to serve as a bilingual English-Spanish clerk and nutrition

must carry a variety of foods that enable customers to make healthy meals.

educator.

So Matt has reached an agreement with an alternative grocery supplier, Texas

Matt said he has consulted with Charlotte Tritch, Associate Director of

Valley Foods, an outgrowth of Kansas City’s popular El Torito Supermart, and the

Entrepreneurship Programs and a lecturer at KU’s School of Business, and

mobile market will be WIC-compliant.

her students about the mobile market business plan. “They concluded that if the startup costs could be covered by others, ECS owns the truck, and

Then there’s the issue of design. As opposed to a school bus or trailer that some

Texas Valley owns the inventory, that will equate to better prices and allow

mobile markets have used, doors on one side of the former beer truck can be

a profit margin to make it economically sustainable,” he said. “And, if it is,

raised once on site to reveal its contents, drawing in potential customers. “Most

there is no reason it can’t operate indefinitely.”

mobile markets require you to climb up inside to see what’s for sale, but you can see what’s available with our design,” Matt said. The design and construction of

If the regulatory issues can be solved, Matt and Nils hope the mobile

the truck includes custom shelves and storage built by Nils and students, and the

market can hit the streets of Wyandotte County and Kansas City by the

truck’s refrigeration will keep food cold.

end of 2017. —by Rick Hellman, KU News Service

The truck was purchased with grants from Humana, the Community Health Council, and Episcopal Community Services (ECS), and it is being renovated with funding from Menorah Heritage Foundation and the Health Care Foundation of Greater Kansas City.

“THIS TYPE OF RESEARCH IS ABOUT PROTOTYPING THINGS,

Zoning and permitting have also taken time. “We’re treated like a farmers’ market,” Matt said. “If we make 20 stops a week, we will need 20 permits. If a church or school is not zoned for commercial, legally we can’t go.” Thus, he’s been working with community partners and officials of the Unified Government of Wyandotte County/Kansas City, Kansas, to address this pitfall, which may require a change in city regulations.

DEVELOPING NEW BUSINESS MODELS. THAT’S WHERE THE INNOVATION IS. THEY ARE MICRO CHANGES ON A LOT OF DIFFERENT LEVELS, BUT IF YOU ADD THEM UP, IT COULD BE SIGNIFICANT.”

CHARLES LINN

PROFESSOR NIL GORE

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New Interior Architecture & Design degree approved The Kansas Board of Regents has approved the School of Architecture & Design’s new B.S. in Interior Architecture & Design (IAD) degree program. “We are excited that the IAD degree we’ve wanted to offer for many years is now a reality,” said Dean Daas. “There are many interiors programs, but we know of none that will immerse students in such a diversity of classwork. This interdisciplinary degree takes advantage of all that we offer in our academic programs and research institutes, which focus on health and wellness, sports and entertainment, smart cities, and design-build.” “Most IAD grads will earn the Master of Architecture in two years or less. That degree is required if an individual wants to eventually earn a license to practice architecture,” notes Associate Dean Mike Swann, who was instrumental in creating the degree. In explaining how this program differs from the traditional Master of Architecture offered by Arc/D, Nilou Vakil, Director of Strategic Initiatives, said, “What is unique is that its classes are drawn from Architecture as well as Visual Communications and Industrial Design classes that are part of the school’s B.F.A. “IAD students will have a deeper focus on the experience of spaces, how they perform, and their relationship with the larger built environment,” she said. “There is also an emphasis on how interior spaces are formed, programmed, and configured and a focus on acoustics, lighting, graphics, furniture, and finishes. We want our graduates to understand how to resolve nearly any kind of interiors-related problem. “There is great demand for commercial interiors specialists,” Vakil continued. “The work done by graduates of our program will encompass all aspects of the design and integration of interiors and user-experiences within all types of buildings.” “We particularly want to thank our alum David Mourning for his counsel and whose generosity made it possible to start this program,” Daas added. Students who have previously not enrolled at KU may apply for admission to the IAD program, which will begin classes in the fall of 2018.

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ELISE KIRK Photographer and Assistant Professor of Design

Missouri native and Assistant Professor of Photography Elise Kirk has lived in many places, but now she’s back where she feels she belongs, even though that’s not exactly a well-defined place. “The Midwest is this amorphous area that is defined by what it is not,” she says. “You are not part of the South, and you’re not part of New England or the new Wild West. The Midwest doesn’t fit into these clearly defined cultural landscapes.” Elise was away for awhile. After college in Chicago and a Fulbright in Spain, she had a 15-year stint working her way up as a documentary producer in Washington, D.C. and New York City, working with National Geographic and the Discovery Channel, among others. Earning an M.F.A. in Photography at the Rhode Island School of Design in 2015 took her even farther east than New York. But the Midwest continued to beckon, and when an opportunity to join the faculty at KU came up in 2016, she jumped at the chance. “I returned and set out on the impossible search to find the Midwest; it was not really a literal search, but I photographed in Missouri, Kansas, and Iowa. Those are the states my family is from.” It is also the same territory where the regionalist painters Grant Wood, John Steurat Curry, and Thomas Hart Benton painted the same sort of down-to-earth people captured by her work. The scenes on this page are from Mid–, a series of photographs she made between 2013 and 2015. She uses a large-format camera on a tripod that she feels separates her from the paparazzi and allows her to strike up conversations with strangers she encounters. “In the full body of work I repeatedly refer back to the highway, the road, and the river, drawing on the idea and the style of regionalism in the work and how the Midwest embodies rootedness contrasted with restlessness. It is a place that people pass through to get someplace else but also a place that I know to be grounded, as in the way land is passed down generation to generation.” To the extent possible, Elise captures that tension. Referencing the photograph of the women lounging on the sidewalk, she says, “I came across them on the last day of summer. The frame is composed so they lie over the line that divides the fenced-in yard from the sidewalk and the road, straddling the security of home with the promise of ‘other’ that the road brings. They are potential energy, not yet kinetic.” For Elise, that tension may have subsided for now. “Leaving the secure comforts of home for the unknown can happen at any age. But I feel so lucky to be teaching here, closer to family and grounded in a place after I have moved around so much — this beautiful landscape where I © ELISE KIRK

