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PORTICO FALL 2017 • THE GLOBAL IMPACT ISSUE

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– NELSON MANDELA

FALL 2017

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THE GLOBAL IMPACT ISSUE THE UINDY EXPERIENCE ETERNALLY CONNECTS STUDENTS, FACULTY AND COMMUNITY THROUGH A COMMON THREAD OF SERVICE, MISSION AND TRADITION — ALL FOCUSED ON CONTRIBUTING TO A BETTER WORLD. THIS EXPERIENCE IS HIGHLIGHTED THROUGHOUT THE MAGAZINE.

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GHANA BENEFITS FROM NETWORK OF SUPPORT Students and faculty lead a network of service support.

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4 //

WELCOME TO THE PACK: CLASS OF 2021

UIndy welcomed 1,100+ first-year students

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INTRODUCING THE R.B. A N NIS S CHO O L O F ENGINEERING

Addressing the need for skilled engineers

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SERVICE TRIP HELPS STUDENTS FIND PURPOSE

A mission to improve health and wellness

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STUDENTS FIND GLOBAL PERSPECTIVE IN SPAIN

A journey on the El Camino de Santiago

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THEN & NOW

A look back at the famous library “egg chairs”

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HER RELENTLESS PURSUIT

Dr. Katherine Welch ’93 tackles the global issue

of human trafficking

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24 // R E S T O R I N G O U R P A S T ,

Good Hall undergoes restoration

BUILDING OUR FUTURE

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D E ST I N AT I O N : H O P E

Offering assistance to refugees

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A THIRST TO CHANGE THE WORLD

Gwen Debaun ’16 seeks to help others

30 // U N I V E R S I T Y U P D A T E S

Updates, news and more about the

campus community

39 // A T H L E T I C S U P D A T E

Accolades and a fall athletics preview

42 // C L A S S N O T E S

The latest news from UIndy alumni


EXPLORATION OF INNOVATION AND IMPACT T H E S TA R T O F T H E N E W A C A D E M I C Y E A R R E P R E S E N T S A M I L E S T O N E I N T H E L I V E S O F O U R N E W A N D R E T U R N I N G S T U D E N T S . W E H AV E M U C H T O B E P R O U D O F AT T H E U N I V E R S I T Y O F I N D I A N A P O L I S A S W E W E L C O M E S T U D E N T S ; from the composition of our

these fields. Our music and arts

freshman class, to our students

programs serve as a foundation

in the Ron & Laura Strain Honors

of excellence for the progressive

College, to the achievements of

cultural arts community across

our student athletes on and off

the region and support the

the field, to the creativity, passion

Indianapolis Quartet, a world-

and accomplishments of each

class ensemble formed through a

and every student. We also are

partnership with the Indianapolis

proud of the impact our faculty

Symphony Orchestra.

have on these students, from service-learning

opportunities

to

research

collaborative

In this edition of Portico, you are provided a snapshot of

to

the difference our University is

academic advisement.

making and the value our graduates bring to everything

The community we enjoy at the University of Indianapolis

they pursue. This is a deliberate approach our students

has impact near and far. Research partnerships and

(current and past) take to make the world a better place,

service-learning trips ensure our influence is felt across

by expanding their influence and expertise at every

the globe. Nationally ranked programs in nursing and

opportunity. We are serving students who want more

other health sciences fields continue to attract top talent

than an education; they want to surpass expectations.

from across the country. Faculty are sought after by the media to serve as experts in their field.

As you learn more about these University and alumni success stories, I encourage you to visit campus. Join us

We also are investing in projects designed to carry our

for Homecoming activities Sept. 29 – 30 and the annual

University forward for the next generation of students.

Family Weekend celebration Oct. 6 – 8. The University

Like the UIndy Health Pavilion, the newly created R.B.

really comes alive as we welcome back alumni, friends

Annis School of Engineering will be an environment

and our extended Greyhound family.

of innovation. We are deeply grateful to the R.B. Annis

We look forward to celebrating our future together with you.

Educational Foundation for its gift to establish the R.B. Annis School of Engineering in the Shaheen College of Arts & Sciences. The School of Business launched new programs, a Master’s of Science in Management and Master’s in Real Estate Development, two distinguishing programs designed to advance the needs of local industry and help students emerge as leaders in

— Robert L. Manuel, PhD University President

THE COMMUNITY WE ENJOY AT THE UNIVERSITY OF INDIANAPOLIS HAS IMPACT EVERYWHERE. FALL 2017

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CLASS OF 2021

W E LC O M E TO T H E PAC K: CLASS OF 2021

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This fall, the University welcomed a new class of discoverers, creators and innovators. UIndy’s freshman class includes more than 1,100 new students, contributing to a total enrollment of 3,937 undergraduate students for the 2017-18 academic year. The new freshman class, hailing from 21 states and 31 countries, is one of the most diverse classes in the University’s history, including more than 150 student-athletes and nearly 250 honors students enrolled in more than 100 majors. FALL 2017

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DONOR STORY

YOU MAKE A LIVING BY

BUT YOU MAKE A LIFE BY

WHAT YOU WHAT YOU

THE LEGACY OF ROBERT B. ANNIS — INTRODUCING THE NEW R.B. ANNIS SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING o those who knew him, Robert B. Annis was a brilliant scientist with an unwavering desire to discover and learn. He committed his life to inspiring students of all ages to explore the wonders of science through critical thinking and problem solving — foundational concepts that are impacting the new R.B. Annis School of Engineering and programs at the University of Indianapolis.

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The R.B. Annis School of Engineering — established through a transformational $5-million gift from the R.B. Annis Educational Foundation last spring — is advancing the University’s strategy to address Indiana’s demand for skilled engineers and STEMrelated professions. Employers across the region are consistently challenged to fill these highly skilled roles, which they need in order to grow and compete in the global marketplace.

EXPANDING HIS LEGACY The R.B. Annis Educational Foundation, established in his honor after his death, supports a variety of educational and cultural initiatives, including many in the sciences. The Foundation’s inaugural gift to the University was endowing the Miriam F. Annis Memorial in honor of Annis’ late wife.

“Bob Annis was a humble and bright person,” explained Dan Yates, who along with Chuck Angus and Wayne Weber serve as trustees of the R.B. Annis Educational Foundation. “In everything he pursued, he wanted excellence and to find answers. It’s a natural fit to have his legacy here at UIndy.”

The Foundation also supported the UIndy Health Pavilion, home to the R.B. Annis Auditorium and UIndy’s healthcare- and wellness-related academic programs as well as industry partners and clinical facilities to serve the community.

As a teenager, Robert B. Annis joined the Indianapolis Radio Club and later the Scientech Club. He impressed others with his knowledge of technology, especially magnets. In the mid-1920s, he opened Annis Electrical Apparatus Company and was in high demand making and selling radio equipment.

“Bob is a model for our students who are coming through the new R.B. Annis School of Engineering,” explained University President Robert Manuel. “He believed that the gifts he had were meant to be shared with others. This connects with the University’s motto of ‘Education for Service’ very well.”

The 1940s brought a change to the company, which

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shifted to creating precision balancing equipment and magnets. Annis stayed involved with the Indianapolis community in many ways, by organizing and judging the Marion County Science Fair, staying involved with the Scientech Club, serving on the Indianapolis Board of Education and even being in the Hoosier Canoe Club. His connection to the University of Indianapolis (then known as Indiana Central College) began when Annis brought the Central Indiana Regional Science Fair to campus, an event that the University hosted for many years.

PPOORRT TI CI C OO

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DESIGN SPINE: A UNI

COMMUNICATION

CREATIVITY

UNIQUE

10-WEEK

INTENSIVE COURSE


F R O M H I S E A R L I E S T D AY S I N BUSINESS, ROBERT ANNIS SERVED

GET, GIVE.

AS THE CHIEF DESIGNER FOR ALL THE PRECISION EQUIPMENT HIS C O M PA N Y P R O D U C E D .

( I N D I A N A P O L I S S TA R P H O T O G R A P H )

IQUE MULTIDISCIPLINARY EXPERIENCE

PROBLEM SOLVING

ORGANIZATION

CRITICAL THINKING PROJECT MANAGEMENT

CURRICULUM 5-WEEK

DESIGN EXPERIENCE

MULTIDISCIPLINARY TEAMS SOFTWARE ENGINEERING COMPUTER SCIENCE BUSINESS MECHANICAL ENGINEERING MATH INDUSTRIAL & SYSTEMS ENGINEERING PHYSICS

SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY

EACH YEAR, ANNIS (CENTER) P L AY E D A N A C T I V E R O L E I N T H E CENTRAL INDIANA REGIONAL S C I E N C E F A I R H E L D AT T H E UNIVERSITY OF INDIANAPOLIS.

FALL 2017

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“ I THINK THIS TRIP MADE ME A MORE LOVING AND COMPASSIONATE PERSON, WHICH I HOPE WILL BENEFIT ME IN MY FUTURE NURSING CAREER. ” - Gloria Perez ’18

UIndy Nursing Student

STUDENT & FACULTY SERVICE TRIP HELPS HAITIAN COMMUNITY hen a team of University of Indianapolis nursing students and professors arrived in Cap-Haïtien, Haiti, in May 2017, the group was thrust into a first-hand experience of some of the worst health conditions in the world.

W

In addition to rampant cases of malnutrition and infectious disease, students and faculty faced communication barriers and the challenges of balancing Western medicine with Haitian culture. Nevertheless, they were determined to bring health, and, in some cases, 8

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hope, to the patients they served and the Haitian care providers in the Bethesda Medical Clinic and at a mobile medical clinic in a nearby community. Nursing major Clare Owens said going into Haiti affected the way she looks at nursing. She was able to apply the cultural competency lessons she learned in the classroom at UIndy to her experiences in Haiti. Students weighed and measured babies, cared for patients in the ER and set up teaching stations for nursing students at the Universite Academie Chretienne

D’Haiti (UNACH) to show the birth process, newborn care, postpartum hemorrhage and breastfeeding. They also visited MamaBaby Haiti, a nonprofit birth center and health clinic aimed at reducing the country’s high infant and maternal mortality rate by providing free prenatal, birth, postpartum and gynecological care. At the end of the trip, UIndy students participated in the UNACH nurse capping ceremony, a tradition that translates across cultures. “Just seeing with my own eyes the conditions that the Haitians live in every day has allowed me to

be a hundred times more grateful for what I have,” UIndy nursing student Gloria Perez said. “I think this trip made me a more loving and compassionate person, which I hope will benefit me in my future nursing career.”

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UINDY IMPACT

To view more stories like this, visit portico.uindy.edu

GUEST COLUMN

L EA R N I N G BY D O I NG N E V E R E N D S BY: BECCA CARTLED G E, I NSTR U CTO R & CLIN ICAL LEAR NI NG CEN TERS COOR DI NATO R, FAITH COMMU NI T Y N URS E ED UCATO R, SCHOOL O F N URS IN G

FOR NURSING STUDENTS AT THE UNIVERSITY OF

FINDING TRUE PURPOSE

INDIANAPOLIS, THE BRIDGE BETWEEN THE CLASSROOM AND CLINICAL PRACTICE EXTENDS BEYOND PATIENT CARE AND BEDSIDE MANNER. University of Indianapolis’ nursing program has a proud tradition of community partnerships that offer students opportunities to develop skills and knowledge that can’t be taught in the classroom. This experiential learning has broadened to include Interprofessional (IPE) simulations and international service-learning trips, as well as more hours dedicated to capstone experiences. The Fall 2015 opening of the four-story UIndy Health Pavilion, the home for the University’s academic and community wellness programs, expanded the Simulation Center. Every semester includes at least one Simulation Center experience, allowing nursing students to critically synthesize what they learn in the classroom while building confidence in their professional skills. The faculty prepare an annual, multi-patient IPE simulation for 50-70 students that starts on an athletic field, transports patients via ambulance to the simulated emergency department and requires nurses to stabilize the patient. International service-learning experiences require the voluntary commitment of all those involved: Faculty must seek community partnerships and opportunities; organizations must be committed to engaging students; and students need to take initiative, make decisions and be willing to learn from their mistakes. As an educator, there is no greater blessing than witnessing the transformations of students as they grow personally, professionally and spiritually through these hands-on projects. Tangible experiences make the nursing profession real rather than something that comes from a textbook. Even more, students take with them the ability to connect with patients and develop relationships. UIndy students emerge as better caregivers through these rewarding, learning experiences.

