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WINTER/SPRING 2021

PORTICO HAPPY ANNIVERSARY

GRADY!

W I N N I N G O U R H E A R T S // 1 6

U I N DY A L U M N I F I N D T I M E T O S H I N E // 4 R.B. ANNIS SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING UNVEILS I N N O VAT I V E N E W S PA C E // 6 EMPOWERING MENTORSHIP T H R O U G H T H E PA U L WA S H I N G T O N LACEY EMERGING LEADER P R O G R A M // 14 C E L E B R AT I N G T H E N I C O S O N FA M I LY L E G A C Y AT U I N DY // 2 8


WINTER/SPRING 2021 ISSUE ABOUT THE MAGAZINE Portico, the official magazine of the University of Indianapolis, is produced by the Office of University Communications and Marketing. This cornerstone publication shares stories, impact, and achievements of students, faculty, staff, and alumni as well as friends and supporters of the institution. Portico is published digitally twice a year and reaches more than 35,000 individuals including alumni, donors, friends, and community and business leaders. The magazine’s digital issue includes expanded content, interviews, and video at portico.uindy.edu.

3 0 // E X P L O R I N G T HE N I C O S O N FA M I LY L EGACY

PRESIDENT

WHEN ANGUS NICOSON ‘42 ARRIVED AT INDIANA CENTRAL, IT WAS THE

Robert L. Manuel, PhD

INTERIM VICE PRESIDENT AND PROVOST

START OF A FAMILY LEGACY THAT WOULD SPAN FOUR GENERATIONS.

Mary Beth Bagg, PhD

BOARD OF TRUSTEES John C. Adams; Kevin R. Armstrong; Annetta C. Beauregard; Carolyn M. Coleman; Gregory Corsaro; Deborah J. Daniels; Linda M. Dillman; Christopher Doehring; Murvin S. Enders; Stephen F. Fry; Sue Anne Gilroy; Adolf Hansen; Emmanuel D. Harris; Barry S. Howard; Charles Edwin Johnston; William R. Kiesel; Dr. David Kiley; Kenneth Loyd; Robert L. Manuel; Thomas C. Martin; Michael McCarty; Ersal Ozdemir; Vicki F. Perry; Edwin O. Qualls; Pamela S. Qualls; David Resnick; David G. Sease; Yvonne H. Shaheen; Richard E. Stierwalt; Laura Strain; Phillip A. Terry; Larry G. Thompson; Bishop Julius C. Trimble; Uche Unogu; Derek VanEmon; Michael J. Watkins; Gordon D. Wishard

CABINET Mary Beth Bagg, PhD; Michael Cartwright, PhD; Jason Dudich; Kelly Hauflaire; Steven Herriford; Andrew Kocher; Lara Mann; Christopher Molloy; Andrea Newsom; Neil Perdue, PhD; Amber Smith, PhD; Kory Vitangeli; Ron Wilks; Scott Young

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4 // G R E Y H O U N D S MAKING A DIFFERENCE

UIndy alumni step into a changed world and find their time to shine.

6 // A C C E L E R A T I N G I N N OVAT I O N

The R.B. Annis School of Engineering moves into a newly renovated, custom-designed space on Shelby St.

10 // P U B L I C H E A L T H I N PRACTICE

16 //  H A P P Y A N N I V E R S A R Y , GRADY!

Highlights from our favorite greyhound’s first year on campus.

18 // U N I V E R S I T Y U P DAT E S

The latest news from the campus community.

27 // A T H L E T I C U P D A T E S Student-athletes and coaches persevered through an unprecedented season.

30 // A L E G A C Y C O N T I N U E S

Members of UIndy’s contact tracing team lay career foundations as they track the coronavirus.

The Nicoson family is making new memories and reflecting on a storied past.

12 // E S S E N T I A L S U P P O R T

32 // C L A S S N O T E S

The UIndy Fund continues to help students navigate their lives in ways never imagined.

14 //  E M P O W E R I N G MENTORSHIP

The Paul Washington-Lacey Emerging Leader program connects students with relationship-building opportunities and professional skills.

The latest news from UIndy alumni.


GREYHOUNDS ENGAGE WITH A CHANGING WORLD Dear UIndy community, 2020 was a year unlike any in our University’s history. It was filled with numerous challenges for our students, staff, faculty, alumni—and of course the world around us. So many aspects of our society have faced fundamental questions about how to continue their work during the pandemic: schools and hospitals, places of worship, business and industry, government, and more. I am proud to see how often Greyhounds are at the center of these important conversations. The University of Indianapolis has remained steadfast in our mission and committed to our motto “Education for Service.” In 2020 we graduated more than 1,400 students who left our campus ready to enter the increasingly digital workforce. They also became healthcare workers and educators who are making a difference in the lives of thousands, helping us through this uncertain time. Their success is a testament to the dedication of our faculty and staff, who provide an essential network of support for our students and each other. COVID-19 has touched everyone in some way. While caring for themselves and their families through illness and loss, Greyhounds found ways not only to cope but to excel. In the face of adversity, we have seen great sacrifices from our community and beyond—acts that bravely put the safety of the community ahead of personal wants and needs. I have been deeply moved by the ability of our campus community to navigate this new reality, and our collective commitment to #ProtectThePack. Even in light of these circumstances, 2020 was one of the most fulfilling years to be a Greyhound since I arrived on campus. Seeing our campus community and our alumni network show resilience and innovation in the face of ongoing challenges filled me with extreme pride. When I last wrote to you I said that the story of what we accomplished during this challenging chapter of our history was still being written and that is still true today. In the interim you have been working fervently to add to that story. Our community continues to lead by example as catalysts for good in the world around us.

In this edition of Portico, you will see the impact our campus initiatives are having and you will get to know some recent graduates who are beginning careers as change agents during this tumultuous time. During the Fall 2020 semester, we strove to provide a student experience that has become expected of the University of Indianapolis. We hosted virtual concerts and lectures, connecting our students with artists and thinkers who helped us better understand ourselves and the world around us. We facilitated vital conversations about social justice, inclusion, and equity to explore our roles as educators and advocates. The Professional Edge Center used virtual platforms to facilitate employer networking opportunities for students. Our Homecoming festivities, though they looked very different in 2020, culminated in the donation of more than $8,000 to local charities. Our students, across all disciplines, remained engaged in the community fulfilling the University’s mission of “Education for Service.” We have also remained true to our legacy and tradition of finding ways to support our students, which has never been more important than it was in 2020. We announced several campus developments, including new spaces for the R.B. Annis School of Engineering and the Department of Art & Design. Students from the Master of Public Health program and the School of Nursing performed critical work on the University’s contact tracing team, helping to limit the spread of the virus. The UIndy Fund also played a pivotal role in supporting our campus community in 2020, allowing our students to flourish on campus and contribute to the community around us. As we begin this year with a return to normalcy on the horizon, I hope you take a moment to appreciate all that our community has accomplished during this time of adversity and I hope you take as much pride in being a part of the Greyhound family as I do.

-R  obert L. Manuel University President WINTER/SPRING 2021

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GREYHOUNDS MAKING A DIFFERENCE “Pursuing my education at UIndy has given me the opportunity to meet some of my best friends, and pursue a job field that I love. The biology program in my opinion is one of the best around because the faculty will go above and beyond to ensure that you are pushing your proximal development. The program helped develop my scientific and professional knowledge into a career with the Indianapolis Zoo as a zookeeper and now as a science teacher.” –M  ason Meling ’19 (biology, teaching license in secondary education)

W

hile the pandemic presented many challenges throughout the course of 2020, it also gave Greyhounds a chance to shine. The University motto “Education for Service” has perhaps never been more important than throughout the COVID-19 pandemic. For these Greyhound alumni, beginning their careers in the middle of a global pandemic made for an interesting transition— but one they were prepared to handle. “The nursing program was phenomenal at putting us through a rigorous curriculum,” said Emma Kohls ’20 (nursing). “They made sure we knew how to be prepared for anything and could think on our feet. That gave us confidence and prepared us for the real world.” As an emergency department and trauma nurse at the busiest

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ER in Iowa, where Kohls says “nothing is predictable and anything can happen,” she puts the skills she gained at UIndy to the test every day. Kohls’ hospital is at the center of a very vulnerable and underserved population, so even though it is early in her career, she’s keenly aware of how she can make a difference in her community. “We just try to do what we can for the population that we serve, and do our best to make sure everyone leaves our care as healthier individuals,” she said. Also aiding an underserved population is Suihlei Tha ’20 (social work), who began her career at Exodus Refugee International last summer as a case manager, with a focus on resettlement and placement. She works with refugee and immigrant clients in the 90 days following their arrival to the United States helping them with tasks like setting up social services, housing, and job placement.


Tha was offered a full-time position directly following her internship. “Fortunately I did not have to make major adaptations once I began as a case manager because half of my internship was conducted from home due to the pandemic,” she said. Tha also credits her two practicum courses in the social work program for preparing her for the rigors of her future career. Mason Meling ’19 (biology, teaching license in secondary education), a high school biology and integrated chemistry/physics teacher in Danville, Indiana, said, “The best part of my job is that I get to develop relationships with my students and help them grow into young adults by finding their path in life.” Even with all the changes in education due to the pandemic, Meling remains undeterred. “I think transitioning to online learning was probably the biggest adaptation to get used to,” he said. “But I have found it very beneficial as it opens my options tremendously.” On a daily basis Meling says he focuses on creating lesson plans that are engaging and foster a hands-on learning experience to help his students become lifelong learners.

Libby Anderl ’12 ’15 (exercise science, doctor of physical therapy) is a full-time clinician specializing in brain injury and stroke rehabilitation at TIRR Memorial Hermann, an inpatient rehabilitation hospital in Houston, Texas. “UIndy not only taught me person-first language, but a person-first approach to care,” she said. “By making personal connections with students, and caring about students as people first, my professors modeled this and prepared me for a career in healthcare.” The pandemic has made this approach challenging, but Anderl and her colleagues have found a way to keep that person-first focus.

“Assistant Professor of Nursing Sarah Holmes helped me gain confidence in my skill, and reassured me that nursing wasn’t just about the “book stuff” and that the skills mattered just as much. Knowing that I had professors rooting for me and wanting to be successful was one of the most motivating things. Having someone who has been through nursing school and their career care about you enough to keep pushing you to be the best that you can be is comforting.” – Emma Kohls ’20 (nursing)

“The involvement of family members, caregivers, and friends in rehabilitation is essential to a patient’s recovery, but we had a no-visitor policy in place,” she said. “We found creative ways to help our patients connect with their loved ones, and, sometimes, this included providing information, training, and support virtually to facilitate a patient’s successful return home or to the community.”

“Professional Edge helped me improve my resume and interview skills and get a part time job in the social work field where I learned a lot. All of my professors, the people at ProEdge, and my academic advisors were my mentors. From interacting with them I learned how to communicate with others and it boosted my confidence.” – Suihlei Tha ’20 (social work)

“Dr. Stephanie Miller completely altered my course as a young professional. Dr. Miller is the reason why I ended up a Houstonian and member of the Brain Injury and Stroke Team at TIRR. While Dr. Miller was not my assigned advisor during my time as a student, I was drawn to her energy, engaging teaching style, and commitment to bettering the PT community at large.” – Libby Anderl ’12 ’15 (exercise science, doctor of physical therapy)

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ACCELERATING INNOVATION A GROWING CAMPUS FOOTPRINT CREATES NEW CONNECTIONS

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The R.B. Annis School of Engineering’s expanded, state-of-the-art space brings exciting opportunities for collaborative entrepreneurship and discovery. The newly renovated R.B. Annis Hall sparks a transformational time for the University of Indianapolis as programs expand to meet growing workforce needs. @UINDYOIE TWITTER-SQUARE Facebook INSTAGRAM

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THE SKY’S THE LIMIT W

ith more than 68,000 total square feet of dedicated space, the wide expanse of the new R.B. Annis Hall is impressive. With its soaring ceiling, the machine shop alone fires the imagination when envisioning the projects that might be brought to fruition here. That’s exactly the kind of inspiration that Ken Reid, associate dean and director of the R.B. Annis School of Engineering, is hoping to generate.