make my work.”

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Daniel Coburn wins Guggenheim Fellowship

Daniel Coburn, Assistant Professor of Photography, received a 2017 Fellowship for the Creative Arts in Photography from the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation. Over the past ten years his work has been inspired by studies of the traditional family photo © NILS GORE

album. Frustrated by the lack of images of the true and sometimes troubling nature of his own family history, he set out to create a supplement to his own family album. “The family photo album is a construct that often

Arc/D announces Institute for Smart Cities

provides a glossy façade, an over-idealized American, domestic utopia. The things that you see in family albums are clichés, exactly what you expect to see. I think there are issues that are never approached, the darker side of family life,” he said. The careful sequencing of images in Daniel’s monograph “The Hereditary Estate,” published by Kehrer Verlag (2015), creates an emotional, visceral dialogue with the viewer. Daniel joined Arc/D in 2013, the same year he received his M.F.A. with distinction from the University of New Mexico. His photographs have been the subject of solo exhibitions at the Mulvane Art Museum, Silver Eye Center for Photography, Filter Photo Space, and La Fototeca Gallery, and in numerous international group exhibitions. His prints are also held in collections at major institutions. Each year about 175 Guggenheim Fellowships are awarded to individuals who have already demonstrated exceptional capacity for productive scholarship or exceptional creative ability in the arts.

Arc/D is proud to announce the formation of the

Smart mirrors, smart toilets, and other devices could be

Institute for Smart Cities. It will be directed by Joe

installed in your home, making it like a medical device

Colistra, Professor of Architecture.

that allows the transmittal of information. And it isn’t just theoretical. Students in Joe’s Spring 2017 studio

“We intend to be at the forefront of research and

constructed an experimental senior housing unit at

innovation in designing and planning data-driven smart

the East Hills Design-Build Center, complete with a

environments that can improve livability for all, while

prototype smart floor.

dramatically reducing resource consumption,” said Joe. “Generous funding from our affiliate partners and KU’s The Institute aims to innovate by developing the

General Research Fund has allowed us to develop a

untapped potential that is created when smart

floor system that is able to collect data on heel strike,”

housing, design, aging population, big data, and

said Joe. Utilizing accelerometers and strain gauges,

artificial intelligence converge to transform how cities

it can monitor activity and detect falls, limp, muscle

are built.

tremor, dragging of feet, and balance issues.

While cities are huge, the first big-data-driven

The data can also be used for more advanced gait

project that the Institute has undertaken as a proof-

analysis, which can identify and predict conditions

of-concept is remarkably small-scale: recording and

such as diabetic neuropathy, Alzheimer’s and

analyzing the way a heel strikes a floor. “What if your

Parkinson’s disease, and other forms of dementia.

house could capture your heel strike, the number of

Funding has been provided by the American Institute

times you left your apartment, the number of times

of Architects, the Mozilla Gigabit Community Fund,

you go to the bathroom, and how much sleep you

the Howard Nearing/NSPJ Housing Studio Fund, and

got last night?” asks Joe.

Sunlite Science and Technology.

“The idea with connectivity and the Internet of Things is to link all that data together. For example, a floor that could monitor heel strikes can tell if someone has fallen or has a stutter in their step that is a precursor

Holloway, Angela Seaba, Matt Kenney,

sensors, but ones that are sensitive enough to use

Willie Johnson, Kailey Smith, Abby

This information is most useful to seniors, so he is working with scientists at the Landon Center on Aging at the KU Medical Center who work on

© DANIEL COBURN

Back row: Culin Thompson, Jared

of Alzheimer’s disease. These are not your normal predictive algorithms on,” he explains.

Noelke, Sarah Long. Front row: Joe Colistra, Pat Witthaus, Lex Dewitt, Olivia Brown, Fatima

Alzheimer’s disease. “They can already do gait

Moufarrige, Theresa Signorino, Hannah

analysis with a device like a Fitbit, but this would be

Wobbe, Connor Janzen, Louis Weishaar.

in the background,” Joe continued.

