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PORTICO IN EVERY SENSE OF THE WORD Bryan Gezon ’13, ’16 is rebuilding lives through physical therapy with both expertise and compassion. // p. 14

HIGH TECH IN THE H E A LT H PA V I L I O N // p. 8

THE ART OF HEALING // p. 10

A STORY OF ENGAGEMENT // p. 12

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T H E W H O L E H E A R T E D H E A LT H I S S U E ABOUT THE MAGAZINE Portico, the official magazine of the University of Indianapolis and produced by the Office of University Communications & Marketing, is a cornerstone publication to share the stories, impact and achievements of the students, faculty, staff and alumni as well as the friends and supporters of the institution. Portico, published two to three times a year, is mailed to more than 35,000 individuals including alumni, donors and community and business leaders. The magazine’s digital issue includes expanded content, interviews and video at portico.uindy.edu. We welcome your thoughts and comments about each issue at portico@uindy.edu

PRESIDENT

41 // UINDY WOMEN’S GOLF: 2018 DII NATIONAL CHAMPIONS

Robert L. Manuel

BOARD OF TRUSTEES John C. Adams; Kevin R. Armstrong; Carolyn M. Coleman; Gregory Corsaro; Deborah J. Daniels; Linda Dillman; Christopher Doehring; Murvin S. Enders; Stephen F. Fry; Sue Anne Gilroy; Adolf Hansen; Emmanuel D. Harris; Kent Holaday; Polly Horton Hix; Barry S. Howard; Charles Edwin Johnston; William R. Kiesel; Kenneth Loyd; Robert L. Manuel; Thomas C. Martin; Michael McCarty; Ersal Ozdemir; Vicki F. Perry; Edwin O. Qualls; Pamela S. Qualls; Dennis J. Reinbold; David Resnick; David G. Sease; Yvonne H. Shaheen; Richard E. Stierwalt; Laura Strain; Phillip A. Terry; James G. Terwilliger; Larry G. Thompson, M.D.; Bishop Julius C. Trimble; Michael J. Watkins; and Gordon D. Wishard

CABINET Michael Cartwright, PhD; Jeanette DeDiemar, PhD; Steven Herriford; Michael P. Holstein; Sean Huddleston; Stephen H. Kolison, Jr., PhD; Lara Mann; Christopher Molloy; Andrea Newsom; Neil Perdue, PhD; Kory Vitangeli; Suzanne Willey, PED; Ron Wilks; and Corey Wilson

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W H AT I S WHOLEHEARTED H E A LT H ? BRINGING HOPE TO A DISEASE OF DESPAIR Finding Solutions to the Addictions Crisis

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HIGH-TECH IN T H E H E A LT H PAVILION Innovative Technology & Teaching at UIndy

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THE ART OF HEALING Art Therapy and Mental Health

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A STORY OF ENGAGEMENT

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Esraa Bintalib ’18

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INSPIRING POSSIBILITIES Cover Story: Bryan Gezon ’13, ’16 is rebuilding lives through physical therapy with both expertise and compassion.

NOT AN HOUR WASTED Paige Dooley ’85

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UINDY PARTNERSHIPS Cultural Connections

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SHARING A VISION Ed ’84 and Pamela ’84 Qualls’ Gift

30 // U N I V E R S I T Y U P DAT E S

Updates, News and More About the Campus Community

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AT H L E T I C S U P DAT E A Record-Breaking Year

44 // C L A S S N O T E S

Improving Quality of Life

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A BEACON OF HOPE

The Latest News from UIndy Alumni

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THEN & NOW Teaching Through Technology for 60 Years


REFLECTING. IMPROVING. INSPIRING. Summer is an excellent time for reflection and to better understand our place in the present. This is especially true for universities. As I look back on the past year, I am incredibly proud of the achievements of our students, faculty and staff at the University of Indianapolis. A 2018 graduating class of 1,650 students, including 566 master’s and doctoral candidates, heading out into the world to pursue their dreams, another record enrollment of incoming freshmen infusing life to a campus that is thriving and growing, and faculty whose teaching and research is both personal and influential all provide plenty of inspiration for gratitude and further reflection. So taking a moment to consider the big picture and where we want to go as a university is appropriate and wise. Our institutional story is one of intention, innovation and community inspiration with a goal to enhance all aspects of human health. This edition of Portico reflects on “wholehearted health” and the many forms in which the University is actively promoting wellness in our city, state and the world–from improved physical and mental health efforts to transformative initiatives as a community partner and agent for social justice. Bettering health and well-being

has always been a core tenet of our mission and it is exciting to be a part of the University’s expanding realm of influence in this effort. From addressing health crises to improving quality of life in our state and around the globe, our students, alumni, faculty and staff are making a positive impact that is both lasting and meaningful. I invite you to return to UIndy for the 2018 Family Weekend celebration, Sept. 21-23, and Homecoming, Sept. 28-29. The University is really at its best when we welcome back alumni, friends and our extended Greyhound family. When you return to campus, you will likely get a sense that things are different. While some things have changed, UIndy will always be rooted in the values and mission that have served so many generations. This is your home, so please visit frequently. And when you do, I hope these inspiring stories will leave you with a deeper understanding of whole-hearted health and the University’s ongoing achievements in improving lives, both on our campus and in the world we share.

— Robert L. Manuel University President

OUR INSTITUTIONAL STORY IS ONE OF INTENTION, INNOVATION AND COMMUNITY INSPIRATION WITH A GOAL TO ENHANCE ALL ASPECTS OF HUMAN HEALTH. SUMMER/FALL 2018

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1 IN 20

HOOSI ERS AD MIT TO AB US ING OPIOID PRESC RI P TION PILLS S O U RC E INDI ANA CENTER FOR RECOVERY

BRINGING TO A DISEASE OF DESPAIR

IND I A NA C U RRE NT LY H AS

13 OPIOID TREATMENT CENTERS

C ERT I FIED BY THE I NDI ANA D EPARTMEN T O F M ENTAL HEALTH AND ADDICTION SOUR CE I N.G OV

$$$ OPIOID A B U S E I S C OST IN G T H E STAT E OV E R

$650 MILLION IN HE A LT H CA R E C OSTS A NNUA L LY

S OURC E D R UG FR EE.OR G

ore than 300,000 Hoosiers find themselves in situations that seem hopeless.* While these individuals are impacted by the growing opioid crisis, so is the need to prepare healthcare professionals to treat them. In keeping with a history of addressing the most pressing issues of the day, the University recently launched two graduate programs (master’s and certificate programs) in addictions counseling. This joint effort between the School of Nursing and the College of Applied Behavioral Sciences creates an interprofessional specialty that features a unique blend of medical care, counseling, psychology and social work. The programs address the critical shortage of skilled addiction treatment professionals, according to Rachel Halleck ’10 (M.S., clinical psychology), senior director of behavioral health services at Volunteers of America (VoA).

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*Based on: 1 in 20 Indiana residents admit to abusing opioid prescription pills (https://treatmentindiana.com/indiana-opioidepidemic/) and the 2017 Indiana population of 6.667 million from the United States Census Bureau.

GUEST COLUMN

MEETING THE NEED BY DR. ANITA TH O MAS DEA N, CO LLEGE O F A PPLI ED BEH AVIO RA L S CIENCES

To say that there is a great need for providing evidence-based, holistic treatment to help end the opioid epidemic is an understatement. I am pleased that the faculty and staff of the College of Applied Behavioral Sciences have stepped up to address this issue. Three experiences led to the development of addictions training. Shortly after my arrival at UIndy, there was a petition to start up a suboxone clinic near the University. 6

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Halleck leads the Fresh Start Recovery Center in Indianapolis, an innovative treatment program for women, and sees firsthand the growing epidemic. The Center allows women to bring their children with them to involve the whole family in treatment rather than placing these children in foster care. Within weeks of opening the Center in 2015, the waitlist for patients skyrocketed to over 100 women. It became apparent that their need to expand was urgent; however, a shortage of trained mental health professionals hindered that ability and the Center had multiple women on their waitlist pass away before they could get help. In the past few months VoA tripled its capacity to treat women, but key positions routinely remain unfilled for several months while they wait for an applicant with the requisite skills and passion to address this issue.

SEE “BRINGING HOPE” ON PAGE 29

While this treatment is helpful, a medication-only approach is not the most effective method for providing long-term recovery. With the crisis affecting so many lives, we decided to base our program on best practices for the field to both understand and prevent addiction, while also providing training for recovery. The National Institute on Drug Abuse recommends merging methadone treatment with behavioral approaches such as individual and group counseling, as well as access to other medical, psychological and social services. For opioid treatment specifically, research suggests that the greatest improvement occurs

with wrap-around or comprehensive treatment services; the addition of onsite medical/psychiatric, employment and family services further improves outcomes. Our degree program is interdisciplinary in behavioral health, with coursework in social work, psychology, and mental health counseling. Students will learn individual and group counseling skills, and have exposure to career and family counseling, case management and competencies for working on integrated healthcare teams. The scope of the program also embraces the new World Health Organization classifications for addictive behaviors, including substances, gaming and gambling.


HOPE R AC H EL H A L LEC K ’1 0 S ENIO R D I R ECTOR OF BE H AVI O R A L HE A LT H SE R VI C E S AT VOLU NTE ER S OF A ME R ICA

“THE MASTER’S IN ADDICTIONS COUNSELING PROGRAM AT THE UNIVERSITY OF INDIANAPOLIS IS SO CRITICAL IN THIS BATTLE AGAINST HOPELESSNESS AND DESPAIR. IT WILL BE INSTRUMENTAL IN BOOSTING THE NUMBERS OF MENTAL HEALTH SPECIALISTS WHO ARE SPECIALLY TRAINED TO MAKE A DIFFERENCE IN THE LIVES OF THOSE IN JEOPARDY, AND EVERYONE AROUND THEM.”

- Rachel Halleck ’10

S TAT E S E N AT O R J A M E S M E R R I T T P R E S E N T E D C O M P E L L I N G D ATA A B O U T H O W T H E O P I O I D C R I S I S H A S I M PA C T E D I N D I A N A AT T H E PRESS CONFERENCE ANNOUNCING THE ADDICTIONS COUNSELING P R O G R A M S I N T H E U I N D Y H E A LT H PA V I L I O N I N A P R I L .

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HIGH-TECH IN THE HEALTH PAVILION S T U D E N T AC C E S S T O C U T T I N G - E D G E M E D I C A L T E C H N O LO G Y A N D O U T S TA N D I N G FAC U LT Y I N S T R U C T I O N I N T H E U I N DY H E A LT H PAV I L I O N I S C R E AT I N G R E M A R K A B L E N E W T E AC H I N G O P P O R T U N I T I E S T H AT W E R E S I M P LY N O T P O S S I B L E E V E N A F E W Y E A R S AG O . H E R E ’ S A N I N S I D E LO O K AT S O M E O F T H E M O S T I N N O VAT I V E P I E C E S O F E Q U I P M E N T AVA I L A B L E T O DAY T H AT FAC U LT Y A N D S T U D E N T S A R E U S I N G O N C A M P U S R I G H T N O W. 8

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“Having a solid understanding of both static anatomy, and how the various body structures relate to each other and move, is critical for students in the health and rehabilitation professions. The Anatomage Table provides our faculty and students with a powerful tool to better integrate their knowledge and understanding of anatomy with their developing skills as health professionals.” -Stephanie Kelly, PT, PhD Dean, College of Health Sciences

ANATOMAGE TABLE The Anatomage Table (pictured above) is the Crown Jewel of the high-tech equipment in the Health Pavilion. Used for athletic training, occupational therapy, physical therapy and exercise science applications, it puts remarkable medical exploratory research at students’ fingertips, or in this case, with the touch of a stylus. The equipment, typically found only in medical schools and teaching hospital settings, resembles a human-sized smartphone, complete with high-resolution display, glass screen and fully-interactive functions. The Anatomage Table contains the complete visual data of a human cadaver–keep in mind: it does not display a simulation, these are all authentic views of a real person, inside and out, from every angle and cross-section imaginable. For instance, the menu allows the user to remove the skin layer, isolate elements of the central nervous system in a different color and stick a virtual pin in a particular spot.

The 3D scan of the body is easily manipulated. A simple swipe of the stylus across the screen rotates and turns the image in 360 degrees, allowing for an infinite number of views and perspectives for scientific evaluation. It is a compelling example of science made accessible, and UIndy is one of the few places you will find it.

SEE “HIGH-TECH” ON PAGE 28

LEARN MORE

See how students are using other high-tech equipment for medical advancement at portico.uindy.edu

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ART

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HEALING THROUGH UINDY’S ART AND MUSIC THERAPY PROGRAMS

With 43 million Americans experiencing mental illness, the need for art therapy is great *

and the applications are endless *National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI)

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pack of colored pencils, paper, clay. Tools like these are succeeding where others have failed to treat common mental illnesses such as anxiety, depression or post-traumatic stress disorder. Just ask Rachel Feldwisch, assistant professor and director of counseling programs in the College of Applied Behavioral Sciences. She also leads the new art therapy program at UIndy. Feldwisch started her career at a modern-day orphanage for teens in Chicago, working with girls who had been involved with gangs or came from abusive homes. It was the first time she saw firsthand the amazing benefits of art therapy. “A young woman whose mom had been addicted to cocaine was very guarded and had good reason to not trust adults,” Feldwisch remembers.

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LEARN MORE See faculty perspectives at portico.uindy.edu

EMI LY BR ADLEY ’ 1 8 (PR E-AR T THER APY ) WOR KS WI TH CL AY I N THE STU D IO.

“It took a month for her to speak a single word to me. Every session she would come in and stare at me. I would talk to her, but she wouldn’t answer.”

talking about her art. The process of artmaking, the

There are many non-verbal memories housed in the brain affected during a traumatic experience. According to Feldwisch, art therapists agree it is most effective to use a multi-modal approach: one that includes talking, along with making art that’s reflective of their traumatic experiences. Producing visual imagery allows people to re-process what has happened, look at the impact on their present life and evaluate how to move forward.

The same concept applies whether you’re recovering

After a long month Feldwisch tried this approach and with time, art formed a bridge between therapist and patient.

her career, there were seven registered art therapists

“When she started making art, she was doing something therapeutic and then eventually she started

They all had something important in common–they

connection it formed and being able to speak about it were productive and helpful,” Feldwisch said. from a traumatic event, having a serious case of the Mondays or somewhere in between. One in five–or about 43 million*–Americans experience a mental illness, and depression is the leading cause of disability worldwide; which is to say the need for art therapy is great and the applications are endless. When Feldwisch moved to Indiana in 2003 to continue in the state. Some were licensed as social workers, others were licensed as mental health counselors. were engaged in treating the whole person. SEE ‘ART THERAPY ’ ON PAGE 24

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A STORY OF ENGAGEMENT:

RENOVATION AND EXPANSION OF OUR COMMUNITY

NEW CONSTRUCTION AND RENOVATION INITIATIVES ON CAMPUS ARE LEADING TO GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT IN THE GREATER COMMUNITY– I N C L U D I N G N E W R E S TAU R A N T S I N T H E A R E A A N D A B U S L I N E T H AT WILL CONNECT UINDY TO A THRIVING DOWNTOWN.

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eing a good neighbor means taking an active role in improving quality of life. This has always been the goal at the University of Indianapolis and some exciting developments–both on and near campus– are evidence that our goal to share wholehearted community health is stronger than ever. Just down the street from historic Good Hall, a community garden is promoting good health for residents in the University Heights neighborhood. The project provides space dedicated to planting and growing fresh vegetables, and creates an opportunity to educate the public on healthy, affordable eating habits and sustainability. It nurtures something equally important: community. Good neighbors share, they help, they care. And when you’re a good neighbor, everyone benefits.

started with the addition of Greyhound Village, which opened in 2016. These projects allow the University to meet the growing trend of students wishing to live near and on campus. Featuring innovative and adaptable common areas, universal wi-fi connectivity, and a variety of unit styles to address unique privacy and living arrangements, University Lofts more closely resembles a modern urban, mixed-use apartment complex than a residence hall. Housing options like this are essential to attract and engage today’s students and help to build a healthier campus community.