THE R.B. ANNIS SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING LAUNCHED IN 2017 THROUGH A T R A N S F O R M AT I O N A L , $ 5 M I L L I O N G I F T F R O M T H E R . B . A N N I S E D U C AT I O N A L F O U N D AT I O N . T H E G I F T H O N O R E D T H E L AT E R O B E R T B . A N N I S , O N E OF INDIANAPOLIS’ MOST REVERED S C I E N T I S T S A N D I N N O V AT O R S .

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“We have one of the most innovative engineering programs in the nation, and the R.B. Annis Hall provides the ideal space to bring new ideas to life,” Reid said. The expansion arrives at an opportune moment. Since its founding, the R.B. Annis School of Engineering has rapidly grown into a robust engineering school offering seven specialized areas of study in computer engineering, electrical engineering, software engineering, mechanical engineering, industrial & systems engineering, computer science, and general engineering. The larger facility, located at the corner of Shelby St.

and National Ave., will accommodate these programs and address their space-related needs. R.B. Annis Hall also allows the school’s unique DesignSpine component to expand beyond its original footprint and meet growing demand. “DesignSpine encourages students to learn by doing as it gives them a deeper understanding of how things are made,” Reid said. “Students work with faculty and lab technicians to safely develop their own prototypes and finished products. R.B. Annis Hall allows them to think bigger as they apply their creative problem-solving skills.” Reid said in addition to providing the necessary space for programs, R.B. Annis Hall will support the school as it continues to build an identity on campus and in the community. The larger space translates to more opportunities for creative and innovative designs from the Annis School’s student teams. Students will have more potential to establish exceptional working relationships in larger maker spaces, workshops, and labs. Faculty will have the opportunity to more


effectively work with and mentor teams, as well as to collaborate with each other and other partners beyond campus. “One aspect which I look most forward to is the creation of new space,” Reid added. “When student design teams meet with their industry customers, we’ll have a professional space in which to meet. The space itself will build a sense of community within students, and expand student opportunity.” Reid hopes R.B. Annis Hall will pave the way for more innovative interdisciplinary projects which have been a hallmark of the Annis School. The recently launched Center for Collaborative Innovation, funded through an Elevate Nexus Higher Education Grant, will further promote the Annis School’s foundational framework.

THE R.B. ANNIS SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING USHERED IN A NEW HOMECOMING TRADITION IN 2020 W H E N F A C U LT Y A N D S T U D E N T S B U I LT TWO STEEL TREBUCHETS FOR THE TOP DOG CHALLENGE, A COMPETITION W I T H T R U M A N S TAT E U N I V E R S I T Y TO SEE WHICH INSTITUTION COULD RAISE THE MOST FUNDS IN SUPPORT OF LOCAL NON-PROFIT GROUPS.

Reid envisions more real-world opportunities for students and faculty to collaborate and problem-solve, as they did for the Top Dog Challenge during Homecoming 2020. Given just three weeks to design and build two steel trebuchets weighing 600 pounds each, Reid was thrilled to see the Annis School rise to the challenge. “Seeing this school go all-in once we have a good idea, once we have a commitment, is an awesome thing to see. The real highlight has been watching our faculty work tirelessly for our students,” he said.

The Department of Art & Design, which celebrates its centennial anniversary in 2023, also is expanding. Supported by a $100,000 grant from the Allen Whitehill Clowes Foundation, Art & Design will undergo a significant facility upgrade and expansion that meets the department’s growing needs to accommodate more students and to continue to meet the accrediting standards set by the National Association for Schools of Art and Design (NASAD).

“In addition to providing our students with innovative, cutting-edge experiences, these developments ensure that UIndy continues to meet current and long-term accreditation requirements. They also play a critical role in helping us to accommodate the increasing enrollments in our programs.” -President Robert L. Manuel

The project includes the renovation of an existing building on campus and a reorganization of space within the Christel DeHaan Fine Arts Center. The additional, repurposed building will include spaces for a sculpture studio (both wood and metal), ceramics, art therapy space, a new student gallery, studio classroom, offices, and storage space. Reorganization and updating of the Christel DeHaan Fine Arts Center will allow expansion of the printmaking studio, digital photography studio, animation/illustration digital studio, and a studio classroom. The expansion will provide the additional space required to facilitate the department’s expanding programs and to grow the department’s interdisciplinary collaborations both inside and outside of the University. During the last five years, innovative programs have connected students with regional and national networks of artists and community organizations. Facultyled projects such as the “River Fish” sculpture along the White River and a hanging sculpture for the Indianapolis Symphony Orchestra’s 2020 Beethoven Series have created hands-on learning experiences for students while further reinforcing the department’s reputation for artistic excellence. WWISINUNTM TEEM RR/E/SRSP/PR FRAI IN LNLGG22200022201 1

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TRACING CAREERS IN T

H E U N I V E R S I T Y O F I N D I A N A P O L I S C O N TA C T T R A C I N G T E A M I S T R A C K I N G T H E C O R O N AV I R U S I N R E A L T I M E A N D P R O V I D I N G S T U D E N T S W I T H VA L U A B L E F I E L D E X P E R I E N C E .

Ensuring all students have ways to complete their education, no matter the circumstances, has always been a priority at the University of Indianapolis. When the coronavirus pandemic struck, the University deployed a variety of methods to keep campus safe, including calling on the expertise of UIndy health science and nursing students, as operations continued throughout 2020. Integral to the University’s response was the ability to track virus activity within the campus community. That’s where the contact tracing team stepped in. Contact tracing determines who has developed COVID-19, the disease caused by the virus, and who may have been exposed. A period of quarantine for those exposed, or isolation for those who are infected, mitigates community spread. Keeping the case numbers as

low as possible while providing support and resources for the sick and exposed is the goal. “There is so much unknown about this pandemic that makes it that much more important for us to take necessary precautions to try to avoid it spreading further,” said Kirsti Oswalt ’18 (exercise science) ’20 (M.S., public health), who leads the University’s contact tracing team. The team includes graduate assistants from the UIndy Public Health Program and School of Nursing students who are gaining clinical experience in community health. All team members have participated in training developed by nationally-recognized organizations such as the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The team is trained to comply with FERPA and HIPAA guidelines, ensuring the University’s contact tracing activities are confidential and protect the privacy of students and employees.



“W E HAVE TO MAKE CHANGES TO OUR SYSTEM WHENEVER THE CDC MAKES NEW CHANGES AND RECOMMENDATIONS SO THAT WE ARE DOING OUR PART TO SLOW THE SPREAD AND ”

PROTECT THE PACK.

–Kirsti Oswalt ’18 ’20 #PROTECTOURPACK

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Since the Fall 2020 semester, students and employees have been required to complete a health screening questionnaire every day they come to campus. If they report symptoms or possible exposure, the contact tracing team begins the process to determine if quarantine or isolation is required. One of the biggest challenges is the constantly changing nature of the pandemic. The team made several adjustments based on the level of new cases coming in, changes in the weather, and the number of people reporting symptoms through the daily health screenings. They also worked to keep students and employees informed as guidance changed frequently. “We have to make changes to our system whenever the CDC makes new changes and recommendations so that we are doing our part to slow the spread and protect the pack,” Oswalt said. Nicholas Powers ’21, a contact tracing team member who is in the Second Degree Accelerated Nursing Program, praised the team’s success in continuing to meet its goals pertaining to patient confidentiality and lowering transmission rates on campus.


PUBLIC HEALTH “The UIndy team not only works in contact tracing but also works in leading the community in asymptomatic testing to make sure that we can screen as many people as possible to help in fighting the transmission of the virus,” Powers said. Two graduate assistants, Samantha Mundt ’21 (public health education and promotion) ’22 (M.S., public health) and Destinee Ward ’21 (M.S., public health), serve on the contact tracing team and can attest to the rapidly evolving nature of their work. Learning to shift gears quickly has been the key to operating efficiently as they hone their public health skills. Determining an infected person’s contacts and movements, and then informing people who may have been exposed, is no small task.

“The biggest change from the beginning of the semester is my speed in calls. Having to get in contact with 80 to 100 people within a day can be challenging,” said Ward. The team developed flexibility in details, such as working from home instead of in the office, or focusing on emails rather than phone calls to increase the response rate. Mundt said she has a newfound appreciation for the importance of transparency during crisis situations.

Oswalt sees a direct connection to the work of the contact tracing team and the Master of Public Health Program’s emphasis on being open to a world of possibilities. “We learn all aspects of health and how we as public health professionals can play a part in shaping and improving the health of those in the communities we live in,” Oswalt said. “There is always a place for us to help those in our community, in our country, and even across the globe.”

“Communication and empathy have been a big part of my role as a contact tracer. Not only do I need to be able to share and gather important information but I also need to show empathy when discussing a topic,” she said.

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ESSENTIAL SUPPORT

THANKS TO YOUR SUPPORT OF THE UINDY FUND, THE UNIVERSITY OF INDIANAPOLIS CONTINUES TO SPARK SOLUTIONS AND HELP S T U D E N T S N AV I G AT E T H E I R L I V E S I N W AY S N E V E R I M A G I N E D .

T

he unusual circumstances of the COVID-19 pandemic inspired numerous innovative solutions at the University of Indianapolis. The origin of many of those solutions can be found in the UIndy Fund. All UIndy students benefit from the UIndy Fund, which supports academic resources, scholarships, and student success programs including the Professional Edge Center. Gifts to the UIndy Fund are unrestricted, which allows the University flexibility in responding to a rapidly changing world. Across the University, examples abound of students benefiting from the UIndy Fund during the pandemic and beyond.

While this experience is one that students may not have had before, it prepared them for a new practice area that may become more common, especially in rural areas. Students learned how to engage with clients through their therapeutic use of technology and gained experience managing treatment sessions online.

GLO BA L CO L L A B O R AT I V E R ES EA R C H

G A I N I N G A N EW TE LEHEALTH S KILL

Your support of the UIndy fund allows our faculty to be nimble and adapt quickly.

UIndy occupational therapy students were only a few weeks shy of fulfilling their clinical requirements for graduation when the pandemic halted their placements at local hospitals. University faculty quickly implemented a new electronic medical records system which was FERPA- and HIPAAcompliant and allowed students to gain telehealth experience to fulfill their academic requirements. Additionally, in true Greyhound fashion, many UIndy alumni who are now licensed occupational therapists stepped up to help supervise these sessions. The telehealth sessions continued to be beneficial for both OT and PT students over the summer. “I am so grateful for the telehealth fieldwork opportunity that allowed me to graduate on time and expand my clinical skills,” said Maggie Rhodes, ’16 (psychology) ’20, (MS, occupational therapy). “My graduate school experience has been wonderful, thanks to those who support UIndy and the entire Occupational Therapy department at UIndy!”

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Your support of the UIndy Fund allows us to provide handson learning and connect students with new opportunities despite pandemic challenges.

UIndy students are safely working in UIndy’s labs as they participate in a global study to help analyze the active ingredient in drugs sold in developing countries. According to the World Health Organization, ten percent of pharmaceuticals sold in developing nations are deficient in the active ingredient and five percent contain no active ingredient—all causing potential harm to those taking it. To meet the high demand for drug evaluations, UIndy is assisting the Distributed Pharmaceutical Analysis Lab (DPAL) study by attracting undergraduate researchers to help with the analysis. The vital work connects UIndy students to a collaboration between 30 academic institutions around the world.

After passing quality control measures, students test pharmaceuticals using advanced chemical instrumentation in UIndy’s chemistry lab.


Any substandard samples will be sent for further testing where a final report will be forwarded to the medicine regulatory agencies for review. This real-world collaborative effort gives students hands-on opportunities while using their skills to help others in need. “I am grateful for the contributions that allow me to do research in the field I love and use instrumentation that I otherwise could not use,” said chemistry major Shira Sasson ’21 (pictured left). “This sets me up for success and allows me to get the most out of my undergraduate degree.”

U I NDY H U M A N IDE NTIFICATIO N CENT ER

Your support of the UIndy Fund allows us to persevere in the face of unprecedented challenges.