“ I T F E LT L I K E I W A S A C T U A L LY A B L E T O S E R V E T H E P E O P L E O F H A I T I , A N D I L O V E D E V E R Y M I N U T E O F I T.” - GLORIA PEREZ ‘18 (NURSING)

FALL 2017

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UINDY IMPACT

A GLOBAL PERSPE IMAGINE A PLACE WHERE THE

ONLY SOUNDS ARE THE CRUNCH

OF GRAVEL BENEATH YOUR FEET AND

BIRDSONG

FILLING

THE

JEAN PIED DE PORT

MOUNTAIN AIR. THE ROAD IN FRONT OF YOU RISES AND TURNS THROUGH VERDANT HILLS, AND THE ONLY THING TO CONSIDER

SANTIAGO DE COMPOSTELA

IS THE NEXT STEP AHEAD.

he road is known as El Camino de Santiago, a meandering trail that stretches 165 miles through 100 quaint towns and villages of northern Spain. A group of students from the Ron and Laura Strain Honors College were among a large group from the University of Indianapolis who took on the challenge of walking the historical journey, spending 21 days on their feet for hours at a time. The trip is one of many international opportunities available through the Strain Honors College, which provided financial support to students.

T

El Camino de Santiago attracts 250,000 pilgrims annually who aim to reach the tomb and Cathedral of St. James. For the students, who started the trail at Astorga to walk 129 miles west through the Serra dos Ancares mountain range to Santiago de Compostela, it was a time for self-reflection as they retraced the footsteps of Christians who have been making the pilgrimage for 1,200 years. “I loved all the people and their spirit of hospitality. Everybody’s so welcoming and understanding that you are a pilgrim,” said Bekah Edmonds, a junior majoring in English education. Robyn Nadler, a senior majoring in psychology, called the trip a test of faith. “I wanted to feel God’s presence through other people and other lands. The Camino gave me more than that and showed me my love of people again. We met so many people from many different countries, all with their own stories,” Nadler said.

To vie

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The group was led by Jeremiah Gibbs, University chaplain; Jim Williams, associate professor of history and executive director of the Honors College; Frank Bates, assistant professor in the Krannert School of Physical Therapy; and Kelly Miller, director of the Student Counseling Center.

u

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UINDY IMPACT

ECTIVE

RECENT RESEARCH PROJECTS & INITIATIVES OF HONORS COLLEGE STUDENTS // M A S T O D O N EXTINCTION IN THE CONTEXT O F D E N TA L MICROWEAR // P E N S , P E N C I L S , A N D PA I N ( T ) // M A Z U R K A ELEGIACA: BENJAMIN BRITTEN’S TRIBUTE TO IGNACY PA D E R E W S K I // E M E R G I N G F R O M THE CHRYSALIS // A N A LY S I S O F THE LINKAGE BETWEEN THE OR6A2 O L FACTO RY RECEPTOR GENE A N D TA S T E PREFERENCE FOR CORIANDRUM // M E D I A P R E S E N TAT I O N S OF CRIME // S U P P R E S S I O N OF BREAST CANCER CELL P R O L I F E R AT I O N BY FISETIN AND LUTEOLIN

STUDENTS HIKING THROUGH THE SERRA DOS ANCARES M O U N TA I N I N S PA I N .

MOTI VAT E D TO CHANGE THE W O R LD THE RON & LAURA STRAIN HONORS COLLEGE

NEARLY 280 STUDENTS ARE ENROLLED IN THE HONORS COLLEGE FOR THE 2017–2018 ACADEMIC YEAR.

When University of Indianapolis students seek extra academic challenges and a unique community, they look to the Ron and Laura Strain Honors College — where the curriculum merges with independent study and opportunities for service and leadership. Sophomore Chase Frazier, computer science and computer engineering major, sees that opportunity paying off. “Through some of the honors courses I have taken, I have been able to learn JIM WILLIAMS, skills and knowledge and apply A S S O C I AT E PROFESSOR OF them to my other classes,” Frazier HISTORY AND said. “Being in the Honors College EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OF THE has given me the opportunity to HONORS COLLEGE meet and converse with so many students that I would not have met within my major.” Honors classes allow the students to take more ownership of what they’re doing. The Honors Thesis, which students work on during their senior year, encourages students to explore a topic they are passionate about and to take on a challenge. Students initiate project ideas or work in consultation with a faculty advisor who helps mentor and prepare them for graduate school or a career path. The projects are presented at the annual Scholar’s Day. During the 2016-17 school year, research topics ranged from the biology-focused project “Antibiotic Resistance in Cave Soils” to an international relations project exploring “Hope in a New Land: Developing an AfterSchool Program for Refugee Children.” Brad Neal, assistant professor of chemistry, was excited to see how many projects were based around topics that students discussed in their classes or with professors. “This kind of individual support for our student projects helps make the lessons in the classroom connect to the world at large in a practical way.”

UINDY.EDU/HONORS FALL 2017

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HOMECOMING WEEKEND 2017

A HOUND ALWAYS FINDS ITS WAY HOME

Join your Greyhound pack for Homecoming, a reunion weekend celebrating you and our multiple generations of UIndy alumni. Come back to reminisce and visit with your classmates, tour a dynamic 115-year old campus and enjoy all the festivities of Homecoming, including the Hound Hustle 5K, President’s Lunch, Homecoming Parade, your Greyhounds taking on the Truman Bulldogs and much more. #GREYHOUNDSFOREVER #UINDYHC

SEPTEMBER 29 – 30

FRIDAY, SEP TEMBER 29 // 50-Year Club Lunch, Noon // Back-to-School Sessions, 1:30 & 3 p.m. // WeatherSTEM Station Dedication, 5 p.m. // Annual Honors & Recognition Dinner, 5:30 p.m.

SATURDAY, SEP TEMBER 30 // Hound Hustle 5K, 9 a.m. // President’s Lunch and Founders Day Celebration, Noon // Department of Criminal Justice Anniversary Celebration, 1:30 p.m. // UIndy Alumni Music Recital, 2:30 p.m. // Tailgate Town, 3 p.m. // Class Reunion Dinners, 3 p.m. // Homecoming Parade, 4 p.m. // Greyhound Football & Halftime Show, 6 p.m.

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Order your official 2017 Homecoming T-shirt online and pick up at the game! T-shirts are $10 each, and $5 of every sale goes to support the University.

R EG IST E R AT H OMEC OMI NG.UI NDY.EDU


C ONTI NUED F ROM PAGE 6

THE LEGACY OF ROBERT B. ANNIS Students enrolled in the R.B. Annis School of Engineering will be working to address the Midwest’s growing need for STEM talent by fusing creativity, problem solving, collaboration and social responsibility with technical acumen — all qualities held in high regard by Robert Annis. The School offers areas of study in computer science, industrial and systems engineering, software engineering and mechanical engineering. As students work their way through the engineering program, they learn and build on what they learned the previous semester. The “design spine” curriculum emphasizes project-oriented courses with practical, hands-on experience and collaboration on real-world projects. Students begin to learn design and project management in their second semester, and José R. Sánchez, director of the engineering program since its creation in 2016, is making plans for students to begin to work with three professors on collaborative projects. “When I meet with executives of engineering companies, they are

BOB IS A MODEL FOR OUR STUDENTS WHO ARE COMING THROUGH THE NEW R.B. ANNIS SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING.

“It was heartbreaking for me to see people living in a very poor country. My team helped me cope with this reality, and I learned not to dwell on their suffering but to focus on the impact that we were making for them.” For many students, the humanitarian experience kindled a greater sense of purpose for their lives, in some cases, before they even came home.

Annis valued service and dedication to the community and to young people. “Bob Annis was an extraordinary man, mentor and friend,” said Yates. “It is a distinct privilege to assure his legacy for generations to come at the University of Indianapolis, an institution he was closely connected to through his many years of mentoring students in the sciences. It is a natural fit to have his legacy here at UIndy.”

C ONTI NUED F ROM PAGE 10

STUDENTS FIND GLOBAL PERSPECTIVE IN RURAL SPAIN The goal, even in training, is “to help all the students realize, ‘I’m going on this trip because I want something to change in my life,’” Gibbs explained.

the students when they get there is really amazing,” Williams said.

up steep mountain paths – for two weeks straight is a true test.

Taylor Zell, a junior majoring in human biology and pre-physical therapy, said she found peace in the natural setting of the mountains, even as she struggled with her commitment not to talk to her family back home during the pilgrimage.

“After the first five days, people were really suffering from aches and pains. But by the end of the trip, people were just zooming down the trail. The confidence that comes with

“That was really hard because I missed my parents, my boyfriend and all of my friends. I knew by doing that I would end up being closer to them because it made

But growing accustomed to walking 8 to 10 miles a day – sometimes

STUDENT AND FACULTY SERVICE TRIP HELPS HAITIAN COMMUNITY Nursing student Cassie Ge shared one of her biggest challenges from the experience.

DR. JOSÉ SÁNCHEZ, DIRECTOR OF THE ENGINEERING PROGRAM

excited that we are teaching our students how to solve challenges and that we are engaging our students from the first semester in innovative ways,” said Sánchez. “We are making industry connections, linking our students to internships and mentoring opportunities. These networks will also impact educational experiences for our R.B. Annis engineers. This puts our students in front of companies and impacts job opportunities.”

C O N T IN UE D F ROM PAGE 8

me think of how much they really mean to me and how much I care about them,” Zell said. Edmonds hopes to apply what she learned on the journey to her everyday life. “One day we had to climb seven miles up a mountain. You had to take it step by step and take a break when you needed to. That’s kind of how life is. You can’t charge up that mountain seven miles. You have to stop, take it in, refocus and just keep going,” Edmonds said.

“UIndy’s focus on service helped me to retain the information I learned in class, but it also helped me realize that I can use that knowledge to become a better educator and care provider,” Ge said. Others were inspired to continue efforts to provide healthcare to locations across the world – where it is needed the most – including at a school in the Ecuador jungle and at an orphanage in Bangladesh. “Many students come back more thankful for what they have and are able to do in their own lives,” Becca Cartledge, instructor and clinical learning centers coordinator, School of Nursing, explains. “Some come back with a passion to raise awareness for a need they saw. Some deal with feelings of frustration, anger, or guilt that the average U.S. citizen has more than most around the world. Students plan to go on service-learning trips so that they can make a difference in someone else’s life, but until they go, they don’t understand that they are the ones who are really changed.”

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THEN & NOW

TAKE A LOOK AT THE UNIVERSITY OF INDIANAPOLIS CAMPUS,

THEN NOW

&

A GOOD EGG.

A F E AT U R E T H AT D I D N ’ T C H A N G E W I T H T H E RENOVATION OF KRANNERT MEMORIAL L I B R A R Y WA S THE ICONIC, RETRO-LOOKING, S P H E R I C A L C H A I R S , D AT I N G T O T H E L I B R A R Y ’ S O R I G I N A L C O N S T R U C T I O N I N 1 9 7 7. T H E C L A S S I C “ E G G C H A I R S ” WERE REFURBISHED AND JOINED BY FOUR S I M I L A R N E W C H A I R S T O CONTINUE THIS GREYHOUND TRADITION. 14

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1970s


THEN & NOW

2017

1990s

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GHANA BENEFITS FROM UINDY NETWORK OF SUPPORT A

school isn’t always a classroom filled with desks, computers and textbooks in rural Ghana.

Sometimes, it is nothing more than a quiet spot under a tree or an empty building in a remote countryside.

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FALL 2017

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UINDY IMPACT

I n rural Ghana, a school isn’t always a classroom filled with desks, computers and textbooks. Sometimes, it is nothing more than a quiet spot under a tree or an empty building in a remote countryside. Education is not always a requirement in Ghana, and many families struggle to find the resources to send their kids to school. The University of Indianapolis community has found a way to address this gap through a powerful mix of networking, service learning and compassion. The Precious Words Project, started in 2011 by Jodie Ferise, associate provost for international engagement and shared governance at the University, provides students and alumni the opportunity to experience a new culture during service-learning trips to Ghana. The group hosts fundraisers for educational projects such as a new kindergarten, junior high school, a computer lab and several libraries (including one with more than 8,000 books and a fulltime librarian). The first school to benefit from the project was the Precious Kids Academy in southeastern Ghana,

“It’s an amazing feeling to know that you have played a part in something special that has a direct effect on people.” James Ringer ’15, MBA

where volunteers encountered Rosemary, a young girl who made a lasting impression and would serve as inspiration for many years that followed. Ferise put out the call through her UIndy network. Alumna Gabriella Fangman ’12 (business education) and her father, Greyhound men’s track coach Scott Fangman, stepped up to fund Rosemary’s high school education. This year, Rosemary graduated at the top of her class and plans to go to engineering school. “Seeing the way of life in Ghana was something that was completely different than anything I ever imagined,” said Ashley Steiner, a second-year graduate student in UIndy’s physical therapy program. “We were able to help people by giving them tools to have a better life … and in the process I met people

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LEARNING TO ADJUST TO THE C I R C U M S TA N C E S W A S A C R U C I A L PA R T O F THE MISSION FOR UINDY STUDENTS.