RESTORING OUR PAST, BUILDING OUR FUTURE

Impacting the neighborhood as a catalyst for positive change always The University’s efforts have had a positive ripple starts in your own front (and back) yard. Significant effect throughout the area as a catalyst for a true renovations to Good Hall are well underway and, just neighborhood renaissance. Soon Books & Brews will as with the Martin/Lilly Hall, Krannert Memorial Library open a new family-friendly location on the west side and Greyhound Athletics facilities of campus in the space previously upgrades, create a renewed sense of occupied by Shelby Bowl. This local place for all UIndy students, employees craft brewery and restaurant serves and visitors alike. In Esch Hall, a up fare with a literary theme and read•drink•converse new finance lab within the School of prides itself as a place to gather Business is another example of the and connect with neighbors through University’s commitment to preserving games and conversation. the integrity of our core campus while improving REDEFINING CAMPUS LIVING facilities to serve contemporary needs.

books&brews

Meanwhile, just around the corner, construction is nearing completion on University Lofts, a state-of-theart student housing complex accepting residential applications for January 2019. Both University Lofts and Greyhound Village are the result of the University’s partnership with Strategic Capital Partners that completely redefined off-campus living with direct access to academic and student life services. The Lofts complex adds 300 beds and continues the trend

Another element to creating a healthy campus is facilitating the need to grow outward with new construction. The University recently purchased two buildings on Shelby Street. Designs have been prepared to convert this space into classrooms and labs, which will house the R.B. Annis School of Engineering and the Department of Art & Design in 2020. That means more classrooms, additional parking and a new student community space on campus. When construction

SEE “ENGAGEMENT” ON PAGE 29

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INSPIRING POSSIBILITIES “When I see a patient come in, and they’re really excited about being able to do something they haven’t been able to do for a while, that’s really motivating,” – Bryan Gezon ’13, ’16

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artnerships form a vital role in the health of our community as they enable organizations to expand their impact. The ongoing partnership between the University of Indianapolis and Community Health Network is one such important example of strengthening ties and improving lives in the local community and beyond. With programs that emphasize the compassion and understanding that form the core of the University’s mission, students, faculty and alumni are bringing new healthcare opportunities to clients through clinical experiences, research and collaboration.

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For Bryan Gezon ’13 (exercise science), ’16 (doctorate of physical therapy), the partnership helped to launch the next phase of his career. Gezon now works as a physical therapist in Community Health Network’s Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation Center, located in UIndy’s Health Pavilion, with patients ranging from 10 to 90 years old coping with orthopedic or sports injuries. His favorite part of the job? “Patients who have doubts when they first come in because they might not know much about therapy–seeing them learn what it’s like and start to see improvements, those are special moments,” Gezon said.

Gezon’s mentees range from undergraduate students in the pre-physical therapy or athletic training programs to those who are shadowing to become doctorate of physical therapy candidates and treating patients as part of their clinical or internship duties. He’s thrilled to be a part of the same program that prepared him so effectively for his career and he appreciates the strength of the University’s clinical focus.

“UINDY RECOGNIZES THE IMPORTANCE OF BOTH LEARNING IN CLASS AND THEN APPLYING IT IN CLINICAL SETTINGS.”

The vision statement of the American Physical Therapy Association is “transforming society by optimizing movement to improve the human experience.” Sara Scholtes, Krannert School of Physical Therapy chair, explained, “Physical therapists are called to be movement experts, dedicated to improving the quality of life for all individuals by addressing movement and movementrelated impairments. Bryan addresses this vision statement by being dedicated to improving movement of individuals in the greater UIndy community.”

The examples of physical therapy patients run the gamut from athletes looking to get back on the field to stroke patients who are learning to walk again. Even small improvements can make a huge difference in clients’ lives. Gezon gave the example of helping a patient overcome a foot injury as she prepared for an overseas trip. “When I see a patient come in, and they’re really excited about being able to do something they haven’t been able to do for a while, that’s really motivating,” Gezon added.

LEARN MORE

In a neighborhood with few clinics, Gezon said the Community Health Network clinic serves many patients from the local community. A typical day for Gezon might involve treating several patients for a wide variety of conditions, and he’ll often have a Krannert School of Physical Therapy student by his side.

“Through the amount of clinical experience that students are exposed to, UIndy recognizes the importance of both learning in class and then applying it in clinical settings,” Gezon said. Following a rigorous year-long orthopedic residency through the University of Indianapolis, Gezon began working at the Community Health Network clinic. He also enjoys bringing clarity to patients about their physical condition.

“When you can explain what’s going on to a patient, why they’re having this issue and what we can do to help treat it, it’s exciting to empower them with knowledge. That can take a weight off their shoulders, even if it takes a few months to heal,” he said. Gezon pointed out that amid the ongoing opioid epidemic, physical therapy provides a safe alternative to strong pain medication. “We can treat pain through a variety of ways, and we see the benefits that come from exercise versus some of the dangerous consequences from taking a pill,” he said. Gezon noted faculty like Emily Slaven, director of the Orthopedic Residency Program; Sam Kegerreis, professor emeritus; and Ed Jones, assistant professor of physical therapy, who were “incredible role models. It’s very motivating when you really respect your professors and want to become like them.”

To learn more about UIndy’s physical therapy program, visit uindy.edu/pt

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A BEACON OF HOPE:

INTERSECTING

CULTURE, SOCIOLOGY & CHANGE

LEARN MORE See faculty perspectives at portico.uindy.edu

As a teenager growing up in Saudi Arabia, Esraa Bintalib ’18 always knew community service would be part of her future. sraa Bintalib ’18 chose sociology as her major with a criminal justice minor and a concentration in community organizing. This combination, together with her cultural background, turned out to be the perfect fit for an internship with Beacon of Hope Crisis Center.

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With guidance from Kevin Whiteacre, Department of Criminal Justice chair, Bintalib applied for an internship with Beacon of Hope Crisis Center during her senior year. The organization, which serves clients contending with domestic violence and sexual assault issues, created an outreach role for Bintalib with the goal of establishing partnerships with the Muslim community through Islamic schools, associations, mosques and student groups. The work was “close to my heart,” said Bintalib. 16

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“I was so happy to see how [Beacon of Hope Crisis Center] accommodated people from different religious backgrounds.”

“When Esraa sent in her application to be an intern, we saw her skill set and that she was a fluent Arabic speaker and a Muslim, so we jumped on that opportunity and created a job description for her as community outreach intern,” said Jessica Counsell, victim advocate and crisis call intervention coordinator at Beacon of Hope Crisis Center. “She was so valuable to our organization’s vision.” Bintalib and Counsell collaborated to produce several presentations to various groups representing a wide range of cultures.

ESR A A BIN TALIB W ITH H ER HU SBAND, AB D ULAZIZ, AB OV E, AN D SON, ELI AS , B ELOW AT TH E 2018 UI NDY COMMEN CEMEN T CEREMO N Y


Bintalib networked with Exodus Refugee Inc., an Indianapolis-based refugee resettlement agency led by UIndy alum Cole Varga ’10 (M.A., international relations), and arranged to present an educational program. Other clients included the Al-Taqwa Mosque and the MTI School of Knowledge. Service-learning had a profound impact on Bintalib during the development of her professional skills. As a freshman, she volunteered with the YMCA as an afterschool program helper at the Laurelwood Community Center as part of a servicelearning lab with Marianna Foulkrod, director of UIndy’s Center for Service-Learning & Community Engagement. Bintalib said she feels grateful for faculty mentors who helped shape her professional development. “Both Marianna and [Sociology Chair] Amanda Miller made informed suggestions about agencies that would be a good fit for me. I’m also grateful to Kevin Whiteacre, who gave me the opportunity to complete my internship with Beacon of Hope.” Bintalib also participated in community service opportunities with SENSE Charter School on Indianapolis’s south side as an assistant social worker and assistant kindergarten teacher in 2015, and returned in 2018 to build a resource database for the school’s large Latinx community.

“UIndy is the greatest not just because of the events that take place on campus, but also the connections you make off campus.”

“I saw the daily challenges for the school’s social worker. It takes a lot of patience,” Bintalib said. “Those communication skills will be invaluable to me as I continue my career.” Bintalib was recently honored with the Department of Sociology’s Hendricks Award, presented to the student with the highest GPA in the department. After returning to Saudi Arabia with her family following graduation, Bintalib plans to pursue a career as a school social worker. She says she’s grateful not only for the interpersonal and professional skills she’s acquired through the program, but also for her family’s support.

Learn more about UIndy’s sociology program at uindy.edu/cas/sociology

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NEVER AN HOUR A CAREER OF CARING & SERVANT LEADERSHIP

There’s never an hour wasted serving someone else,” said Paige Dooley ’85 (nursing). This sentiment has been a cornerstone of her career, and arguably of her life. Dooley has worked at Community Health Network for more than 33 years, since graduating with an associate degree from the University of Indianapolis School of Nursing. Jobs were hard to come by at the time, but she quickly impressed hospital administrators with her willingness to learn. Dooley began as a surgical nurse working the night shift, a position that taught her about the human condition as much as medical techniques.

PAIGE DOOLEY LIVED ON CAMPUS FROM ’82 - ’85 IN EAST HALL WITH FELLOW NURSING MAJORS. LEARN MORE ABOUT THE SCHOOL OF NURSING AT UINDY.EDU/NURSING 18

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“I love that in nursing, you can get close to people. They allow you into some of their most vulnerable moments. It’s very powerful,” she said. “When someone has a baby or receives a cancer diagnosis, I’m able to say, ‘We have relief for your suffering. We can help.’”


“AS A NURSE, I CAN HELP ONE PATIENT, ONE FAMILY, ONE SITUATION. NOW, AT AN EXECUTIVE LEVEL, I CAN HELP THE WHOLE EASTSIDE POPULATION–ABOUT 255,000 PEOPLE. I FEEL LIKE I’M A NURSE FOR THAT MANY PEOPLE!”

WASTED In 2003, she moved into nursing administration, earning a Master of Science in Nursing and an MBA from Anderson University shortly after.

and has played an important role in developing the new eastside hospital, a $175 million project.

“As a nurse, I can help one patient, one family, one situation. Now, at an executive level, I can help the whole eastside population–about 255,000 people. I feel like I’m a nurse for that many people,” Dooley said.

Dooley often puts in 12-hour days to make sure everyone else is taken care of–making rounds with her team of directors, meeting with fellow executives and filling the role of ‘chief problem solver,’ which is more of a nickname than a professional title.

Her desire to help others seems to run in the family: Dooley’s mom was a labor and delivery nurse at Community Health Network in the family’s hometown in nearby Anderson. “I get a lot of joy out of helping others. I think I’m just wired that way,” Dooley said. “As a leader I make sure that I eat last, so to speak, and put the needs of my team first.”

“I don’t mind problems,” Dooley said. “Sometimes we have pretty complex, sensitive issues to work through–it could be life or death. I developed a reputation as a problem solver because I find the right people to pull together, communicate the goal and work through it together. It’s about coming to the table with a ‘how can I help?’ attitude.”

Dooley credits her education at the University of Indianapolis for reinforcing this idea of servant leadership. “UIndy has such a great reputation in nursing. It set the tone for my career,” she said. “It prepared me so well to have fundamentally sound judgment as a nurse and to get a great job.”

Dooley’s compassion and commitment to her work haven’t gone unnoticed. In 2018, she was named a Health Care Hero by the Indianapolis Business Journal, and in 2017 was honored by StarMedia’s 2017 Salute to Nurses for Advancement in Nursing, a cherished moment in her career.

As vice president of patient services and chief nurse executive at Community Hospital East, Dooley is responsible for about 800 staff who care for thousands of patients annually across central Indiana. She also leads the ethics committee, serves on the Institutional Review Board at Community East

“I know I was named a hero, but I’m really not the hero,” she said. We’ll agree to disagree with her on that point.

LEARN MORE Read more about Paige Dooley at portico.uindy.edu

UINDY EFFECT TWO ALUMNI WITH DISTINGUISHED CAREERS IN H E A LT H C A R E , W O R K I N G T O G E T H E R T O B U I L D A L A S T I N G L E G A C Y– T H AT ’ S T H E U I N D Y E F F E C T .

Jean Putnam ’17 (right), executive vice president and chief nursing officer for Community Health Network, works closely with Paige Dooley ’85 (left) to support nearly 4,000 nurses and lead projects such as the inception of the new Community East hospital. A registered nurse with more than 25 years of experience, Putnam received a Doctor of Nursing Practice from UIndy in 2017.

PA I G E D O O L E Y ’ S F A M I LY A N D C O W O R K E R S SURPRISED HER WITH THE NEWS ABOUT THE S A L U T E T O N U R S E S A W A R D I N 2 0 1 7. ( S H O W N L T O R : B R YA N M I L L S , P R E S I D E N T A N D C E O O F C O M M U N I T Y H E A LT H N E T W O R K ; J E A N P U T N A M ’ 1 7 ; PA I G E D O O L E Y ’ 8 5 ; A N D S C O T T TEFFETELLER, PRESIDENT OF CHN EAST)

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UINDY P NERSHIPS

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THE I NDI ANAPOLI S QUAR T ET, AN ELITE ENSEMBLE OF WI DELY ACCLAIMED MUS ICIAN S , I S THE ENSEMBLE-I N-R ESID EN CE AT TH E UNI VER SI T Y OF I NDI ANAP O LIS . FO UN D ED IN 2016 THR OUGH A COLLABORATIO N B ET W EEN ESTEEMED UNI VER SI T Y FACULT Y AN D TH E I NDI ANAPOLI S SYMPHONY O RCH ESTRA, TH E QUAR TET R EPR ESENTS THE UN IV ERS IT Y R EGI ONALLY AND I NTER NATIO N ALLY W H ILE BUI LDI NG A R EPER TOI R E O F WO RLD - CLAS S MU SI C. THE PR OJECT R ECEIV ED G EN ERO US FI NANCI AL SUPPOR T FR OM TH E CH RISTEL DEHA AN FAMI LY FOUNDATIO N . 2017-18 MEMBER S LEF T TO RIG H T: ZACH ARY DEPU E, VI OLI N; JOANA GEN OVA (AS S ISTAN T PR OF ESSOR OF VI OLI N AN D D IRECTO R O F CHAMBER MUSI C I NI TI ATIV ES AT UN IV ERS IT Y OF I NDI ANAPOLI S), VI OLI N ; AUSTIN HU NTI NGTON, CELLO; MI C H AEL STRAUS S , V IO LA.

LEARN MORE Visit indianapolisquartet.uindy.edu 20

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EXPLORE EVENTS at events.uindy.edu

INTERNATIONALLY-RENOWNED MUSICIAN DREW PETERSEN (STANDING), WHO IS THE 2017 AMERICAN PIANISTS AWARDS WINNER, CHRISTEL DEHA AN FELLOW AND UNIVERSIT Y OF INDIANAPOLIS ARTIST-IN-RESIDENCE, MENTORS UINDY STUDENTS DURING A MASTER CLASS EVENT ON CAMPUS.

The arts play an important role in the enhancement of good health in a community. When the University draws in deep draughts of artistic talent from around the world and then shares those experiences with the public, it is like a breath of fresh air. The University creates experiential learning opportunities with celebrated musicians, renowned lecturers and acclaimed artists. The Department of Music is accomplishing this by giving students a chance to practice and perform with top international talent. The University hosts over 100 cultural engagements each year, many of which are free and open to the greater community. The Faculty Artist Concert

Series sponsored by Katz, Sapper & Miller features compelling presentations of solo repertoire, dynamic readings of great chamber literature, provocative premieres of new works and distinctive approaches to both classic and contemporary jazz. From performances by the Indianapolis Quartet and the annual Jazz Week events (both of which also feature UIndy faculty) to exhibits at the Christel DeHaan Fine Art Center Gallery, student theatre productions and literary events, the University of Indianapolis is a beacon for the arts in the region. C O N T IN UED ON NEXT PAG E

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AMERICAN PIANISTS ASSOCIATION

TUSKEGEE UNIVERSITY CHOIR

The University’s partnership with the American Pianists Association (APA) brought Drew Petersen, the APA’s 2017 Awards winner, to campus for an artist-in-residence program that offered students and the broader community the chance to experience his world-class musical talent. Petersen, who held master classes for students, is also a Christel DeHaan fellow. Petersen collaborated with the UIndy Chamber Orchestra conducted by Ariel Rudiakov for a February performance. The concert and master classes, which were free and open to the public, were well attended by UIndy music students and attracted educators and students from around the state.

The University’s partnerships go even deeper to nurture connections that faculty and staff have already established in their lives before UIndy. Stephen Kolison, executive vice president and provost, took full advantage of such an opportunity when the legendary Tuskegee University Choir performed on campus in April during an international tour. Kolison himself spent many years at Tuskegee in his first professional role after obtaining his PhD. He welcomed the choir with heartfelt comments about how an institution can have a profoundly transformative influence on one’s life for years, and the choir reciprocated by delivering a truly inspiring performance.

TRUMPET CONFERENCE And from breathtaking piano conciertos to bombastic horn blasts, UIndy hosted the Second Annual Trumpet Conference in March. The brass extravaganza featured a full day of clinics that concluded with a packed house in Christel DeHaan Fine Arts Center that “blew the roof off!” according to Larry Powell, adjunct faculty member and chair of the conference planning committee. This joint effort with the International Trumpet Guild was headlined by legendary trumpeter from “The Tonight Show with Johnny Carson,” Doc Severinsen and international soloist Rex Richardson. Hands-on master classes conducted by these jazz icons offered incredible mentoring opportunities for UIndy students and conference attendees alike. Experiences like this do much more than amaze and delight the audience. “They serve to inspire our students as they pursue successful careers in music,” explained Brenda Clark, Department of Music chair.