Some things can’t be put on hold during a pandemic. That was the case for human biology students working with Dr. Krista Latham, professor of biology and anthropology and director of the UIndy Human Identification Center. Through the University’s Forensic Anthropology and Forensic DNA Labs, UIndy students continued their learning and service to the community. Even when the University went virtual this spring, they didn’t skip a beat.

on a class project to translate documents for Prevail of Central Indiana, an organization which serves victims of sexual abuse and domestic violence. Students in the course completed a “translation bootcamp” week to translate, from English to Spanish, many of the brochures, handouts, and informational sheets that the workers at Prevail give to their clients. Ferreira reviewed all of the students’ work before submitting it to Prevail. Kaitlyn Ruiz ’23 (nursing, Spanish) was committed to doing her best to make sure that the translations were done appropriately. “I think our motto ‘Education for Service’ was exemplified in this project,” Ruiz said. “I think it’s important that we include this motto in our curriculum because it allows us to learn early on how to use our education to help others. I believe that no matter what we are studying, we will always impact others. There’s no better way to learn how to impact them positively than this.”

Please consider supporting UIndy students through the UIndy Fund by visiting uindy.edu/giving or contact Stephanie HaysMussoni at 317-791-7988 or haysmussonis@uindy.edu.

By gaining essential employee status and taking additional safety precautions, students continued to help provide human identification answers to law enforcement in Indiana, Illinois, and Ohio while gaining valuable hands-on learning experiences. “I truly appreciate everyone who has supported UIndy and am so grateful to those who have made it possible for me to pursue my education,” said Alba Craig ’21 (MS, human biology), shown above right with Samantha Beck ’20 (MS, human biology). “Without this current program and all of its hands-on learning opportunities, I would not feel as confident in science as I do now.”

TRA NSL ATI ON B OOTCA M P Students in Dr. Ana María Ferreira’s Spanish 300 course provided another example of “Education for Service” put into action. They worked

Your support of the UIndy Fund allows us to serve our community more deeply.

40%

96%

Undergraduates who are firstgeneration college students

Undergraduates receiving UIndy scholarships

100% Students who benefit from the UIndy Fund. WINTER/SPRING 2021

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EMERGING HONORARY ALUM INSPIRES OPPORTUNITIES FOR THE N E X T G E N E R AT I O N

E D G E SCH OLAR S STARTING IN THE NINTH GRADE, 21STCENTURY SCHOLARS ACROSS INDIANA CAN JOIN THE EDGE SCHOLARS PROGRAM, A PIPELINE TO A UNIVERSITY OF INDIANAPOLIS EDUCATION TAILORED TO EACH STUDENT’S NEEDS AND INTERESTS.

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A PARTNERSHIP BETWEEN THE OFFICE OF INCLUSION & EQUITY AND THE OFFICE OF ADMISSIONS, THE PROGRAM HELPS YOUNG ADULTS BUILD INCLUSIVE LEADERSHIP SKILLS AND DESIGN THEIR FOUR-YEAR COLLEGE JOURNEY. THROUGH SERVICE, LIVINGLEARNING COMMUNITIES, AND MORE, EDGE SCHOLARS FIND THE SUPPORT THEY NEED TO COMPLETE THEIR EDUCATION, BUILD THEIR PORTFOLIO, AND IGNITE THEIR PASSION.


LEADERS A

dedicated leader and friend to many, Paul WashingtonLacey was known for decades of advocacy and mentorship at the University of Indianapolis. In 2017, friends and family honored his memory by establishing a leadership program in his name for students at UIndy. The Paul Washington-Lacey Emerging Leader Program inspires student growth in four key areas: academic excellence, career readiness, leadership development, and personal growth. Students meet regularly for team-bonding activities, professional networking events, workshops, and awards dinners. They compete in challenges that address real-world situations, like food insecurity, and advocate for the needs of students through meetings with university leadership.

“We want to empower students by putting them in the same spaces with mentors, creating relationship-building opportunities, and challenging them. Students are getting feedback from people in fields they are aspiring to be in, and they’re responding to something they have ownership in,” said Dr. Amber R. Smith, vice president and chief inclusion & equity officer. The program shows students how to use their voices, skills, and experiences to achieve what they want, said Tylyn Johnson ’22 (social work), who is also in the Ron & Laura Strain Honors College. “For me, I think that’s a grand thing, because oftentimes, students are, unintentionally or otherwise, pushed towards working in their own silos with somewhat limited interaction with others. There’s so much to be gained from understanding and engaging with those intersections of subject, of identity, and so much more.”

“My experience so far has been beautiful. I remember walking into the room when we had our first meeting and seeing fellow Black leaders. I felt safe and overwhelmingly happy to see people who look like me and have a shared experience in the same room,” said Black Student Association Secretary Primrose Paul ’23 (biology). The program is collaboratively led by the Office of Inclusion & Equity, the Office of Ecumenical & Interfaith Programs, Student Affairs, Professional Edge Center, and the Office of University Advancement.

At the Inclusive Leadership Institute event in January, to kick off the new year, students engaged in activities about how to best approach obstacles, overcome adversity, and receive constructive feedback. “I think the most important virtue that Dr. Smith has emphasized is allowing ourselves to be vulnerable in order to overcome the numerous things life constantly throws at us,” Paul said.

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HAPPY ANNIVERSARY,

GRADY! November 2020 marked Grady the Greyhound’s first

anniversary as the University of Indianapolis mascot. During that time, Grady found his way into our hearts as he showed his Crimson and Grey pride.

@UINDYHOUND #GRADYPACK U I N D Y. E D U / G R A D Y 16

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These Greyhounds are as fast in the water as I am on land. I will nap here today!

I love it here!

Home sweet home! Cheering on the women’s soccer team. Go Hounds!

Working hard, or hardly working? Family reunion! Running laps with my sister, Misty Enjoying a stroll on Smith Mall with friends WINTER/SPRING 2021

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UNIVERSITY UPDATES SCHOOL OF BUSINESS Dr. Larry DeGaris, professor of sports marketing, was quoted in an Indianapolis Business Journal article about the impact of COVID-19 on the sports industry. Dr. Matt Will continued to lend his expertise on the economic impact of COVID-19 to numerous local and regional media outlets. Assistant professor of operations and supply chain management Dr. Craig Seidelson was featured in Inside Indiana Business, discussing continuing concerns of trade war tariffs and the COVID-19 pandemic. Seidelson was also accepted to be a member of the advisory panel for Wiley, an American multinational publishing company. Three graduate students in the data analytics program, along with Alli Snyder, assistant professor of data analytics, received first place in “Healthy Mom & Baby Datapalooza 2.0,” a virtual data challenge conference. The students are Claudia Alocer, Angie Zhang, and Lawrence Bukenya, who will be graduating in May 2021.

SCHOOL OF EDUCATION Mark Snodgrass ’00 (elementary education) received one of 10 Amazon “Future 18

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The University Updates section is a snapshot of the accomplishments of students, faculty, and the larger University community. For a full selection of news and stories, visit news.uindy.edu.

Engineer Teacher of the Year” awards and was the only award recipient from Indiana. Assistant professor Kate Reinhardt was selected to be a National Site Visitor for the Council for the Accreditation of Educator Preparation and will serve a three-year term. Chair and associate professor Dr. Jean Lee co-presented “Project Based Learning as the Vehicle for School Improvement” at the 2020 CELL Virtual Conference. Lee also co-published a peerreviewed article, “Valuing the journey: How intuition and sensemaking promote mathematical competence,” in Indiana’s Mathematics Teacher Journal, Summer/Fall 2020 Issue. Professor Dr. Angie Ridgway and assistant professor Deb Sachs presented a two-day workshop for faculty in UIndy’s College of Health Sciences titled “Blossoming with Bloom’s: Incorporating Bloom’s Taxonomy to Promote Intentionality in Instruction and Assessment Practices.” Erin Dawson ’21 (elementary education) received a Classroom Teacher Grant from Kappa Delta Pi, the international honor society in education, for the proposal “STEM Soft Start.”

COLLEGE OF APPLIED BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES Assistant professor Dr. Mason Burns and Erica Granz ’21 (MA, psychology) published “Confronting Sexism: Promoting Confrontation Acceptance and Reducing Stereotyping through Stereotype Framing” in the journal Sex Roles: A Journal of Research. Gabrielle Glorioso ’20 ’25 (MA, PsyD) and Dr. Erin Fekete, interim associate dean and director of psychological sciences, presented research on self-objectification and eating behaviors in women with obesity at the Annual Meeting of the American Psychological Association. Michelle Itczak, assistant professor and practicum and internship coordinator of mental health counseling, presented a poster, “ArtBased Assessment Teaching Methods” for the UIndy Office of Accreditation 2020 Assessment Poster Fair and was interviewed for a podcast, “Littles News Briefing Episode 11: Interview with an Art Therapist.” Dr. Rachel Feldwisch, director of counseling programs, and assistant professor Michelle Itczak, Patricia Cavanaugh ’20, and Shelbi Gabbard ’20 presented a webinar, “Art

Therapy in Cancer Care” for the Indiana Counseling Association Annual Conference. Feldwisch co-authored “Safe Sisters: A Sorority-Based Bystander Intervention Program to Prevent Sexual Assault” in The Journal of College Counseling (October 2020). Dr. Lynn Shaw, assistant professor of social work and MSW field director, was the guest speaker for a NASW-Indiana webinar, “Mindful Moments: A Contemplative Practice for SelfCare.” Shaw also presented a webinar on “Laughter Yoga for Faculty Engagement” for the faculty at St. Catherine University and was interviewed by FOX 59 for a segment on managing stress during a pandemic. Shaw and Francine Carter, assistant professor in the Phylis Lan Lin Department of Social Work, were the plenary speakers for the National Association of Social Workers of Indiana State Conference. The virtual presentation was titled “Critical Self-Reflection in Social Work Practice - Reflection is Reflection, Isn’t It?” Social work faculty, including assistant professors Stephanie Rudd and Melissa Ketner, teamed up to offer pro-bono services to first responders during the COVID-19 pandemic. Dr. Taniko King-Jordan, BSW program director and assistant


professor of social work, submitted a peer-reviewed manuscript for publication to Advances in Social Work Special Edition: Dismantling White Supremacy in Social Work Education. King-Jordan also contributed to a chapter in Child and FamilyServing Systems: A Compendium of Policy and Practice on “Transition-Age Foster Youth: Implications for policy, practice, and research.” Dr. Katie Boucher, assistant professor of psychology, spoke with Fox 59 and the IndyStar about the psychology of maskwearing. The story was syndicated and appeared in multiple outlets across the state. Boucher presented a workshop on “Supporting equity and success in a blended learning environment” for faculty at the University of Toledo. Research by Dr. Aaron Kivisto, associate professor of clinical psychology, Dr. Katherine Kivisto, associate professor of clinical child psychology, Erica Gurnell ’22 (PsyD), and Dr. Peter Phalen ’18 (PsyD) shows that state-level gun ownership is strongly linked to rates of suicide among high school-aged adolescents, and gun ownership is linked more strongly to adolescent suicide than adult suicide. Dr. Aaron Kivisto and Phalen are serving as external program evaluators for the State of Indiana’s Recovery Works program. Professor Dr. Debbie Warman published an article, “Decisionmaking about intrusive thoughts: Relationships to attitudes towards them” in the Journal of Behavior Therapy and Experimental Psychiatry.

Dr. Rhianna Beasley ’20 (PsyD), assistant professor Dr. Jordan Sparks Waldron and Dr. Aaron Kivisto published “Childhood maltreatment and psychosis: A comparative validity study of maltreatment indices” in Child Maltreatment. Dr. Emma Eckart, assistant professor, co-authored “Predictive variables of faculty retention in the counselor education field: A gender perspective” in the Journal of Education and Training Studies. Eckart also co-authored “Counselor educator mothers: Work-life enrichment and occupational satisfaction” in Adultspan and presented a webinar, “Work-Family Conflict of Female Counselors,” for the Indiana Counseling Association. Dean Dr. Torrey Wilson co-authored “Themes and trends in teaching group psychotherapy” in The Group Psychologist. Wilson copresented “Cultural humility & structural competency: Recognizing sociocultural embeddedness reduces resistance” at the annual convention of the American Psychological Association. Wilson also co-created a preconference workshop, “Yes, us, too: Addressing realities of sexual harassment of counseling psychology trainees in an ethical, empowering, and compassionate way” for the 2020 Counseling Psychology Conference in New Orleans, LA. *Canceled due to the pandemic Psychology students Allison Taylor ’20, Ansley Crutchfield

’23, Elizabeth Ray ’21, Alena Gorman ’21 (MA), and Dr. Boucher co-presented a poster on the influence of belonging and faculty mindset for college students’ STEM experiences at the MidAmerica Undergraduate Psychology Research Conference.