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Students in the Studio:


© MIKE SINCLAIR

Dirt Works Studio transforms dreary Jaybreak into glorious Chalmers Café and Gallery

When the Kansas Memorial Union announced the

& Planning John Gaunt located in an alcove depict

closure of the Jaybreak, a snack bar in Chalmers Hall

students engaged in Arc/D’s traditions of drawing by

that operated for 30 years, panic ensued among the

hand and building.

building’s caffeine dependent. Where would students get a cuppa joe?

For the first time, the Gallery is connected to the expanded central seating area with a frameless full-

In the spring of 2016, the problem was reframed

height glass wall and frameless sliding doors. The

when a “design blitz,” organized by Dean Daas and

Art & Design Shop, which sells art supplies and is

facilitated by designer John Bielenberg, brought an

the source of the Café’s crucial coffee and snacks,

interdisciplinary team of students together to “think

is more than twice the size of the cramped closet it

wrong” about it. Armed with their observations,

previously occupied.

Three departments + 6,000 s.f. renovated + 30 feet of timber panels

Dean Daas, Dean Carl Lejuez of the College of Liberal Arts & Sciences, KU’s Design & Construction

“For a group of third-year architecture students to

Management team, and David Mucci, Director of

design and build a project of this scale and scope in

the Memorial Union, came together to initiate the

an academic setting over the course of a semester

remodeling as a collaborative design-build project

and a half is an extraordinarily ambitious undertaking,”

involving Architecture, Design, and Visual Arts

said Kraus, who estimated the students spent about

students and faculty.

9,000 hours on the project. “For them to risk failure

Barnhart, Matthew Bellomy, Sam

and persevere through daunting and sometimes

Bradley, Jordan Coslett, Haley

Dirt Works Studio, a third-year design-build

seemingly insurmountable challenges is awesome.”

studio under the direction of Associate Professor

Students in the Studio: Eliot Alpert, Erin Ayers, Bailey

Dougherty, Laren Downie, Sydney

of Architecture Chad Kraus, designed the new

The project also gave students from two KU Schools

Grimm, Gretchen Kelly, Breanna Kolk,

6,000-square-foot space during the fall and

who use Chalmers the rare opportunity to collaborate.

completed construction May 2017. The Jaybreak

Besides the Dirt Works Studio, Assistant Professor of

Christopher Koss, Morgan Merkel,

was rebranded and is now the Chalmers Café

Design Tim Hossler’s class contributed environmental

and Gallery.

graphics. Associate Professor of Visual Art Matt

Daniel Osburn, Robyn Payne, Will Shadwick, and Kenneth Wilson.

Burke’s sculpture class created 14 inlaid wooden An adjacent classroom is connected to the much-

tabletops to grace the study area.

expanded study area through 30 feet of pivoting, cross-laminate timber panels. Turning them 90

Dean Daas said, “Food and drink bring people

degrees allows the space to be temporarily expanded

together, and this place is an essential element of our

for exhibition openings and receptions. Drawings by

creative culture. This project used design-thinking to

former Dean of the School of Architecture, Design

address the needs of people.”

The class was assisted by Architecture graduate student David Versteeg.

T HE U N IV E RSIT Y OF KAN SAS

23


When Hui Cai arrived at Georgia Tech for graduate school in 2006, she intended to study history, criticism, and theory. A pivotal moment came when she became involved in the design and evaluation of an ICU unit at Emory University Hospital. That’s when she chose healthcare design as her career path, in particular validating the effectiveness of healthcare facilities through both quantitative research and qualitative onsite observation. “In architecture, a lot of training is about making buildings beautiful,” she said. “Beauty is important, but some kinds of buildings have a strong functional component, where the architecture shapes people’s behavior and impacts organizational outcomes. That is particularly true of healthcare design. “Most study in this area is devoted to the patients. But nurses are there 24/7, day-in and day-out. The healthcare environment as a workplace is less studied,” she continued. “To me, it is important to know how the environment affects the very committed healthcare workers and nurses who deliver patient care. The environment is highly stressful, and if the design exacerbates the stress, the care quality will inevitably be impacted.” Since her arrival at KU in 2014, Hui has become an indispensable member of the architecture faculty and a leader in the Institute of Health + Wellness Design. She continues her research into whether decentralizing nurse stations works as well as designers had hoped when this design began to appear 10 years ago. She also teaches graduate seminars in healthcare design and first-year and capstone design studios in the Master of Architecture program. “I like the feeling that my research can validate whether design decisions are actually making a difference in people’s lives,” she said. “You can always claim you did a good design, but how is it actually working from the users’ perspective? The professionals I want to most influence are healthcare designers and hospital administrators. They are the ones on the front lines of making changes and the ones who implement change.” Hui’s research has taken her as far away as University Medical Center of Princeton at Plainsboro, New Jersey, and SSM Health St. Mary’s Hospital in Jefferson City to conduct in-depth, onsite observation, behavior mapping, tracking, focus-group interviews, and surveys. Hers are among the few studies that link decentralized nurse station design with actual organizational performances and patient outcomes, such as nurse-turnover rate and patient satisfaction. “Researchers validate, but the designers are the ones who can make it better. We are the ones who bridge the gap between research and design through conducting and disseminating research to practitioners,” Hui concluded.