I NT ERNATION AL SOLO I ST, R E X R I C H A R D S ON ( L ) A N D L EGE N DA RY TRUMP ETER FROM “ T H E TONI G H T S H OW WI TH J O H N N Y CA R S O N ,” DOC SEV ERIN S EN (R ) P ER FOR M E D AT U I NDY I N M A R C H FO R T HE S EC OND A NNUA L TR U M P ET C O N FE R E N C E .

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THE TU SKEGEE U NI VER SI T Y CHOI R GAVE AN I N S PIRIN G PER FOR MANCE ON CAMPU S I N F EBR UARY.

REACHING OUT WITH SOCIAL PRACTICE ART As well as hosting outstanding artistic talent, the University connects with the greater community. UIndy’s social practice art program, which was developed by two faculty members–Jim Walker, CEO of Big Car Collaborative and adjunct UIndy professor, and Kevin McKelvey, director of the program and associate professor of English–is doing just that. This multidisciplinary program connects students with degrees in art & design, theatre, dance, music and writing with community stakeholders to engage in social practice and creative placemaking. Artists who practice placemaking step outside the studio and venture off campus to actively pursue ways to engage people in surrounding neighborhoods. The result is a participatory art form that empowers and transforms communities. Social practice art is a catalyst for positive change and challenges students to incorporate questions of ethics and accountability in their work.


THEATRE CONNECTIONS The Department of Theatre provides real-life experiences for students while reinforcing alumni and community connections, from the 200th anniversary of “Frankenstein” to contemporary works such as Lauren Gunderson’s “I and You.” Providing both onstage and behind-the-scenes hands-on learning is a critical component of the program.

BÉLA FLECK R ECEI VED AN HONOR ARY DEGR EE AN D P ERFO RMED AT TH E 2018 U NI VER SI T Y OF I NDI ANAPOLI S COMMEN CEMEN T CEREMO N Y.

BÉLA FLECK AND THE UINDY EXPERIENCE “FRANKENSTEIN” ADAP TED BY AUSTI N TI CHENOR D I R ECT E D BY B R AD W RIGH T, AS S O CIATE PRO FES S OR OF THEATR E

CHRISTEL DEHAAN FINE ARTS CENTER GALLERY The Art Gallery in the Christel DeHaan Fine Arts Center annually hosts six to seven curated exhibitions. Spanning a wide range of genres and featuring local, regional and international artists, recent exhibitions included patriotic posters from World War II and the impact of female artists in the field of illustration. True to the gallery’s teaching mission, featured art explores history and current issues through a cultural lens.

Just as art can evoke remarkable change in unexpected places, UIndy’s partnerships with acclaimed artists also reveal surprisingly meaningful connections to our mission. When Béla Fleck was bestowed an honorary degree from the University during the 2018 commencement ceremony, some may have wondered, ‘Why choose a banjo player from New York for this honor? What is the relevance to the University of Indianapolis?’ It turns out, the connections are wonderfully appropriate. Fleck is a 16-time Grammy Award winner who has been nominated in more categories than any other musician. This is clear testimony to his passion for music, along with an ambition to always challenge convention by fusing and reimagining African, Celtic, bluegrass, jazz and many other musical styles with remarkable mastery. You cannot neatly categorize his work, and that quality is what makes him such a champion of true artistic expression. As an institution that takes great pride in collaboration, individuality and its own cultural impact in the city and the region, this is something that is truly valued at the University of Indianapolis. It was in that spirit that Fleck was invited to perform for thousands of students, family and friends so that they could pause and reflect on what the UIndy experience is all about.

WATCH VIDEO of Fleck’s performance portico.uindy.edu “ U NI V ERS E IN MY S H ADOW ” BY PENELO P E DU LLAGHAN

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C ONTINUED F ROM PAG E 11

» ART THERAPY to their required core content,” Feldwisch said. During the last 15 years, resources have grown, but not as “We’re training students to identify both as art therapists quickly as states like Illinois and New York where graduate and counselors.” programs in art therapy have existed for decades. In Indiana, art therapists are licensed as counselors at the state level in New this year, the program hosts meetings for the Indiana addition to being nationally registered as art therapists. Today, Art Therapy Association, which are held in the UIndy Health Pavilion and are open to the public. Students are engaged there are 68** credentialed art therapists in the state of Indiana. in research and with the addition of The University of Indianapolis and two new faculty members in fall 2018, faculty like Feldwisch are working “I find it amazing to see how music Feldwisch said, the faculty will be to grow those numbers. can help people communicate.” – further supported in their own research UIndy offers an undergraduate Conor Furgason ’20 (music therapy) agendas, which are much-needed in program in pre-art therapy, which the field. has been the most popular major Trauma, eating disorders and addictions are three main areas in the Department of Art & Design for the last three years, where art therapy practice and research are growing. Another and an art therapy concentration within the Master of Arts in area is related to technology. It creates stress for people, but Mental Health Counseling program that launched in fall 2017. we’re only starting to understand the full implications. The rise Both degrees teach students how creativity can be used to of technology–particularly among young populations–brings enhance physical, mental and emotional well-being for people with it an even greater need for creative outlets. “Passively of all ages and backgrounds. watching technology engages fewer parts of the brain “Being situated in the College of Applied Behavioral compared to art and music, which engage unique neurological Sciences sets us apart because our students have paths and relieve stress,” Feldwisch explained. the option of taking elective courses from other areas of psychology or from social work in addition

MUSIC THERAPY

THE ART AND SCIENCE OF TRAUMA

Just as art can heal, music therapy offers an increasing number of opportunities to help patients achieve goals. The University’s new music therapy program, which allows qualified musicians to graduate with a bachelor of science in music therapy, provides students with hands-on opportunities to apply innovative techniques, grow their skill sets and connect with the community. Music therapists use techniques such as improvisation, performing and listening to achieve nonmusical goals that include the patient’s physical, emotional, cognitive and social well-being. Music therapy students are paired with community partners as part of the program’s emphasis on practical experiences, including Accessibilities Inc. in Greenwood, Noble of Indiana, Riley Hospital for Children at Indiana University Health and many others. **Indiana Art Therapy Association, as of June 1, 2018

Internationally-renowned art therapist Dr. Noah Hass-Cohen visited campus in the spring to speak at the 2018 Katherine Ratliff Symposium. From working in Israel to running a graduate program in California, her work primarily focuses on the understanding that traumatic injuries live within the body and the psyche.

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LEARN MORE To learn more about UIndy’s art therapy and music therapy programs, visit uindy.edu.


&

HEALTH PAVILION ATRIUM

THE GREEN

SCHWITZER STUDENT CENTER HALLS

Get Married Give Back

Begin your marriage at the University of Indianapolis by giving back. A portion of your wedding package will support a scholarship in your honor.

CONTACT JEFFREY BARNES, DIRECTOR OF UNIVERSITY EVENTS: EVENTS@UINDY.EDU OR 317-788-3409 SCHWITZER STUDENT CENTER HALLS

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always finds its way home.

HOMECOMING SEPTEMBER 28-29

Gather your Greyhound pack for Homecoming 2018, a reunion weekend celebrating you and our multiple generations of UIndy alumni. Come back to reminisce and visit with your classmates, see Good Hall’s newly restored portico and enjoy all the festivities of Homecoming, including the Hound Hustle 5K, President’s Lunch, Homecoming Parade, your Greyhounds taking on the Lincoln University (MO) Blue Tigers, and much more.

SEPTEMBER 21-23 This fall, University of Indianapolis students will welcome their families and friends to campus for a glimpse of life at UIndy. This annual event features a weekend of exploration, fun, entertainment, faculty lectures and a Greyhound football game. Autumn is a particularly wonderful time to be on campus. We hope to see you here for Family Weekend! See what’s planned for a weekend designed for you. F R I DAY, S EP T EMB ER 2 1 // UIndy Men’s and Women’s Soccer vs. Illinois Springfield (Key Stadium), 5 p.m. & 7:30 p.m. // Greyhound Family Weekend Gathering (Good Hall Portico), 6 p.m. // Family Fun with Magician, Josh McVicar (Schwitzer

U INDY H OMECOMING 2 018 H I GH LIGHTS INCLU D E :

Student Center Atrium), 8 p.m

SAT U R DAY, S EP T EM B ER 2 2 // Professors & The Perk on the Portico, 9 a.m.

// Hound Hustle 5K Run/Walk

// Greyhound Football Game, 2 p.m. kickoff

// President’s Lunch on the lawn in front of the newly restored Good Hall

// Post-Party Jazz at Books & Brews, 8 p.m.

// Special reunions for the Class of 1968, 50-Year Club, and more // Dedication of the new School of Business Finance Lab // Annual Homecoming Parade // Tailgate Town with fun activities for the entire family

// Movie on the Field (Key Stadium), 9 p.m.

S U N DAY, S EP T EM B ER 2 3 // Christian Worship (Schwitzer Student Center, McCleary Chapel), 11 a.m. // UIndy Men’s & Women’s Soccer vs. McKendree (Key Stadium), 12 p.m. & 2:30 p.m

#UINDYFAMILY

// Greyhound Football & Halftime Show

# GREYHOU ND S FO R E VE R #U IN DYHC

MORE DETAILS AT FAMILY.UINDY.EDU

MORE DETAILS AT HOMECOMING.UINDY.EDU Follow @UIndy and #UIndyFamily on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram for news, reminders and updates during Family Weekend. 26

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SHARING A VISION

Thanks to a generous donation from University Board of Trustees Edwin “Ed” ’84 and Pamela (Pierson) Qualls ’84, new video walls enhance the technology and communication in the UIndy Health Pavilion, the state-of-the-art health education facility that was built in 2015. These high-tech screens showcase student and faculty achievements–including highlights of student artwork, videos, notifications and emergency messages. The video walls are powered through technology offered by the company, Just Add Power, where Ed serves as president. The international company, founded in 1992 in Indianapolis, is a full-service computer supplier to K-12 schools in Indiana. The company has navigated 25+ years as a specialty hardware device company for niche markets.

THE QUALLS’ UINDY STORY The Qualls began their UIndy story as undergraduates in the 1980s. They met during orientation when Ed was an orientation leader and Pam was an incoming freshman. Both had a mutual appreciation for music and were residents in one of the two coed dorms on campus, then North Hall. In the later years as students, they lived in married student housing located where Greyhound Village now stands. Ed received a bachelor’s degree in business administration and an associate’s degree in business data processing at the University of Indianapolis. He’s now the owner and president of Just Add Power. Pamela received degrees in business administration and music performance from the University of Indianapolis and an MBA from the University of Tampa. She is the executive director of UMCM Suncoast, a leading social services not-for-profit agency. She plays the flute in the orchestra of Anona United Methodist Church in Largo, where she also participates in mission work and worship arts, youth leadership and religious education. The Qualls, proud parents of two adult children, became members of the University of Indianapolis Board of Trustees in October 2016. They each attribute the University to helping shape their lives.

PA M E LA QUA LLS ’84

E DWIN QUA LLS ’8 4

“We began to realize how formative this university had been for all of us and now with all of our experience in life, we see that’s not something that happens by accident. It’s something that is created. A culture where you learn how to use your gifts to enrich other people’s lives is rare and amazing.”

Pamela Qualls ’84

LEARN MORE To learn more about the Qualls and highlights on the dedication ceremony in February, please visit portico.uindy.edu.

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C ONT I N U ED FROM PAGE 9

» HIGH-TECH NURSING SIMULATION LAB Experience in a real clinical setting is what ultimately enhances a nurse’s ability to deliver optimal patient care, and the Sim Lab at the University of Indianapolis is among the best at providing this learning opportunity for students. The robotic patient breathes, blinks, maintains variably controlled vital signs and even speaks–all manipulated by instructors on the other side of the glass from nursing students who are learning to make life-saving decisions in real-time scenarios. This technology, combined with exceptional faculty and clinical experiences, including the Nursing Academy in partnership with Community Health Network, routinely places the UIndy School of Nursing near the top of national rankings every year.

PREPARATION TO SUCCEED THE UNIVERSITY OF INDIANAPOLIS HAS A P R O U D T R A D I T I O N O F P R E PA R I N G S T U D E N T S T O P U R S U E M E D I C A L , D E N TA L AND OTHER PROFESSIONAL DEGREES IN H E A LT H F I E L D S .

“My undergrad work provided me with the critical foundation of the principles, techniques and trends that I will learn and apply in medical school.” –Casey Wendorff ’18 (biology major, chemistry minor, pre-med concentration) “Dr. Kevin Gribbins [assistant professor of biology] talked to me about how I can market my research experience wherever I choose to go. I was also

The Ron & Laura Strain Honors College provides students with the opportunity to delve into academic research that

given a lot of opportunities to showcase my skills

prepares them for a variety of careers. Casey Wendorff ’18

at UIndy.”

and Lauren Bryant ’18 will pursue medical degrees at the

–Lauren Bryant ’18 (biology and psychology)

Indiana University School of Medicine in fall 2018. Both students participated in Honors College. Bryant plans to focus on child and adolescent psychiatry, and Wendorff will concentrate on sports medicine, specializing in the knee, foot and ankle. Aura Ankita Mishra ’12 (psychology) was an Honors

“What really helped me prepare for graduate school was the Honors College independent project, where I gained firsthand experience in

College student whose induction into the National Alpha

working with actual data, running analytic models,

Chi Honors Society made her eligible for a $6,000

and interpreting results.”

fellowship at Purdue University, where she is pursuing a doctorate in human development and family studies.

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–Aura Ankita Mishra ’12 (psychology)


C ONT I NUED F ROM PAGE 6

» BRINGING HOPE But opioids are not the only issue. Addictions manifest themselves in myriad ways for which society pays a heavy price that can be measured in real economic terms. According to the National Institute on Drug Abuse, tobacco, alcohol and illicit drugs contribute to more than $740 billion annually in costs related to crime, lost work productivity and healthcare. The University aligning curriculum with pressing issues of the day is not unique. The creation of the University’s clinical psychology program, the development of the doctoral program in psychology and the formation of the College of Applied Behavioral Sciences all serve an important community need. The University’s

undergraduate and graduate programs in public health, as well as the TEACH (STEM)³ program, which aims to fill the talent gap for math and science teachers in middle and secondary schools, all address the diverse demands for solutions to contemporary social challenges. In addition, the master’s degree in social work, one of only a few in the state, prepares graduates for a broad range of high-demand careers as master’s-level preparation becomes the standard for social workers in settings that include healthcare, education, the legal system, child welfare services, and mental health and addictions.

C ONTIN U ED FROM PAG E 13

» ENGAGEMENT is complete, the art and engineering departments will both move into larger spaces that will provide opportunities for these students to further collaborate on creative and innovative projects. Additionally, these developments will allow for the expansion of the Department of Music into more classrooms within the Christel DeHaan Fine Arts Center.

C A B

Construction began on the Red Line this summer, a rapidtransit electric bus service that will link the UIndy campus to downtown Indianapolis and dozens of other destinations north, all teeming with arts, culture and entertainment. The Red Line transit plan is a critical step forward for Indianapolis to connect its neighbors and businesses, north and south, to expanded access to education, jobs and recreation. As the southernmost point on the Red Line, the University is more than just a stop along the path; it becomes a destination.

C

D

E

UNIVERSITY DEVELOPMENT PROJECTS

ABCDE-

R E D L I N E R O U T E More info at indygored.com NEW ENGINEERING AND ART & DESIGN BUILDINGS BOOKS & BREWS UNIVERSITY LOFTS COMMUNITY GARDEN GOOD HALL RENOVATION

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UINDY NEWS

UPDATES

The University Updates section is a snapshot of the accomplishments of students, faculty and the larger University community. For a full selection of news and stories, visit portico.uindy.edu SCHOOL OF BUSINESS Awards & Accolades The Master of Professional Studies in Real Estate Development cohort won the 2018 NAIOP & Urban Land Institute Challenge for the second consecutive year facing other local universities and colleges. The UIndy team received the Wally F. Holladay Entrepreneurial Excellence Award and a $5,000 scholarship provided by the Opus Foundation for their vision for the redevelopment of Lafayette Square Mall. Dr. Jerry Flatto, professor of information systems, led a team of students to Ball State for the 8th Annual CIS Case Competition, where they earned first place in all three awards categories. The competition invites students of information systems and technology, management information systems, software engineering and computer science to present projects and participate in a live case analysis. Shelby Winner ’19 (accounting), ’20 (MBA) won the 2018 Indiana ACG Student Leadership Award, the fourth UIndy student to be honored with the prestigious award in recent years. Winner is also the president of the Student Business Leadership Academy. The School of Business Entrepreneurship Club and the Center of Excellence in Leadership of Learning joined forces to run the first edition of the Imaginaction competition, the first innovation competition designed to foster high school students’ creative professional skills. The University hosted the finals in April. A panel composed by invited guests selected Decatur Central High School as the winning team. 30

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Dr. Marcos Hashimoto, associate professor of entrepreneurship in the School of Business, nominated four undergraduate students who received the Service-Learning Undergraduate Student of the Year Award–marketing majors Samantha Beckwith ’18, Nicholas Southwood ’18 and Mallory Walker ’18, and Justin Jones ’18 (operations & supply chain management)–for developing a marketing campaign for an association that collects and shares stories of women with invisible diseases.