“I had never seen poverty like this, with people struggling, but they had smiles on their faces everyday. I’m now more grateful for what we have, and it has expanded my perspective on life in the U.S. I’m a better person because of it.” David Schlecht ’15, marketing

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UINDY IMPACT

GUEST COLUMN

AN EDUCATION OF MIND AND HEART BY: JODIE FERIS E ASSOCI ATE P ROVO ST FO R I NTER NATIO N AL EN G AG EMEN T AND SHARED G OV ERN AN CE

I remember as a young adjunct professor 15 years ago, I fretted over every detail of lesson preparation for my students. But I always had lingering doubts. How much of it stuck? Was I really teaching them? When they needed the information, would they recall it? Then, in the fall of 2010, I was approached with a request that I take a group of students to Ghana, Africa, the following May. There was an opportunity for me to teach a class on social enterprise and mission-driven business, and I jumped at the chance. This was something I had always wanted to do. But in the months and years to come, I became as much student as teacher. Since May 2011, I have taken groups of students on six different trips to Ghana. Each time, we have studied mission-driven business and the benefits of social enterprise. Each time, we have completed projects to create sustainable educationbased opportunities for children. And each time, I have become more and more convinced of the value of experiential learning opportunities that are unmatched in their ability to broaden the perspective of all who are involved.

For images of the Ghana trip and other servicelearning opportunities, visit portico. uindy.edu

More than 50 students later, the impact on both sides of the ocean has been immeasurable. Many of them have told me that the work that we have done has been a catalyst for changes they made in their personal and social lives, their way of thinking and even their career paths. Their empathy has grown, and, along with it, their creative ideas for enhancing the lives of others. Aristotle is quoted as saying “educating the mind without educating the heart is no education at all.� This is what our work in Africa has offered: an education of both heart and mind. And that is a win-win proposition. FALL 2017

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HER RELENTLESS PURSUIT

I

n contrast to the natural beauty of Thailand, too many young women from poor families wait in cells as captives and slaves. Promised jobs, they are instead trapped in a global sex industry. Invisible beyond the horizon, too many men are trafficked and

enslaved aboard fishing ships in Thailand’s $1 billion fishing industry. These are people who exist in the shadows across the globe, part of a modernday slave trade that represents a major humanitarian issue. The International Labour Organization estimates there are 21 million victims of forced labor worldwide, including 4.5 million victims of forced sexual exploitation. Human trafficking can happen anywhere—even in the United States.

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ALUMNI

To view video of Katherine’s story, visit portico.uindy.edu

KATHERINE WELCH ’93

BIOLOGY & CHEMISTRY DR. JOE BURNELL, UINDY

KATHERINE’S JOURNEY: GLOBAL CALLING IS SEEDED IN UINDY EXPERIENCE

A C R O S S T H E W O R L D , H U M A N T R A F F I C K I N G I S A T H R E AT.

INDIANA UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF MEDICINE

PEDIATRIC INTERNSHIP AND RESIDENCY PHYSICIAN/ CO-MEDICAL DIRECTOR FOR SMALL HOSPITAL THAI-BURMA BORDER

D R . K AT H E R I N E W E L C H ’ 9 3 H E L P S F I N D V I C T I M S A W AY O U T.

DR. KATHERINE WELCH ’93 is bringing light to the darkness for victims of abuse, exploitation and trafficking. She is the founder of Relentless, a global consulting agency that trains organizations to assist marginalized populations who need access to basic health care services and other resources.

“HEALTH PROFESSIONALS CAN PLAY A CRUCIAL ROLE IN THE PREVENTION OF HUMAN TRAFFICKING.”

CARE IS A CALLING Welch never intended to go to medical school after studying biology and chemistry at the University of Indianapolis, instead pursuing a graduate degree in physical therapy. But her mentor, Chemistry Professor Joe Burnell, encouraged her to apply to medical school, leading her to attend Indiana University School of Medicine in 1993 and complete her pediatric

internship and residency at the University of Alabama in 1997. Following her residency, Welch accepted a position as a physician and co-medical director for a small hospital on the Thai-Burma border, serving refugees, poor villagers and other marginalized groups; she soon discovered it was her calling.

“It was that first experience at the border hospital where my sense of justice was deeply moved and sparked,” Welch says. “I had never before encountered people living in such conditions, fleeing from their own government, and, most of all, so many people without any health care.”

FOUNDED RELENTLESS.ORG

GET INVOLVED Visit gorelentless.org to discover more about the work of Relentless, read about Welch’s latest initiatives on her blog and learn how you can make a lasting contribution in the fight against human trafficking.

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HER RELENTLESS PURSUIT

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GHANA BENEFITS FROM SUPPORT who would become some of my best friends at UIndy.” Alumnus David Schlecht ‘15 (marketing) looks back on his journey as an important benchmark in his life, personally and professionally. “I had never seen poverty like this, with people struggling, but they had smiles on their faces everyday. I’m now more grateful for what we have, and it has expanded my perspective on life in the U.S. I’m a better person because of it.” The 2017 Precious Words project raised funds to build and furnish a local school in Ghana. A donor covered the cost of building the school while volunteers raised $7,000 to provide electricity, desks, chairs, shelving and books.

THE BIRTH OF A RELENTLESS FIGHT Welch’s experiences spurred her to form Relentless, which trains medical professionals to identify warning signs of exploitation. Many victims who have been trafficked, according to Welch, report having seen a doctor who didn’t realize their situation. Relentless also works to set up clinics where they’re most needed, such as red light districts in Bangkok. Services may involve free HIV tests and consultation. Even more importantly for trafficked people, “it’s a way for them to get to know organizations that are willing and able to help them get out of that life,” Welch said. “If you want out, we can set things in motion to help you get out.”

AN EDUCATION IN COMPASSION As Welch went from Indiana to

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saving lives halfway around the world, she recalled how her experience at the University of Indianapolis shaped her path. “The smaller school environment and personalized attention I received from everyone — including professors, coaches, guidance counselors and administrative staff — helped me develop as a person and gain confidence in myself. Professors such as Joe Burnell could see more potential in me than I could see in myself at that time and actively developed that. For that, I will be ever grateful,” said Welch. Welch’s educational experiences also gave her a tenderness for humanity unlike anything she had experienced before. Using her skills as a physician to respond to the needs and injustices around her, Welch now puts UIndy’s motto, “Education for Service,” into practice every day.

James Ringer ’15 (MBA) visited Ghana three times as a student and continues to support initiatives there.

Dr. Katherine Welch was the 2017 Keynote Commencement Speaker and recipient of an Honorary Doctorate in Science by the University of Indianapolis. UIndy awards honorary degrees annually to alumni committed to education for service by serving their local and global communities.

Building local, sustainable partnerships is an integral part of the work. The University works with Ghana Christian Mission to determine which communities are most in need of specific resources. UIndy’s commitment is leading to long-term change in Ghana. One of the students who participated in this year’s project, Laura Ledgerwood ’18 (applied psychology), decided to do her capstone project to address the high attrition rate at a local school, a common problem in Ghana because parents cannot afford the annual tuition. “In the first school we served, the kids did not even have their basic needs met, such as food and water. And $30 per year (tuition) is preventing many children from a chance at an education,” said Ledgerwood. “I don’t have to wait for graduation to start making an impact and bringing about change in the world!”


F A M I LY W E E K E N D 2 0 1 7

This year, University of Indianapolis students will welcome their families and friends for a weekend of exploration, fun and entertainment. Autumn is a particularly wonderful time to be on campus. We hope to see you here for Family Weekend! See what’s planned for a weekend designed for you. #UINDYFAMILY

OCTOBER 6-8 FRIDAY, OCTOBER 6 // Party in Schwitzer Park, 7 – 9 p.m. // Late Night with Campus Program Board, 9 – 10 p.m.

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 7 // Family Brunch, 11 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. // UIndy Marketplace, 12:30 – 4 p.m. // University of Indianapolis “Last Lecture” Dr. Deborah Sachs, Teacher of the Year, 1 – 2 p.m. // Blacklight Mini-Golf, 2 – 4 p.m. // Classical Music Concert, 3 p.m. // Volleyball game, 4 – 5:30 p.m. // Gathering at Smith Mall, 5:30 – 7:30 p.m.

// Jon McLaughlin Performance on Smith Mall, 7:30 p.m.

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 8

Follow @UIndy and #UIndyFamily on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram for news, reminders and updates during Famiy Weekend.

// Christian Worship, 10 – 11 a.m.

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FU E TU R THIS SUMMER, THE UNIVERSITY OF I N D I A N A P O L I S B EG A N A R E STO R AT I O N PROJECT OF GOOD HALL, A UNIVERSITY HISTORICAL LANDMARK.

SUPPORT THE GOOD HALL RESTORATION Your gift to the Good Hall restoration project will contribute to an institutional legacy as we restore our past and build our future for the next generation of UIndy students. uindy.edu/goodhall

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OUR FUTURE

Today, Good Hall serves as the home to the Shahee houses the history and political science, anthropolo The restoration process includes preservation of the become symbolic of the University’s history and futu icon began in late June and will continue through 2 Good Hall to align with the needs of today’s studen

OUR PAST Once known as the Administration Building of Indiana Central University when it was built in 1904, the large red brick building was the University’s only structure for nearly 18 years. Over the years, the building–now named Good Hall after the University’s third president, I.J. Good–was home to classrooms, offices, a dormitory, library and chapel. The building also served as home to the University’s first president, Rev. John Roberts, whose wife often would cook meals for faculty and students living there. In 1984, Good Hall was added to the National Register of Historic Places.


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en College of Arts & Sciences and ogy and criminal justice departments. e columns and portico, which have ure. Work to restore this University 2018. Plans to transform the interior of nts are in progress.

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AS THE RECONSTRUCTION CONTINUES, ALUMNI AND FRIENDS HAVE THE OPPORTUNITY TO SUPPORT THIS LANDMARK NAMING OPPORTUNITIES EXIST FOR THE FOLLOWING AREAS OF GOOD HALL • Portico • Pillars • Dean’s Office Suite • Faculty Offices FALL 2017

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T H E A M E R I CA N D R E A M I S AC H I E VA B L E F O R R E F U G E E S T H A N K S I N PA R T T O T H E WO R K O F C O L E VA R G A ’ 1 0 A N D E X O D U S R E F U G E E I M M I G R AT I O N , T H E O R G A N I Z AT I O N H E L E A D S .

DESTINATION:

HOPE W H E N N D U W I M A N A S A D A N A H AY O FL E D HE R WA R -TORN PROV INCE OF THE DEMOCRATIC REPUBLIC OF THE CONGO IN 2009, SHE AND HER TWO C H I L D R E N H A D N O D E S T I N AT I O N ; O N LY T HE HO P E TH AT TH EY WOU LD FIN D P E AC E A ND SAF ET Y.

Learn more about Exodus’ work at exodusrefugee.org

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t would take two years of illness and uncertainty before the family settled in Ethiopia, where their dreams of becoming American citizens were answered with the help of Exodus Refugee Immigration, a resettlement agency based in Indianapolis and now run by University of Indianapolis alumnus Cole Varga ’10 (international relations).

I

Today, Varga has led the resettlement of dozens of families just like Nahoyo’s. He joined Exodus as an intern in 2009 after learning of the organization through faculty member Jyotika Saksena in the International Relations graduate program. He earned his master’s degree in 2010, and served as an adjunct instructor at UIndy until he was promoted to executive director of Exodus.

In its 36th year of operation, Exodus is one of about 300 resettlement agencies in the United States. In 2016, Exodus welcomed 947 refugees from 17 countries, including Burma, Democratic Republic of Congo, Syria, Afghanistan, Bhutan, Burundi, Central African Republic, China, Cuba, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Honduras, Iran, Iraq, Somalia, Sudan and Ukraine. Roughly 90 percent of the organization’s funding comes from the federal government, and the recent executive orders on immigration have had a direct impact on their work. Exodus now faces a drastic 40 percent reduction in staffing. The number of refugees allowed into the U.S. has been cut by more than half, a decision that “immediately does major damage to the infrastructure of this program across the country,” Varga says.

COLE’S JOURNEY: GRADUATE’S PATH CHANGES LIVES AND ENHANCES COMMUNITY.