HUI CAI

CHARLES LINN

Assistant Professor of Architecture

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Design-Build Studio Recreates Gorgeous Wainwright Details Can architecture students using 21st-century technology turn out something as beautiful as the master designers and craftsmen of the 19th century did? That was what Assistant Professor Keith Van de Riet’s third-year design-build students explored in his Craft in the Digital Age studio. They created full- and half-scale models of the terra-cotta ornaments found on Louis Sullivan’s landmark Wainwright Building in St. Louis, one of the nation’s first skyscrapers. “It’s modeled after the methods of the Beaux Arts School in the 18th century, © KEITH VAN DE RIET

which is really the source of American architecture,” Van de Riet said. “There, the students copied classical details – Ionic, Doric and Corinthian columns, for example – until they internalized the lessons. Now with the digital tools we have, I wanted to test those tools and the students’ knowledge with a deep precedent of historical analysis.” So, the students used photos and 3-D modeling software to recreate Wainright’s details. Those drawings were translated into positive models – some created with a 3-D printer and some cut from foam blocks with a router. Negative molds were then created in plaster, or silicone rubber, and those molds were filled by hand with clay, plaster or cast stone. The dry clay pieces were then fired in a kiln housed at KU’s Department of Visual Art in collaboration with Marshall Maude, Associate Professor of Ceramics. The students also built steel frames from which to hang their creations, which are currently displayed on the walls of the first-floor commons of Marvin Hall. According to Van de Riet, “The students also learned about how a façade works; about mocking up a piece of a façade to show contractors and subcontractors what it will actually look like.” “Students may not be the only possible beneficiaries of the exercise,” Van de Riet said. “The techniques they used could be used to replicate other historical architectural details, creating a catalog of 3-D digital models that could be made available publicly.” — by Rick Hellman, KU News Service

Students in the Studio: Kelechi Akwazie, David Brookman, Alex Delekta, Cassandra Hall, Jacob Hansen, Joseph Herdler, Andrew Hutchens, Maxwell Irby, Mark Kaufman, Grace Kennedy, Joseph Libeer, Benjamin Marquardt, Andrew Marquette, Andy Martinez Renteria, Jacob Peterson and Dana Ritter.

T HE U N IV E RSIT Y OF KAN SAS

25


Recipients of Inaugural Distinguished Alumni Awards

© LAZER, INC.

NIRVANA CHAIR DONATED BY WENDELL CASTLE TO THE UNIVERSITY OF KANSAS’ SPENCER MUSEUM OF ART.

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Dean Daas and the Dean’s Advisory Board have announced the names of the School’s Inaugural Distinguished Alumni Award winners. They were chosen by a jury that evaluated the nominations submitted by Arc/D alumni and friends based on leadership, public service, and professional achievements. The awards’ framework was developed by the Alumni Experience Committee of the Dean’s Advisory Board.

JUSTIN CRATTY

KENNETH SIMMONS

Young Distinguished Architecture and Design

Young Distinguished Architecture and Design

M.Arch., 2008

M.Arch., 2007

Senior associate, Gensler, laboratory

Architect, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers

designer. Based in the United Kingdom,

(USACE). During his time at the Corps of

Justin has worked on millions of square feet of

Engineers, Kenneth has helped develop

laboratory space in the U.S., Europe, and the

technical policy, guidance, and criteria for

Middle East, and data centers, skyscrapers,

USACE construction activities and led

and retail and hospitality projects. He was

technical advancements in construction. He

also the president of the American Institute of

has served both the nation and profession as

Architects’ U.K. chapter.

a public-sector architect by managing critical

ROBERTO MUNTOREANU

The awards were given at Arc/D’s Alumni School of 12000 Recognition Banquet on October 27, 2017. That celebration followed the School’s second annual Alumni Symposium, a daylong event, when alums made presentations on the theme “The 12000 Who Transform.”

infrastructure projects worth billions of dollars.

WENDELL CASTLE

SILVIA VARGAS

JIM WALTERS

Distinguished Alumni

Distinguished Alumni

Distinguished Alumni

B.F.A., 1958, M.F.A.,1960

B.A., 1991, M.U.P., 1993

B.E.D., 1975, B.Arch., 1977

Furniture designer. Wendell has been called

President, Silvia Vargas - Community

Founding partner, Populous. During his 25-

“the father of the art-furniture movement.”

Planning. Silvia’s focus has been on the

year career at Populous, formerly HOK Sport

His furniture merges seamlessly the

creation of urban plans that represent the

Venue Event, Jim led the design of more

industrial design and sculpture he studied

consensus of a community’s priorities. She

than 20 major stadium projects. He is on

at KU, earning him a Gold Medal from the

has been a project manager and team leader

the Board of Commissioners of the Unified

American Craft Council and many other

for more than 15 years, directing the creation

Government of Wyandotte County and

awards. Examples of his work are held in the

of plans and implementation tools such as

Kansas City, Kansas, and serves on the Mid-

collections of more than 50 museums and

urban design guidelines and zoning code

America Regional Council Board of Directors.

some 20 corporations.

updates in the U.S. and abroad.