Thomas, they provided pro-bono program evaluation and helped the organization make datadriven decisions.

SHAHEEN COLLEGE OF ARTS & SCIENCES R.B . Annis Sch ool of

Dr. Jordan Sparks Waldron, assistant professor of psychology, presented a poster, “The impact of drug source and user’s race on stigma toward opioid addiction” at the 17th Annual Improving Outcomes in the Treatment of Opioid Dependence Conference. Waldron also presented “Biogenetic explanations and stigma: A comparison of schizophrenia and alcohol use disorder” at the 11th Annual International Conference on Stigma. Professor Christie Jansing, LCSW (BSW Program) and Diana Buxton ’04 (LCSW) presented “Secondary Traumatic Stress” at the Johnson County Department of Children’s Services in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. Dr. Kendra Thomas, assistant professor, and Erin Hoolihan ’17 (MA, clinical psychology) co-authored an article, “The relationship between bonding social capital, personal belief in a just world, and well-being: An analysis of a diverse adolescent sample” in Social Psychology of Education. Adam Sensoli ’22 and Sarah Kosten ’20 (PsyD) presented dissertation findings to South African non-profit iThemba. Under the guidance of Dr. Kendra

Engineering The School received a 2020 Elevate Nexus Higher Education Grant for $50,000 to support program curriculum and entrepreneurship. Dr. Md Munirul Haque, assistant professor, co-authored a conference paper, “Towards Developing A Mobile-Based Care for Children with ASD (mCARE) in low and middle-income countries (LMICs) like Bangladesh” in IEEE COMPSAC. Haque received a Distinguished Paper Award from the Association for Computing Machinery for a paper titled “Two Tell-tale Perspectives of PTSD: Neurobiological Abnormalities and Bayesian Regulatory Network of The Underlying Disorder in A Refugee Context.” Haque also received a $11,305 subaward from Purdue University to work on a National Science Foundation project, “Physiological sensing to enable expert decision-making in healthcare.” Dr. Kenneth Reid was announced as the new associate dean and director of the R.B. Annis School of Engineering. (See page 6.)

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Reid co-authored “Overcoming Challenges to Enhance a First-Year Engineering Ethics Curriculum” in Advances in Engineering Education. Assistant professor Megan Hammond was nominated for the Outstanding Education in STEM Award, given by the organization Women & Hi Tech. Assistant professor Dr. Mohammad Shokrolah-Shirazi served as publication chair, associate editor and chair for eight sessions of the 2020 IEEE Intelligent Vehicle Symposium. Three new assistant professors joined the program: Hung-Fu Chang (Software Engineering), Joan Martinez (Industrial & Systems Engineering), and Eliot Motato (Mechanical Engineering). Assistant professor Dr. David Olawale received a National Science Foundation grant to participate as an entrepreneurial lead in the Innovation Corps program. Dr. Stephen Spicklemire, director of engineering instruction, was awarded a faculty fellowship by the American Society for Engineering Education. He worked with the Center for Physics Education Research at the United States Air Force Academy to develop engaging physics lessons.

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Assistant professor Dr. George Ricco coauthored an article in the Journal of Engineering Technology: “Integrating Digital Civics into the Engineering Technology Classroom.”

Phase Ib Archaeological Survey of Portions of Prophetstown State Park.”

Dr. Joseph Herzog, assistant professor, has been elected a Senior Member of SPIE, the International Society of Optics and Photonics.

Professor Dr. Christopher Schmidt published a book, Long ‘on’ the Tooth: Dental Evidence of Diet, through Academic Press, London.

Meredith Magee ’22 (software engineering) and Miles Furr ’21 (software engineering), under the guidance of Herzog, published “Plasmonically enhanced photo brightening using quantum dots,” in the August 2020 issue of Proc. SPIE. Faculty collaborated to publish “Developing the Entrepreneurial Mindset in STEM Students: Integrating Experiential Entrepreneurship into Engineering Design” in the July 2020 issue of the International Journal of Process Education. Faculty and students collaborated to design and build two steel trebuchets in three weeks for Catapult for a Cause, a new Homecoming tradition in support of local non-profit organizations. Ant h ro p o lo g y & Arc h ae o lo g y Dr. Christopher Moore ’04, associate professor, received a $50,000 Historic Preservation Fund Grant from the Indiana Department of Natural Resources Division of Historic Preservation and Archaeology and the National Park Service for “A

Moore also co-authored an article, “Exploring the Guale Village and Spanish Mission Occupations at the Sapelo Shell Ring Complex through Bayesian Analysis,” in the journal Radiocarbon.

Art & Des ign A $100,000 grant from the Allen Whitehill Clowes Charitable Foundation is supporting a significant facility upgrade and expansion to accommodate more students and continue to meet the accrediting standards set by the National Association for Schools of Art and Design. The Hullaballoo Press created a free, downloadable, and printable poster in a non-partisan effort to encourage voting. Associate professor Katherine Fries is part of a seven-person team from the US and UK that organized “Make-ready 2020: A Symposium for Letterpress Educators,” a week-long virtual experience that was attended by 150+ people from around the world. Fries also presented and served as moderator during the event. Fries was a guest artist for the Hamilton Wood Type & Printing Museum’s Virtual Series “Ham Hangs.” Other

exhibitions included Hoosier Women in Art: My Generation, Juried Exhibition, Garfield Park Arts Center (Indianapolis) and Reverting to Type 2020: Protest Posters, Juried Exhibition, New North Press, London, England, International Juried Exhibition and Signs of Change!. Art by assistant professor Nathan Foley was included in The In Art Gallery, an international virtual sculpture exhibition. Work by assistant professor Barry Barnes was included in an exhibition at the New Harmony Gallery of Contemporary Art. Noni Brynjolson, assistant professor, published an essay, “Learning From Watts House Project: On Failure and Reparative Practice in Socially Engaged Art,” in the peer-reviewed journal Public Art Dialogue. Brynjolson published a chapter titled “The Making of Many Hands: Artisanal Production and Neighbourhood Redevelopment in Contemporary Socially Engaged Art” for the book The New Politics of the Handmade: Craft, Art and Design. Assistant professor Sarah Pfohl participated in Broadside, a large-format photo poster fundraiser sale and online exhibition. Pfohl’s edition sold out, with proceeds benefiting the Navajo Nation and their COVID-19 pandemic relief fund. Work by Pfohl was featured in a juried international-online exhibition in Fraction Magazine’s 12th Anniversary Issue, a juried


exhibition, There/Their/They’re, in Brooklyn, New York, and at Filter Photo’s we like small things v.3 exhibition in Chicago, among others. Pfohl published “Teaching in The Age of COVID-19” in Postdigital Science and Education, provided an updated definition of the term people with disabilities to the Photo Bill of Rights, and was invited to contribute eight disability-related questions to “The Photographer’s Green Book” project. Adjunct professor Steve Garst designed, manufactured, and released 134 printing presses to help 25+ printmaking and letterpress university programs around the US cope with the COVID-19 pandemic. Garst’s work has been featured in two juried exhibitions: Printmaker, Interrupted at Illinois State University and Artlink 40th National Print Exhibition in Fort Wayne, Ind. Jim Viewegh, associate professor and chair, had work featured in The Figure and Exploring our Fears, international juried online exhibitions by The In Art Gallery. B i olog y Dr. Kevin Gribbins was named Mentor of the Year by the Ron & Laura Strain Honors College and was a finalist for the University Teacher of the Year. Associate professor Dr. Kim Baker was awarded the Brooker Teaching Award for the Division of Math and Sciences.

Associate professor Dr. Marc Milne worked with the Indiana Department of Natural Resources to create the first official list of spiders in the state and to assign statuses of conservation concern (threatened, endangered, vulnerable, etc.) to these species. Milne co-authored “Results of the Indiana Forest Alliance Ecoblitz at Morgan-Monroe/Yellowwood State Forest in Indiana,” in the Indiana Academy of Science and co-authored “Biodiversity from caves and other subterranean habitats of Georgia, USA,” which was published in the Journal of Cave and Karst Studies. Professor Dr. Krista Latham participated in a virtual press conference to announce the Lilly Girls and Young Women in STEM Advisory Committee, of which she is a member. Latham participated in a review of research and development applications as a standing member of the National Institute of Justice, Research and Development in Forensic Science for Criminal Justice Purposes Forensic Biology Panel. Assistant professor Dr. Daniel Scholes presented a research poster at the American Society of Plant Biology virtual conference, and co-presented a scholarship of teaching and learning poster with Shira Sasson ’21 (chemistry, biology minor). Scholes also presented an invited research poster for the virtual Leading Ecologist Showcase of the Ecological Society of America. Alba Craig ’21 and Tanya Ramos ’22 (human biology) were featured in a video on the Indiana Academy of Science website.

Chem is tr y The department has been accepted into the MICRO (Development and Deployment of Microfluidic Based Labs in Chemistry) program, which incorporates microfluidic lab-ona-chip devices into analytical chemistry curriculum. UIndy is one of 10 institutions selected to pioneer this program, led by associate professor Dr. Levi Mielke. Aaron Drake ’21 (chemistry major, biology minor), 2020 recipient of the Wayne Patrick Comer Award, had data featured in the latest seminar in the JASCO series on Molecular Spectroscopy. Com m unication Professor Dr. Katie Greenan was appointed by President-Elect Joe Biden’s campaign director to serve on the BidenHarris 2020 Presidential Campaign by hosting and moderating virtual leadership events and communication training sessions. Greenan, assistant professor Dr. Whitney Tipton, and colleagues completed an audio book narration with Indiana State Library. “Campaign Crossroads: Presidential Politics in Indiana from Lincoln to Obama” will be published in 2021 and preserved by the Library of Congress in Washington, D.C.

Tipton presented two papers at the National Communication Association annual conference: “Still in the fight but out of the race: An agenda-setting analysis of the last week of the Kamala Harris campaign” (co-authored by graduate students Stephen Cox, Rebecca Coutcher, and Lamara Finley) and “Toward an invitational andragogy: Articulating a teaching philosophy for the adult/accelerated classroom” (co-authored by Dr. Stephanie Wideman, assistant professor). Scott Uecker, instructor and general manager of WICR, commented for an Indianapolis Business Journal article about radio listenership during the pandemic. Uecker co-presented “Coaching Radio On-Air Personalities” at the College Broadcasters, Inc. virtual National Student Electronic Media Convention, and was re-elected to the Indiana Broadcasters Association Board of Directors. Uecker received an Indiana Broadcasters Association Spectrum Award for Best Sports Coverage in the large market radio division for his football play-by-play on Fox Sports Radio 1260 AM. The UIndy Forensics Speech and Debate Team competed in their first virtual tournament at the 2020 T-Town Swing Tournament, hosted by Tulsa Community College and Northeastern State University. Dr. Steven Koehn, assistant professor, was the keynote speaker at the 27th ICTEL 2020 WINTER/SPRING 2021

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Virtual International Conference on Teaching, Education & Learning held at the Universiti Teknologi Malaysia (UTM) in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. Dr. Ray Begovich, director of graduate studies in public relations, published a book review of News From Germany: The Competition to Control World Communications, 1900-1945 by Heidi J.S. Tworek in Journalism and Mass Communication Quarterly, Vol. 97, No. 2, Summer 2020. Begovich participated virtually in the Annual General Meeting of the International Association of Business Communicators; the annual conference of the American Journalism Historians Association; and three webinars hosted by PR Week magazine. Begovich also served as a judge for the Society of Professional Journalists’ Sigma Delta Chi national writing awards. Cri m i n a l J u st i ce

En g lis h

Ex p erience Des ign

H is tor y & Political Scien ce

Dr. Leah Milne, assistant professor, published “ZITKÁLAŠÁ, Earlham Hall, Richmond, Indiana,” in Literary Landscapes.