ADJUNCT PROFESSOR AT UINDY

PROMOTED TO EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR 2016

MASTER’S IN INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS

COLE VARGA ‘10

DIRECTOR OF OPERATIONS AT EXODUS 2013

JYOTIKA SAKSENA

NAMED TO INDIANAPOLIS BUSINESS JOURNAL’S “40 UNDER 40” LIST 2017

INTERNSHIP AT EXODUS 2009

Varga and his team, which includes several UIndy graduates and interns, help refugees realize the American dream by assisting with job searches, finding housing, securing food and medical care and taking English-speaking lessons — life necessities to put them on the path toward success and happiness. “People from all across the world want the same things: the opportunity to live in safety and to give their children the chance to thrive,” Varga says. “Even though they have been through unimaginable circumstances, refugees are capable of incredible things. The talents and cultural vibrancy they bring to Indiana are well worth the investment.”

Despite the challenges ahead, Varga is confident Exodus will follow the example of the community, which has stepped up and contributed funds and volunteers in wake of the budget cuts to Exodus and its mission. “The families that Exodus serves are just like American families – and now they are American families,” said Varga, who was named one of the Indianapolis Business Journal’s “40 under 40” young professionals for 2017. Facing a never-ending line of entrants to the United States, Varga continues to be motivated by the feeling he had greeting a family of refugees at the airport on his first day with Exodus: “It was really inspiring what they had overcome.”

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A THIRST TO CHANGE THE WORLD GWEN DEBAUN ’16 HAS

T R AV E L E D T H E C O N T I N E N T E D U C AT I N G S T U D E N T S O N

T H E G L O B A L W AT E R C R I S I S .

LIFE HAD CHANGED FOR GWEN DEBAUN.

UINDY’S CONNECTIONS BRIDGE INSPIRATION AND ACTION

NO LONGER WAS SHE A GLOBETROTTING ACTIVIST, TRAVELING TO ELEVEN COUNTRIES IN 11 MONTHS WITH WORLD RACE, A CHRISTIAN-BASED MISSION TO SERVE PEOPLE AND COMMUNITIES IN NEED.

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PROJECT WORKS TO BRING C L E A N D R I N K I N G W AT E R T O ALL PEOPLE.

JAN: Dominican Republic FEB: Haiti MAR: Costa Rica APR: Honduras

GWEN’S JOURNEY: SERVICE-FIRST EDUCATION INSPIRES COMMUNITY ADVOCACY

MAY: Guatemala JUN: Thailand JUL: Malaysia

WRITING & EDITING FOR NONPROFITS

AUG: Philippines SEP: Swaziland OCT: Botswana

SETH MAXWELL, FOUNDER, THIRST PROJECT

THE WORLD RACE

GWEN DEBAUN ‘16

UINDY PROFESSOR KEVIN MCKELVEY

NOV: South Africa

THE THIRST PROJECT

UINDY PROFESSIONAL EDGE CENTER

ROAD WARRIOR INTERNATIONAL INTERNSHIP

ENVIRONMENTAL SUSTAINABILITY / INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS

She returned from the adventure with her itch to travel momentarily scratched, but now the urge that had driven her to leave everything to serve humanity was once more growing. Debaun began a search to find the next organization with which she could make a difference. And an assignment for English Professor Kevin McKelvey’s class “Writing and Editing for Nonprofits” brought her the answer. “I was making a list of organizations I thought it would be fun to work with,” Debaun said. She remembered hearing about The Thirst Project, a group that works to address the global drinking water crisis, and she decided to learn more: “I put the Thirst Project on my list and started to fall in love with the work their team had been doing around the world.” Debaun turned to UIndy’s Professional Edge Center, an on-campus resource dedicated to building student professional connections and skills. Kirk Bryans, Pro Edge’s director of financial services, manufacturing, logistics and entrepreneurship, helped her get an interview with Seth Maxwell, CEO of the Thirst Project. When discussing how she might be able to help the organization

“In the past eight years, students have helped us to raise more than $8 million to fund clean water projects to help more than 300,000 people in 13 countries,” Debaun says. “During the World Race, I saw first-hand what the global water crisis is actually like. I’ve felt the effects of drinking dirty water. I could not have been more excited to travel across the country educating students and helping them to use their talents to end the global water crisis.”

as an intern, Debaun didn’t mince words: “I honestly don’t think I’ve ever wanted anything more in my life.” Later that month, Debaun’s persistence and prayers paid off, and she started the Thirst Project’s Road Warrior internship program just after graduating with a degree in environmental sustainability and a minor in international relations. Debaun traveled across North America, speaking at schools about the water crisis faced by people every day and that she, as a world traveler, had experienced herself.

“The experience was an absolute dream for me,” Debaun says. “I’ve worked on public speaking, encouraged students to change the world and traveled.” As she plans the where and the when of the next chapter in her career, Debaun knows there is one source on which she continuously relies. “So many people at UIndy helped me to get to where I am today,” she says. “I could never have done this by myself.”

For more stories like Gwen’s, visit portico.uindy.edu and proedge.uindy.edu.

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UPDATES

The University Updates section is a snapshot of the accomplishments of students, faculty and the larger University community. For a full selection of news and stories, visit UIndy 360 (news.uindy.edu), the institution’s comprehensive news site resource, and connect with the University via social media. SHAHEEN COLLEGE OF ARTS & SCIENCES

the “Sociopolitics of Migrant Death,” a book they co-edited and published in August. Two UIndy students each won $200 student awards.

ANTHR O P O LO GY Professors present new book at symposium Two faculty and six graduate students presented research at the 37th Annual Mountain, Desert & Coastal Forensic Anthropologists Meeting. Krista Latham, associate professor of biology & anthropology, and Alyson O’Daniel, assistant professor of anthropology, organized a symposium based on

Latham publishes book on human identification Krista Latham’s new book, “New Perspectives in Forensic Human Skeletal Identification,” reveals important advances in human identification methods in forensic anthropology. Latham co-authored five chapters,

with contributions from Stephen P. Nawrocki, professor of biology, and Justin Maiers ’17 (human biology). Latham received national media recognition for her work with a student forensic team at the Texas-Mexico border to exhume and analyze the remains of individuals who died immigrating into the United States.

Exploring early pioneer life in Carroll County Chris Moore, chair of anthropology, led students on an archaeological field study at the Baum’s Landing site in Carroll County, Indiana. The site holds a 19th Century structure associated with the Baum family homestead. Moore, who is from the area, has led students to the historic Delphi Trails since 2013, where they have uncovered artifacts that reveal details about early pioneer life in Indiana.

“Middle of the Road Grave” project receives state recognition

MAKERS AT WORK LEARN MORE ABOUT A MASTER’S IN SOCIAL PRACTICE ART AT UINDY.EDU/SOCIALPRACTICE.

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DESIGN YOUR CAREER, BUILD YOUR COMMUNITY

Chris Schmidt, professor of anthropology and director of the Indiana Prehistory Laboratory, was honored with the 2017 Indiana Archaeology Award, along with Johnson County Commissioner Brian Baird and Johnson County attorney Kathleen Hash, for leading the Middle of the Road Grave project. The goal of the project was to record, recover and reinter the seven individuals who were buried in the median of County Road 400 South. The median was redesigned to reinter the graves in a concrete vault at a lower depth to protect the graves and heritage but still allow traffic to flow around the median.

T H E A R T W O R K O F K AT H E R I N E F R I E S , A S S I S TA N T P R O F E S S O R O F A R T A N D DESIGN, IN DOWNTOWN INDIANAPOLIS

ART & DESIGN Indy 500 connection As downtown Indianapolis welcomed thousands of race fans for the 101st running of the Indianapolis 500, the talent of Katherine Fries, assistant professor of art and design, was showcased in the heart of Downtown in the Indianapolis ArtsGarden. Fries was one of five local artists commissioned to create signs welcoming fans to Indianapolis at locations across the city.

Social Practice Art master’s program launches A one-year, intensive master’s program in Social Practice Art, unique to Indiana, prepares students to become community leaders by leveraging the power of the arts and the impact on communities. Developed by Associate Professor of English Kevin McKelvey and Big Car CEO and Co-founder Jim Walker, the program connects students with degrees in art and design, theatre, dance, music or creative writing with community stakeholders to engage in creative placemaking, community building and social practice (an art medium that focuses on human interaction and social discourse). The result is a participatory art form that empowers and transforms communities and continues to rise in popularity in cities across the country.


UINDY NEWS

Excellence Awards from the Society of Professional Journalists. Reflector editorin-chief Kylee Crane ’17 was named the Brook Baker Collegiate Journalist of the Year for the State of Indiana by the Indiana Collegiate Press Association at the annual ICPA Annual Convention in April.

EN G L I S H

BI O LO GY Faculty-student collaboration A new manuscript by Daniel Scholes, assistant professor in biology, Erika Rasnick ’17 (biology) and Ken Paige, professor at the University of Illinois, published in the journal Oecologia details their analysis of factors that contribute to plant damage tolerance. The new study, “Characterization of Arabidopsis thaliana regrowth patterns suggests a trade-off between undamaged fitness and damage tolerance,” sought to determine the traits and developmental strategies that plants use to tolerate stem damage typically caused by mammals such as rabbits and deer. Rasnick presented this study at the 2017 Midwest Ecology and Evolution Conference in Urbana, Ill., in March and Scholes presented the research at the 2017 Ecological Society of America annual meeting in Portland, Ore., in August. Daniel Scholes has authored two other published manuscripts this year on related studies in the journals Ecology and Plant Ecology.

COMM U N I CATI O N Award-winning year for The Reflector The Reflector, UIndy’s student run newspaper, celebrated 94 years of continuous publishing. Student journalists also had an extremely successful year with a total of 21 state- and regionallevel awards. Eight students won Mark of

Student receives Fulbright teaching assistantship Erica White ’17 (English literary studies/creative writing with a concentration in TESOL) earned the Fulbright English Teaching Assistantship to Latvia. She will spend the 2017-18 school year working in a Latvian educational institution. White joins more than 100,000 alumni of the Fulbright U.S. Student Program who have worked abroad since 1948.

I N T ER DI S C I PL I NARY Students lead strategic planning for Indiana’s energy future A group of 11 students from UIndy and IUPUI, led by former Indianapolis Mayor and UIndy Visiting Fellow Greg Ballard, drafted a strategic plan for the future of energy in Indiana. The Indiana Advanced Energy Plan creates an energy policy for Indiana that strives for a safe, sustainable and economically secure future. The students were hired as interns on the project and brought a diverse mix of backgrounds to the discussion, with majors ranging from accounting to biology to art education. The Plan was shared with Indiana lawmakers to raise awareness of how the state can continue its tradition of self-sufficiency by moving toward a more economically and environmentally sustainable energy model.

WELCOMING STEPHEN H. KOLISON, JR., UNIVERSITY EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT & PROVOST In April, the University community welcomed Stephen H. Kolison Jr., as executive vice president and provost, serving as the institution’s chief academic officer. Kolison brings to the role an effective record of research and implementing system-wide policies to increase degree productivity, expand learning opportunities including nontraditional students and foster innovative and effective teaching methods to increase student learning and educational success. “Stephen’s expertise, leadership abilities and personality make him an ideal fit to support and enhance the spirit of collaboration among our faculty and guide our academic mission in the years ahead,” University President Robert Manuel said. Since 2008 he served as vice president for Academic Programs, Educational Innovation and Governance for the University of Wisconsin System Administration. Previously he served on the faculty of Tennessee State University and Tuskegee University (TU), where he founded the Institute of Agricultural and Environmental Research and significantly expanded the support for TU research and outreach activities. As Provost, Kolison is leading faculty collaboration and University-wide initiatives to expand the institution’s academic and intellectual life.

F O R M E R M AY O R G R E G B A L L A R D , VISITING FELLOW WITH THE INSTITUTE FOR CIVIC LEADERSHIP A N D M AY O R A L A R C H I V E S , W O R K E D WITH STUDENTS TO HOST A C O M M U N I T Y D I S C U S S I O N T H AT I N F O R M E D T H E I N D I A N A A D VA N C E D ENERGY PLAN. AUTHORED BY THE STUDENTS AND PRESENTED TO THE S TAT E O F I N D I A N A .

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UINDY NEWS

CHEMIST RY Kenneth “Doc” Borden receives honorary degree Dr. Kenneth “Doc” Borden was one of three honorary degree recipients during May Commencement, along with Dr. Katherine Welch ’93 and Marc Adams ’81. Borden joined the faculty in 1968 and was instrumental in the growth and expansion of the University over the next 30 years. He taught a variety of introductory science courses, including mathematics, chemistry, computer science and physics, impacting thousands of students pursuing all areas of study. He also served as the University’s sports information director from 1976 to 1978 and for many years as the faculty representative to the Athletics Committee, including as chair in 1980.