Worldwide Service-learning and Study A group of 19 students, faculty, staff and alumni involved in the MBA program visited Hong Kong and Vietnam to explore business relations in those countries. Many of the students who participated in the trip were members of the MBA 652 Global Business Seminar class taught by Kathy Bohley, professor of international business and marketing.

DEBRA FEAKES NAMED DEAN OF THE SHAHEEN COLLEGE OF ARTS & SCIENCES Following an extensive national search, Debra Feakes was appointed dean of the Shaheen College of Arts & Sciences. In her role, which began July 1, 2018, Feakes oversees nearly 150 faculty from undergraduate and graduate programs in 16 departments, as well as the R.B. Annis School of Engineering. Feakes, a tenured full professor, previously served as the associate chair of the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry at Texas State University (San Marcos) and interim associate director of the LBJ Institute for STEM Education and Research. She has authored and co-authored numerous publications in peer-reviewed journals, and received more than $3 million in grants/funding for several research projects and protocols, including from the National Science Foundation. Feakes completed her undergraduate degree in mineral engineering chemistry at the Colorado School of Mines (1986) and a Doctor of Philosophy in chemistry from Utah State University (1991). Before entering the academic ranks, she served as a postdoctoral research associate at the University of California at Los Angeles. She is a recipient of many honors and awards for her commitment to undergraduate teaching and was named a 2016 Piper Professor and a 2017 Regents Teacher; and was named the 2015-2016 Presidential Fellow at Texas State University (San Marcos).

Read more at portico.uindy.edu

Six students from the Student Business Leadership Academy (SBLA) made the 12-hour drive to Savannah, GA, to help Coastal Empire Habitat For Humanity for the second consecutive year. Master of Professional Studies: Human Resource Development and Administration (MPS-HRDA) student Ann Denis ’18 was awarded the inaugural Outstanding MPSHRDA Scholar Award. This award recognizes outstanding scholarship in the program. Courtney Carpenter ’18 (MPSHRDA) spent nearly a month overseas completing an intensive internship in Thailand with Destiny

D R . J E R R Y F L AT T O ( L ) W I T H S T U D E N T S AT T H E 8TH ANNUAL CIS CASE COMPETITION.


UINDY NEWS

Rescue, a nonprofit organization that helps individuals, particularly children, who are victims of human trafficking. Carpenter used this experience as the basis for her master’s capstone project to complete her MPS-HRDA degree.

Dr. Olawale published “Enhanced fabrication process for in situ triboluminescent optical fiber sensor for multifunctional composites” in Measurement.

Campus Hosts HR Convention

ARTS & SCIENCES

In February, the UIndy Student Human Resources organization hosted the Indiana State Student SHRM conference on campus. The event brings together human resource students from student SHRM chapters around the state.

R.B. ANNIS SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING Students & Faculty Present at Engineering Conference Two students from the R. B. Annis School of Engineering participated in the poster presentation at the 2018 American Society for Engineering Education IL-IN Section Conference in April. Allison Zwickl ’20 (software engineering) presented her team’s work on the design of a custom orthosis for enhanced patient healing outcomes. Bailey Wilder ’20 (software engineering) presented his team’s work on the design of a mobile water distribution system, a project sponsored by Citizens Energy Group. Also attending the conference were Dr. Stephen Spicklemire, associate professor of physics, and Dr. David Olawale, assistant professor of engineering. Dr. Olawale presented a paper co-authored with Dr. Jose Sanchez, director of the R. B. Annis School of Engineering, and Dr. Spicklemire, titled, “UIndy Engineering DesignSpine: Engineering Leadership Development through Interdisciplinary Teams and Early Exposure to Real Life Problems.”

Faculty Research Dr. Octavian Nicolio, associate professor of engineering, published “Extending an Interpreter program written in C++ over a computer network using the TCP protocol” in the Academic Journal of Science.

SHAHEEN COLLEGE OF

AN T HR O PO LO GY Faculty Publications Dr. Christopher Moore ’04, chair and associate professor of anthropology, published two papers in edited volumes, both co-authored by Dr. Richard Jefferies of the University of Kentucky. The first, “Maintaining Relations with Deer: A Day-in-theLife in the Middle Archaic” was published in the book “Investigating the Ordinary: Everyday Matters in Southeast Archaeology.” The second paper, “Mission San Joseph de Sapala: 17th Century Franciscan Mission Efforts on Sapelo Island, Georgia,” appears in the book “Franciscans and American Indians in Pan-Borderlands Perspective.”

EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT MARK WEIGAND RETIRES After more than 38 years of service to the University of Indianapolis, Mark Weigand, executive vice president for campus affairs and enrollment services, has retired. Weigand served as an architect of the University’s enrollment and financial aid programs that have produced records in each of the years he has been in office. His accomplishments significantly contributed to recruitment efforts during a time when many other Midwest institutions were struggling with enrollment. These efforts were recognized with a 2014 Distinguished Faculty/Staff Alumni Award and the 2002 Indiana Association for College Admission Counseling award. Weigand has been a wonderful consultant, providing much needed institutional memory and connecting present day decisions to the University’s mission and tradition. We will miss his guidance, energy and creativity.

Dr. Christopher Schmidt, professor of anthropology, was featured on the nationally syndicated radio program, “Academic Minute,” to discuss his research on the diets of ancient peoples. He is co-editing a volume entitled “Dental Wear in Evolutionary and Biocultural Perspectives” and serves on the editorial board of the Journal of Paleopathology.

Student Scholarship Awards Christa Kelly (MS ’17) was accepted into the anthropology Ph.D. program at the University of Arkansas with a full tuition fellowship. Elizabeth Straub (BS ’16, MS ’17) was accepted into the anthropology Ph.D. program at the University of Kentucky with a full tuition assistantship.

I N F E B R U A R Y, T H E R . B . A N N I S S C H O O L O F E N G I N E E R I N G SCHOLARSHIP COMPETITION CHALLENGED HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS TO WORK TOGETHER TO PRODUCE A PLAN FOR A P R O T O T Y P E I C E M E LT E R . T H E S T U D E N T S W E R E J U D G E D O N T H E I R T E A M W O R K , P R E S E N TAT I O N S K I L L S A N D C R E AT I V I T Y. E L E V E N S T U D E N T S E A R N E D F U L L- R I D E S C H O L A R S H I P S .

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UINDY NEWS

ART & D E S I G N

winner in the 2017 Print Regional Design Awards for her Hullabaloo Press logo. Her entry was featured in the winter issue of Print magazine and was celebrated on the Regional Design Annual website.

Exhibitions on Illustration and Interactive Art “Illustration: Women Making A Mark,” an exhibition held in January at the Christel DeHaan Fine Arts Center, celebrated the work of female artists from around the globe. Randi Frye, assistant professor of art & design, curated the exhibition, which also highlighted the Department of Art & Design’s newest concentration within the studio art degree: animation/illustration. In addition, the gallery hosted the Art & Design Juried Student Exhibition and “Art of Persuasion: World War II Patriotic Posters” during the winter semester. The University and Big Car presented “Art: A Social Practice” during May’s First Friday event, featuring work by graduate students in the social practice art program: Lauren Ditchley ‘18, Linnea Gartin ’18, Brittany Kugler ’18, Emma Landwerlen ’18 and Danielle Wilborn ‘18. The students created an interactive show inviting visitors to explore the Garfield Park neighborhood.

Printmaking Program is Making its Mark The first three art & design students with print concentrations graduated in May. Kalia Daily, Auna Winters and Emily Bradley completed the printmaking concentration coursework to earn Bachelor of Fine Arts degrees. All three alumni are enrolling in UIndy graduate programs. Katherine Fries ’07, ‘11, assistant professor of art & design, served as presenter and moderator for “Letterpress: Charting the Un/Familiar,” at the College Book Arts Association Conference in Philadelphia, and is now serving on the Membership & Nominations Committee for the College Book Arts Association. Fries was a Teacher of the Year finalist and was honored with the Faculty Achievement Award for Scholarship & Service. Her artwork was featured in the following exhibitions: “Painting & Printmaking,” The Dunn Gallery, Oakland City University, Portland, IN (Solo Exhibition) and “Why Letterpress?”: Experimental Adventures Exhibition, Mainframe Studios Gallery, Des Moines, IA (Juried Invitational). Randi Frye, assistant professor of art & design, was selected as a regional

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RON WILKS NAMED VICE PRESIDENT OF ENROLLMENT MANAGEMENT Ron Wilks was promoted to Vice President of Enrollment Management, effective July 1, 2018. He has worked at the University since the summer of 1991 under the leadership of Mark Weigand. He also completed an undergraduate degree in history and a master’s degree in business administration from the University of Indianapolis. “As I thought about how to go about finding the talent to continue the work that Mark did, I realized that we had access to someone in our own backyard,” President Robert Manuel said. Wilks has been recognized across the nation as an expert in admissions and enrollment management strategies by the Indiana National Association for College Admissions Counseling (serving as president in 2005) and its National Organization (NACAC). His work has also been acknowledged with several awards including the 2008 Indiana Association for College Admissions Counseling Distinguished Service Award, and he sits on the national advisory board for the University’s inquiry management software system.

Nicole Hopf ’18 (pre-art therapy) and Paige Stratton ‘18 (studio art, photography concentration) were selected to display at the Indianapolis Arts Center’s 2018 College Invitational Exhibition. Hopf’s piece was called “A Collection of Memories” and Stratton’s piece was titled “Difficult to Hide.” Jenna Krall ‘18 (visual communication design) was honored with a Student Gold ADDY Award from the American Advertising Association for packaging design. Lauren Raker ’19 (studio art) was selected for the competitive Hatch Internship Program at the Historic Hatch Show Print in Nashville, TN. She will complete her internship this summer. Auna Winters’ ’18 woodcut “Lemon Shake Up” was selected for the Fletcher Place Arts’ Juried Exhibition Fruit Salad. It was also chosen to be the promotional piece for the exhibition.

BIOLOGY Arachnid Discovery

Read more at portico.uindy.edu

Dr. Marc Milne, assistant professor of biology, published “A new species of spider (Araneae, Linyphiidae, Islandiana) from a southern Indiana cave” in Subterranean Biology. His work was covered by Fox News, MSN Australia, the CBC (Canada) and Gizmodo.

“ I L L U S T R AT I O N : W O M E N M A K I N G A M A R K ,” AT T H E C H R I S T E L D E H A A N F I N E A R T S C E N T E R G A L L E R Y.

Dr. Milne and four undergraduate students–Emily Stern ’19 (environmental science), Baothu Dinh ’18 (biology), Brodrick Deno ’18 (environmental science) and Lucas Frandsen ’19 (human


THE BEYOND BORDERS TEAM I N S TA L L E D W AT E R S TAT I O N S

CH EMIST RY

COMMU NICATION

Faculty and Alumni Honored

Faculty Publications & Research

Dr. Levi Mielke, assistant professor of chemistry, was honored as Teacher of the Year and carried the mace during May’s graduation ceremony.

IN THE TEXAS BORDERLANDS.

biology)–presented research at the 2018 Indiana Academy of Science Conference in March. In June, Dr. Milne presented research conducted with Baothu Dinh at the 2018 American Arachnological Society conference in Ypsilanti, MI.

Grants & Research Dr. Daniel Scholes, assistant professor of biology, started work as an external collaborator on a $91,800 grant funded by Agriculture and Agri-Foods Canada led by principal investigator Jillian Bainard (AAFC). In July, Dr. Scholes presented the results of a study conducted with Hannah Haller ’18 (biology) as her 2017 Summer Research Institute project supported by the Health Career Opportunity Program. The presentation took place in Montreal, Quebec, Canada, at the Plant Biology annual meeting. Dr. Douglas Stemke, associate professor of biology and presidentelect of the Indiana Branch of the American Society for Microbiology, was the host for the 2018 IBASM branch meeting sponsored by the Department of Biology.

Beyond Borders Dr. Krista Latham, director of the University of Indianapolis Human Identification Center and associate professor of biology, returned to the Texas borderlands in January and May to advance her humanitarian work with graduate students who are part of the University’s Beyond Borders Team. The group continued its collaboration with the South Texas Human Rights Center to install water stations and prevent migrant deaths.

Dr. Latham’s new book, co-edited with Alyson O’Daniel, assistant professor of anthropology, sheds light on the migrant death crisis by discussing the circumstances that force people to seek refuge in the United States. “The Sociopolitics of Migrant Death and Repatriation: Perspectives from Forensic Science” also explores the reasons why migrant deaths have reached mass disaster proportions and the techniques employed by forensic scientists to locate and identify the dead.

Raising Awareness of the Disappeared

DR. LEVI MIELKE

Karly Bryans ’17 (chemistry) graduated from the Franciscan Health Clinical Laboratory Science Program in May. The 10-month program was established in 1967 and is dedicated to preparing professional medical technologists with the theoretical and practical training to serve as active members of the healthcare team in clinical laboratory science.

Internationally-acclaimed journalist Dawn Paley gave an on-campus talk about community-led efforts in Mexico to locate the bodies of disappeared citizens. Student members of F.O.U.N.D. (Forensics at UIndy), advised by Dr. Latham, organized the discussion. Paley contributed a chapter to Dr. Latham’s book, “The Sociopolitics of Migrant Death and Repatriation.”

Dr. Steven Koehn, assistant professor of communication, presented at the 18th International Conference on Knowledge, Culture and Change in Organizations at Konstanz, Germany, in March. Abby Land ’19 (communication with journalism emphasis; international relations) was awarded a prestigious Eugene S. Pulliam Internship through the Hoosier State Press Association Foundation. Land is interning this summer at The Republic in Columbus, IN.

Presenting Research More than a dozen students and faculty, including Dr. Latham and Dr. Stephen Nawrocki, professor of biology, traveled to Seattle for the 70th Annual Scientific Meeting of the American Academy of Forensic Sciences (AAFS) in February. Current faculty and students gave five presentations, and 10 alumni also attended.

Dr. Rebecca Gilliland, professor of communication, published a textbook, “Writing Winning Proposals: Public Relations Cases.” She is using the textbook in her public relations analysis and applied public relations classes. Dr. Gilliland is director of the public relations program and faculty advisor for the University’s chapter of the Public Relations Student Society of America (PRSSA) and Top Dog Communication, the University’s student-run public relations agency.

Speech and Debate Team

K A R LY B R YA N S ’ 17 R E C E I V E D A C E R T I F I C AT E A N D P I N D U R I N G G R A D U AT I O N C E R E M O N I E S F R O M F R A N C I S C A N H E A LT H ’ S C L I N I C A L L A B O R AT O R Y SCIENCE PROGRAM.

The UIndy Speech and Debate Team competed in several regional and state championships. The team, led by Stephanie Wideman, assistant professor of communication, finished third in the overall team sweepstakes category at the Indiana Forensics Association State Championship in February. In March, several team members traveled to Suffolk University in Boston to compete in the Novice National Championship. SUMMER/FALL 2018

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The team earned fifth place (out of 24 competing schools), and individual participants were ranked among the top five in the nation. Varsity team members also traveled to Tennessee State University in Nashville to compete in the Pi Kappa Delta National Championship. The regular season finished off with a team member being named a national quarterfinalist in two events at the National Speech Championship hosted by the University of Nebraska-Lincoln.

down to one book each in three categories. The recipients are: Chad V. Broughman’s the forsaken…, the 2018 Chapbook Prize in Prose; Robert Campbell’s In the Herald of Improbable Misfortunes, the 2018 Chapbook Prize in Poetry; and James R. Gapinski’s Edge of the Known Bus Line, the 2018 Novella Prize. The books are available for purchase on Amazon.

Shayla Cabalan ’20 (communication & English) and Vanessa Hickman ’19 (operations and supply chain management) earned the honor of representing Indiana at the Interstate Oratory Association’s (IOA) Persuasive Competition hosted by Monmouth College in Illinois. Their speeches will be published in IOA’s annual book.

Tim Evans and Alvie Lindsay of The Indianapolis Star were honored as Community Partners of the Year at the Community Campus Forum in April. Dr. Jeanne Criswell, director of the journalism program, nominated Evans and Lindsay for their collaboration and mentorship during a newly conceived investigative reporting course. They provided expert guidance and opinion to students who worked on an investigative story about the Mayor’s Action Center published by the newspaper under the students’ bylines.