T HE U N IV E RSIT Y OF KAN SAS

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Fourth-Year Student, Visual Communications

© CHLOE HUBLER (BLEND, NUDEL, WOOD PICKER)

CHLOE HUBLER Fourth-year Visual Communications student Chloe Hubler, who grew up in Leawood, Kansas, always knew she wanted to do something with the arts. Fashion design was a possibility for awhile, and she studied architecture at the University of Arkansas for a year. “A friend was studying Vis Comm here at KU. I saw her work and realized that’s what I want to do,” she said. “I really liked branding — I didn’t know much about it, but taking art and making it practical made sense to me. I’m pretty creative, but math makes a lot of sense to me as well, and I need to put a bit of the logical and creative together.” After graduation and perhaps a stint traveling overseas, she hopes to work in a small design studio in a major metropolitan area. She’s split on whether she prefers branding to editorial design. It is easy to understand her ambivalence, as her student work in both realms has been winning lots of awards. “Dui Gusti,” a hand-bound book of her photography and essays that document her study-abroad trip to Italy, was named Best Publication at the National Student Show, received an AIGA KC Award, and was an Adobe Design Achievement Awards (ADAA) semifinalist. She was also part of a team whose magazine Pavement was a semifinalist for an ADAA award. Meanwhile, her identity development and branding for a clever folding pack and logos for toothpicks she christened “Wood Picker” and a line of pasta products she calls Nudel, plus packaging and signage for Blend Iced Tea, have won awards from Graphic Design USA, AIGA KC, and Mississippi State University Glitch awards as well as being featured on behance.net, a graphic arts website. Chloe is also one of two KU students who won AIGA KC Scholarships in October 2017. Students from seven area schools may

put com-

enter the scholarship competition, and only two are awarded annually. “There are many aspects of design that I want to get involved in, and that’s one of the great things about our Vis-Comm program at Arc/D. It touches on everything. I think the reason I say yes to so many design-related activities here is that I want the exposure. I want to get as much out of my school experience as I can while I am lucky

LAUREN EDEN HAKMILLER

enough to be here.”

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ADOBE Pavement magazine, a student project by Austin Barto, Haley Hennier, Chloe Hubler, Jenny O’Grady, and Roxy Townsend, is a semifinalist in the Adobe Design Achievement Awards.

VIS COMM student awards

Devon McGowan and Lucas Nelson were The Design Kids Award winners for 2016. Megan

Illustration student awards

Snelten and Kylie Vandeven were featured in Student Showcase in the March-April 2017 issue of Communication Arts. Megan Snelten and Henna Gaus had their work selected for the AIGA Blue Ridge Flux 2016 competition. Amy Brown won the Best Student Award at the American Advertising Federation of Kansas City.

Charlotte Pemberton and Tyler Jones’s illustrated book covers were selected for the Lawrence Public Library’s Banned Books Trading Card Series. Madison Karr had her work selected for the 2017 Embracing Our Differences International Exhibition. Nate Gerber’s work was selected for the Lawrence United Way’s Backsnack Brainfood program.

AIGA KC Gala juror’s choice awards: Blend Iced Tea—Student print, Chloe Hubler; Scrunch—student digital, Sarah Hinman; Postcards from Italy—student print, Jenny

Student awards & scholarships

O’ Grady. KU students won 17 awards.

Architecture student awards Graduate student Sabrina Shafique won an International Fellowship from the American Association of University Women. First place in the Kansas City chapter AUSTIN BARTO, HALEY HENNIER, CHLOE HUBLER, JENNY O’GRADY, AND ROXY TOWNSEND (PAVEMENT MAGAZINE)

of the Illuminating Engineering Society’s Emerging Professionals Luminaire Design Competition was awarded to architecture student Zachary Overschmidt. A virtual

put com-

24 Design Department students had portfolios selected for the National Student Show, the nation’s largest graphic arts conference, which

reality project for the Dallas Deaf Art Museum, done by Ben Naudet in Associate Professor Kapila Silva’s studio, won the Bluebeam Innovator of the Year award. Associate Professor Paola Sanguinetti’s design-build studio fabricated outdoor furniture using digital technology to create a space south of Marvin Studios.

Kansas City Architectural Foundation Scholarship Recipients

features student work exclusively Sekou Hayes: Peggy and Frank Zilm Scholarship Natalie Claerhout: Kent Spreckelmeyer Scholarship Anna Collins: Women in Design Scholarship - Kansas City.

Photography student Deven Knapp was named a KU Undergraduate Research Award winner T HE U N IV E RSIT Y OF KAN SAS

29


MATT KLEINMMAN

CHARLES LINN

The Association of Collegiate Schools of Architecture’s Collaboration Award was given to Professor Nils Gore, Associate Professor Shannon Criss, and Ph.D. student Matt Kleinmman for the work of their Dotte Agency, which they founded in 2013. The Dotte Agency also won Gehl Institute’s Open Call for Public Life Competition, which asked entrants to show how their project demonstrated the impact of small-scale design interventions promoting awareness of physical activity in neighborhood parks.