MOD ER N L A NG UAGE S Gerburg Garmann, assistant dean of Interdisciplinary Studies & Service Learning, and Paul Levesque, assistant professor of Global Languages &

Cross-Cultural Studies, were elected to the Humanities Education and Research Association (HERA) Board in March 2017. HERA, which holds an annual conference in the United States and publishes a refereed scholarly journal three times per year, promotes the worldwide study, teaching and understanding of the humanities across a range of disciplines.

MUSIC Guitar Festival Two University of Indianapolis guitar students embarked on a life-changing trip in March to the XVIII Guitar Art Festival in Belgrade, Serbia. Their instructor, Nemanja Ostojic, University of Indianapolis professor of guitar and world-renowned classical guitarist, was a featured artist at the festival. A grant from the U.S. Embassy funded travel and accommodations for sophomores Jamie Johnson (music and psychology) and Evan Hawk ( jazz studies), who also received lessons with some of the world’s leading guitarists. To learn more, visit uindy.edu/cas/music.

NORMA HALL NAMED DEAN OF THE SCHOOL OF NURSING Norma Hall, who has served as an assistant professor and director of the Graduate Nursing Program, was appointed dean of the School of Nursing at the University of Indianapolis in May 2017 after a competitive national search. She had served as interim dean since midDecember 2016. “We are excited about the vision and leadership that Dean Hall brings to this role. She received strong support from her colleagues and other stakeholders based on the excellent work she did as interim dean. I have been impressed with her vision for the School,” said Stephen H. Kolison Jr., executive vice president and provost. Hall has been a registered nurse for 25 years, practicing in cardiovascular nursing, critical care, emergency nursing and nursing management. In addition to her leadership role with the School, Hall has worked closely with faculty on securing new clinical partnerships, research, and coordinating student assessment outcomes and CCNE accreditation. Since assuming the dean role, the school has solidified its Nursing Academy partnership with Community Health Network and has launched a new program with Eli Lilly & Co that gives UIndy students an opportunity to complete a nursing research program onsite at Lilly. Furthermore, Hall’s charge as dean will continue the School’s history of excellence, with a focus on incoming students, programs and student preparedness.

CAPITALIZE ON THIS A REAL ESTATE

DEGREE FOR

LEARN MORE ABOUT A MASTER’S IN REAL ESTATE AT UINDY.EDU/REALESTATE.

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Hall earned a doctorate of Nursing Practice from University of Southern Indiana, a master of science in nursing administration from University of Indianapolis, a bachelor of science in nursing from Indiana Wesleyan University and an associate degree in nursing from Indiana State University. She is a member of the Indiana State Nurses Association, serving on several task forces and as a board member of the Indiana Organization of Nurse Executives.


UINDY NEWS

Music program recognized at national level The University of Indianapolis chapter of the National Association for Music Education (NAfME) was named the Outstanding Collegiate Chapter of the Year for Indiana. The honor is the fourth time the local chapter has received the award. The NAfME award recognizes the University’s community outreach efforts to bring future music educators into classrooms, along with the program’s achievements throughout the year.

Acclaimed pianist named inaugural University of Indianapolis Artist in Residence Drew Petersen was announced as the winner of the 2017 American Pianists Awards and the Christel DeHaan Classical Fellow and Artist-in-Residence at the University of Indianapolis. The 23-year-old, internationally acclaimed pianist will perform as Artist-in-Residence at the University for the next two years. He was among five finalists who performed in the American Pianists Awards New Music Recital in April at the Christel DeHaan Fine Arts Center. Petersen will visit campus for one week for each of the next four semesters beginning in Fall 2017 to teach, perform and work with students in master classes.

New Music Therapy program offers growing career options for music students The Bachelor of Science in Music Therapy program is founded in the latest neurological research that focuses on restoring mental, physical, emotional and spiritual health. The program provides students a comprehensive way to develop their strong interests in music and communications and helping others by combining these passions into a meaningful career.

S O C I O LO GY Faculty book explores relationships of modern couples Amanda Miller, associate professor and chair of sociology, co-authored the book Cohabitation Nation: Gender, Class and the Remaking of Relationships, examining the dynamics of couples who live together. Miller tackled myths about intimacy, including the benefits of increased sexual activity and creating more equal partnerships through fulfillment and collaboration. Her research also was featured on NPR and in a CNN Opinion article headlined, “Are you having enough sex? Wrong Question.”

Professor authors book on local winery industry

DREW PETERSEN, WINNER OF THE 2017 AMERICAN PIANISTS AWARD, WITH UINDY PRESIDENT ROB MANUEL

Jim Pennell, professor of sociology and co-director of the Community Research Center, authored Local Vino: The Winery Boom in the Heartland. Pennell, a specialist in social and institutional change, interviewed more than 40 winery owners and industry specialists who shared their insights on the challenges and rewards of growing grapes, wine-making, distribution and building a business.

EMBRACING THE STRENGTH OF DIVERSITY Sean Huddleston joined the University of Indianapolis leadership team in June 2017 as vice president for Office of Equity & Inclusion, a position dedicated to leading and enhancing a university-wide culture of diversity. He will work with the campus and surrounding communities to maintain the University’s historical traditions of equity. This Cabinet-level position reports directly to the Office of the President. Huddleston, who previously served as the chief officer of Diversity, Inclusion and Community Engagement at Framingham State University in Massachusetts, brings a strong record as a collaborator who embraces community partnership, a cornerstone of the University’s success. He will provide strategic vision as the campus continues to expand diversity and engagement opportunities, while also celebrating the differences that help to define the culture. “This position demonstrates a solid commitment to advancing inclusion and equity throughout the institution, and also signifies that this important work is a priority for everyone,” Huddleston said. “I look forward to working side-by-side with students, faculty, and staff on achieving inclusive excellence at UIndy. This is an amazing opportunity.”

DR. KENNETH “DOC” BORDEN WAS ONE OF THREE HONORARY D E G R E E R E C I P I E N T S D U R I N G M AY C O M M E N C E M E N T

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UINDY NEWS

COLLEGE OF APPLIED BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES Human trafficking research A research project conducted by Lisa Elwood-Kirkpatrick, assistant professor in the College of Applied Behavioral Sciences, and doctoral student Samantha Goodin, received national recognition early in 2017 when Sen. Todd Young (R-IN) highlighted their research efforts in collaboration with the Indiana Protection for Abused and Trafficked Humans (IPATH) initiative. ElwoodKirkpatrick is a clinical psychologist who has served on IPATH’s outreach and victim services committees as well as on the board of Restored, an Indianapolis-based nonprofit that works toward long-term services for victims of human trafficking. She and Goodin worked with IPATH to survey service providers, including therapists and caseworkers who work with high-risk youth. The goal was to estimate the rate of trafficking experiences in provider caseloads.

Collaborative study compares state gun laws and fatal police shootings Aaron Kivisto, assistant professor of psychological sciences, published a study in the American Journal of Public Health, which found that citizens living in states with the weakest gun laws are more than twice as likely to be fatally shot by law enforcement. Kivisto conducted the research along with doctoral student Peter Phalen, and in collaboration with Brad Ray, assistant professor in the School of Public and Environmental Affairs at IUPUI. The study subsequently was highlighted by national media including Reuters, Huffington Post and NPR.

New Master of Arts in Mental Health Counseling A new master’s program in Mental Health Counseling with an art therapy concentration is designed to allow students to pursue licensure as a mental

BOWTIE GOODBYE As part of an illustrious career, David Wantz, known for his bowties, has helped to integrate the University into the surrounding neighborhoods and define the campus as an anchor in the community. After 35 years, Wantz retired in June to become the president of Independent Colleges of Indiana. At UIndy, he served as executive vice president and Provost, professor of psychology, dean of students, director of corporate and foundation giving and as special assistant to the President for community and government relations. “I spent more than half my life at UIndy,” said Wantz. “I met and married my wife, Susan, here. I won’t miss it because it is part of who I am and will always be with me.” Wantz, who has served two Indianapolis mayoral administrations, holds multiple positions in the local community and is a two-time recipient of the Sagamore of the Wabash award, one of the highest awards given by the State of Indiana. “The University of Indianapolis has grown tremendously in the past 35 years, and David has contributed significantly to helping us to become what we are today,” added University President Rob Manuel. “His contributions will impact the future of our campus for years to come.”

TAKE THE LEAD

BUSINESS PROGRAMS IN DATA ANALYTICS

LEARN MORE ABOUT GRADUATE BUSINESS PROGRAMS AT UINDY.EDU/BUSINESS.

MANAGEMENT & HUMAN RESOURCES

MARC ADAMS ’81, A MASTER C R A F T S M A N A N D U I N D Y E D U C AT I O N MAJOR WHO FOUNDED THE MARC ADAMS SCHOOL OF WOODWORKING, WAS ONE OF THREE ALUMNI WHO RECEIVED AN HONORARY DEGREE D U R I N G M AY C O M M E N C E M E N T

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health counselor and certification as an art therapist. The intention is to help artists and students with pre-art therapy credentials transition into the exciting field of art therapy and mental health counseling. Upon completion, students will earn a license in mental health counseling and a certificate in art therapy.

National Institute of Health grant supports teen drug study Katherine Kivisto, assistant professor of psychological sciences, received a National Institute of Health/National Institute of Drug Abuse grant to examine the epidemic of teenage substance abuse. The $300,000 grant will fund The Teen Resilience Project, which focuses on understanding the obstacles of addiction and long-term recovery for 13- to 18-year-olds.

New advanced degree offerings in social work The University began a new two-year Master of Social Work program in Fall 2016 and a one-year advanced standing MSW program was launched in May 2017. The MSW program builds on the University’s highly regarded undergraduate program and features small classes, engaged faculty and significant opportunity for community outreach and interdisciplinary collaboration with UIndy’s health sciences and psychology programs — an innovative approach in the state of Indiana. The programs offer two concentrations: behavioral health and families/children.

SCHOOL OF EDUCATION National Science Foundation grants $1 million to STEM teaching program Kathy Stickney, associate professor of chemistry, was the principal investigator for a $1.2 million grant from the National Science Foundation’s Robert Noyce Teacher Scholarship Program. Deb Sachs, director of the Teach (STEM)³ Program, and Kim Baker, assistant professor of biology, were coprincipal investigators. STEM refers to the fields of science, technology, engineering and mathematics. The University’s Teach (STEM)³ program, a unique clinical experience for career changers interested in becoming elementary or secondary teachers, builds on the University’s strong history of teacher preparation. The Noyce Grant will enhance collaboration between high-need, local schools to prepare and mentor 36 teacher candidates, who commit to serve as high school STEM teachers after graduation. The grant — the first of its kind for the program — will help candidates complete the intensive, one-year program without undue financial hardship. Graduates will emerge with a Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT) degree and fill a critical need to support STEM education.

Master craftsman receives honorary degree Marc Adams ’81, a master craftsman and UIndy education major who founded the Marc Adams School of Woodworking, was one of three alumni who received an honorary degree during May Commencement, along with Dr. Katherine Welch and Kenneth “Doc” Borden. Adams combines his love for woodworking with a passion for teaching at his internationally acclaimed school in Whiteland, Ind. He is recognized as one of the world’s leading voices in the craft, and his school is one of the top training grounds in North America. Adams said he was humbled to be chosen as an honorary degree recipient.

iLEAD earns national ELCC accreditation The University of Indianapolis School of Education’s iLEAD program, which prepares future school leaders with field experience, decision-making skills and mentorship from leaders in education, received national recognition through its specialized professional accrediting body, the ELCC (Educational Leadership Constituent Council). iLEAD is a School of Education graduate program offering a Masters of Arts in Educational Leadership, leading to a principal’s license.

L T O R : M O L LY B E A L , M O L LY W O L F E , CURRENT ISEA PRESIDENT MIKAELA G E R B A , A N D LY N D S Y E S L I N G E R , N E W LY E L E C T E D I S E A P R E S I D E N T

School of Education sweeps ISEA student awards

Adjunct faculty earns doctorate

The University’s School of Education swept the awards categories at the Indiana State Education Association earlier this year, with two students (Lyndsy Eslinger ’18 and Molly Wolfe ’18, elementary education) elected into leadership roles and three others winning scholarships (Molly Beal ’17, Andria Shook ’17 and Molly Wolfe). Eslinger was awarded the J.D. Miller Student Leadership Award, and Beal was named the Outstanding Senior of the Year. Also at the event, UIndy was named the Outstanding Chapter of the Year.