The department has been collaborating across campus to design virtual programming that is safer and more accessible during the pandemic.

Dr. Ted Frantz, professor and department chair, collaborated with Indiana politician John Mutz to write An Examined Life: The John Mutz Story, published by the Indiana Historical Society Press. Frantz was quoted in an Associated Press article about the presidential election, along with several regional news outlets.

Milne also presented at the Midwest Pop Culture/American Culture Association conference and presented “Emotional Labor & the Labor of Distraction” at the National Humanities Conference. Rebecca McKanna, assistant professor, published a short story, “What Happens to Girls,” in Rumpus, 24 June 2020. Liz Whiteacre, assistant professor, published a poem, “Home for the Holidays,” An Indiana Christmas (Indiana University Press), and had two poems published in the literary magazine Last Leaves (October 2020): “My Daughter Hates Basil” and “My Daughter Whirls.” Dan Vice, assistant professor, published the poem “House Hunters” in High Shelf XIX. A poetry collection by professor Kevin McKelvey was shortlisted for top honors for the 2020 Eugene and Marilyn Glick Indiana Authors Awards.

Faculty and students have been working with the Marion County Forensic Services Agency surveying cold case homicides that have National Integrated Ballistic Information Network criteria evidence which has not yet been entered into the database.

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McKelvey also presented “Arts, Community, & Place: A Collaborative Workshop” in the Indiana Humanities INseparable Speakers Bureau for Historic New Harmony and University of Southern Indiana’s Crossroads: Change in Rural America series.

Students in EXD 101 have been working with the Center for Global Engagement, and EXD 300 students are partnering with Dr. Bev Reitsma (School of Education) and Mary Gobbett (biology) to create original experiential video content for teaching modules in social studies and science. Glob a l La ngua ges & Cross Cultura l Studies Professor Dr. Gerburg Garmann published a poem, “Covid-19 or On Cultivating a Sharpness from the Backs of Rocks” in Northern New England Review. Dr. Ana María Ferreira, assistant professor, published “George Floyd, la víctima más reciente del racismo y el abuso policial” in Razon Pública. Students in Ferreira’s class translated documents for Prevail of Central Indiana, an organization that serves survivors of sexual abuse and domestic violence. Dr. Eduard Arriaga, assistant professor, published “Redes epistemológicas y acciones. Manuel Zapata Olivella en el Primer Congreso de la Cultura Negra de las Américas.” Visitas al patio. Revista de lingüística y literatura, vol. 14, No. 1, pp. 107125.

Associate professor Dr. Laura Wilson continued to provide commentary to multiple local, regional, and international outlets regarding questions surrounding the 2020 election cycle. Professor Dr. James Fuller presented papers virtually at two conferences: “The Significance of War Governors or Why We Should Care About State and Local Matters in Studying Civil War History,” at the Thirteenth Annual Symposium of the Civil War Study Group, hosted by Youngstown State University and “Interpreting the Life of Richard Yates, Civil War Governor of Illinois,” at the 22nd Annual Conference on Illinois History. Fuller also virtually spoke on “The Lady Major and the War Governor: The Politics of a Civil War Sex Scandal,” as the Hosmer-Williams Lecture hosted by Principia College and The Historic Elsah Foundation. Professor Dr. Lawrence Sondhaus published a second


revised edition of his book “World War I: The Global Revolution” with Cambridge University Press. Instructor Emily G. Miller was elected to a threeyear term as secretary for the Indiana Council for the Social Studies. I ntern at i on a l Re l atio n s Led by associate professor Dr. Jyotika Saksena, students majoring in international relations, political science, and history participated in the Model United Nations Conference this fall. Craig Chigadza ’21 won the Best Delegate Award for the African Union Council. Musi c Professor Dr. John Berners collaborated with faculty and alumni to create an original composition that honors the life of Christel DeHaan. The tribute is based on “Wandrers Nachtlied,” written by German poet Johann Wolfgang von Goethe. Nemanja Ostojić, associate adjunct professor of classical guitar, was featured in a music video to educate young students in his home country of Serbia. Dr. Brett Leonard, assistant professor and director of music

technology programs, and the Department of Music produced several virtual ensembles in the wake of social distancing requirements during the COVID-19 pandemic. Leonard has been nominated for a 2021 Grammy Award for “Best Engineered Album” for his work on Third Coast Percussion & Devonté Hynes’s album “Fields,” for which he provided audio editing. Dr. Ryan Behan, assistant professor, has been named co-director of the Franz Liszt International Piano Competition, which is to be held in May 2021 in Columbus, Ohio. Instructor Amy Foley published an article, “Coping with Changes to Music Therapy Business During the Pandemic” in Connect 2 Music Therapy, an online magazine for music therapists. Assistant professor Joana Genova and adjunct instructor Ariel Rudiakov, artistic directors of Taconic Music, presented the first indoor (limited audience, socially distanced) concert series in the state of Vermont. Phys ic s & Ear t h - Sp a ce S c ie n c e The department welcomed two new faculty, assistant professor Dr. Nick Soltis and associate adjunct professor Opondo Makito. Soltis published “Measuring student engagement in traditional and active learning biology classrooms using skin biosensors” in CBE: Life Sciences Education and presented “Exploring spatial relationships between lignite-bearing aquifers, total organic carbon, and end-

stage renal disease in the US Gulf Coast” at the Geological Society of America Annual Meeting. Instructor Dr. Stacy Hootman received the Charles Emmert Distinguished Service Award from the Indiana Section of the American Association of Physics Teachers.

Interdis ciplin ar y Carla Harper, an instructional designer for the Faculty Academy, recently received the Outstanding Service 2020 Award from the Private Academic Library Network of Indiana.

Sociology Dr. Colleen Wynn, assistant professor, published an article for the American Sociological Association’s Community & Urban Sociology blog that discusses the importance of using evidence when talking about urbanization and racial justice. Wynn also spoke with local radio station WFYI about the collection of the 2020 Census. “Surrogacy and Medicalization: Navigating Power, Control, and Autonomy in Embodied Labor,” an article by assistant professor Dr. Liz Ziff, was accepted for publication at The Sociological Quarterly. Dr. Amanda Miller, associate professor and department chair, completed data collection with more than 65 current and former cohabiting individuals as a follow-up study with her colleague, Sharon Sassler.

Dakota Ebersold ’21 (history and government/geography education) and Sierra Roberts ’21 (history and social studies education) received the 2020 Dennis Beadles Pre-Service Teacher Award – Outstanding Future Social Studies Educator from the Indiana Council for the Social Studies. Aviya Hawkins ’22 (public health) and Abigail Wagner ’22 (physical therapy) were selected for the Indiana AHEC Scholars Program, part of a national initiative to prepare tomorrow’s health professionals to become leaders in interprofessional practice. The Department of Music and the Center for Aging & Community partnered with the Dementia Friends Indiana movement (led locally by CICOA Aging & In-Home Solutions) to host a series of Memory Cafes at Books & Brews-South Indy.

Miller also presented “Supporting Underprepared Students in the Online Classroom: COVID-19 Edition” for Alpha Kappa Delta, the Sociology Honor Society, and wrote a press release for the Council for Contemporary Families on the challenges of Cohabiting During COVID.

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Dr. Colleen Wynn, assistant professor of sociology, and Dr. Leah Milne, assistant professor of English, presented “How Interdisciplinarity Can Enhance Conversations about Race in the Classroom” for Alpha Kappa Delta, the Sociology Honor Society. For the second year, visual communication design students collaborated with engineering students on DesignSpine, yearlong engineering entrepreneurial projects. R.B. Annis School of Engineering faculty Dr. David Olawale, Dr. Paul Talaga, and James Emery, along with Dr. Marcos Hashimoto (School of Business) and Rhonda Wolverton (Department of Art & Design), have been named Innovation Fellows to support collaborative entrepreneurship and innovation across campus. The initiative is funded by the Elevate Nexus Higher Education Grant. Olawale and Wolverton hosted a webinar for their project, “Art-Engineering Collaboration: Enhancing Entrepreneurial Opportunities.” for the Jack M. Wilson Center for Entrepreneurship at UMassLowell. Dr. Melissa Ketner, assistant professor in the Phylis Lan Lin Department of Social Work and Liz Ziff, assistant professor of sociology, received a Faculty Scholarship Award to support a research study called “Sex Ed Curriculum in the State of Indiana: Is Abstinence-Only Education Best for our Youth?”

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COLLEGE OF HEALTH SCIENCES Students and Gurinder Hohl, former Community Health Network partnership director, were interviewed for a local news story about produce distribution from the University’s community gardens project. Kin e s io lo g y, Hea lth & S p o r t S c ien c es After review by the National Strength and Conditioning Association, the UIndy Exercise Science program was recognized as a strength and conditioning program through the Education Recognition Program. The UIndy Sport Management program has received a “Reaffirmation of Accreditation” from the Commission on Sport Management Accreditation. The Sport Management program also launched a podcast called “Greyhound Guide,” giving listeners an inside look into the business of sport. Find it on Spotify and Apple Podcasts. Public health faculty Dr. Heidi Hancher-Rauch and Dr. Kara Cecil were frequently featured experts in news stories on COVID-19. Graduate student Samantha Mundt (public health) and Hancher-Rauch spoke with Indiana Senator Mike Braun via Zoom as part of the Indiana Society of Public Health Education Advocacy Summit. The Master of Science in Exercise Science program hosted a virtual speaker series during the fall semester featuring a four-time national professional motorcycle racing champion,

a U.S. National TaeKwonDo champion, a five-time U.S. National Cycling Champion, and an Olympic silver medal winner, among others.

Salamh co-authored “It is time to put special tests for rotator cuff–related shoulder pain out to pasture” in the Journal of Orthopaedic & Sports Physical Therapy.

SCHOOL OF

Dr. Kathy Martin co-authored “Assimilation of the Pediatric Essential Core Competencies by Professional Physical Therapist Education Programs” in Pediatric Physical Therapy.

OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY The School provided OT services via telehealth to people who live in Indiana. These services helped Doctor of Occupational Therapy students complete their fieldwork requirements when most traditional fieldwork opportunities were suspended due to the coronavirus. Both the Master of Occupational Therapy and Doctor of Occupational Therapy programs received official recognition as approved programs by the World Federation of Occupational Therapists. Associate professor Dr. Brenda Howard was the lead author of “An ethical response to the COVID-19 pandemic: An AOTA Ethics Advisory Opinion” in the journal OT Practice. Associate professor Dr. Katie Polo was the lead author and associate professor Dr. Beth Ann Walker was a co-author of “Aerosol-generating procedures decision guide” published on the American Occupational Therapy Association website as a COVID-19 decision guide.

KRANNERT SCHOOL OF PHYSICAL THERAPY The National Strength and Conditioning Association announced that Dr. Paul Salamh, assistant professor, was selected as the NSCA’s SCJ Editorial Excellence Award winner for 2020.

The School offered free physical therapy services delivered via telemedicine in the month of July to aid the community during the pandemic. A telemedicine specialty seminar for Doctor of Physical Therapy students, taught by Dr. Emily Slaven, coincided with the telemedicine visits. Students participated in the 2020 Gamecock Challenge, an event designed to celebrate Physical Therapy Month in October. Teams competed in a timed 50,000-meter row on an indoor rower. The UIndy team earned 5th place and raised $1,000 for a minority scholarship fund. Athletic Train in g The master’s program has joined the Indiana Athletic Training Clinical Education Consortium to provide additional learning experiences for students. UIndy faculty members are collaborating with educators from across the state to provide a professional speaker series and a virtual patient clinic. Assistant professor Dr. Cameron Powden coauthored “The Evaluation


of Joint Mobilization Dosage on Ankle Range of Motion in Individuals With Decreased Dorsiflexion and a History of Ankle Sprain” in the Journal of Sport Rehabilitation. I nterp rofe ssi on a l Healt h & Agi ng Stu di e s Dr. Heidi Ewen, associate professor, was named Guest Editor of a special issue on aging and resiliency in the journal Behavioral Sciences. Ewen was also the lead author of “Exploring Beliefs about Aging and Faith: Development of the Judeo-Christian Religious Beliefs and Aging Scale,” published in Behavioral Sciences. Dr. Laura Santurri, assistant professor, department chair, and director of the Doctor of Health Science program, ran 160 miles over four days across Indiana to raise money for a new IHAS scholarship.