Arc/D Faculty Books Published “The Geometry of Urban Layouts: A Global Comparative Study” (Springer International Publishing, 2017). Professor Mahbub Rashid, Author “Designbuild Education” (Routledge, 2017). Associate Professor Chad Kraus, Editor

In late 2016, the National Architectural Accrediting

“Toward a Robotic Architecture” (ORO Editions, 2018). Dean Mahesh Daas, Coeditor

Architecture’s Masters of Architecture program for

“Cultural Landscapes of South Asia: Studies in Heritage, Conservation and Management” (Routledge, 2017). Associate Professor Kapila Silva, Coeditor Assistant Prof. Farhan Karim and Lecturer Farhana Ferdous also contributed chapters “Detroit After Dark” (Detroit Institute of the Arts, 2016). Assistant Professor Tim Hossler, Designer “Studio 804: An Architectural Experience” (Artifice Books on Architecture 2017). J.L. Constant Professor of Architecture Dan Rockhill, Author

30 KUDOS 2 017 - SCHO O L O F ARCH I TECTU R E AN D DE SI GN

Board extended accreditation of the Department of eight years, the maximum term allowable.


Graphic Design USA named Design Lecturer Tad Carpenter one of its people to watch for 2017. His Instagram feed is listed as a must-follow account for graphic design enthusiasts by Collective Hub.

PROFESSOR

BAR RY FITZG E RALD had his illustration “Rothko’s PBJ” accepted into “American Illustration 35,” an exhibition and book. “Web/Rise Above” from his Dis/ Re/Con.nect Exhibition at the Lawrence Art Center was accepted into Studio Visit magazine

Arc/D’s American Institute of Architecture Students chapter won a $2,100 Freedom by Design grant from the National Association of Architectural Registration Boards. They used the funds to create a play space at a home for at-risk children owned by The Shelter, Inc., a Lawrence non-profit. Henderson Engineers also donated $500 to the project.

PROFESSOR

JOE COLISTRA and The Institute for Smart Cities was awarded a $21,000 grant from the Mozilla Gigabit Community Fund and a $30,000 American Institute of Architects Upjohn Research Initiative grant

DIRECTOR OF STRATEGIC INITIATIVES

N I LOU VAKI L Clockwise from upper left: MIKE SINCLAIR, LORI JOHNS, KU MARCOMM, KU MARCOMM, CHARLES LINN, HANNAH DENTON

was named one of DesignIntelligence’s 25 Most Admired Educators for 2018. DI gave Architecture Lecturer Anne Patterson this honor last year.

The Institute for Health + Wellness Design enters its second year, continuing its mission to bridge academia and practice with education, research, and service. A pdf of its 2017 Annual Report can be downloaded at arcd.ku.edu/ihwd.

CENTER FOR DESIGN RESEARCH DIRECTOR

G R EGORY THOMAS was recognized by Connected World magazine as one of its 2017 Pioneer Award winners. During the spring 2017 semester, students under his direction studied improving wayfinding at the KU Cancer Center in a project sponsored by the KU Health System’s Innovation Center

T HE U N IV E RSIT Y OF KAN SAS

31


Commitment to Interior Architecture Inspires $250,000 Pledge David Mourning, a 1969 architecture graduate of the School, has committed $250,000 to help establish the School’s new Interior Architecture & Design program. To date, this is the largest outright, multiyear gift made by an alum in the School’s 105-year-old history. Early in his career, David had remarkable insights into the untapped market for architectural interiors and in 1984 founded IA Interior Architects. IA was the first and largest global architectural firm dedicated exclusively to interiors. Today, it has 19 offices and 84 global alliance partners and employs more than 650 professionals. Before the firm was founded most, if not all, interiors practices operating at a national level were small divisions of large architectural firms. “I felt that it was time to take the practice of interiors out of the back room and let it shine on its own,” David said. “The vision was that even though IA was licensed and incorporated as an architectural firm, we would not practice base-building architecture. We would be architects from the inside out. The dream was to build a national architectural firm that only does interior design.” He continued, “IA Interior Architects was named for what we do, interior architecture, and who we are, interior architects. It was an easily remembered brand, and that would be a brand differentiator, something

I THINK ITS

to set us apart.” In the process of building the firm he found an asset that was more

GRADUATES

powerful than brand identity. “The real strength in the concept of just practicing interior design and not doing base-building work was what it meant for the people who wanted to join the firm,” he said.

WILL EXCEL IN

“I soon realized that there were a great number of professionals who found the concept of practicing interiors as a standalone discipline

WHAT IS STILL A

to be liberating. They were tired of being their firms’ ‘second-class citizens.’ They wanted to help build a firm that was unique and focused exclusively on what they love to do: interior design.

RELATIVELY NEW,

“The main reason that IA has been successful has been the passion and focus of its people,” says David. “In any organization, it is always all

EXCITING, AND

about the people, and when everyone in a firm has the same focus it is a very powerful thing. When they have been given the liberty to practice and manage what they love, that creates a work environment full of

HIGHLY CREATIVE

enthusiasm and palpable energy. “I have hoped for some time that the profession of interior architecture

PROFESSION.

could have a new school that would imbue students with the same kind of passion, energy, and joy that designers in my firm have had. This is it. This academically diverse, interdisciplinary IAD program, taught by outstanding faculty who also love what they do, is going to be very powerful. I think its graduates will excel in what is still a relatively new, exciting, and highly creative profession.”