Todd Hurst, adjunct in the School of Education since 2015, graduated with a doctorate in educational sciences with a focus in school technology leadership from the University of Kentucky in May 2017. His dissertation focused on “The Superintendent’s Feed: An Analysis of Superintendents’ Engagement in Political Discourse on Twitter.” Hurst is the director of education and workforce for Regional Opportunity Initiatives, Inc.

iLEAD graduates leading change at IPS

SCIENCES

Three of the University’s Educational Leadership graduates are at the helm of transformational change at Indianapolis Public Schools. The Thomas Gregg Neighborhood School, also known as IPS School 15, became an Innovation Network School in July 2017. The model puts school administrators in direct control of the school’s structure, staffing and performance, with input from parents and the neighboring community. Executive Director Ross Pippin ’13 and Director of Operations Anuja Petruniw ’14 are graduates of the iLEAD program. Director of Academics Dana Stockton is a graduate of the MBA in Education Leadership program, an interdisciplinary program that combines best practices in business and education leadership.

New athletic training program launches

COLLEGE OF HEALTH

The College of Health Sciences launched a master of science program in athletic training. The program focuses on advanced, hands-on skills in multiple clinical placements. With small studentto-preceptor ratios, students will participate in five clinical rotation semesters at a variety of sites and have easy access to Indianapolis medical systems.

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UINDY NEWS

Center for Aging join College of Health Sciences

SCHOOL OF NURSING

The Aging Studies programs became part of the University’s College of Health Sciences (CHS) in July 2017. All programs – the Undergraduate Certificate in Aging Studies, the Graduate Certificate in Aging Studies and the Master of Science in Gerontology – will continue to be offered in a completely online format. UIndy’s Center for Aging & Community (CAC) remains a dedicated Center of Excellence at the University. The reorganization of the academic programs structure provides greater synergies for the gerontology faculty and encourages more opportunities for collaboration.

School of Nursing partners with Community Health Network Community Health Network’s Nursing Academy, in partnership with the University of Indianapolis, celebrated the graduation of the first cohort in August. The Nursing Academy represents a unique and innovative academic-practice partnership. Students participating in the Nursing Academy train alongside nurse mentors in the Community Health Network system to learn about the culture of the health care network, along with the requirements of providing patient-centered nursing care. All of the 2017 Nursing Academy graduates have secured jobs within Community Health Network.

Kinesiology Jacob Bradshaw ’18 (public health education and promotion) presented at the 2017 International Health Conference at St. Hugh’s College at Oxford in Oxford, England, in June 2017. His presentation, “Assessing Engagement and Knowledge Regarding Advanced Care Directives,” was the result of a research project in the Kinesiology 400 Assessment of Health and Activity course. Bradshaw, along with co-researchers Ariel Galliher ’18 and Cheyenne Kern ’17, presented their work at the Butler University Undergraduate Conference in April 2017. Bradshaw will present his research at the American Public Health Association Annual Meeting (Atlanta, GA; November 2017) and at the European Union Public Health Association Annual Meeting (Stockholm, Sweden; November 2017). Nathan Eckert, assistant professor of kinesiology, published research in The Journal of Pain, titled, “Age differences in the time-course and magnitude of changes in circulating neuropeptides following pain evocation in humans.”

Health Pavilion Scholarship Day The University of Indianapolis held the first annual Health Pavilion Scholarship Day in May 2017 to 36

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SCHOOL OF BUSINESS

In 2017, UIndy unveiled a new ceremonial mace as part of its annual commencement. The mace—a symbol of university scholarship and integrity dating back to the 11th century—was handcrafted by a local wood turner and designed by University faculty and leadership. It incorporates several University traditions, including three sections denoting the institution’s evolving name, symbolic columns representing Good Hall and a bright, golden torch found on the University seal. Deb Sachs, Teacher of the Year, was designated a Mace carrier for the second of two Commencement ceremonies on May 6, 2017.

See video of the mace at portico.uindy.edu

showcase research conducted by students and faculty in the health sciences disciplines. Held in tandem with the Community Health Network Research Symposium on campus, the events highlighted the growing partnership between the University of Indianapolis and Community Health Network. Scholarship Day focused on the unique studentfaculty collaboration opportunities available from freshmen to graduatelevel students at the University of Indianapolis.

Master of Science in Management (MSM) program expands career potential The MSM program, a new program designed to train and prepare the next generation of business managers launched in the School of Business, caters to students with bachelor’s degrees in a variety of subjects to build their credentials and boost their talents, ultimately making them more marketable. Entrepreneurs looking to enhance their interpersonal skills and strategic problem-solving will find the MSM valuable as they move beyond the technical knowledge and experience provided by a traditional MBA.

RESEARCH EVENTS HIGHLIGHT THE PA R T N E R S H I P BETWEEN UINDY AND COMMUNITY H E A LT H N E T W O R K , INCLUDING H E A LT H PA V I L I O N SCHOLARSHIP D AY.


UINDY NEWS

Real Estate Development program targets industry innovators Graduate students in the Master’s in Real Estate Development program won first place in the 6th Annual NAIOP/ULI University Challenge Award this spring for their plan outlining the future use of the Circle Centre Mall in downtown Indianapolis. Program Director Eric A. Harvey said the University’s victory against teams from Butler, IUPUI, ISU and Ball State underscores the unique approach of the applied degree. In addition to classes being taught by industry professionals, students have access to an advisory board that guides the curriculum and program. The Master’s in Real Estate Development program trains career changers and working professionals with industry experience how to successfully manage development projects, proactively shape the business environment and analyze variables that contribute to growth opportunities.

CENTERS UIndy leads at 7th International Symposium on Service Learning The University had the largest faculty delegation at the 7th International Symposium on Service Learning (ISSL), held at the National University of Ireland in Galway. The University of Indianapolis cohosted the event with NUI Galway and Stellenbosch University (South Africa). Several faculty members presented research on the impact of service learning and community engagement. Marianna Foulkrod, director of Service Learning & Community Engagement, served as co-chair.

Center for Service-Learning & Community Engagement Community Campus Forum & Service Expo

& Service Expo, organized by the Center for Service-Learning & Community Engagement. Seniors Alexandria Bishop and Brian Bakemeyer, who are both art therapy majors, shared the Outstanding Service Learning Undergraduate Student Award for their contributions at the Indiana Center for Children and Families. Derek Thiems (physical therapy) won the Outstanding Service-Learning Graduate Student Award for his work at Camp PossAbility, which provides a safe space for young adults ages 18-35. Lauren Johnson, principal of IPS School 65, was honored as Community Partner of the Year.

University Executive Vice President and Provost contributes to book University of Indianapolis Executive Vice President and Provost Stephen H. Kolison, Jr. is a primary contributor to “A President’s Perspective,” a new digital textbook on higher education administration. Kollison provides video commentary for the textbook from Jay Gogue, president of Auburn University, which addresses the fundamental areas of university administration in a flexible digital format. Kolison, who joined UIndy in April 2017, also carried the University’s new ceremonial mace, which debuted in the 109th Commencement Ceremony in May 2017. The mace is an ancient symbol of power and authority found in both royal and academic settings. Mark Waninger, an internationally

CURTAIN CALL Jim Ream never imagined that he’d be a theatre professor. He certainly didn’t imagine he would be at one place for 45 years. Having earned his master’s degree in religion, Ream thought about creating a traveling religious drama troupe, but teaching at a college seemed like an interesting idea. To him, it was “just a pipe dream.” But in 1972, he was asked by Dick Williams to stage-manage a show at what was then Indiana Central College (University of Indianapolis). Over the years, Ream taught classes of scenic design as well as radio and television, public speaking, audio technology and introduction to theatre. Ream also has worked with numerous local and national theatres to design sets. The University honored Ream during the 2017 Commencement ceremony with an honorary degree. “I am still stunned,” he said. “I have so many great colleagues and I feel very selfconscious and honored to be recognized in this way. This is one of the few times in my life that I couldn’t have dreamed would ever happen. I am very thankful.”

recognized Hoosier artist and craftsman, created the mace in collaboration with art faculty and administrators at the University.

U I N D Y F A C U LT Y L E D T H E W AY AT T H E 7 T H I N T E R N AT I O N A L SYMPOSIUM ON SERVICE L E A R N I N G I N G A L W AY, IRELAND.

More than 150 University of Indianapolis students and faculty joined community partners in April for the Community Campus Forum

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UINDY NEWS

Professional Edge Center hosts Facebook designer/expands services The Professional Edge Center hosted Tanner Christensen, Facebook product designer and author of “The Creative Challenge,” as part of an initiative to encourage students to pursue creativity in their careers. Christensen spoke to more than 60 students at Fountain Square Theatre and was joined by local creative professionals for an evening discussion. UIndy’s Professional Edge Center serves as the student career center by helping them to identify pathways, interact with business professionals and develop professional and interpersonal skills to establish a career path.

Symposium brought together thought leaders and community members to discuss why parks and greenspaces are vital to attractive, innovative and vibrant cities.

2017 Faculty/Staff Awards The University of Indianapolis recently recognized outstanding achievements of University employees with the announcement of the 2017 Faculty/ Staff Awards. The awards highlight exceptional performance, commitment to teamwork, student mentorship and overall excellence. Faculty Achievement Award for Research: Katie Kivisto Faculty Achievement Award for Leadership: Matt Will Faculty Achievement Award for Service: Elizabeth Turner Faculty Achievement Award – College of Health Sciences: Elizabeth Moore Faculty Achievement Award for Scholarship: Stephanie Kemery Faculty Achievement Award – Shaheen College of Arts & Sciences: Katherine Fries Faculty Achievement Award – Shaheen College of Arts & Sciences: Marc Milne

TA N N E R C H R I S T E N S E N , F A C E B O O K PRODUCT DESIGNER AND AUTHOR, URGED STUDENTS TO EMBRACE C R E AT I V I T Y I N T H E I R C A R E E R S .

To see video of Tanner Christensen, portico.uindy.edu Institute for Civic Leadership & Mayoral Archives hosts Fairbanks Symposium Local and national community leaders gathered to discuss the value of urban parks and greenspaces in maintaining a world-class city at the Richard M. Fairbanks Symposium on Civic Leadership held in March 2017. “Building Vibrant Cities Through Greenspaces and Parks” was the topic of this year’s symposium, presented by the University’s Institute for Civic Leadership and Mayoral Archives, in partnership with Indiana Humanities, Keep Indianapolis Beautiful and Indy Parks. Supported by the Richard M. Fairbanks Foundation, the Fairbanks 38

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Faculty Achievement Award – Shaheen College of Arts & Sciences: James Fuller Staff Unsung Hero Awards: Gail Cooper and James Wilson Staff Emerging Leader Award: Cecilia Van Wijk Staff Enhancing the Student Experience Award: Jennifer Smith Spirit of UIndy Award: Ned Shannon Beyond UIndy Award: Jolanda Bean Collaborative Spirit Award: Administrative Staff in the Office of Financial Aid

PROFESSOR HONORED FOR MILITARY CHAPLAIN SERVICE Brigadier General Jeffrey Hauser of the Indiana National Guard (left) awarded the military’s Legion of Merit and Joint Service Commendation medals to UIndy Professor Gregory Clapper in a 2016 ceremony at the Guard’s Stout Field in Indianapolis. Dr. Gregory Clapper’s service to the U.S. Armed Forces was recognized recently when he was awarded the prestigious Legion of Merit decoration and the Joint Service Commendation Medal. A full-time professor in the Department of Philosophy & Religion, Clapper also served 24 years as a military chaplain before retiring from that role. He received the Legion of Merit–which ranks just below the Silver Star and above the Purple Heart, the Bronze Star and the Distinguished Flying Cross–to commemorate his service as the National Guard Chaplain Liaison between the National Guard and the U.S. Africa Command, resulting in the first-ever Chaplain State Partnership for Peace program. The program fostered cooperation between eight African countries and eight U.S. states to build closer ties between the United States and several key allies. The Joint Service Commendation Medal was awarded by the U.S. Africa Command to recognize Clapper’s work in creating courses to help professionalize African Military Chaplain Services. These courses, offered to Protestant, Roman Catholic and Muslim chaplains in Kenya, Ghana and Nigeria, included a basic ethics curriculum and seminars in pastoral counseling, operational stress first aid, suicide prevention and the grief process.

Peters “Good Neighbor” Award: Dr. Julie Gahimer, Krannert School of Physical Therapy THE RICHARD M . FA I R BA N KS SYMPOSIUM ON CIVIC LEADERSHIP FOCUSED O N H O W G R E E N S PA C E S CONTRIBUTE TO A VIBRANT URBAN LIFE.