SCHOOL OF NURSING Dr. Briyanna Morell, assistant professor, received the Dr. Janet Rexrode Southby Prize in Nursing Research for recognition in and exhibiting an outstanding commitment to nursing research while earning her PhD in Nursing Science at the Catholic University of America.

CENTERS C e nte r fo r Ag in g & C o mmu n ity 2021 marks the 20th anniversary of the creation of the Center for Aging & Community. Planning has begun for 20th anniversary activities. CAC has been selected by the Indiana University School of Medicine as a partner in a 36-month venture to expand support for people with Alzheimer’s Disease and related dementias in 34 Indiana counties. The initiative is supported by a $1.3 million grant from the U.S. Administration for Community Living, Department of Health and Human Services. CAC worked with Probari, Inc. to provide training to members of the Indiana National Guard before they were deployed to nursing homes in response to COVID-19. CAC is also hosting two cohorts of the National Nursing Home COVID-19 Action Network ECHO, coordinating and delivering weekly education sessions on preventing and responding to COVID-19 to more than 50 nursing homes in Indiana. C e nte r of Exc e lle nce in Le ad e rs h ip of Lea rning

Morrell also received the 2020 Indiana League for Nursing Horizon Award.

CELL is partnering with the Indiana Higher Education Commission and INvestEd to meet the need for qualified teachers to deliver dual credit coursework in Indiana’s K-12 schools.

Dr. Norma Hall, dean, was elected president of the Council of Indiana Nursing Deans and Directors for a term of two years.

CELL is spearheading the University of Indianapolis Governor’s Emergency Education Relief Fund Project.

UIndy received the $4.8 million award to address new needs associated with extended periods away from classroom instruction in 30 rural Hoosier school districts. CELL will be celebrating its 20th anniversary in 2021. Details will be shared as plans are confirmed. Center for Ser v iceLea rning & Com m unity Enga gem ent Marianna Foulkrod, director of CSLCE, received a Multiplying Good “One in a Million” Award, recognizing the creative ways she helps young servant leaders continue to engage with their communities, even during a pandemic. The University of Indianapolis was also a recipient of the One in a Million Award for serving as a vital community anchor during the pandemic. Center for Glob a l Enga gem ent Kay Gunyon, director of international admission & recruitment, has been named to the American International Recruitment Council (AIRC) Certification Commission. Ghina Sadek, director of global education, has been named to the College Consortium for International Studies 2020-21 Board of Directors. CCIS is a non-profit partnership of colleges and universities across the globe providing access to quality educational experiences. With leadership from associate professor Dr. Karen Newman, events were held during UIndy’s

International Education Month to promote multiculturalism and diversity. This year’s virtual Celebration of the Flags brought together more than 3,000 Greyhounds from around the world. Off ice of Ecu men ical an d Inter fa ith Prog rams Rev. Dr. Jeremiah Gibbs, chaplain and director of the Lantz Center Christian Vocations & Formation, was appointed pastor of St. Andrew United Methodist Church. Gibbs will continue in his roles at UIndy, which include assistant professor of philosophy & religion, while he serves St. Andrew UMC parttime. Gibbs published his second book, “Find Your Place in God’s Mission,” which emphasizes the discernment curriculum of the Lantz Center for a wider audience of young adults. It is available to purchase at Amazon.

Take Portico with you wherever you go! Visit: portico. uindy.edu WINTER/SPRING 2021

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Carey Dahncke joined the University of Indianapolis as the next executive director of the Center of Excellence in Leadership of Learning (CELL) in August 2020. Since 2001, CELL has engaged in education transformation efforts to make Indiana a national model for educational excellence. Dahncke brings 28 years of experience as an educator, having taught in secondary and elementary classrooms including a year in England as part of the Fulbright program. He was recruited to help Christel DeHaan’s fledgling charter school and under his leadership, the single school grew into an award-winning network serving impoverished children and adults. He has been named one of 10 national Breakthrough Principals for dramatically improving the academic outcomes of students living in poverty. As executive director of CELL, Dahncke will oversee strategic planning, staffing, budgeting, advocacy, school and government relations, and other statewide initiatives, including the Education Workforce Innovation Network, STEM Teach, the Lilly Endowment Comprehensive Counseling Initiative and Early College High School.

Kenneth Reid joined the University of Indianapolis R.B. Annis School of Engineering as associate dean and director in 2020. Reid holds degrees in computer and electrical engineering (BS) from Purdue University, electrical engineering (MS) from Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology, and engineering education (PhD) from Purdue. He began his position at the University of Indianapolis with a wealth of experience in higher education, having served as a faculty member at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis, Ohio Northern University, and most recently, Virginia Tech where he also served as the assistant department head for undergraduate programs. Reid has several goals for the Annis School. “The overarching goal is to grow the program and increase visibility,” he said. Reid hopes to accomplish this by exposing the program—especially aspects like the DesignSpine curriculum with an emphasis on hands-on problem-solving— to more high school students, parents, and teachers.

Faculty and students from the Departments of English and Art & Design collaborated to bring the 18th-century novel The Castles of Athlin and Dunbayne by Ann Radcliffe back into print. Set in medieval Scotland, the book features warring clans, imprisoned heroes and heroines, a shipwrecked Count, stolen inheritances, and many of the hallmarks of Radcliffe’s later Gothic fiction. Students learned how to produce a scholarly edition of the novel in ENGL 420, taught by Dr. Jennifer Camden, professor and associate chair of English. Students in ART 193 and ART 430, taught by Randi Frye, former assistant professor of Art & Design, illustrated key scenes from the novel. Students in the ST 299 course, taught by Liz Whiteacre, assistant professor of English, created the master design file of the book, completed its editing, and developed marketing materials to promote it. Katherine Fries, associate professor of Art & Design and director of Hullabaloo Press, is working with the National Library Bindery Company of Indiana to provide an opportunity for students to hand-bind a limited, commemorative art edition of the novel and learn more about bookmaking. The novel was published through Etchings Press at the University of Indianapolis and is available for purchase on Amazon. Faculty presented a roundtable panel on the project at the virtual Indiana College English Association conference, which was well-attended by UIndy students, faculty, and alumni.

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ATHLETICS.UINDY.EDU

Just as it did in the spring semester of 2019-20, the COVID-19 pandemic adversely affected the athletics calendar in the fall term. All of the Greyhound team sports this fall were bumped to the spring, including football, soccer, and volleyball. However, CROSS COUNTRY

cross country, tennis, and golf—all considered low-risk sports—were allowed to compete, in spite of the cancellation of the NCAA cross country regionals and nationals as well as the tennis ITA nationals. The basketball and

Behind the historic effort of Lauren Bailey, the UIndy cross country team made the most of the limited competition. Bailey was twice named National Runner of the Week by the Division II coaches before going on to become the first Greyhound since 1988 to capture the GLVC individual crown. Her 6K time of 20:23.48 at the conference meet broke both the school and league records.

swimming and diving seasons also got underway in the fall, complete with an array of COVID-related safety guidelines.

Meanwhile, four other Greyhounds earned All-GLVC accolades. Junior Melissa Spencer joined Bailey on the women’s all-conference list, placing 13th among the league’s fastest distance runners. On the men’s side, a trio of Hounds placed in the top-15, including Chris Switzer, Nathan Herbst, and Will Reid, who placed fifth, 10th and 15th, respectively.

GOLF Led by UIndy alum Brent Nicoson ’94, the Greyhound golf teams combined for an impressive six team titles in seven total tournaments. Reigning DII Player of the Year Pilar Echeverria secured two individual wins in the fall, as did senior Oliver Mast. Additionally, newcomer Keegan Bronnenberg tied the men’s program record with an 11-under 205 at the 54-hole Brickyard Invitational in October.

TENNIS The UIndy tennis teams also tasted success in limited action, capturing three of four draws at the ITA Midwest Regional, held at nearby Center Grove High School in September. Junior Nikol Alekseeva won her second straight Midwest singles title as well as another doubles championship at the fall regional. She paired with Anna Novikova to secure the latter, good for the duo’s second doubles crown in the past three years. Agustin Gascia and Renato Lima highlighted the men’s efforts, capturing the Midwest doubles title. Lima nearly pulled off the singles win as well, falling 6-4, 6-4 in the final.

>> Continued on page 32

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IT RUNS IN

ONE OF UINDY’S LEGACY FAMILIES, THE NICOSONS HAVE SEEN IT ALL

DAN NICOSON ’68

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BRENT NICOSON ’94

BEN NICOSON ’23


THE FAMILY T

he University of Indianapolis has undergone many changes over the last three-quarters of a century and few families have had a first-hand look at those changes like the Nicosons. “The campus would be almost unrecognizable to anyone who went there while I was there,” said twelve-year football assistant coach and staff member Dan Nicoson ’68 (HPER and business). His son, national championship-winning golf coach Brent Nicoson ’94 (business administration) added, “It feels like more a part of the city than it used to be. I definitely see more UIndy gear around town.” When Ben Nicoson ’23 (exercise science, pre-physical therapy), Brent’s son, enrolled at UIndy in Fall 2019 to play basketball, he

became a fourth-generation Greyhound, though because of his family, UIndy was home long before that. Fans of Greyhound athletics no doubt recognize the Nicoson name for the eponymous gymnasium on campus that hosts men’s and women’s basketball games. Ben’s great grandfather Angus Nicoson ’42 (physical education and social studies) was the legendary coach of the Greyhounds from 1947 to 1977 where he amassed nearly 500 victories—a total still good for the most in UIndy history—and he also served as the director of athletics for UIndy for 30 years. The three younger generations of Nicosons grew up on UIndy’s campus, spending time around the athletes that their fathers coached. “I spent a lot of time there, especially in the gym, with my father being

the coach and athletic director,” Dan said. “And I had to be there a lot because he was there,” said Brent, who would become head coach for the men’s and women’s golf teams, leading the women to national championships in 2015 and 2018. During home basketball games, almost all of which Brent attended, he remembers spending the game wadding up cups and shooting them at the trashcan like a basketball hoop for hours on end before Dan would finally come and get him. Another memory that Brent recalls fondly is picking up football game film with his father on Saturday evenings, picking up pizza, and going back to Coach Bill Bless’ home and the coaches would watch film as the children played football or basketball.

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Brent recalled another story that he’s heard countless times about his grandfather kicking a box that he thought was empty and breaking a bone in his foot.

ANGUS NICOSON ’42

Even more than his fiery competitiveness, the biggest mandate that Angus Nicoson passed down to his progeny was that they were charged with impacting their athletes as people first. “When my father passed away, many athletes came back for the visitation and funeral,” Dan said. “I think without exception they emphasized what he meant to them in their lives. To me, that’s what means something about coaches and UIndy in general.” “That’s one of the biggest things I’ve taken away from my family history here,” Brent said. “People always mention that when they talk to me about my grandfather, it always comes up that he had an impact on their life so I’ve tried to do the same in my program.” The youngest Nicoson says that consideration is one of the few times he has really felt any kind of pressure regarding his family name. “As a freshman, stepping on the court in Nicoson Hall the first time and thinking about how many people played under my great grandpa was a lot to think about,” Ben said. “But that has lessened over the last year.” “I’ve always felt more pride than pressure,” said Brent. “I thought it was cool to be a third-generation coach in my family at UIndy.” “Those memories are what made me feel like I was already part of the family,” Brent said. “That’s where it all started for me.” Many alumni, and those who have been involved in UIndy athletics in some capacity over the years, have Nicoson stories—about Angus, Dan and Brent, surely with Ben to follow—the family has heard practically all of them by now. “Years ago I was taking a graduate class and the coach rolled out a chalkboard with a big hole on the corner,” Dan said, “And the coach said, ‘you’ll have to pardon my chalkboard, Coach Nicoson got a little upset one time.’”