Rebecca McKanna, assistant professor of English, was honored with the 2018 Fiction Award from Third Coast Magazine for her work, “The Real Thing.”

Staff of 30.1 included English majors Kylie Seitz ’19, Spencer Martin ’18, Jimmy Nelligan ’18, Shauna Sartoris ’20, Sara Perkins ’20, Paige Stratton ’18, Jessica Marvel ’20, Duncan Weir ’20, and Kate Watts ’18 (English, literary studies concentration). Advisor: Liz Whiteacre, assistant professor of English.

GLOBAL LA N GUAGE S &

Faculty and Students Study in Scotland

Achieving Success in Journalism The staff of The Reflector and The Reflector Online won 22 Indiana Collegiate Press Association statelevel journalism awards in April. The student-run publications were also recognized with three regional journalism awards in the Society of Professional Journalists Mark of Excellence competition.

Etchings was recognized by the Indiana Collegiate Press Association 2018 Awards. The magazine won second place for “Literary Magazine of the Year.”

Celebrating the 30th birthday of Etchings Literary and Fine Arts Magazine, students produced two magazines (volumes 30.1 and 30.2) to highlight new and past talent. Student editors reached out to more than 400 alumni before printing Issue 30.2, which included many updated biographies of the writers, artists, and staff who’ve made Etchings an exceptional publication.

Dr. Jen Camden, associate chair and professor of English; Dr. Molly Martin, chair and associate professor of English; Kevin McKelvey, associate professor of English; and Barney Haney, assistant professor of English, led students from the Scottish Literature course on a trip to Scotland over spring break. The Ron & Laura Strain Honors College provided significant support to subsidize the travel of participating Honors College students.

Faculty Publications Dr. Leah Milne, assistant professor of English, published a chapter in “Growing up Asian-American in Young Adult Fiction,” from the University Press of Mississippi. The chapter is titled, “The Melting Pot Boiled Over: Hawaiian Identity and Self-Authorship in Lois-Ann Yamanaka’s Name Me Nobody and Blu’s Hanging.” The book is now available for purchase.

ENGLIS H Etchings Press Etchings Press, the University of Indianapolis student-run publisher, announced the recipients of the 2018 Book Prizes. To choose the winners, students in the Etchings Press class narrowed 56 submissions S T U D E N T S PA R T I C I PAT E D I N T H E S C O T T I S H L I T E R AT U R E C O U R S E D U R I N G S P R I N G B R E A K .

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CROSS -CU LTUR A L STUD IE S Cultural Events and Humanitarian Efforts The department hosted for the second year the “Fiesta, Fête, Fest,” a two-day event celebrating languages and cultures around the world. More than 150 students attended. Dr. Eduard Arriaga, assistant professor of Spanish, hosted a humanitarian mapathon on campus. The digital activity focused on mapping to help relieve the posthurricane crisis in Puerto Rico and the post-earthquake crisis in Mexico City.

Publishing Acclaim Dr. Eduard Arriaga presented a scholarly paper on Post-Conflict and Visual Representation in Colombia at the Kentucky Foreign Language Conference (University of Kentucky). He served as advisor for Aliyah McCorkle ’21 (Spanish), who presented “Mixing Colors: Race in Latin American Literature” at Butler University’s Undergraduate Research Conference. Dr. Arriaga also published book chapters in three essay collections. Dr. Ana Maria Ferreira, assistant professor of Spanish, presented at the American Comparative Literature Association annual meeting at UCLA a paper about the biblical idea of greed in several Latin American colonial texts. She also published a scholarly paper, “Indigenous Feminism” (INOLAS Publishers LTD.), focused on how women of color are included in or excluded from mainstream feminism. Dr. Ferreira was invited to write about the relationship between Marxism and feminism by the Goethe Institute magazine (South America), and the article is being translated into Portuguese and German. Dr. Ferreira also continues to collaborate as a columnist for the Colombian magazine “Razon Pública,” and she was recently invited to be part of the magazine’s board.


UINDY NEWS

JOHN KUYKENDALL NAMED DEAN OF THE SCHOOL OF EDUCATION John Kuykendall, III, Ph.D., was appointed dean of the School of Education effective July 1, 2018. He most recently served as a tenured associate professor of education and as the director for the School of Education at the University of Arkansas at Little Rock. In his administrative role at Little Rock, he oversaw 27 undergraduate and graduate degree programs in teacher education and educational leadership. Before arriving at Little Rock, he was a faculty member at Marquette University in Milwaukee, where he oversaw the College of Student Affairs Program and taught graduate courses in higher education. Kuykendall’s research areas address several of the most pressing concerns in higher education today: achieving college readiness for first-generation students, developing new models for college recruitment and retention, and how social class structures impact children’s abilities to attend and be prepared for higher education. He plans to continue these lines of scholarly inquiry and to seek external funding to support these important projects. A native of Pine Bluff, Arkansas, Kuykendall began his baccalaureate studies at the University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff, where he earned a Bachelor of Science in biology education. He earned a Master of Science in educational leadership from Christian Brothers University in Memphis, Tennessee, and earned a Ph.D. from Indiana University in higher education administration.

Read more at portico.uindy.edu

SAMANTHA BURKEY ’18 AND MADDIE KINTNER ’19 RECEIVED THE O U T S TA N D I N G F U T U R E M U S I C E D U C AT O R AWARD. (BRENDA C L A R K , D E PA R T M E N T OF MUSIC CHAIR, CENTER)

German Faculty and Student Research

UIndy Jazz Week Brings in Top Talent

Dr. Paul Levesque, assistant professor of German, co-led a study abroad trip to India with Dr. Milind Thakar, chair and associate professor of international relations in March 2018. Patricia Cabrera, instructor of Spanish, and Dr. Arriaga led students on the “Urban Spaces: Madrid, Barcelona and Rome” to Spain and Italy, while Dr. Julie Kiefer, study abroad advisor, and Dr. Ferreira led a group of students on the “4 Countries, Many Adventures” spring term trip to Switzerland, Liechtenstein, Austria and Germany. Cabrera also led a group of students to Costa Rica during Spring Term.

The University celebrated Jazz Appreciation Month with the 11th Annual Jazz Week in April, featuring prominent combos and big bands of local, regional and national renown. Guest artists included guitarist Dave Stryker, trumpeter Chad McCullough and saxophonist Dick Oatts.

Dr. Levesque served as a board member of the Humanities Research & Education Association and hosted a “German Road Trip” through Indianapolis for students in April. Dr. Gerburg Garmann, professor of German and French Language & Literature, served as a board member of the Humanities Education & Research Association (HERA). Dr. Garmann presented research at the 2018 HERA conference in Chicago, and coached UIndy’s first interdisciplinary undergraduate research team: Rachael Walter ’21 (exploratory) and David Kurz ’18 (sport management), who presented research at the conference.

Student Awards Samantha Burkey ’18 (choral/ general music education) and Maddie Kintner ’19 (instrumental/ general music education) received the Outstanding Future Music Educator Award at the Indiana Music Education Association’s annual professional development conference in Fort Wayne in January. Burkey and Kintner are among an elite group of 18 UIndy students to receive the award over the past 10 years. Logan Fox ‘17 (music performance, percussion) was named the 2018 Aeolian Classics Emerging Artist in partnership with the Chicago College of Performing Arts at Roosevelt University. The award will allow Fox to record a debut album for Aeolian Classics during the summer. He also performed at Chicago venues this spring, including the Chicago Cultural Center, the 19th Century Club and PianoForte Chicago.

Dr. Garmann also led an interdisciplinary workshop for neuroscientists at Harvard University in July.

MU SIC Trumpet Conference Features Doc Severinsen In March, the Department of Music hosted the University’s Second Annual Trumpet Conference in conjunction with the International Trumpet Guild. Headliners included the legendary trumpeter from the Tonight Show with Johnny Carson, Doc Severinsen. Severinsen, along with international soloist Rex Richardson and several other musicians, presented a day of clinics and finished with a concert in Christel Dehaan Fine Arts Center. Larry Powell, adjunct faculty member, chaired the conference planning committee that included Department of Music Chair Dr. Brenda Clark and several other music faculty members.

L O G A N F O X ‘ 17 ( M U S I C PERFORMANCE, PERCUSSION)

Music Partnerships Drew Petersen, 2017 American Pianists Awards winner, Christel DeHaan fellow and University of Indianapolis artist-in-residence, returned to campus in February for master classes and a solo repertoire and concerto collaboration with the University’s Chamber Orchestra, sponsored by Katz, Sapper & Miller. Petersen brings unique learning experiences to students in the music program with master classes, SUMMER/FALL 2018

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UINDY NEWS

private coachings, lectures and performances, which are part of the partnership between the American Pianists Association and the University.

Alumni & Faculty Performances Brandon Vos ’18 (music performance) was named the winner of the Indiana Music Teachers Association (IMTA) annual Hoosier Auditions, held at Indiana Wesleyan University in May. Vos performed music of Haydn, Liszt and Griffes in the final round of the collegiate division. In addition to a cash prize, he has been invited to perform at the IMTA conference in October. Vos was a student of Dr. Richard Ratliff, professor of music. In April, Dr. Mitzi Westra, assistant professor of music, performed Ottorino Respighi’s “Il Tramonto” at the Indiana Historical Society with the Grammy Award-winning Pacifica Quartet as part of the Ensemble Music Series. Austin Hartman, former assistant professor in the Department of Music and creator of the Indianapolis Quartet, is now the second violinist in this internationally acclaimed string quartet.

PHYS I C S The American Association of Physics Teachers (AAPT) recognized Dr. Steve Spicklemire, associate professor of physics, with its Homer L. Dodge Citation for Distinguished Service to AAPT. The honor is presented to members in recognition of their exceptional contributions to the association at the national, sectional or local level.

PO L I T I CAL S C I EN CE Partnership with McKinney School of Law The University of Indianapolis established a partnership with Indiana University Robert H. McKinney School of Law, through which one UIndy student or alumni will be named a Law Scholar each year, beginning in the 2018-19 academic year. The UIndy Law Scholar will receive a minimum half-tuition scholarship throughout law school, as well as a guaranteed experiential learning opportunity. Efforts to establish the partnership were conducted by Dr. David A. Root, assistant professor of political science, in his capacity as prelaw advisor and faculty advisor to the Pre-Law Student Association. Three students earned distinguished scholarships at McKinney School of Law for the 2018-19 academic year:

THE INDIANAPOLIS QUARTET MADE THEIR CHICAGO DEBUT IN MARCH AT N O R T H W E S T E R N U N I V E R S I T Y ’ S LUTKIN CONCERT HALL, AND P E R F O R M E D AT T H E C H R I S T E L

Schuylar Casto ’18 (history, political science, pre-law minor, Honors College) was awarded the Kennedy Scholar, the law school’s top scholarship. It consists of a full-tuition scholarship and living stipend throughout law school. Schuylar is the first UIndy student to receive this prestigious award.

SOCIOLOGY CHAIR AMANDA MILLER RECEIVES 2018 GOODE BOOK AWARD Amanda Miller, associate professor and chair of sociology, recently received the 2018 Goode Book Award for Cohabitation Nation: Gender, Class, and the Remaking of Relationships, a book she co-authored with Sharon Sassler of Cornell University. The William J. Goode Book Award is the most prestigious book award in the field of family sociology. The award will be formally given at the American Sociological Association meeting in Philadelphia in August 2018. “Looking at the list of past recipients, I am completely humbled to have my name appear next to theirs,” Miller said. Cohabitation Nation, which was featured in national media outlets, including The New York Times and NPR, explores why more unwed Americans are living together than ever before, and how that trend is redefining relationships.

Jason Marshall ’17 (political science and pre-law minor) has been awarded the Jump Scholarship. This distinguished

DEHAAN FINE ARTS CENTER RUTH L I L LY P E R F O R M A N C E H A L L I N A P R I L .

AMANDA MILLER’S BOOK

THE QUARTET ALSO PERFORMED LIVE

RECEIVED EXTENSIVE

O N “ I N D Y S T Y L E ” O N W I S H -T V.

N AT I O N A L M E D I A AT T E N T I O N A N D A N AT I O N A L A W A R D .

P HILO S O P H Y & R E L IG I O N Dr. Perry Kea, associate professor of religion, published “Silencing Jesus with Theology: From Parable to Allegory” in The Fourth R, Jan/ Feb, 2018 issue. Dr. Kea was also recognized for 35 years of service to the University.

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J A S O N M A R S H A L L ’ 17 W I T H INDIANA SUPREME COURT C H I E F J U S T I C E L O R E T TA R U S H .


UINDY NEWS

award consists of a two-thirds scholarship throughout law school and an experiential learning opportunity after completion of the first year of study. Marshall is the first UIndy student to receive this award. Marshall was also named a UIndy Law Scholar. Jimmy Sedam ’17 (political science and pre-law minor) has also been named a UIndy Law Scholar. Marshall and Sedam are the first UIndy Law Scholars.

Governor’s Fellowship Selects UIndy Grad Daniel Miller ’18 (political science) has been named an Indiana Governor’s Fellow for 2018-19 by Gov. Eric Holcomb (R). The Governor’s Fellowship is a highly selective program, recruiting talent from across the state to serve in various state agencies on a rotating basis over the course of a year. Fellows participate in the daily activities of state government, complete special projects and experience firsthand how policies are made.

Indiana Supreme Court Chief Justice Speaks on Campus In March, Indiana Supreme Court Chief Justice Loretta Rush delivered the keynote address at the inaugural Pre-Law Student Association Judicial Lecture Series. Organized by Dr. David A. Root, assistant professor of political science, the Chief Justice discussed why students should consider their roles as future leaders to help meet the challenges facing our communities.

Faculty Expertise in the News Dr. Laura Wilson, assistant professor of political science, was featured on PBS NewsHour, a nationally syndicated program. Dr. Wilson also appeared on local television and radio outlets to offer expert analysis on the May primary and other political news.

SO CIO LO GY Research and Recognition Faculty and graduate students presented research at the Southern Sociological Society in New Orleans in April:

the Schwitzer Dining Hall, featuring 37 Shakespeare plays in 97 minutes. Students also performed Lauren Gunderson’s “I and You” during the winter semester.

PHYLIS LAN LIN CELEBRATES 45 YEARS OF SERVICE Phylis Lan Lin, who is retiring after 45 years of service to the University of Indianapolis, is known by multiple titles: professor of sociology, executive director of University of Indianapolis Press, director of Asian programs and associate vice president for international partnerships. She was also the driving force behind the creation of the Phylis Lan Lin Department of Social Work. Dr. Lin joined the University faculty in 1973 with a passion for enhancing diversity and internationalization on campus. She played an integral role in forming accredited partnerships with Chinese institutions and establishing the Chinese Student Alumni Association, making frequent trips overseas to forge new relationships. Most recently, Dr. Lin was recognized at the Zhejiang Yuexiu University and Ningbo Institute of Technology commencements for outstanding service and was also appointed as the director of the Center for Research and Planning by the president of Assumption University. “We are incredibly proud of Dr. Lin’s achievements. She is one of the hardest working members of our department and an integral part of our team. We are grateful for her fantastic 45 years of service,” said Amanda Miller, associate professor and chair of sociology.

Dr. Tim Maher, professor of sociology, and Megan Lalioff ’18 (M.A., applied sociology): “Toxic Re-branding: Contaminated Communities in the Age of Gentrification.” Co-author: Matthew Byrd ’18 (M.A., applied sociology). Angie Calvert ’18 (M.A., applied sociology): “The Role of Marketing and Public Relations in Gentrification.” Dr. Jim Pennell, professor of sociology: “Selectively Local: Why Restaurants and Bars Sell Local Beers but Reject Local Wines.” The department recognized three students at its annual awards dinner in April. Esraa Bintalib ’18 (sociology), was honored with the Henricks Award, presented to the

student with the highest GPA in the department. Marlena Muszak ’18 (M.A., applied sociology) was recognized with the Youngblood Award, in recognition of outstanding commitment and service to the community. The Center for ServiceLearning & Community Engagement also presented Muszak with the Service-Learning Graduate Student of the Year Award. Matthew Byrd ’18 was honored with the Praxis Award, which promotes action through leadership and initiative.

T H EAT RE Department of Theatre students presented “Dinner Theatre: The Complete Works of William Shakespeare (Abridged) [Revised]” at

1,400 theatre students from around the Midwest visited campus for the 50th Kennedy Center American College Theatre Festival. University Production Manager Christian McKinney received the festival’s Region III Faculty Service Award for her expertise in planning the event.