FOR LIFE

CHAMPION

ESTD 1902

The 2016-17 season was another banner year for the Greyhounds. UIndy held on to the coveted Great Lakes Valley Conference All-Sports Trophy for the sixth consecutive year. For the second time in four years, the wrestling team became the champion of NCAA Division II Super Region 2. Men’s lacrosse earned a historic victory against No. 5 Lindenwood in April. Dozens of student-athletes earned academic and athletic honors. More than 40 university athletics programs nationwide joined softball’s #FaithFightFrost movement to support head coach Missy Frost, who was diagnosed with breast cancer at the start of the 2017 season.

FOR LIFE

FOR LIFE

FIFTH TIME’S A CHARM: THE MEN’S AND WOMEN’S TENNIS TEAMS CAPTURED

ESTD 1902

ESTD 1902

T H E G LV C T E N N I S CHAMPIONSHIPS. FOR LIFE

ESTD 1902

CONFERENCE HIGHLIGHTS AND HONORS: GLVC A L L- S P OR TS TR O P H Y A N D ATHLET E S O F TH E Y E A R

strategic leadership). Track and field athletes Austin Hogan ’18 (chemistry/ pre-med) and Katie Monk ’18 (biology/ respiratory therapy) also were named GLVC Scholar Athletes of the Year. Hayden Janney ’17 (sports marketing, MBA in progress) was named GLVC Scholar Athlete of the Year in football.

Greyhounds claimed the sixth consecutive GLVC All-Sports Trophy, presented annually to the university demonstrating the best all-around performance in the league’s 20 sponsored sports. With five GLVC Scholar Athletes of the Year in 201617, the University has the most in the conference for the third consecutive season, including tennis studentathlete Florence Renard ’18 (MS

N CA A DI VISION II C HAM PI ONSH IP S In March, 25 Greyhound studentathletes competed in the NCAA Division II Championships Festival in Birmingham, Ala., combining for 31 All-American honors in track and field, men’s and women’s swimming and diving, and wrestling.

WINNING ON AND OFF THE FIELD: ACADEMIC EXCELLENCE ACADEMIC H ONORS FOR LIFE

The GLVC recognized 19 UIndy student-athletes who were named recipients of the conference’s inaugural Brother James Gaffney, FSC Distinguished Scholar Award. The award is presented to studentathletes who finished the previous academic year with a 4.0 grade point average. Taylor Kleyn ‘19, and Casey Wendorff ‘18 (both biology and pre-med) collected two Brother

FOR LIFE

ESTD 1902

ESTD 1902

FOR LIFE

FALL 2017

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James awards, one for cross country and one for track and field. Twentytwo UIndy student-athletes earned the GLVC Council of Presidents’ Academic Excellence Award for the 2016-17 season. The recipients exemplify the outstanding studentathletes in the GLVC. Each honoree has exhausted his or her eligibility in the intercollegiate sport in which they participated and maintained at least a 3.5 grade point average throughout their academic career.

LEARFIELD DIRECTORS’ CUP Athletics finished 17th in the prestigious Learfield Directors’ Cup Division II standings, the highest in the Great Lakes Valley Conference this season. It also marked the school’s 11th consecutive appearance in the top 20.

INDIVIDUAL PROGRAM HIGHLIGHTS: WO M EN ’ S G OLF Women’s golf won the GLVC conference and NCAA regional titles for the sixth consecutive year, and finished third at the NCAA Division II Championships. All five team members were named all-region for the first time in program history, while Pilar Echeverria ’20 (industrial and system engineering) won the regional title and was named the GLVC Player and Freshman of the Year. Golfers Annika Haynes ’18 (finance) and Katharina Keilich ’19 (sports management) were named Academic All-America Third Team for combined academics and athletics. Keilich was named GLVC Scholar Athlete of the Year. Along with Haynes and Keilich, Paxton DeHaven ’18 (sports management), Echeverria, and Kennedy Holtsclaw ’19 (human resource management) were named All-American Scholars.

MEN’S LACROSSE The men’s lacrosse team clamped down on defense to beat Lindenwood on the road in April. The fifth-ranked Lions were the highestranked team the Greyhounds have defeated in their short history, also marking UIndy’s second straight win

SW IM MIN G The swimming and diving teams received Scholar All-America Team recognition from the College Swimming & Diving Coaches Association of America, while a total of 16 UIndy student-athletes were dubbed Scholar All-America.

over a ranked Lindenwood squad.

T ENN IS SOF T BALL

TEACH STEM LEARN MORE ABOUT THE TEACH (STEM)3 PROGRAM AT UINDY.EDU/TEACHSTEM.

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A total of 43 teams from 16 states and 14 conferences wore jerseys bearing the slogan “Faith.Fight.Frost” in support of softball coach Melissa Frost, who is battling breast cancer. Frost, the 13-year head coach of the program, called it “amazing to have an army of people behind me and fighting this journey with me.”

DEVELOPING THE NEXT GENERATION OF PROBLEM SOLVERS

For the fifth time in University history, the men’s and women’s tennis teams captured the Great Lakes Valley Conference tennis championships. Both teams hosted the NCAA Division II Midwest Region, with the women winning the regional and advancing to the Sweet 16 for the

The softball team also hosted its annual MDA Day and raised more than $9,000 for the Muscular Dystrophy Association in honor of Liam Ealy, nephew of Greyhound softball alum Megan (Hall) Slightom ’06. THE WOMEN’S TENNIS TEAM WON

The softball team earned a bid to the NCAA Division II Midwest Regional for the 10th consecutive year, the

T H E G LV C C H A M P I O N S H I P A N D

longest active streak in the region.

T O U R N A M E N T.

A DVA N C E D TO T H E S W E E T 1 6 I N T H E NCAA DIVISION II MIDWEST REGION


in 2016-17, earning a combined six GLVC Field Athlete of the Week awards during the academic year, including a school-record five in the indoor season. Also an Academic AllAmerican, Hogan went on to qualify for nationals in four events.

WOMEN’S GOLF D O M I N AT E D T H E

At the GLVC Championships in May, women’s track and field placed second overall and the men placed third.

G LV C C O N F E R E N C E AND NCAA

W R EST L I N G

REGIONAL TITLES FOR THE SIXTH CONSECUTIVE YEAR.

UIndy Athletics hosted the NCAA Wrestling Regional and the GLVC Indoor Track and Field Championships in February. The wrestling team won the NCAA Division II Super Region 2 Championship, led by redshirt junior Nick Crume ’18 (sport management) with redshirt sophomores Dylan Faulkenberg ’19 (community health) and Heath Lange ’19 (finance) taking runner-up honors and freshman Ana Abduljelil ’20 (exercise science, prePT) earning fourth place.

G R E Y H O U N D S F O O T B A L L S TA R T E D T H E 2 0 1 7 S E A S O N L O O K I N G TO EXTEND THE LONGEST STREAK OF WINNING SEASONS IN P R O G R A M H I S T O R Y.

Support the pack! Full schedules at uindyathletics.com

FO OT BAL L P REVIEW THE SWIMMING AND DIVING TEAMS E A R N E D S C H O L A R A L L- A M E R I C A TEAM HONORS.

third straight season. Tennis studentathletes Arklon Huertas del Pino ’17 (international business) and Hanna Volikova ’19 (sports management) were named Intercollegiate Tennis Association Division II All-Americans.

TR ACK A ND F I EL D Men’s and women’s track and field earned nine medals, four event wins and one school record in the GLVC indoor championship meet in February. In addition to being named GLVC Field Athlete of the Year, standout Austin Hogan ’18 (chemistry/pre-med) led a stellar group of UIndy throwers

The UIndy football team enters 2017 looking to extend what is already the longest streak of winning seasons in program history. After compiling a 6-5 mark last fall, the Greyhounds have boasted a winning record in each of the past seven seasons, all under current head coach Bob Bartolomeo. “Coach Bart” returns 14 starters to his 2017 club (eight offensive, six defensive), including two-time All-GLVC First Team running back Andrew Walker. The UIndy senior and Chicago native needs just five rushing touchdowns to break the program’s career record. The Hounds opened the season at home on Thursday, Aug. 31, when they upset perennial-powerhouse No. 2 Grand Valley State, 24-20. The match-up marked the first of seven home games this season.

CARING IS YOUR CALLING. LEARN MORE ABOUT A MASTER’S IN HEALTHCARE MANAGEMENT AT UINDY.EDU/HCM.

LEAD H E A LT H C A R E TO A HIGHER STANDARD FALL 2017

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The alumni network of the University of Indianapolis is 32,000 strong and growing. Share your news with our fellow Greyhounds–from personal to professional to monumental moments in your life. Class notes are published in the University’s digital and print editions of Portico. All original photos are returned. Mail a print or submit a high-resolution digital image to alumni.uindy.edu.

C O N N E C T ! Updating your contact information ensures you receive the latest news about your alma mater and invitations to alumni and University events. Update your information at alumni.uindy.edu. facebook.com/uindyalumni @UIndyAlumni 42

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Y O U R

A L U M N I

C O N T A C T S

ANDY KOCHER ’98 ’15

LORA TELIHA

CORAN SIGMAN ’14

Associate Vice President of Alumni Engagement akocher@uindy.edu

Director of Alumni Engagement lteliha@uindy.edu

Assistant Director of Alumni Engagement cokerc@uindy.edu


CLASS NOTES

E D

B

C

A

F

Linda Harshbarger ’88 ’91 Brad ’17 and Trisha (Wright)

started a new position at the

Smith ’03 ’19

Barn at Bay Horse Inn located in

welcomed their second daughter

Greenwood, Ind. as the bookkeeper

Corinne, on May 20, 2016. She joins

beginning June 2017. She is also

big sister Kyla in their Greenwood,

under contract through MCC, LLC as

Ind. home. (photo D) Amanda Longsworth Bluhm ’97

bookkeeper for the National Guard Ronald Scott ’64

Executive Director Association, a

Jenn Wilson White ’06

recently retired after serving more

national nonprofit association.

added to their family by adoption.

and husband, Jesse, welcomed their

than 40 years in higher education.

Burton James was born on Aug.

firstborn, Isaac James White, on Nov.

4, 2014, and joined their family on

9, 2015. (photo A)

and her husband, Jim, have

Nov. 18, 2015. He joins 4 sisters,

Muhammed N. Amin ’92 Derek Weber ’80

has been hired by F.C. Tucker Co.

is the lead pastor at Southport

to join its corporate team.

Juliana–16, Elizabeth–14, Maggie–12

Joshua Reichart ’08

United Methodist Church in

and Ella–7. The family resides in

and wife, Briana, welcomed their first

Indianapolis.

Monroe, Ind.

child, Kasen Ray, on Oct. 2, 2015. He

Michael Porter ’92 started as an Employee Benefits

joins all of the fur kids at the family

David W. Wantz ’84

Underwriter with USI Insurance

Kimberly Allen Bauer ’02

farm outside of Pendleton, Ind.

was named president

Services effective March 2017. He

and husband, Rob, welcomed their

(photo B)

and CEO of the Independent

was also elected as a volunteer

Colleges of Indiana.

Director of the North Carolina Beach

second child on Nov. 19, 2015. Helen Elizabeth joins her big brother,

Melissa Snyder Tannehill ’08 and

Samuel. They live in Louisville, Ky.

husband, Chad, welcomed Cason

Paige L. Dooley ’85

(photo C)

Miller Tannehill on Feb. 22, 2016.

has been honored with the

He joins big sister, Madelyn, in their

Advancement in Nursing award by

Stephanie Crabill Dunfee ’94

Plainfield, Ind. home. (photo F)

the Indianapolis Star in the 2017

graduated from the Kelley School of

“Salute to Nurses.” She works at

Business-Indianapolis with her MS in accounting.

Stephanie Stringham ’02 and husband, Mike, welcomed son,

Buggy Association effective

Aidan Owen Stringham, on Oct.

Paige (Parks) Wise ’08

Community Hospital East as vice

9, 2015. Aidan has an older sister,

and her husband, Adam,

president of patient services and

Megan Lenore Stringham, who was

welcomed their daughter,

chief nurse executive.

born in 2012.

Lillian Christine, on Jan. 17, 2016.

May 2017.

Daniel S. “Dan” Richwine ’94 is the new pastor at Greensburg

She joins big sister Grace in

Kimberlee M. Fogg ’87

United Methodist Church in

Brian ’11 and Julie ’11 Doty

their Shelbyville, Ind., home.

is ranked 149th on the Forbes list of

Greensburg, Ind.

welcomed a son, Luke Andrew Doty,

Lillian will be a fourth-generation

top 200 female financial advisors in

on May 5, 2016.

Greyhound! (photo E)

the country for 2017. FALL 2017

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C

A

B

Nichole C. Wilson ’02 ’06

Tiffany J. Spudich ’08

has been promoted to vice president

has been promoted to chief client

of retail services at Community

officer at Capital Cities LLC in

Health Network in Indianapolis.