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Is there any coaching in Ben’s future? Not afraid to forge his own path, he didn’t think about it for very long. “I don’t think so,” he said, adding that he hopes to eventually work in outpatient physical therapy and perhaps one day own his own clinic. “He’s the smart one,” Dan joked. “He’ll be the least stressed of all of us,” Brent added.

FAVORITE MEMORIES “Coaching the 1975 team that’s now in the Hall of Fame. That was a great year. I’d also have to say Ben’s first game. When he hit his first shot a friend next to me said ‘That’s the first Nicoson point in Nicoson Hall!” DAN NICOSON ’68

The family lives in the present for the most part, not thinking too often about 75 years of family history at UIndy. “We do talk about UIndy a lot,” Brent said. “But it’s more about Ben’s basketball games, or my dad is following my recruiting or our tournaments so we’re talking about that.”


“Everyone cares about the students and athletes as people first,” added Brent. “I know in my experience as a coach, we might all talk amongst ourselves about what’s happening on the field, court, or course but the most common topic of conversation is how we’re helping our kids and what we’re doing for them. That made it easy for me to send Ben to school here.”

FAVORITE MEMORIES “One would be seeing Ben on the court for the first time in Nicoson Hall. But I’ve also got to include winning the first national championship. I remember after the final round being in the huddle afterwards and saying ‘You’ve done something that no one else in the history of the school has done.’”

With the arrival of the fourth-generation Nicoson on campus, nothing has exemplified a changing of the guard like a shared experience for both Dan and Brent: now being known as “Ben’s grandfather and father, respectively.” “I’ve been through my whole life being asked about my dad or Brent,” said Dan, “But that was a newer experience for me.”

BRENT NICOSON ’94 “It just feels normal to me, it’s just where we’re supposed to be. You don’t want to take it for granted but it feels natural and I don’t really think about it until I read stuff or I talk to someone and realize it really has been a long time. That is pretty surreal.” “I’ve thought about it more since Ben decided to go to UIndy,” Dan added. “When I worked part-time in development, that gave me a chance to talk to alumni that spanned some 50 years, and as they reminisced I would think about the school over the years and how impactful it’s been.” A common experience among legacy families, having had a front row seat to both academics and athletics at UIndy, Dan and Brent had no problem with their sons attending UIndy. “Almost every alum that I visited with during my time in development focused on the faculty/student relationships,” Dan said. “I’ve always appreciated how important that is at UIndy.”

FAVORITE MEMORIES “Back in 5th or 6th grade, Coach Gouard invited me back to the locker room at halftime, but they were losing so I was nervous about going back there. He had some choice words for the team and on the way back out he stopped me and said ‘Ben, I’m sorry for that, but it had to be done.’ That one stands out as well as going to other basketball games when I was younger.” BEN NICOSON ’23

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>> Continued from page 27 BASKETBALL Led by first-year head coach and UIndy alum Paul Corsaro ’12, the men’s basketball squad realized an early-season highlight on January 14 when the team took down in-state rival Southern Indiana in Nicoson Hall, 62-61. The comeback victory came against Corsaro’s former mentor Stan Gouard, who left this past offseason to coach his alma mater after manning the UIndy bench for 12 years. The women’s basketball team also found early success with a three-game winning streak over the holiday break, besting conference-rivals Quincy, Southern Indiana, and Southwest Baptist in succession.

GEAR FOR GRADS!

SWIMMING AND DIVING Meanwhile, UIndy swimming and diving entered the spring semester with a number of studentathletes well positioned for the upcoming conference and nationals championships. The list includes junior Gabriel Knaut, who broke the school record in the 50 free in November, becoming the first Greyhound ever to post a sub-20-second time in the event.

ATHLETICS.UINDY.EDU

GRADUATION IS JUST AROUND THE CORNER. GET YOUR GRAD A GIFT TODAY! • • • • 32

ATHLETIC CASUAL WEAR BACKPACKS GIFTS AND ACCESSORIES SO MUCH MORE!

PORTICO


CLASS NOTES Class notes in this issue of Portico represent those submitted between May 15, 2020 and November 30, 2020. Class notes submitted after November 30, 2020 will be featured in the next issue.

2010–2019

The alumni network of the University of Indianapolis is 34,000 strong and growing. Share your news with fellow Greyhounds—from the personal to the professional to the monumental moments in your life. All original photos are returned. Mail a print to UIndy Alumni Engagement, 1400 Hanna Ave., Indianapolis, IN 46227, or submit a high-resolution digital image to alumni@uindy.edu. Updating your contact information ensures that you’ll receive the latest news about your alma mater and invitations to alumni and University events. Update your information at uindy.edu/alumni.

C O N N E C T !

@UIndyAlumni

Hallie Hunziker ’20 married Aaron Kelly on September 19th, 2020 in Jamestown, Indiana. Isabel Tintera Graham ’19 served as a bridesmaid. Anthony Heygood ’20 is a developer at Flaherty & Collins Properties in Indianapolis. Bolanle Oladokun ’20 is the community development blocks grant program manager for the Indiana Office of Community and Rural Affairs.

Derek J. Magee ’19 has been promoted to senior accountant at Donovan CPAs in Indianapolis.

317-788-3295

A L U M N I

Darryl Hutson Jr ’20 is a family case manager with the Indiana Department of Child Services.

Hannah M. Wuest ’19 is the new assistant women’s volleyball coach at Ferris State University in Big Rapids, MI.

facebook.com/uindyalumni

Y O U R

1 Pamela Guerrero ’20 was named as an Axis leader 1 by the Indiana Latino Expo/City of Indianapolis.

C O N T A C T S

ANDY KOCHER ’98 ’15

CORAN SIGMAN ’14

Associate Vice President of Alumni Engagement akocher@uindy.edu

Associate Director of Alumni Engagement and Live Mascot Handler sigmanc@uindy.edu

Rebekah Mathew ’19 is a clinical data specialist for pediatric cancer research at UTSW Medical Center in Dallas, Texas. Michelle J. Ferguson ’18 has been named executive assistant to the CEO at JCC Indianapolis.

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CLASS NOTES 2

3

6

4

7

5

2000–2009 Nakia M. Douglas ’09 is the new principal at Normandy High School in St. Louis, MO. Paul M. Voigt ’09 is the new superintendent for the Caston School Corporation in Rochester, IN, effective January 1, 2021. 10 Benjamin Reed ’08 works in the emergency department of multiple hospitals in the Austin, Texas area.

2 Kaley Gatto Thacker ’18 and husband welcomed son Marty David on October 23, 2019.

6 Maxwell Frempong ’11 was recently promoted to vice president financial center manager at Fifth Third Bank Chicago.

3 Jordan Loyd ’16 has signed a contract with KK Crvena Zvezda in Serbia. The team is a member of the Basketball League of Serbia, the Adriatic Basketball Association League, and the EuroLeague.

7 Emily Church Miller ’11 ’12 and husband adopted Jonah Odysseus Miller, who was born on June 23, 2020.

Bradley Wiseman ’15 has been promoted to manager of hospital services for the Indiana Donor Network. 4 Ryan Barnett ’13 is Co-Chief Resident, PGY-4 Anesthesiology at Wake Forest Baptist Health and has provided anesthesia services for surgery in Winston-Salem North Carolina throughout the pandemic. 5 Andy Gipson ’12 is joining “News Nation” as a Supervising Producer. The new three-hour primetime national newscast premiered Sept. 1 on WGN America.

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Brock L. Easton ’10 has been promoted to partner at Alerding Castor LLP in Indianapolis. 8 Brandie Thomas ’10 and husband celebrated the birth of Elijah Thomas, born January 26, 2020, and official adoption on May 20, 2020. 9 Justin Kemker ’10 ’15 and Erika Kemker ’12 welcomed son Benjamin Robert on September 12, 2020. He joins his big sister Marley at home. Chelsea Anderson ’10 is the new executive director of the Indiana Conference for Women.

Hannah Corbin ’06 has professed her final vows with the Sisters of Providence of Saint Mary-of-the-Woods. 11 James Rust ’06 is a registered nurse in the Louisville, KY area. Christina Liggett Golay ’04 was promoted to branch supervisor of Indiana Members Credit Union Community East Hospital branch. Kimberly S. Moore ’03 is the new head women’s golf coach at Western Michigan University in Kalamazoo, MI. Kim Jones ’03 was named Partner and Coowner of Willow Marketing. Elizabeth M. Ramsey ’01 has been named executive director of the U.S. Olympic & Paralympic Committee athletes’ advisory council in Colorado Springs, CO, effective July 20, 2020. Angela M. “Angie” Steeno ’00 has been promoted to managing director at Crowe LLP in Indianapolis.


12 Dara Faust ’00 and husband welcomed Desmond Statnon Hosten on February 27, 2020. 1990 -19 9 9 Daniel W. Struck ’99, head coach of the boys’ wrestling team at Jeffersonville High School in Jeffersonville, IN, has been elected to the Indiana Wrestling Coaches Hall of Fame. Jerry Padgett ’98 became a shareholder and director of the law firm of Taylor DeVore & Padgett, P.C. 13 David Leske ’94 founded the law firm Lekse Kirk, LLC, with offices in Fishers and Greenwood, IN in October 2020. Greg Everling ’92 has been promoted by PNC Bank to senior vice president and market manager for commercial banking in central and southern Indiana.

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1 980 -19 8 9 Cindy Marks ’82 ’83 retired from FedEx in June 2020 after 37 years. Shoshanna Everhart ’81 has been selected by Gov. Eric J. Holcomb as ombudsman for the Indiana Department of Child Services, effective September 14, 2020. 14 Sid Hall ’80 is the recipient of the Perkins School of Theology at Southern Methodist University 2020 Distinguished Alumnus Award. 1 970 -1979 Vince Flecker ’73 retired from teaching at Zionsville Middle School after 23 years in 2017. In January 2020 Vince published his first novel, What Family Does. It is a heartwarming story about how two families came together through the depression and beyond World War ll. All profits from the book are being donated to Neighborhood

Fellowship church’s free inner city health clinic. Books can be purchased through Authorhouse.com or on Amazon. Jon Burroughs ’72 writing as J. Paul Burroughs wrote “Mister 20” which was out in July in the Murder 20/20 anthology. J. Donald Cossairt, ’70 retired from the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab) in Batavia, IL in February 2020 after almost 42 years of service reaching the rank of Distinguished Scientist. Don remains a Scientist Emeritus at Fermilab, a Distinguished Emeritus Member of the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP), a Fellow Member of the Health Physics Society, and a member of the American Physical Society. He continues to live with his wife Claudia in Aurora, IL. 19 6 0-19 6 9 Don Felten ’60 has relocated across the state of Florida from the Jacksonville area to Bradenton.

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IN MEMORIAM The University of Indianapolis mourns the loss of these former Board of Trustees and UIndy faculty and staff members and is deeply grateful for their service to the University’s mission over the years.

DR. CARY HANNI

MICKEY POWELL

1947-2020

1939-2020

Dr. Cary Hanni ’69 served on the University Board of Trustees from 1993 to 2006. Dr. Hanni was honored several times over the years including being named the UIndy Science and Mathematics Alumnus of the Year in 1996, the UIndy Gene and Joanne Sease Alumni Award Winner in 2008, and the Greyhound Club Athletic Alumnus of the Year. Dr. Hanni also served as Assistant Director of Admissions at Indiana Central from 1970 to 1974. After graduating from Indiana Central College with a degree in mathematics, Dr. Hanni became a middle school teacher before ultimately deciding to return to school to become a physician. After completing his education, Dr. Hanni served communities in Grand Rapids, MI, Evansville, IN, as well as in Indianapolis over the course of his nearly 40-year career in medicine. In Fall 2019, the University dedicated four pillars of Good Hall to honorees who represent the institutional core values of inquiry, innovation, leadership, and service. Dr. Hanni, along with 16 family members who are also alumni, was among those honored. One of the largest legacy families in University history, the Hannis have provided decades of service to support education and health needs in our community.