SCHOOL OF EDUCATION School Receives Full Accreditation The School of Education recently received full accreditation for the next seven years, at the initial-licensure level with no areas for improvement, through the Council for the Accreditation of Educator Preparation (CAEP), the single specialized accreditor for educator preparation in the United States. This accreditation status is effective Spring 2018 through Spring 2025, with the next site visit taking place in Fall 2024.

(STEM)³ Highlights Dr. Jean Lee’s recent book, “Rigor, Relevance and Relationships: Making Mathematics Come Alive with ProjectBased Learning,” was published by the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics. Dr. Lee is associate director of the Teach (STEM)³ Program. Deb Sachs, director of the Teach (STEM)³ Program, co-presented a session with Teach (STEM)³ scholars Meredith Weir ’18 and Elena Graham ’18 at the Hoosier Association of Science Teachers Annual Conference in February 2018.

Faculty & Student Accolades John Somers, School of Education graduate programs director, Rachael Aming-Attai, assistant professor of teacher education, and Gaoming Zhang, associate professor of teacher education, published an article in ECampusNews.com about using technology to prepare teachers to teach elementary math. Three students were recognized as “Outstanding Future Educators” at the Indiana Association of Colleges of Teacher Education (IACTE): Lyndsy Eslinger ’18 (elementary education), Lakeesha Turner ’18 (MAT) and Amanda Johnson-Hodge ’17 (secondary education). SUMMER/FALL 2018

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UINDY NEWS

COLLEGE OF APPLIED BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES Addictions Counseling Programs Announced The University of Indianapolis is supporting the nationwide fight against addiction with the introduction of two new graduate programs in Addictions Counseling. Learn more on pages 6-7. The College of Applied Behavioral Sciences developed a partnership with Laurel Woods to provide students with practicum/clinical experience through the YMCA.

Student Awarded Fellowship Jazmin Atzhorn ’19 (M.A., mental health counseling) received a Minority Fellowship Program Services for Transition Age Youth (STAY) fellowship from the American Psychological Association. The fellowship program supports master’s level training for clinicians who hope to work with transitioning adults.

COLLEGE OF HEALTH

CASSIDY BRUNER ’19 (LEFT)

CAREER CHANGERS The Teach (STEM)³ Noyce Initiative provides built-in mentorship, preparation and support for career changers in STEM fields wishing to pursue teaching opportunities. The one-year clinical residency program addresses the growing need for STEM teachers by providing a full tuition stipend for professionals in those fields to become high school teachers as they pursue a Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT). Partnering with local schools is a vital component of the program. Jas’Minique (Jazz) Potter ’18 (MAT), who previously worked as a design engineer for Rolls-Royce Corp. in Indianapolis, is now teaching at a central Indiana high school. Potter was among the first cohort who recently graduated from the program, who have all obtained teaching positions at area schools.

SCIENCES Read more at portico.uindy.edu

I NTER P R O F E S S I O NAL HEALT H & AGI N G ST U DI ES Danielle Bellows ’18 received the Outstanding Doctoral Project Award from the Doctor of Health Science Program in the Department of Interprofessional Health & Aging Studies. Dr. Heidi Ewen, director of the Master of Science in Healthcare Management program, presented “Helping Seniors Age in Place: Roles of HCBS Providers,” at the LeadingAge Indiana annual conference. Dr. Laura Santurri, director of the Doctor of Health Science (DHSc) program, was named the chair of the newly-formed Interprofessional Health and Aging Studies Department (IHAS), which includes DHSc, Aging Studies, and the new Master of Science in Healthcare Management.

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Three Master of Science in Gerontology students presented capstone presentations in May on issues from dementia to chronic pain in the aging population: Kyra Clements, Tyler Etchison and Pamela Lindley.

K I N ES I O LO GY Faculty & Student Achievements Dr. Nathan Eckert, assistant professor of kinesiology, published research in ProQuest: “Differential processing of nociceptive input within upper limb muscles.” Dr. Jennifer VanSickle, professor of kinesiology, and Dr. Isabell Mills, assistant professor of kinesiology, presented “The Utilization of Academic Advisory Boards in Sport Management” at the Commission on Sport Management Accreditation conference in Tampa, Fl.

Cassidy Bruner ’19 (health & physical education) was honored as a Society of Health and Physical Educators (SHAPE) Major of the Year at the SHAPE America National Convention in Nashville, Tenn. Roberta Sipe, the University’s HPE program coordinator, nominated Bruner for the honor.

OCCU PAT IONAL T H ERAPY Faculty & Student Research Dr. Taylor McGann and Dr. Sally Wasmuth, assistant professors of occupational therapy, presented research separately at the Indiana Occupational Therapy Association’s Spring Conference at Franciscan Health Center in Lafayette, IN. The 2018 American Occupational Therapy Association Annual Conference took place in Salt Lake City, where several faculty, students and alumni from the School of

Occupational Therapy presented research, including Dr. Julie Bednarski, assistant director and Master of Occupational Therapy program director; Dr. Lori Breeden, assistant professor; Dr. Jennifer Fogo, associate professor; Dr. Lisa Borrero, assistant professor of Interprofessional Health and Aging Studies; Dr. Kate DeCleene Huber, School of Occupational Therapy chair and Doctor of Occupational Therapy program director; Dr. Brenda Howard, assistant professor; Dr. Rebecca Barton, associate professor and OTD academic fieldwork coordinator; Dr. Katie Polo, assistant professor; Dr. Beth-Ann Walker, associate professor; and Dr. Sally Wasmuth, assistant professor.

KRANNERT SCHOOL OF PHYSICAL THERAPY Faculty & Student Research Ed Jones, assistant professor of physical therapy, presented an education session at the Great Lakes Athletic Training Association annual conference in Chicago. Jones also assumed the role of faculty advisor for physical therapy students at the Student Outreach Clinic. Several faculty and students from the Krannert School of Physical Therapy presented scholarly research at the Combined Sections Meeting of the American Physical Therapy Association in New Orleans. Participants included Dr. Frank Bates, assistant professor and physical therapist assistant program director; Dr. Erin Peterson, assistant professor of occupational therapy; Dr. Jim Bellew, professor of physical therapy; Dr. Ed Jones, assistant professor of physical therapy; Dr. Stephanie Combs-Miller, associate professor and College of Health


UINDY NEWS

SCHOOL OF NURSING Primary Care Nursing Minor

“RED FLAG” GUN LAWS A new study by Aaron Kivisto, assistant professor of clinical psychology, provides evidence that risk-based gun seizure laws are saving lives. The study, “Effects of Risk-Based Firearm Seizure Laws in Connecticut and Indiana on Suicide Rates, 1981-2015,” appears in the June 2018 issue of Psychiatric Services. Peter Phalen ’18 (Psy.D. in clinical psychology) was co-author. Risk-based firearm seizure laws–also known as “red flag” laws– provide ways for law enforcement to seize guns from individuals considered to pose an imminent risk of serious harm to themselves or others. The study, which utilizes CDC data for the 50 states, covers a 34-year period and focuses on Connecticut and Indiana, respectively the first two states to enact risk-based gun seizure laws. With more than 20 “red flag” gun bills pending in state legislatures across the country, Kivisto said risk-based gun seizure laws have emerged as a prominent policy option for reducing gun violence. “Policy makers working to reduce gun violence benefit from data in helping them weigh the balance between individual risks and rights,” Kivisto said.

S E V E R A L O C C U PAT I O N A L THERAPY STUDENTS PA R T I C I PAT E D I N R E G I O N A L A N D N AT I O N A L CONFERENCES.

A $2.5 million grant from the Health Resources & Services Administration, obtained through the Community Health Network Foundation, is revolutionizing the University’s undergraduate nursing curriculum. The grant will support a first-of-its-kind Minor in Primary Care Nursing and the opportunity to receive intensive clinical training at Community from a primary care RN preceptor.

100 Percent Pass Rate For the third consecutive year, the School of Nursing achieved a 100-percent pass rate from the American Academy of Nurse Practitioners Certification Board for the Family Nurse Practitioner & Adult/ Gerontological Nurse Practitioner programs.

Student & Faculty Highlights Briyana Morrell, assistant professor of nursing, and Heather Ball ’17 (M.S. in nursing/nursing education), had a manuscript accepted for publication in Nursing Education Perspectives. Ball has also been appointed as the manager of the operating rooms at IU Health West Hospital. Faculty from three health professions led an interprofessional simulation in the summer of 2016. The qualitative results of associated research from the project have been accepted for publication in the Athletic Training Education Journal: Morrell, B. L., Nichols, A. M., Voll, C. A., Hetlzer, K. E., Toon, J., Moore, E. S., Moore, S. M., Kemery, S. R., Carmack, J. N.

housing, homelessness and public/ private partnerships. The University partnered with Indiana Humanities and Indianapolis Neighborhood Housing Partnership for the event.

CENT ER FOR SE R VIC ELEARNING & C OMMUN IT Y ENGAGEME N T The Center hosted several events to celebrate the many collaborations that provide opportunities for students, faculty and community partners to engage with one another, including the Community Partners Fairs, the Indiana Campus Panel Conversation on Carnegie Classification, and the Community Campus Forum and Service Expo that honored several students with awards, and supported the Perry Cultural Festival held at the Baxter YMCA to celebrate the diversity of Perry Township. Kamron Sanders was recently hired as the Center’s new program assistant. She will manage existing programs and create new programming that engages students and faculty with the community through service-learning.

UINDY TRUSTEE AND EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OF THE LEAGUE OF C A L I F O R N I A C I T I E S C A R O LY N COLEMAN AND FORMER HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT

CENTERS INST IT U T E FOR CIVIC LEADERSH IP & MAYORAL ARCH IVES Sciences director of research; Dr. Elizabeth Moore, assistant professor, College of Health Sciences; Dr. Mindy Mayol, assistant professor of kinesiology; Dr. Stephanie Kelly, professor and dean of the College of Health Sciences; Dr. Connie Fiems, assistant professor of physical therapy; Dr. Paul Salamh, assistant professor of physical therapy; Dr. Sara Scholtes, Doctorate of Physical Therapy program director

and Krannert School of Physical Therapy chair; Dr. Tammy Simmons, assistant professor of physical therapy and assistant director of clinical education; Dr. Bill Staples, associate professor of physical therapy; Dr. Emily Slaven, assistant professor of physical therapy and director of the Orthopaedic Residency Program; and Dr. Steve Wiley, assistant professor of physical therapy.

The Richard M. Fairbanks Symposium on Civic Leadership explored the theme of “A City of Homes” in March. The Institute welcomed former Housing and Urban Development Secretary Juliàn Castro and University of Indianapolis Trustee and Executive Director of the League of California Cities Carolyn Coleman for a discussion that covered affordable

S E C R E TA R Y J U L I À N C A S T R O

CENT ER OF E XC E LLE N C E IN LEADERSHIP OF LE A RN IN G (CELL) CELL, in partnership with the School of Education, hosted a series of breakfast events during the 201718 academic year for area school leaders called “Partners in Excellence: Capacity Through Collaboration.” School administrators were invited to participate in these opportunities for dialogue and collaboration around school needs, challenges and successes. SUMMER/FALL 2018

39


UINDY NEWS

COMMUNICATIONS AND MARKETING The University’s Integrated Marketing & Communications team received three HERMES Creative Awards for marketing and communications efforts launched in the past year.

23

NCAA DIVISION II TEAM SPORTS

14

TEAMS QUALIFIED FOR NCAA POSTSEASON PLAY IN THE LAST YEAR

DR. JOHN MCILVRIED RETIREMENT In 1981, Dr. John McIlvried was just one of two psychologists in the Behavioral Sciences department. By the time of his retirement in 2018, he was responsible for the establishment of clinical psychology at the University, the development of the Psy.D. program, and growth of the School of Psychological Sciences. All of these initiatives contributed to the formation of the College of Applied Behavioral Sciences. Under Dr. McIlvried’s leadership, the Psy.D. program was accredited by the Higher Learning Commission and the American Psychological Association - an achievement made possible by his unflagging work ethic. In addition to his achievements at UIndy, Dr. McIlvried also made significant contributions to the field of psychology and the American Psychological Association. The unit joined the National Council of Schools of Professional Psychology, and Dr. McIlvried was instrumental in helping to develop competencies for graduate students that are still being used in training programs today. He has also published research on training programs and ethics. Read more at portico.uindy.edu

Platinum Print media/publications/magazine: Portico (redesign) Print media/publications/viewbook: Admissions viewbook

Gold Microsite: New admissions microsite (explore.uindy.edu) 6,500 entries from across the United States and 21 countries and judged by industry professionals and AMCP members from marketing, public relations, digital media production and designers.

ECUME NI CA L & I NT ER FAI T H PR O G R AM S

The Jerry Israel Interfaith Service Award was presented to a student for the second time in 2018. The inaugural class of Interfaith Scholars – Bethany Pollock ‘20 (biology), Thanthaphorn Rueangnopphasit ‘20 (human biology), Kiley Harmon ‘20 (international relations and political science) and Kaitlin Holton ‘20 (history) – were given the award jointly for extraordinary commitment and success at increasing interfaith discussions across campus. They were critical partners in developing an annual 9/11 Interfaith Prayer Vigil, annual Interfaith Winter Holiday Festival and other events of religious literacy training and political activism. 40

PORTICO

Associate Chaplain Rev. Arionne Williams and Dean of Students Kory Vitangeli led nine students on a mission to United Methodistrelated Mission Guatemala, a first for the University. One of the participating students, Emily Sands ’18 (finance), stayed with the Mission as an intern, helping to lead other mission groups who serve there during summer. M I S S I O N G U AT E M A L A

12

TOP-20 FINISHES IN NCAA D-II LEARFIELD SPORTS DIRECTORS CUP IN THE LAST 12 YEARS

7

CONSECUTIVE GREAT LAKES VALLEY CONFERENCE ALL SPORTS TROPHY WINS

3

GREAT LAKES VALLEY CONFERENCE CHAMPIONS IN THE LAST YEAR

200

STUDENT-ATHLETES EARNED ACADEMIC ALL-CONFERNCE HONORS IN THE LAST YEAR


FOR LIFE

UINDY NEWS

RECORD-BREAKING

ESTD 1902

The 2017-18 academic year proved to be historic for the Greyhounds, including a second women’s golf national championship in four years and a seventh consecutive GLVC All-Sports Trophy. UIndy also acheived conference championships at a record-breaking pace. The Hounds earned eight GLVC titles on the year–good not only for a school record, but also a conference mark–while tacking on one GLIAC championship for good measure.

9 CHAMPIONSHIPS

FOR LIFE

FOOTBALL

WOMEN’S GOLF

MEN’S SOCCER

MEN’S LACROSSE

MEN’S SWIMMING & DIVING

WOMEN’S LACROSSE*

MEN’S INDOOR TRACK & FIELD MEN’S GOLF

MEN’S TENNIS

FOR LIFE

ESTD 1902

ESTD 1902

*GLIAC; all other sports were GLVC.

FOR LIFE

CONFERENCE HIGHLIGHTS AND HONORS

ESTD 1902

GLVC Al l - S po r ts Tro p hy

Ac ad e mic Ho n o rs

Lea r f ield Directors’ Cup

UIndy captured its seventh straight GLVC All-Sports Trophy, an award that judges departmentwide success on the conference level. The feat matches the league record for consecutive wins, set by Lewis University from 1984 to 1990.

The Greyhounds also impressed in the classroom, with UIndy’s 600+ student-athletes combining for a 3.24 GPA. A league-high 306 Hounds earned Academic All-GLVC accolades (3.3 GPA or higher), including 19 that maintained a perfect 4.0 throughout the 2017-18 year. UIndy also brought home five GLVC Scholar Athlete of the Year awards and five Academic All-America honors, while senior women’s golfer Annika Haynes earned her sport’s NCAA Elite 90 Award, given to the studentathlete with the highest GPA competing at each of the NCAA’s 90 championships.

The Crimson and Grey secured a 12th consecutive top-20 finish in the prestigious Learfield Directors’ Cup standings in 201718. The Greyhounds racked up 598.75 total points, including 374.25 alone, on the way to a ninth-place showing–their sixth top 10 in the last seven seasons. The Directors’ Cup awards institutions maintaining broadbased success in many sports, both men’s and women’s.

SUPPORT THE PACK! Full schedules at uindyathletics.com

FOR LIFE

FOR LIFE

ESTD 1902

ESTD 1902

FOR LIFE

SUMMER/FALL 2018

41


INDIVIDUAL PROGRAM HIGHLIGHTS: Wom e n’s Gol f The UIndy women’s golf team capped an historic season with a dominating performance at the 2018 NCAA Division II Championships, held at Bay Oaks Country Club in Houston, Texas, May 16-19. The Greyhounds won their second national championship in four years with a convincing 38-stroke, wire-to-wire win on the way to matching the tournament record for lowest team score (+5). The performance also produced the individual national champ, as junior Katharina Keilich (-1) became the first Greyhound to take the individual medal at nationals since former UIndy All-American Lyndsay McBride in 2009. For the first time in program history, five Greyhounds garnered All-America honors from the WGCA. Keilich and sophomore Pilar Echeverria received firstteam recognition, seniors Paxton DeHaven and Kylie Raines earned second-team accolades, while senior Annika Haynes collected All-America Honorable Mention.