Indianapolis.

was selected to attend the week-

Elijah J. Hammans ’04

Kelli Whitenack ’10

long Poetry Foundation Summer

has been appointed chairman of the

accepted the position of RCS

Teachers Institute in Chicago as a

private equity group at Taft Stettinius

manager for IU Health Ball Memorial

participant in the community college

& Hollister.

Hospital/Blackford Hospital.

Kimberly Hull Hilton ’94

educators group. (photo C)

D

(photo F) Matthew Gootee ’05

Douglas Weber ’78

was promoted to director at BKD,

Andy Gipson ’12

serves as executive vice president

LLP, CPAs and Advisors.

accepted a job as a producer

Morgan M. Foley ’16

with NBC News in the Bay Area

has signed with Italian Softball

for Responsibility Foundation, Inc. He and his wife Nancy “Dinkledine”

Leah M. Raider ’05

of California. He was previously

Weber ’79 celebrated their 39th

League club Labadini Collecchio

has been appointed chief financial

a producer for WISH-TV in

wedding anniversary on June 24,

as a starting pitcher for the 2017

officer of the Indiana Department of

Indianapolis. (photo G)

2017. (photo B)

season. She played for the Chicago

Child Services.

Bandits of the National Pro Fastpitch Aura Ankita Mishra ’12

league in the United States last year.

Amber L. (Stearns) Denney ’95

Devon D. Phillips ’06

received her MS en route to her

is vice president of print for the

is the new principal at Batesville

PhD in 2016 and is concurrently

Indianapolis Association of Black

Angela D. Heckman ’16

Intermediate School in Batesville,

pursuing a degree in Master’s in

Journalists board of directors.

has been promoted to professor of

Ind.

Public Health with a biostatistics

nursing at IU Kokomo.

concentration while completing her Jennifer L. “Jenny” Butler ’99 ’02

Jessica L. Daniel ’07

PhD dissertation. She married Patrick

is a trust officer at Mutual Bank in

has been promoted to finance

Ringwald in 2015. (photo D)

Fishers, Ind.

process improvement manager at Cummins Inc. in Indianapolis.

Vivian Kemp Durham ’00 was married May 6, 2017. (photo A)

Tiffany Murray ’16 has been hired by Guthrie/Mayes Public Relations as assistant account

Kayleigh Allen ’14

manager.

is engaged to be married to Jason L. Marshall ’08

Nathaniel Adrian on Sept. 23, 2017.

has been hired as executive vice

(photo E)

Vanessa M. Richardson ’17 has joined the morning team at

Kyle Wurtzel ’02

president of transmission and

raced in the historic NHRA US

WLWT News 5 Today in Cincinnati,

regulatory affairs at Wabash Valley

Nationals in Indianapolis Aug. 31-

Ohio. Previously, she worked in the

Power in Indianapolis.

digital department at WTHR-TV in

Sept. 4.

44

Indianapolis. PORTICO


CLASS NOTES

F

G E

Janice L. Phelps ’59

Donald R. Smith ’72,

James F. “Jim” Mann ’87,

sister of the late Samuel W. Stone

father of Brent E. Smith ’73 ’76,

son of the late Esther M. Mann ’86,

’54, sister-in-law of Daisy M. Stone

passed away on April 27, 2017.

passed away on April 27, 2017.

Ronda L. “Ron” Chinn ’73

Shannon M. Peterman Lester ’94

passed away on June 19, 2017.

passed away April 30, 2017.

’52, and aunt of Jana M. Cole ’77, passed away on June 17, 2017. Talmage H. “Hager” St. Clair ’60 Mary B. Ratliff ’35,

husband of Doreen W. St. Clair ’61,

Ronald W. Rajer ’75

Tanya M. (Wright) Irwin ’99

sister-in-law of Betty L. Larson ’51,

passed away on May 27, 2017.

passed away on April 16, 2017.

passed away May 18, 2017. Survivors

Roger J. Fontanella ’62 passed

Rodney D. Sanford ’76,

parents and sister Trisha D. (Wright)

away on May 11, 2017.

father of Joseph P. Sanford ’14 and

Smith ’03.

passed away on April 19, 2017. She was predeceased by husband Francis B. Ratliff ’34 and sister-in-law

include her husband, children,

Dorothy L. Smith ’37.

father-in-law of Lauren S. Sanford ’12, William H. “Bill” Blackketter ’67

Jesse E. Hilgert, Jr., ’51 passed away on April 26, 2017. Survivors include sister Nancy A. McClure ’62. Russell D. Albert ’52 passed away on May 4, 2017. Richard A. Warren, Jr., ’52 passed away on June 1, 2017.

Jessica Elston ’05, part-time administrative assistant in

Helen A. Evans ’79,

UIndy’s Krannert Memorial Library,

Rebecca A. “Becky” Carr ’69

mother of Victoria S. “Vicki” Bernard

passed away on July 5, 2017.

passed away on April 13, 2017.

’76 and mother-in-law of Wendell L.

Judy A. Showalter ’70

Bernard ’74, passed away on April

Richard A. Coram ’08

22, 2017.

passed away May 24, 2017.

passed away on April 1, 2017. Survivors include brother-in-law

Harry J. Ragsdale ’80

Robert L. “Bob” Showalter ’80, sister-

brother-in-law of Rosanne Kirk-

in-law Mary Alice Smith ’62, and

Gillespie ’85, passed away on May

uncle John R. Rider ’47.

31, 2017.

John L. Lewellen ’59 passed away on May 23, 2017.

passed away on April 1, 2017.

passed away on March 26, 2017.

Beth A. Myers ’71

C L A S S

N O T E S

Submit your class note at alumni.uindy.edu.

passed away on June 21, 2017.

FALL 2017

45


IT ALL STARTS WITH YOU Transformation is more than a concept at the University of Indianapolis. We are familiar with change – with rising to the challenge. Since 1902, we have identified areas of need and embraced progress while holding fast to the traditions and values that have defined us. We are excited to share these stories:

The Campaign for the University of Indianapolis has experienced great success because of dedicated supporters like you and countless others. Publicly launched in the Fall of 2015, alumni and friends have generously given more than $50M — but we’re not stopping there!

ELIJAH ’04 AND LAURA ’05 HAMMANS are young alumni who understand the importance of giving back early in their careers. They provide support to the University and the programs that are important to them.

Our fundraising efforts are continuing as we raise support for additional scholarships and student success through projects like the New Finance Lab for the School of Business, the Good Hall restoration and many other student-faculty driven projects. These efforts address the needs and opportunities identified in the Vision 2030 strategic planning process, which supports these four UIndy pillars: students, faculty, community and the future. Your gift toward the Campaign for the University of Indianapolis supports each of these areas. Support the Campaign For The University of Indianapolis at campaign.uindy.edu.

L J U

J U LY 2 0 1 2 – J U LY 2 0 1 7

Y

RON & LAURA STRAIN HONORS COLLEGE

GENE & MARY ANN ZINK POVERTY CENTER

S P

N E

SHAHEEN COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES

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24,404 T O TA L C A M PA I G N D O N O R S I N 2 017

I

1 7 0

2

H

ENDOW

33

C

1 2

$51 ,1 5 8, 28 9

S

0

W

D

R S

Y

2

GIFTS OVER $1 MILLION

E

E

O

L J U

40%

10

TOTA L R A I S ED N

D O N

W

L A R S H

RAY SKILLMAN FLOOR IN NICOSON HALL

R.B. ANNIS SCHOOL OF ENGIENERING

SUPPORT FUTURE GREYHOUNDS •

Make your gift online or enroll in monthly gifts supporting your favorite department or initiative at UIndy at uindy.edu/giving.

Multiply your impact! Visit matchinggifts.com/uindy to see if your employer will match your gift.

46

Establish an endowed scholarship. More than 33 endowed scholarships have been established over the course of the campaign. Endowed scholarships can be established across a 5-year pledge period and are a great way leave a legacy of support for future UIndy students.

PORTICO

Scholarships often mean the difference between getting an education or not. ASPEN

LOVEJOY ’17 attributes her success to the

generosity of others. Learn more about these inspiring stories and the Campaign for the University of Indianapolis at campaign.uindy.edu

BOB SACHS ’75 was looking to leave a legacy that reflected his values. At The Center for Ethics at the University of Indianapolis, he found a place that will perpetuate what’s important to him and encourage others to develop their own values.


PORTICO FALL 2017 • THE GLOBAL IMPACT ISSUE

N

E R S I I V T

Y

I S

U

O

L

F

I

O N D P I A N A

O U R G L O B A L I M PA C T S TA R T S H E R E . “EDUCA

TION

IS T HE

MO

ST

PO

WE

RF

UL

WE

AP

ON W HI

CH YO U CA N

US O E T CHA NGE

THE WORL

ON MANDELA D.” – NELS

UINDY FAMILY GOES BEYOND GRADUATION – GET INVOLVED!

A NOTE TO OUR READERS

Wherever you are, you will always be a part of a vibrant community of leaders, innovators and doers across the

1992

state, nation and world. We hope to welcome you back on campus soon. UINDY HOMECOMING

Saturday, Oct. 21

Sept. 29–30

Sutphin Lecture Series: Theaster Gates: Contemporary Social Performance Art

A hound always finds its way home! Relive favorite memories, relax and reconnect with UIndy friends at Homecoming 2017! homecoming.uindy.edu

UINDY FAMILY WEEKEND Oct. 7–8

Alumni are always part of the Greyhound family. Join us for a concert by pop-rock singer, songwriter, producer and pianist Jon McLaughlin on this special day. uindy.edu/family

Wednesday, Oct. 25 Kevin Radaker: “A Visit from Henry David Thoreau”

Thursday, Sept. 21

Showers Lecture Series: John Bowlin: Moving Beyond the Culture Wars

2 017

Portico was launched nearly 25 years ago, serving as a resource for insight into academics, student life, alumni, achievements, community engagement and University growth. Even the magazine’s name, derived from the Good Hall landmark central to our campus, was, according to University Archives, “inspired by the University’s passionate and innovative energy … helping to illustrate how future leaders are created, how the spirit of our students is ignited and how our students, faculty and alumni are changing the community and the world.”

Thursday, Oct. 26

With the relaunch of Portico, we are enriching how we recognize and celebrate the way students and faculty inspire creativity and entrepreneurship while enhancing communities. In this inaugural edition, we highlight their impact as they proudly represent the Greyhound tradition in various parts of the world. We also share momentous achievements of our world-class faculty and news and developments that highlight an evolving University footprint.

Visit us in the Stierwalt Alumni House and select UIndy residence halls to celebrate Halloween!

We hope you also will visit UIndy 360 (news.uindy.edu), a comprehensive University news site, learn more about our other communication outlets at the UIndy Connect page (connect.uindy. edu) and visit Portico’s digital edition, portico.uindy.edu.

UINDY CAMPUS TRICKOR -TREAT

#GIVINGTUESDAY Tuesday, Nov. 28

UNIVERSIT Y SERIES: FLIPPING THE SCRIP T

1

FALL 2017

Your thoughts are important to us, so please feel free to send your comments and ideas about this issue of Portico and future editions to portico@uindy.edu. Thank you for helping to tell the UIndy story.

Join the collective power of the community as we join the global movement to make a difference.

– Jeanette DeDiemar, PhD Vice President of Communications and Marketing dediemarj@uindy.edu

uindy.edu/givingtuesday

S T A Y

C O N N E C T E D

HOLIDAY WITH THE HOUNDS

events.uindy.edu

Tuesday, Dec. 12

/UINDY

/UINDY

/UINDY

/UINDY

Get in the spirit of the Holidays with sweet treats and photos with Santa! /UINDYTV

/UNIVERSITY-OF -INDIANAPOLIS

NEWSDESK@ U I N D Y. E D U

#GREYHOUNDSFOREVER Register for upcoming events at events.uindy.edu

N E W S . U I N D Y. E D U

FALL 2017

47


FALL 2017

// T H E G L O B A L I M PA C T I S S U E

THIS ISSUE

RESTORING OUR P A S T, B U I L D I N G OUR FUTURE Good Hall undergoes restoration.

GHANA BENEFITS FROM SUPPORT A service trip to Ghana changes lives there and here.

HER RELENTLESS PURSUIT Dr. Katherine Welch ’93 tackles the issue of human trafficking.

FINDING PURPOSE A mission to improve health and wellness in Haiti.

1400 East Hanna Avenue Indianapolis, IN 46227

48

PORTICO

Portico – University of Indianapolis Magazine  
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