Michael L. “Mickey” Powell ’61 served on the University Board of Trustees from 1999 to 2004. He was a golf letter winner (1958-61), and four-time Hoosier College All-Conference Selection (195861) who went on to become a UIndy Athletics Hall of Fame inductee and the 1987 UIndy Distinguished Alumnus. He served as president of the PGA of America from 1985 to 1986 and was the builder, owner, and developer of the Golf Club of Indiana. He was a member of the NAIA District 21 Golf Champions, Conference Champions, and Little State Champions in 1961 and became the first golf professional at Otter Creek Country Club (Columbus) in 1964. A true trailblazer and innovator in professional golf, Powell was inducted into the Indiana Golf Hall of Fame in 1986. He earned the titles of Indiana Senior State Champion in 1990; Indiana PGA Senior Champion in 1989 and 1992, and Indiana Senior Player of the Year in 1990 and 1991. Several members of his family attended the University including his daughter Michelle Parks ’83, son-in-law Patrick Parks ’83, and granddaughter Paige Wise ’08.

University of Indianapolis Alumni Clara H. Nierman ’43–Aug. 11, 2020 Vera O. Painter ’44—August 4, 2020 Betty J. DeBaun ’48—July 6, 2020 George B. Keenan ’49—July 17, 2020 Max N. Hoffman ’50—Apr. 21, 2020 Shirley A. Turley ’52—Oct. 18, 2020 Jesse W. “Willoughby” Steckley ’52—Nov. 4, 2020 Elwood L. “Woody” McBride ’52—Oct. 30, 2020 Joseph R. Lewis ’52—June 11, 2020 Ruth M. Switzer ’54—Nov. 8, 2020 John A. Martinez ’54—Sept. 17, 2020 Frank S. White ’55—Oct. 11, 2020 Martha L. Morris ’56—Oct. 26, 2020 Benton M. “Ben” Harlan, Jr. ’57—Sept. 13, 2020 Frederick W. Farrell ’58—Sept. 27, 2020 Jack A. Fischer ’58—Oct. 14, 2020 James E. Wilbur ’59—June 12, 2020 Mary E. Greenlee ’59—July 17, 2020 Jack Miller ’60—May 29, 2020 36

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Ruth E. Altop ’60—Oct. 22, 2020 Michael L. “Mickey” Powell ’61—Nov. 8, 2020 Donald L. “Don” Poole, Sr. ’61—June 9, 2020 William W. Baldwin ’62—Aug. 25, 2020 Russell S. Graham ’63—Oct. 7, 2020 Sandra K. Krock ’63—July 6, 2020 Lorin L. Clemenz ’63—Sept. 3, 2020 Larry W. Gates ’65—June 24, 2020 Thomas M. Bowman ’65—July 30, 2020 Nicholas G. “Nick” Haus ’65—Aug. 27, 2020 Mary L. Sleeva ’65—Sept. 13, 2020 Philip W. Lutz ’65—Oct. 11, 2020 Laura L. Hutslar-Rogers ’66—Sept. 13, 2020 Marilyn J. “Jean” Layton ’66—June 18, 2020 Richard E. Cummings ’66—June 4, 2020 Norma C. “Claudette” Holcomb ’66 ’72—Aug. 26, 2020 Lois L. McCarter ’67—Nov. 8, 2020 Bruce Holman ’67—July 26, 2020 Anne E. Michel ’67—Oct. 7, 2020

Carolyn A. Rankin ’67—Sept. 28, 2020 Charles M. Roberts ’68—Aug. 16, 2020 Stephen M. “Steve” Carson ’68—Oct. 15, 2020 James W. Danhauer ’69—Nov. 19, 2020 Richard L. Pearce ’71 ’77—Oct. 15, 2020 Roger K. Henry ’71—Aug. 31, 2020 William J. “Bill” Byers ’72—May 3, 2020 Gerald A. Scheele ’72—Oct. 9, 2020 Jimmie R. Shoufler ’73—June 18, 2020 Helen R. Kanter ’74—Aug. 25, 2020 George A. Martin, Jr. ’74—Nov. 12, 2020 Luna J. “Joyce” Jones ’74 ’77—Oct. 1, 2020 George Stuckey, Jr. ’75—June 21, 2020 Linda G. Card ’75 ’88—Nov. 14, 2020 Gary E. Welmer ’75—June 28, 2020 Steven E. Wheatley ’75—Oct. 29, 2020 Paula J. Verderosa Cooney ’75–Apr. 8, 2020 Wanda L. Murphy ’76—Nov. 27, 2020 Warner Wiley ’76 ’79—July 12, 2020


Former University of Indianapolis faculty

STEPHEN M. CARSON 1946-2020 Stephen M. Carson ’68 served on the University Board of Trustees from 1993 to 2000 and again from 2007 to 2012. He received a full scholarship to play football at Indiana Central College and roomed with future and fellow trustee Mike Watkins. Carson spent more than 30 years as a financial and operation officer in the telecommunications and professional services industries and went on to serve as Chief Financial Officer of AT&T. After his retirement from AT&T, he founded SMC Consulting and served on numerous boards of directors. He was the recipient of the 2014 “I” Person of the Year presented by UIndy Athletics.

JOHN WIMMER 1956-2020 John R. Wimmer ’79 served as faculty at the University of Indianapolis, teaching courses in religion from 1989 to 1996. He also served as Special Assistant to the President. Wimmer most recently served as program director in religion at Lilly Endowment, Inc., and served many roles in his life as scholar, professor, pastor, author, inspirational public speaker, and mentor. A devoted Christian, Wimmer was an ordained minister in the United Methodist Church for 40 years. Wimmer also was an acclaimed authority on the shifting religious landscape in the United States, authoring three books and many articles throughout his career. Several alumni and friends created an endowed scholarship at the University of Indianapolis in his memory. Within a matter of weeks after his passing, the John Wimmer Endowed Scholarship was fully funded.

MARTHA MORRIS 1934-2020

Romona R. “Mickey” Heaton ’76—Aug. 7, 2020 Sue Ann Mendenhall ’76—Sept. 30, 2020 John T. Hanagan ’77—July 17, 2020 John A. Kasten ’77—Aug. 20, 2020 Deborah J. Anthony Wright ’77—Sept. 12, 2020 John R. Wimmer ’79—June 24, 2020 Mary J. Zembala ’80—July 30, 2020 Patricia A. “Patty” White ’82—Nov. 9, 2020 William A. J. Peddie, Jr. ’82—Nov. 24, 2020 Mary Ann Goebel ’85—Sept. 30, 2020 Christine H. Lykins ’88—Oct. 3, 2020 Judith A. “Judy” Padgett ’90—June 4, 2020 Thomas A. Beatley ’93—Aug. 4, 2020 Kevin M. Prentice ’97—June 14, 2020 Angela D. Wooldridge-Schutte ’03 ’04—Oct. 21, 2020 Jacob A. Clifford ’06—Sept. 23, 2020 Erin M. Wheat ’14—July 16, 2020 Scott W. Sutton ’15—Nov. 4, 2020

Martha L. Morris ’56 served on the faculty of the School of Education from 1972 to 1999, retiring from the University as an Assistant Professor Emerita of Education. While attending Indiana Central College, she met the love of her life, Peyton “Pete” Morris ’55. After graduating with magna cum laude honors, Morris worked as a teacher for the Perry Township School Corporation and later became the Children’s Education Director for the University Heights United Methodist Church. Martha had a strong love of playing and teaching others how to play the piano. In retirement, Martha convinced Pete to begin taking ballroom dance lessons and they became graceful dancers. Martha is survived by her husband and two children: Ron Morris ’86 and Beth “Wendy” Jolliff ’89.

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THE UINDY STARTS WITH YOU CAMPAIGN

$90,110,185 IS NEARING $100 MILLION RAISED. IN CASH GIFTS AND PLEDGES AS OF DECEMBER 31, 2020

17

GIFTS OVER $1M

$90M RAISED

$75M GOAL

$16,006,762 RAISED FY 21 YTD

100%

TRUSTEE PARTICIPATION

$40M

ORIGINAL GOAL

45,457

TOTAL GIFTS

2,156 MAJOR GIFTS

DEPARTMENT OF MUSIC RECEIVES MAESTRO RAYMOND LEPPARD’S PIANO The University of Indianapolis Department of Music is grateful for the generous gift of Maestro Raymond Leppard’s piano. Maestro Leppard’s partner, Dr. Jack Bloom, graciously donated the Yamaha Model C6 to the Department of Music for the benefit of students and faculty. Maestro Leppard, who passed away in 2019, spent 25 seasons as the University of Indianapolis artist-in-residence. He received an honorary degree from the University in 1991 and an honorary alumni award in

Supporters like you have made life-changing impacts for thousands of UIndy students throughout this campaign. You have provided more than $90 million to establish new endowed scholarships and yearly support for students to work toward and attain their college degree. You have also supported programs to further enrich their academic careers including life-changing travel opportunities, career guidance from our Professional Edge Center, events featuring top-notch speakers and performers, internships, career experiences, enhanced technology, and countless learning opportunities. You have changed the lives of so many who are on their way to leading our communities and improving our world.

their UIndy degrees. Support for scholarships impacts thousands of students and support to the UIndy Fund impacts all students on campus. There will also be opportunities to support several special initiatives over the next two years as we build and grow our programs and opportunities for students. Your support allows UIndy to thrive. Please consider supporting the University of Indianapolis as we work to provide a transformative education that prepares our students to serve their communities. Visit uindy.edu/giving. Questions? Contact Associate Vice President Stephanie Hays-Mussoni, EdD, CFRE at haysmussonis@uindy.edu or 317-791-7988.

UIndy students have a growing need for financial assistance to complete

2014. During his career at the University of Indianapolis, he conducted ensembles and held performances that showcased his talents as a pianist, harpsichordist, lecturer, composer, and arranger. “It’s a privilege to have this wonderful instrument and with two pianos in the studio. It makes teaching so much easier—especially during the pandemic—as both professor and student have their own instrument. It also provides faculty and student pianists with a rare opportunity to perform piano duos, something that Maestro Leppard, who was an excellent collaborative pianist, also enjoyed. Having his personal instrument at UIndy for students to play on is a continued reminder of his generosity towards the Department of Music,” said Elisabeth Hoegberg, chair of the Department of Music.

M A E S T R O L E P PA R D ’ S P I A N O ( A B O V E R I G H T ) I N O N E O F T H E M U S I C S T U D I O S AT T H E CHRISTEL DEHAAN FINE ARTS CENTER. THE P I A N O I S N E A R LY S E V E N F E E T L O N G .

M A E S T R O L E P PA R D AT T H E P I A N O . P H O T O PROVIDED BY JACK BLOOM.

M A E S T R O L E P PA R D AT T H E C H R I S T E L DEHAAN FINE ARTS CENTER IN 2018.

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WEAR YOUR UINDY GEAR SHARE YOUR FAVORITE UINDY STORIES GIVE BACK TO HELP CURRENT STUDENTS GO TO OUR VIRTUAL EVENTS THAT DAY

ALUMNI LEGACY SCHOLARSHIPS AVAILABLE!

Join your fellow Greyhounds for the biggest virtual day of the year as we unite to celebrate and support our amazing University of

Alumni, do you have a high school-aged child or grandchild? If so, we would love to help them become a future UIndy graduate and pass on your UIndy legacy to the next generation.

Indianapolis community. Show us

A $1,500 Legacy Scholarship is available for freshman children and grandchildren of UIndy alumni. Qualifying freshman students are automatically awarded the Legacy Scholarship once they disclose their legacy information on the freshman application for admission.

UIndy Days have trended on social

Contact the Admissions Office for more details on the Legacy Scholarship at 1-866-421-7173 or get started today by visiting attend.uindy.edu/apply.

your UIndy pride and make a plan to get involved! Thanks to your past support, past media and raised over $150,000 for our students.

VISIT UINDY.EDU/UINDYDAY TO LEARN MORE ABOUT THE DAY AND SEE AN UP-TO-DATE SCHEDULE OF EVENTS.

WINTER/SPRING 2021

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1400 East Hanna Avenue Indianapolis, IN 46227

THANK YOU! THE UNIVERSITY OF INDIANAPOLIS IS GRATEFUL FOR THE HARD WORK OF OUR DINING SERVICES STAFF AND THEIR CARE FOR OUR CAMPUS COMMUNITY DURING THE PANDEMIC.

Profile for University of Indianapolis

Portico - Winter/Spring 2021  

Portico - Winter/Spring 2021  

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