THE WOMEN’S GOLF T E A M D O M I N AT E D AT T H E N AT I O N A L CHAMPIONSHIP H E L D AT B AY O A K S COUNTRY CLUB IN HOUSTON, TEXAS.

The group also set new UIndy single-season marks for team scoring average (293.2) and winning percentage (.948). Echeverria even broke her own school record for lowest singleseason average at 73.2 strokes per round. In addition, Head Coach and UIndy alum Brent Nicoson was named the 2018 WGCA Division II Coach of the Year, while Assistant Coach Kacey Dalpes picked up up the inaugural WGCA DII Assistant Coach of the Year award.

Men’s Golf Also led by Nicoson, the UIndy men’s golf team brought home the hardware in 2018, capturing its league-record 16th GLVC title, as well as its first NCAA Midwest Regional crown since 2008. The Greyhounds went on to place fifth in the three-round stroke play portion of the 2018 NCAA DII Championships, advancing to match play for the first time since the format was adopted in 2011. The Greyhounds were led by GLVC Player of the Year and conference medalist Graham McAree. The senior from Fishers, IN, finished his stellar Greyhound career with a 72.78 scoring average–good for second in the UIndy all-time annals, just behind 2009 graduate and current professional golfer Justin Hueber (72.68).

G A RY VAU G H T R E T I R E D A F T E R 24 Y E A R S AS T H E H E A D B A S E B A L L C O A C H AT U I N D Y

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PORTICO

Sophomore Erik Edwards joined McAree on the All-Midwest Region squad. Both garnered All-GLVC accolades, as well as freshman Ian Carroll and sophomore Spencer Klimek. Carroll was named GLVC Freshman of the Year.

Women’s Ten n is The Greyhounds advanced to the NCAA postseason for the fourth consecutive season, but just missed out on a trip to the NCAA Championships in as many years. Hanna Volikova received GLVC Player of the Year honors, while Alina Kislitskaya took home the league’s Freshman of the Year award. Florence Renard finished her career at UIndy as the alltime leader in doubles victories, while Volikova is already atop the record books in singles and total wins as a junior.

Men’s Ten n is UIndy advanced to the national semifinal for the first time in program history this past season, falling to eventual runner-up Barry. It was the first time the Greyhounds won a match at the NCAA Championships, defeating Hawai’i at Hilo, 5-4, before prevailing over upset-minded Washburn, 5-1. Nils Hoffacker was named the GLVC Player of the Year, while Renato Lima was honored as the top rookie in the conference. Head coach Malik Tabet earned the league’s Coach of the Year award.


B a se ba l l The UIndy baseball team finished the 2018 season with a 31-23 overall record and fell in the GLVC championship game to Quincy. Head Coach Gary Vaught called it a career after 24 seasons at the helm of the program, which saw him win 808 games. Dylan Jones, Storm Joop, Kyle Orloff and Hunter Waning were named to the All-GLVC East Division second team.

S of t ba l l The Hounds concluded their 2018 campaign with an 11th straight trip to the NCAA Midwest regional. The team won 39 games with 65 percent of the roster made up of underclassmen, including just two seniors. Sophomore pitcher Lauren Honkomp earned first-team all-GLVC honors before tossing a no-hitter in the conference tournament over topseeded Illinois Springfield. Haylie Foster and Gianni Iannantone were all named all-conference performers.

M en’s Lac ross e The Greyhounds won the inaugural GLVC Championship Tournament, which was held at Key Stadium. UIndy went 10-5 in its third campaign in program history, the most wins the team has earned in a season. The Hounds had 10 players receive all-conference laurels, including a league-high five first-team selections. Max Groves was the lone unanimous choice for the Crimson and Grey, as Parker Kump, Sam Horning, Max Gerhardt and Jake Wittmeyer joined him on the top team.

Wo me n’s Lacross e The Greyhounds finished their third season as a program with a record of 16-4 and a GLIAC tournament title. The Hounds were invited to their first NCAA tournament as the three seed in the Midwest region, in which they dropped the first round matchup to Regis. Overall, UIndy had nine all-GLIAC selections, including Defender of the Year Riley McClure and Freshman of the Year Lauryn Hardoy.

F O O T B A L L S T U D E N T AT H L E T E S H O L D U P A P O S T E R C E L E B R AT I N G T H E 2 0 1 7 - 1 8 U N D E F E AT E D S E A S O N . P O S T E R D E S I G N E D B Y J U L I A N A R O H R M O S E R PA C H E C O ’ 1 8 ( V I S U A L C O M M U N I C AT I O N D E S I G N ) .

Footb a ll P rev iew The UIndy football team hopes to build on an epic 2017 campaign that saw the Greyhounds complete the program’s first undefeated regular season in 63 years. The Hounds set new team records for most wins in a season (11), consecutive wins (15) and scoring offense (38.2 ppg) on the way to securing their fifth GLVC title and fourth NCAA playoff berth in the last six years. Head Coach Bob Bartolomeo returns 12 starters from last year’s club, including senior quarterback and Harlon Hill-candidate Jake Purichia. A native of Indianapolis, Purichia was voted the 2017 GLVC Offensive Player of the Year after finishing with 2,738 passing yards, a school-record-tying 29 passing touchdowns and just four interceptions while also setting a UIndy single-season record for passing efficiency (186.5).

Sophomore running back Al McKeller will also return to the fold. Another Indy native, McKeller wrapped up one of the greatest freshman campaigns in program history last November. The Lawrence North High School graduate burst on the scene with a 206-yard performance versus No. 2 Grand Valley State in the season opener before finishing with 1,134 rushing yards and 13 touchdowns on the year. The Greyhounds open the 2018 season at Grand Valley Thursday, Aug. 30. The upcoming schedule features five home dates, including Homecoming versus Lincoln University on Saturday, Sept. 29, and Family Day versus William Jewell on Saturday, Sept. 22. The regular season concludes Saturday, Nov. 10, with Senior Day versus Hillsdale.

UINDY BASEBALL TEAM IN ACTION

SUPPORT THE PACK!

Full schedules at uindyathletics.com

SUMMER/FALL 2018

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A

C

The alumni network of the University of Indianapolis is 32,000 strong and growing. Share your news with our fellow Greyhounds–from personal to professional to monumental moments in your life.

B

Class notes are published in the University’s digital and print editions of Portico. All original photos are returned. Mail a print to UIndy Alumni Engagement, 1400 Hanna Ave., Indianapolis, IN 46227, or submit a high-resolution digital image to alumni@uindy.edu. Krissy Robbins Sullivan ’06 and

C O N N E C T !

Justin Sullivan ’08 welcomed daughter, Skylar, in August 2017.

Updating your contact information ensures you receive the latest news about your alma mater and invitations to alumni and University events. Update your information at uindy.edu/alumni.

(photo B) MeBret Gillard ’07 welcomed son MeBret Dominic Gillard, Jr. on August 6, 2017.

facebook.com/uindyalumni

Rosalie Ann Mallis was welcomed by

@UIndyAlumni

Greg Mallis ’09 ’12 and Sarah Mallis ’09 ’12, and by big sister Lucy, on September 26, 2017. (photo A)

Y O U R

A L U M N I

C O N T A C T S

ANDY KOCHER ’98 ’15

LORA TELIHA

CORAN SIGMAN ’14

Associate Vice President of Alumni Engagement akocher@uindy.edu

Director of Alumni Engagement lteliha@uindy.edu

Assistant Director of Alumni Engagement cokerc@uindy.edu

Matthew Wilson ’99 and UIndy faculty member Dr. Laura Wilson welcomed daughter Eleanor on March 19, 2018. Jeff Harris ’01 married Shelly on June 10, 2006 in Cleveland, OH. Their first child, Lilly, was born January 2009 and their second child, Landon, in June 2011. (photo C)

44

PORTICO


CLASS NOTES

G E

David Kiley ’14 was promoted to south region president at D

Community Health Network in

H

Indianapolis.

F

Ashlee Giesler ’16 is a nurse practitioner who is dedicated to postoperative, inpatient and outpatient Urology of Indiana Karly Bryans ’17 graduated from the Franciscan Health Clinical Laboratory Science Program May 18. Evan Dant ’17 has been hired as a public affairs specialist with the state and local government relations team at Bose Public Affairs Group LLC in Indianapolis. (photo D) Logan Fox ’17 was recently awarded Roosevelt University’s 2018 Aeolian

patients.

Jenn Meadows ’14 married Allen

Cara Silletto’s ’03 book, “Staying

Bower on October 14, 2017. The

Power: Why Your Employees

ceremony occurred on Smith

Leave and How to Keep Them

Mall. Former UIndy chaplain

Longer” was released in March

and professor L. Lang Brownlee

by Silver Tree Publishing. Cara is

administered communion during

the President and Chief Retention

the ceremony. The wedding party

Officer of Crescendo Strategies,

included maid-of-honor Jenna

and is an international keynote

Whalen ’14, bridesmaids Kelsey

speaker on employee retention

(Becker) Bunetta ’14, Rachel

and generational dynamics in the

(Taller) Mellencamp ’15, Hanna

workplace. (photo G)

Leo Fletcher ’15 began working at

(Carter) Cripps ’14, and Haley

Eli Lilly as an IT Desktop Support

(Carter) Elizondo ’14. Current UIndy

Elizabeth “Betsy” Bigler ’13 is

Technician.

student Andrew Meadows was a

vice president of quality and

groomsman. Ushers included Mark

administration at Northwind

Francesca Zappia ’15 was

Foerster ’14, Will Schnabel ’14,

Pharmaceuticals in Indianapolis.

chosen as an Emerging Author

Kristen Hay ’14, Austin Cripps ’14,

Finalist as part of the 2017 Indiana

Kelbi (Ervin) Schnabel ’15 and Matt

Authors Award during an October

Mellencamp ’15. (photo E)

celebration. Michele Bates ‘14 joined Octago Alexa Alfaro ’15 is the lead

as the marketing communications

assistant coach of the softball

manager in Naples, FL, in

Nancy Shannon ’17 has accepted

program at Morehead State

September 2017.

a full-time position as the

University in Morehead, KY.

Classics Emerging Artist award.

Communications Coordinator for Cancer Support Community in Washington, D.C. Kathryn Dawson ’16 has joined the audit staff at ComerNowling in Indianapolis. Adam Cornwell ’16 has signed to pitch for the Traverse City Beach Bums baseball team in Traverse City, MI.

Diane Renforth ’14 ’16 has been Royce Carlton ’14 is the head

hired as a senior client advisor

baseball coach at Shelbyville High

at Huntington National Bank in

School.

Indianapolis.

Cori Eckerle ’14 is the head coach

Ashley Balazs ’13 is the head

of the women’s softball program at

softball coach at Pittsburg State

Hanover College in Hanover, IN.

University in Pittsburg, KS.

Heather Zalewski ’14 began a job

Saisha Rairdon ‘13 and Kaleb

with the Indiana Youth Institute as a

Meredith ‘14 married October 7,

marketing associate.

2017. (photo F)

Adam Robinson ’12 ’15 is principal at Crothersville Junior-Senior High School in Crothersville, IN. Dayne Charbonneau ’12 ’16 is a sports psychologist at West Virginia University in Morgantown, WV. Joseph “Joe” McGuire ’12 is an associate manager at the Siegfried Group in Chicago. Brooklyn Kohlheim ’11 is an assistant women’s basketball coach at Michigan Technological University in Houghton, MI. Mark Martinez ’11 and Laura Martinez ’11 ’12 celebrated their one year anniversary on July 24, 2018. (photo H)

Class notes in this issue of Portico represent those submitted between July 1, 2017 and May 15, 2018. Class notes submitted after May 15, 2018 will be featured in the next issue of Portico. SUMMER/FALL 2018

45


C B A Kristen Rosenberger ’08 earned two master’s degrees from Indiana Wesleyan University specializing in Addictions Counseling and Clinical Mental Health and is employed by Nichole Goddard ’11 has been

St. Vincent Stress Center.

promoted to chief operating officer of the south region at Community

Amy Jarecki ’08 was promoted

Health Network.

to dean of students at Indiana University East.

Cole Varga ’10 is listed on the

Angela Woodlee ’11 has been

of Global Programs for The AfricaAmerica Institute and frequently travels to manage educational programs in multiple African countries. Whitney Boling Norton ’06 is an ophthalmologist at the Elkhart and

annual Indianapolis Business

Christa Peters ’07, executive

Notre Dame locations of Boling

Journal “Forty under 40” list for

director of patient health at St.

Vision Center.

2017.

Vincent Health in Indianapolis, received the “Leading Light Award”

elected newsletter director for the

Sam Kingdon ’10 married Lisa

Indiana Paralegal Association.

from Professional Research

LeCleir on October 7, 2017.

Consultants, Inc.

administrative assistant for the chief

Michael Richardson ’10 was

Michael “Mike” Solari ’07 has

legal officer at the Indianapolis

featured in a February 19, 2018,

been promoted to president at

Colts.

Journal and Courier article about his

Short Strategy Group, a long-time

success as the director of bands for

legislative lobbying and business

Benton Central Schools.

consulting firm in Indianapolis.

Before You Grow Up.” It landed

Samuel “Sam” Moya ’09 ’11

Nicole Jonas ’07 married Mark

on Amazon’s children’s crafts and

has been promoted to chief

Bolado on March 23, 2018, and now

hobbies section as the number one

administrator of children’s

resides in Melbourne, FL. (photo C)

book.

residential services at Damar

In April 2017, she became

Ben Bertoli ’11 wrote a book

Chantal Uwizera ’06 is the Director

entitled “101 Video Games to Play

Services in Indianapolis. Jonathan “Johnny” Henry ’11

Virginia “Nickie” Redick ’06 was promoted to office industry leader

is interim head wrestling coach

Isabell ’09 & Braxton ’09 Mills

for construction at BKD, LLP in

at Harrison High School in West

welcomed Braxton David Mills II on

Indianapolis.

Lafayette, IN.

September 7, 2017.

Wade Baker ’06 is the director of bands in the music department at Lincoln Trail College in Robinson, IL. Josie Dillon ’06 has been named treasurer of the Center Grove Education Foundation board of directors. Cara Veale ’05 ’06 ’10 has been promoted to executive director of provider services at Daviess Community Hospital in Washington, IN, where she also serves as chief patient experience officer. Molly Whithead ’04, executive director of the Boone County Economic Development Corp.,

Aaron Lawson ’06 is an

has been recognized on the

Chelsey Chang ‘11 was married to

Rachel Matusik ’08 married Jon

environmental scientist at RQAW

annual “Forty Under 40” list by the

Adam Schmenk on October 10, 2017.

Michael O’Brien on November 12,

Corp. in Indianapolis.

Indianapolis Business Journal.

(photo A)

2016. (photo B)

46

PORTICO


CLASS NOTES

D E F

Amber Fields ’03 is on the Damar Services board of directors. Brenda Barrie ’02 was featured in The House Theatre of Chicago play United Flight 232 about the July 19, 1989, plane crash in Sioux City, Iowa. Of note, Professor Greg Clapper helped tend to the workers

Ryan “Brady” McClure ’00 is the Assistant Principal and Athletic Director of Peru Junior High School. Jayson Boyers ’00 will serve as President and CEO of Cleary University in Howell, MI, for five more years.

and the wounded of the crash that

Melanie Schroeder Patterson ’00

day as a United Methodist minister

is a senior scientist at AbbVie and

and National Guard chaplain and is

discussed her research on how

a character in the play.

to spy on cancer cell messages

Peter Buck ’01 was named vice president for investments at the Lilly Endowment Inc. Robert “Bob” Wonnell ’01 is the boys’ varsity basketball coach at Kokomo High School in Kokomo, IN. Kevin Kammeyer ’01 was hired by Gilead Sciences in Strategic Sourcing supporting the company’s advertising and media buying. Thomas Smith ’01 has been promoted to regional vice president at the First Internet Bank of Indiana. The Lopez triplets, Monica, Angelica, and Veronica, class of 2001, returned to UIndy to tour campus and visit with professors in November. (photo D)

and decode them in a November Science Rocks! article. Beenu Sikand ’99 has been appointed to be a state delegate from Franklin Township for the GOP convention this year. She is the top

Juan Paz ’95 ’96 ’99 was promoted to Director of Property Tax at Simon Property Group. Michael DeHaven ’95 is the assistant police chief for the city of Valparaiso, IN. Stephanie Crabill Dunfee ’94 graduated with a Master of Science in Accounting from Kelley School of Business – Indianapolis and started as an accountant at the Department

Philip Jackson ’94 is the Director for the CPA firm OnTarget CPA in Indianapolis. (photo F)

in North Vernon, IN.