32 KUDOS 2 017


BRUCE WAGMAN

Say Hello to Arc/D’s Dean’s Advisory Board! One year ago, when I was forming our new, multidisciplinary Dean’s Advisory Board, little did I realize that we would be enlisting 42 accomplished and emerging architecture and design Jayhawks and friends from all across the country. This is one of the largest, most active advisory boards on campus, and they are a source of inspiration and support. In addition to their personal philanthropy, the members volunteer hundreds of hours of their valuable time and provide advice to strategically advance the School and its mission. The board operates through Advancement, Governance, Alumni Experience, and Student Experience Committees to lead initiatives that provide the support that we need in order to make our School the measure of excellence in architecture and design education. On behalf of the School, thank you Advisory Board members! —Dean Mahesh Daas.

Kathy Achelpohl PGAV Westwood, KS

Duncan Fulton GFF Dallas, TX

Steve McDowell BNIM Kansas City, MO

Tom Trenolone HDR Omaha, NE

Linda Atha Designer Prairie Village, KS

Fred Green Cripe Indianapolis, IN

David Morris The Beck Group Denver, CO

Tucker Trotter Dimensional Innovations Overland Park, KS

Tom Bergmann CannonDesign St. Louis, MO

Kevin Harden GastingerWalker& Kansas City, MO

David Mourning IA Interior Architects San Francisco, CA

Ron Turner Gensler Los Angeles, CA

Dave Broz Gensler Chicago, IL

Mike Hauser DesignHaus Overland Park, KS

David Ohlemeyer Lawrence Group St. Louis, MO

Jeff Van Sickle GLMV Architecture Wichita, KS

Steve Chucovich ArcS Los Angeles, CA

Dennis Heath MBH Architects Alameda, CA

Shade O’Quinn RHA Architects Dallas, TX

Debbi Vandeven VML Kansas City, MO

Mecayla Cobb Hord Coplan Macht Denver, CA

Dave Hoffman LK Architecture Wichita, KS

Mark Pearlman Group Delphi Alameda, CA

Tom Waechter University of Kansas Lawrence, KS

Michael Cummings TK Architects Kansas City, MO

Kelly Jones Lighting Design Alliance Long Beach, CA

Gino Polizzotto Polizzotto Development New York, NY

Julie Wellner Wellner Architects Kansas City, MO

Paul Diamond DMH Kansas City, MO

Dana Knapp ArtsKC Kansas City, MO

April Pottorff CGL Lexington, KY

Irvetta Williams Beyond Housing St. Louis, MO

Lorie Doolittle-Bowman BBN Architects Kansas City, MO

Jamie Koval VSA Partners Chicago, IL

Nicole Satterwhite Willoughby Design Kansas City, MO

Eric Zabilka Omni Architects Lexington, KY

Phil Duff ORANGEWALLstudios Portland, OR

Krista Masilionis Hallmark Kansas City, MO

David Shultz Perspective Lab San Francisco, CA

Kevin Flynn Kiku Obata & Company St. Louis, MO

Patrick McCurdy gkkworks Pasadena, CA

Amy Slattery Odimo Kansas City, MO

T HE U N IV E RSIT Y OF KAN SAS

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Robert C. Coffeen Architectural Acoustics Lectureship

Robert “Bob” Coffeen taught Architectural Acoustics and a number of other acoustics-related courses at KU for 25 years. He is known for his creative approaches to teaching, and his field trips exposed his students to valuable, exciting aural experiences. His real-world applications prepared students for career success.

O’Quinns Establish Opportunity Fund

The Robert C. Coffeen Architectural Acoustics Lectureship is an endowed fund that will provide support for an expert who is hired to teach on a

Shade and Sally O’Quinn have made a multi-

sustainable support that we can give to the School,”

year pledge of $50,000 to establish the O’Quinn

Shade said. “Whether it is your church community,

Opportunity Fund, a permanently endowed fund to

your academic community, or your business

support faculty, staff and program operations within

community, it is important to give back. We want to

the School. Shade earned his master’s degree in

support the faculty because in our opinion they make

architecture in 1986 as his wife Sally was earning her

or break the School. We wanted to put the money in

master’s degree in special education here at KU.

unrestricted funds for whatever needs might emerge.”

“The education I got in architecture at KU was bar

Shade is currently President and CEO of RHA

none,” Shade said. “At that time in my life what I

Architects, which is headquartered in Dallas. The

needed as much as the discipline and skills was

company has brought innovation and advanced

inspiration. Professors like Victor Papanek, Dan

resource-conserving technologies to millions of

Rockhill, Steve Padget, Kent Spreckelmeyer, and

square feet of retail buildings they’ve designed all

Dennis Sander — they helped and inspired me.”

across the U.S.

full- or part-time basis. This fund will be dedicated to supporting faculty in the architectural acoustics program; its use may include costs for lectures, travel, research, and general program support. It will last in perpetuity, introducing KU students to lecturers who are leaders and innovators in architectural acoustics and noise control. We invite you to join in honoring Bob and, at the same time, contribute to the university to which he devoted his knowledge, time and energy over the past 24 years. One-time gifts can be made online by visiting www.kuendowment.org/coffeen

“My wife and I want to do our part in the community

MAKE A DIFFERENCE

of life — we’ve tried to think of what is a reasonable,

Stephen Grabow Scholarship

We deeply appreciate the support

Emeritus Professor of Architecture Stephen Grabow

Plains of Kansas, the challenge has been to keep

retired last spring after five decades of teaching and

costs affordable without significantly raising tuition.

alumni and friends provide the School

service to the School and KU. His lecture classes,

Professor Grabow and friends have already raised

of Architecture & Design. If you

design studios, and the more than 50 study abroad

$10,000 in support of the scholarship fund, and more

trips he led both in the U.S. and Europe touched

funds have been pledged.

would like to get involved, consider participating in a studio, mentoring

thousands of students. “In my capacity as one of the caretakers of our highly

a student, providing an internship, or

The Grabow Scholarship Fund will allow the

regarded study-abroad programs, I feel confident

School’s unique architectural study-abroad programs

that we have created a secure foundation,” Stephen

making a contribution. Gifts can be

to continue as a requirement for the degree in

writes. “For that reason, I hope you will consider

architecture at KU. This in turn will help prepare

supporting this new fund to help future generations of

program or Arc/D initiative. To

graduates for careers in professional practice, which is

architecture students to have the same experience. If

explore ways you can help, visit www.

increasingly globalized.

you have already made a contribution, please accept my heartfelt thanks.”

impact of teaching architecture and urban design is

If you are one of the thousands of students whose

greatly enhanced in the presence of real buildings and

life and career were changed by a study-abroad trip,

towns in culturally unique settings. But with so many

please consider making a donation by visiting www.

significant sites thousands of miles from the Great

kuendowment.org/SADPgrabow

DE A N Mahesh Daas, DPACSA

ED I TOR Charles Linn, FAIA, Director of External Affairs

DE S I G N E R Roberto Muntoreanu

ASSI STANT ED I TOR Tanvi Nimkar, Communications Specialist

34 KUDOS 2 017 - SCHO O L O F ARCH I TECTU R E AN D DE SI GN

kuendownment.org/arcd or contact Lindsay Hummer, Development Director

Study abroad opportunities are critical because the

KUDOs University of Kansas School of Architecture & Design Volume 2, Number 1

designated to support a department,

COPY ED I TOR Donna Kehoe

at KU Endowment, at (785) 832-7428 or lhummer@kuendowment.org


© UNIVERSITY ARCHIVES, KENNETH SPENCER RESEARCH LIBRARY, UNIVERSITY OF KANSAS

Goldwin Goldsmith Guild funds excellence in design and research

Thank You to the Goldwin Goldsmith Guild Inaugural Members!

The Goldsmith Guild is an elite group of individuals, families, organizations, and

BBN Architects

friends who are committed to making the School the measure of excellence in design and research. The fund provides flexible annual support that enables

BNIM

Arc/D to invest in key initiatives that will build educational and scholarly

Steve Chucovich

excellence through its world-class programs and dynamic infrastructure.

Michael Cummings and Pamela Miller

In 1913, the University of Kansas established an architecture department and

Kay and Duncan Fulton

appointed Goldwin Goldsmith (1871-1962) as its first professor and chair.

Kevin and Brenda Harden

Goldsmith had apprenticed with McKim, Mead and White and earned a Ph.D. in architecture from Columbia University before he was hired by KU. During the

Dennis and Laurie Heath and MBH Architects

next 15 years, Goldsmith led the nascent program to international prominence.

David and Keri Morris

Standing upon the foundation Goldsmith laid 105 years ago, the department has grown into the School of Architecture & Design.

Gino Polizzotto Tucker and Mandi Trotter and Dimensional Innovations

Gifts to the Goldsmith Guild make an immediate impact on the excellence of our students and the work of our faculty. Guild funds make it possible for us to prototype key activities and seed strategic initiatives that enhance the national profile of the School. The Guild’s members provide unrestricted contributions of $25,000 or more over five years ($5,000+ per year). The members also become part of the Dean’s Club, are acknowledged in the School’s publications, and benefit from gaining exclusive access to special events and communications featuring prominent architects and designers, leaders of the university, and Dean Daas.

KUDOs is published annually by the University of Kansas School of Architecture & Design and is distributed to all members of the School of 12,000, which includes our students, alumni, friends, staff and faculty. We want to hear from you! Our address is the University of Kansas School of Architecture & Design, 1465 Jayhawk Boulevard, 200 Marvin Hall, Lawrence, KS 66045. Please email us at arcd@ku.edu. © 2017 University of Kansas School of Architecture & Design.

The University of Kansas prohibits discrimination on the basis of race, color, ethnicity, religion, sex, national origin, age, ancestry, disability, status as a veteran, sexual orientation, marital status, parental status, gender identity, gender expression and genetic information in the University’s programs and activities. The following person has been designated to handle inquiries regarding the non-discrimination policies: Director of the Office of Institutional Opportunity and Access, IOA@ku.edu, 1246 W. Campus Road, Room 153A, Lawrence, KS, 66045, (785) 864-6414, 711 TTY.

T HE U N IV E RSIT Y OF KAN SAS

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The Pioneering Force for Global Impact Through Design. 200 Marvin Hall, 1465 Jayhawk Boulevard Lawrence, KS 66045-7626

38 KUDOS 2 017 - SCHO O L O F ARCH I TECTU R E AN D DE SI GN

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KUDOS is a publication of the University of Kansas School of Architecture and Design. Fall 2017.