Gov. Rick Scott of Florida presents to teachers who pursue excellence. Daniel “Dan” Salian, Jr. ’89 has been hired as chief financial officer of Graybug Vision in Redwood City, CA. Sharon Annee ’89 has been appointed administrative director of

Association.

neurosciences at Franciscan Health

Education Association (NCEA). He

elected as the National Federation

is the principal at St. Jude Catholic

of Paralegal Associations (NFPA)

School in Indianapolis.

primary representative for the

Theodore “Ted” Maple ’96 was

the Jennings County Public Library

the Indiana Basketball Coaches

Angela Hopson ’93 ’97 has been

2017.

of the Adult Services Department at

Coaches of the Year” for 2018 by

educator by the National Catholic

Vernon Area Library on October 15,

Rose-Marie Howell ’90 is the head

“Governor’s Shine Award” which

honored as one of six “Bob King

Jeffrey Stein ’96 presented at TEDx

2017-18 academic year.

Rebekah Lester ‘90 won the

in AGC in 2017. (photo E)

outstanding Catholic school

Franklin College at the end of the

Accounting Service.

Todd Sturgeon ’94 has been

’03 has been recognized as an

as Professor of Accounting from

of Defense, Defense Finance &

producer with Berkshire Greenwood

Joseph L. “Joe” Shelburn ’98

Daniel Andrews ’93 will retire

Indiana Paralegal Association board of directors. In May 2017, she was

Central Indiana.

C L A S S

N O T E S

promoted to the position of legal project management analyst at Ogletree Deakins.

Submit your class note at uindy.edu/alumni.

named a program director at the Lilly Endowment, Inc. SUMMER/FALL 2018

47


A

C

Chris Brown ’76 and his business B

partner Gary Peterson were awarded a patent and FDA approval for the first non-surgical electrical device to assist in the reduction of the symptoms of opioid withdrawal. Terri Smith ’10, Jana Stall ’83,

Janice Lesniak ’75 has been named

Kathy Taylor Remsburg ’83, Chris

vice president of the Friends of

Dyar ’84, Diane Dietz-Darnell ’83,

Garfield Park board of directors for

Cindy Marks ’83, and Sue Leibrock

2018.

’86 returned to tour campus in October which included taking time to visit their residence hall rooms and sitting in the egg chairs. Ann Vendrely ’87 is the academic

(photo B)

dean and vice president for academic affairs at Goshen College

Dawn Puckett ’80 has been

in Goshen, IN.

selected to manage secondary

D

John Burroughs ’72 retired in 2016

Larry Gates ’65 won the election

from 44 years in Indianapolis Public

for the Bargersville, IN, town council

Schools. He is now a writer and is

at-large seat in April.

hoping to have a book published in November 2018.

Reba Boyd Wooden ’62 has been named a recipient of a 2017 Indiana

Robert Coleman ’68 in addition to

Woman of Achievement Award. The

serving part time in retirement as

award recognizes her Distinction

associate District Superintendent,

in Advocacy for Education, Civil

is also serving as president of

and Human Rights. The award was

the Otterbein Franklin Senior Life

presented at a dinner at Ball State

community, as a member of the

University on October 18, 2017.

John Liles ’79 has been appointed

Otterbein Corporation Board and

Katherine Welch ’93 was

(photo D)

senior vice president at George E.

member of the Board of Trustees for

recognized by Sigma Zeta National

Booth Co. in Indianapolis.

United Theological Seminary.

the 2018 recipient of the Harold

Paul Harper ’78 was inducted into

Six members of the Class of 1966

school teachers and administrators,

Wilkinson Distinguished Alumni

the Blue River Valley High School

traveled to Indianapolis from North

and enjoy reminiscing about their

Award.

(Mt. Summit, IN) athletic hall of fame

Carolina, Ohio, Kentucky, Indiana

years at Indiana Central where he

on December 1, 2017.

and Wisconsin on March 3-4, 2018,

served as Dr. Morgan’s lab assistant

to reminisce and catch up on their

and she was the senior year Campus Queen.

curriculum and technology for Ron Morris ’86 won an award for the best geography lesson plan of 2017 with the National Geography

the state-appointed emergency management firm in charge of Muncie Community Schools.

Association. (photo A)

Science & Mathematics Honor as

both class of 1952, are retired

Paige Dooley ’85, chief nurse executive at Community Hospital

Jana Marie Cole ‘77 was ordained

lives over the last five decades.

East, has been recognized as a

after graduating from Grace Bible

Pictured left to right are Wayne

“Top Honoree” in the non-physician

College.

Anderson, Robert Denney, Joseph

category by the Indianapolis Business Journal on its list of “Health Care Heroes” for 2018. (See story on page 18.)

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Raymond and Nancy Alexander,

John Erwin ’77 has been appointed interim president at Black Hawk College in Moline, IN.

Chambers, Pamela (Ormond)

C L A S S

N O T E S

Anderson, James Miller and Joseph Huse. (photo C)

Submit your class note at uindy.edu/alumni.


IN MEMORIAM T H E U N I V E R S I T Y O F I N D I A N A P O L I S R E S P E C T I V E LY R E C O G N I Z E S T H E PA S S I N G O F T H E F O L L O W I N G M E M B E R S O F T H E C A M P U S C O M M U N I T Y T H I S PA S T Y E A R .

Nicholas Dworet, who would have been a member of the University of Indianapolis Class of 2022, died in the shootings at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida, February 14.

Dr. John W. Batey III, 1942-2018, former UIndy biology chair and associate dean, passed away June 23.

Dorothy M. Deupree, 94, of Indianapolis, passed away July 11. She was born June 23, 1924 in Palestine, Illinois, and retired from the University in 1989.

Mildred Orme ’36 –  August 15, 2017 Marjorie E. Hill Knecht ’42  –  January 4, 2018 John R. Knecht ’42  –  August 9, 2017 Beverly D. Moore ’45  –  April 20, 2018 Alonzo R. “Nick” Nicodemus, Jr. ’47 –  November 11, 2017 Wilma Koch ’47  –  July 13, 2017 William E. Morrett ’48  –  December 2, 2017   Dr. George J. Warheit ’49  –  March 23, 2018 Russell E. Robbins ’49  –  January 8, 2018 Edna D. Hineman ’50  –  December 30, 2017 Robert B. Hanni ’50  –  November 15, 2017 Gerald E. Schroder ’51  –  April 16, 2018 Hazel M. Brett ’51  –  November 4, 2017 Joyce M. Porter Dazey ’51  –  August 30, 2017 Gordon L. Cole ’52  –  May 4, 2017 Betty I. Lunsford ’52  –  March 8, 2018 Harry D. Iunghuhn ’52  –  August 26, 2017 Dorothy M. Boruff ’53  –  December 21, 2017 Joanne B. Lantz ’53  –  December 6, 2017 Kenneth R. Vaught ’53  –  December 16, 2017 Burdellis L. Carter ’54  –  May 1, 2018 Rawlins I. Whitaker ’54  –  October 23, 2017 Donald E. Hilton ’54  –  July 28, 2017 William D. Schmeling ’55  –  December 13, 2017 Kathryn A. Merkel ’55  –  January 24, 2018 Ruth E. Hermann ’56 ’82  –  March 28, 2018 Charles E. Smitley ’56  –  February 20, 2018 Dick Walters ’56  –  Sept. 30, 2017 John C. “Jack” Kost ’57  –  January 23, 2018 Glen S. Keller ’57  –  September 1, 2017 Mary “Wimp” Baumgartner ’57  –  June 2, 2018 Catherine Thompson ’58  –  December 4, 2017 Gilbert W. Fey ’58  –  August 30, 2017 Charles E. Nichols ’58  –  January 24, 2018 Thomas E. King ’59  –  July 17, 2017 Ann L. Bowles ’59  –  July 19, 2017 Harlan D. “Dale” Mace ’60  –  May 5, 2018 Peggy G. Longenbaugh ’60  –  October 11, 2017 Arthur R. Shaw ’60  –  February 20, 2017 Gloria J. Brewer ’60  –  September 7, 2017 Donna J. Kerr ’60  –  July 30, 2017 M. D. “Dale” Dougherty ’60  –  December 25, 2017 Jerry C. Adams ’61  –  February 7, 2018 Walter W. Bishop ’62  –  October 23, 2017 Marilyn J. Ramsey ’63  –  February 11, 2018 Richard K. “Doc” Shelly ’63  –  August 31, 2017 Paul D. “David” Milhouse ’63  –  July 18, 2017 Charles C. “Curt” Davis ’64  –  February 19, 2018 William G. Porter ’64  –  January 19, 2018 James C. Nipp ’65  –  November 21, 2017 James F. Bell ’65  –  August 18, 2017 Victor M. Combs ’65  –  December 26, 2017 David A. Creighton ’65  –  July 22, 2017 Richard Burrows ’65  –  December 26, 2017 Letha M. Hiland ’66  –  April 2, 2018

Bernice L. Werbe Hindman ’67 –  November 18, 2017 Charlene Riley ’67  –  November 29, 2017 Donovan W. “Don” Bare ’68  –  May 5, 2018 Jeanene A. Fisher ’68  –  April 15, 2018 Margaret A. Hall ’68  –  March 10, 2018 Sandra J. Boone ’69  –  April 26, 2018 Larry D. White ’69  –  March 11, 2018 Larry D. Bechtel ’69  –  March 8, 2018 Howard L. Williams ’69  –  August 14, 2017 Carolyn L. Natalie ’70  –  February 23, 2018 A. A. “Arlene” Montgomery Spencer ’70 ’73   –  September 28, 2017 Phyllis S. Farrell 70  –  August 25, 2017 Ned L. Fox ’71  –  April 25, 2018 Jean-Paul Tolin ’71  –  June 18, 2017 Martha L. Roman ’71  –  May 15, 2017 Marietta L. Taylor ’72  –  April 9, 2018 Leroy Jackson ’72  –  March 13, 2018 Marilyn D. Barton ’72  –  November 25, 2017 Judith A. McGinnis ’72  –  August 19, 2017 Philip E. Watson ’72  –  November 13, 2017 Susan P. Woodward ‘73  –  December 10, 2017 Peter Girolamo ’74  –  October 23, 2017 Edward A. Price ’75  –  September 18, 2017 Steven D. Ricke ’75  –  November 8, 2017 Margaret B. “Peggy” Ensor ’76  –  December 30, 2017 Audrey L. Singleton ’76  –  January 16, 2018 Lisa K. Weiper ’76 ’08  –  January 30, 2018 Karen A. Harman ’77  –  February 16, 2018 Fred Chafin ’78 ’88  –  November 9, 2017 Lester L. Frye ’79  –  August 21, 2017 Martha L. McCardle ’81  –  August 30, 2017 Mary F. Bowers Legan ’82  –  November 24, 2017 Hermia M. Tucker ’82  –  July 2, 2017 Eleanor L. Ellis ’83  –  September 22, 2017 James L. Davis ’84  –  August 16, 2017 Jon A. Massey ’85  –  August 8, 2017 Thomas M. Sughrue ’85  –  January 12, 2018 Lisa M. Berkey ’86  –  September 28, 2017 Sarah B. Gibson ’88  –  July 23, 2017 Danita L. Gilbert ’89  –  July 13, 2017 Mary E. Pugh Alligood ’89  –  November 26, 2017 Holly D. Sale ’89  –  June 30, 2017 Mary E. Deeter ’94  –  September 18, 2017 Andre A. Vera ’94  –  November 6, 2017 Paul R. McNeely ’97  –  February 12, 2018 Jo Ellen Christy ’97  –  October 11, 2017 Jessica A. Elston ’05  –  July 5, 2017 James A. Negro ’06  –  September 6, 2017 Suzanne C. Hinsch ’08  –  July 17, 2017 Nathaniel R. Patterson ’10  –  August 2, 2017 Paula K. Lowery ’13  –  January 4, 2018 Patrick J. Friel ’13  –  December 4, 2017 Eric W. Borst ’13  –  September 4, 2017 Omokhoje “Daniel” Daudu ’15  –  October 27, 2017

SUMMER/FALL 2018

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31,115 T O TA L C A M PA I G N DONORS THROUGH 2 01 8

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N T E L U E

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UNDERGRAD

120,000+ E

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HOURS

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$58 MILLION

Publicly launched in the Fall of 2015, the Campaign for the University of Indianapolis—UIndy Starts With You—has raised more than $58 million to address needs and opportunities identified in the Vision 2030 strategic planning process supporting these four pillars: students, faculty, community and the future.

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E

J U LY 2 0 1 2 – J U N E 2 0 1 8

9 5% OF STUDENTS

Multiply your impact! Visit matchinggifts.com/uindy to see if your employer will match your gift.

Establish an endowed scholarship. More than 35 endowed scholarships have been established over the course of the campaign. Endowed scholarships can be established across a 5-year pledge period and are a great way to leave a legacy of support for future UIndy students.

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SUPPORT UINDY Contact us at giving@uindy.edu for more information.

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ENDOW

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• • • • • • • •

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Make your gift online or enroll in monthly gifts supporting your favorite department or UIndy initiative at uindy.edu/giving.

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Naming of the Shaheen College of Arts & Sciences Naming of the Ron & Laura Strain Honors College Establishment and growth of the R.B. Annis School of Engineering 35 new endowed scholarships Renovation of Krannert Memorial Library Upgrades to Nicoson Hall Creation of the Indianapolis Quartet New School of Business Finance Lab Renovations and upgrades to Good Hall Increase in faculty/student research opportunities Increase in faculty/student domestic and international research trips More than $26 million raised for direct student scholarships and aid.

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SUPPORT FUTURE GREYHOUNDS

RECIEVE FINANCIAL AID

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Fundraising efforts have been extended an additional year to June 2022 when the University will be celebrating its 120th anniversary.

Alumni and Donor Support Outcomes:

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BUT WE’RE NOT STOPPING THERE!

L A R S H

12:1 STUDENT TO FA C U LT Y R AT I O

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TH E NEW UINDY LICENSE PLATE DES IG N IS NOW AVA ILABLE

INDIANA RESIDENTS

$25 of your $40 annual distinctive plate fee supports scholarships for University of Indianapolis students. Order your plate today on the BMV website, in.gov/bmv, or visit your local license branch. The plate can be used on your car, motorcycle, RV, or truck. CHECK TO GET CREDIT FOR YOUR GIFT Select the consent box on your registration form to allow the BMV to share your information with us. This lets us know that you are a UIndy license plate supporter!

UINDY FAMILY GOES BEYOND GRADUATION

GET INVOLVED!

FAMILY WEEKEND Saturday, September 22, 2018

Thursday, October 25, 2018 Come back to campus for special activities and to cheer for the Greyhound football team as they take on the William Jewell Cardinals.

HONORS AND RECOGNITION AWARDS DINNER

Whether you are connecting

Join alumni, friends, faculty, staff, and students as we honor the 2018 Alumni Award Winners.

date on the accomplishments of fellow alums, or participating in exciting events, we hope that you

HOMECOMING 2018

will stay connected with UIndy.

Saturday, September 29, 2018

Join the Alumni Association at For a full list of events, visit getinvolved.uindy.edu.

S T A Y

/UINDY

HOLIDAY WITH THE HOUNDS Date TBD Get into the holiday spirit with our annual festive celebration. Enjoy sweet treats, photos with Santa and play with two of Santa’s flying friends!

A hound always finds its way home. Relive favorite memories, relax and reconnect with UIndy friends at Homecoming 2018! Contact alumni@uindy.edu to host an affinity reunion or to volunteer. See the full schedule at homecoming.uindy.edu.

one (or more!) of these events.

/UINDY

Bring your little ones to campus for safe trick or treating in the Stierwalt Alumni House and select UIndy residence halls!

Friday, September 28, 2018

with classmates, getting up-to-

/UINDY

UINDY CAMPUS TRICK-OR TREAT

/UINDY

C O N N E C T E D

/UINDYTV

/UNIVERSITY-OF -INDIANAPOLIS

NEWSDESK@ U I N D Y. E D U

N E W S . U I N D Y. E D U

SUMMER/FALL 2018

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THEN NOW Medical technology in the health sciences classrooms have come a long way since 1959, but one thing has remained constant: The U n i v e r s i t y ’s d e d i c a t i o n to providing experiential learning for students and state-of-the-art technology

2018

found in clinical and hospital environments.

1959

1400 East Hanna Avenue Indianapolis, IN 46227

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2018 HERMES Platinum Creative Award Winner

Portico - Summer/Fall 2018  

Portico, the official magazine of the University of Indianapolis and produced by the Office of University Communications & Marketing, is a c...

Portico - Summer/Fall 2018  

Portico, the official magazine of the University of Indianapolis and produced by the Office of University Communications & Marketing, is a c...

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