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WINTER/SPRING 2020

PORTICO FORGING GLOBAL CONNECTIONS

C H A N TA L U W I Z E R A ’ 0 6 : FROM UINDY TO THE U N I T E D N AT I O N S // 4 JOHN C. ADAMS FINANCE INSTITUTE LAUNCHES // 6 A R T & D E S I G N E X PA N D S ON CAMPUS AND BEYOND // 8 INTRODUCING GRADY THE GREYHOUND // 2 0


WINTER/SPRING 2020 ISSUE ABOUT THE MAGAZINE Portico, the official magazine of the University of Indianapolis, is produced by the Office of University Communications and Marketing. This cornerstone publication shares stories, impact, and achievements of students, faculty, staff, and alumni as well as friends and supporters of the institution. Portico, published twice a year, is mailed to over 35,000 individuals including alumni, donors, friends, and community and business leaders. The magazine’s digital issue includes expanded content, interviews, and video at portico.uindy.edu.

PRESIDENT Robert L. Manuel, PhD

PROVOST

20 // G R A D Y T H E G R E Y H O U N D M A K E S H I S D E B U T

Stephen H. Kolison Jr., PhD

BOARD OF TRUSTEES John C. Adams; Kevin R. Armstrong; Annetta C. Beauregard; Carolyn M. Coleman; Gregory Corsaro; Deborah J. Daniels; Linda M. Dillman; Christopher Doehring; Murvin S. Enders; Stephen F. Fry; Sue Anne Gilroy; Adolf Hansen; Emmanuel D. Harris; Polly Horton Hix; Kent Holaday; Barry S. Howard; Charles Edwin Johnston; William R. Kiesel; Dr. David Kiley; Kenneth Loyd; Robert L. Manuel; Thomas C. Martin; Michael McCarty; Ersal Ozdemir; Vicki F. Perry; Edwin O. Qualls; Pamela S. Qualls; Dennis J. Reinbold; David Resnick; David G. Sease; Yvonne H. Shaheen; Richard E. Stierwalt; Laura Strain; Phillip A. Terry; James G. Terwilliger; Larry G. Thompson; Bishop Julius C. Trimble; Michael J. Watkins; Gordon D. Wishard

CABINET Michael Cartwright, PhD; Jason Dudich; Kelly Hauflaire; Steven Herriford; Lara Mann; Christopher Molloy; Andrea Newsom; Neil Perdue, PhD; Amber Smith; Kory Vitangeli; Suzanne Willey, PED; Ron Wilks; Corey Wilson

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4 // L E A D I N G W I T H A

GLOBAL PERSPECTIVE Chantal Uwizera ’06 shares 

16 //

I N S P I R I N G A N E W

 irst Good Hall pillar honorees F named

18 //

T R A I L B L A Z I N G

international relations success

6 // J O H N C . A D A M S

FINANCE INSTITUTE Launching competitive opportunities 

HOOSIER Faculty-student sleuthing revives 

for School of Business students

8 // W H I T E R I V E R

CONNECTIONS

New public art project reflects UIndy’s community spirit

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KERMIT BERG ’73 Internationally renowned  photographer wows with exhibition at alma mater

12 // O P E N I N G D O O R S OF DISCOVERY Shaheen Grants connect students  and faculty through research, study abroad

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 HE POWER OF T LAUGHTER Colin Bowles ’15 finds his groove  with new television series

TRADITION

Indiana legacy

20 //

22 //

C A L L M E G R A D Y ! Meet UIndy’s new live mascot

1902 SOCIETY

 legacy of giving provides vital A support

26 //

U N I V E R S I T Y

U P DAT E S Updates, news, and more about the  campus community

36 // A T H L E T I C U P D A T E S 41 // C L A S S N O T E S

Latest news from UIndy alumni


THE POWER OF CONNECTION with the R.B. Annis School of Engineering, Strategic Capital Partners, and other groups to create a new public artwork in downtown Indianapolis. Their work will contribute to the quality of life for residents and visitors for years to come.

Dear Colleagues, As we welcome the Class of 2020 into the University of Indianapolis alumni family this May, we recognize that graduation is only the beginning of a career. The combination of making new connections while maintaining a firm foundation in tradition is part of a broader network that strengthens our lives and our communities in positive ways. During Homecoming 2019, the University welcomed back alumni including Chantal Uwizera ’06 and Kermit Berg ’73, two remarkable individuals who have employed their considerable skills and talents to make an impact on the world stage. As you read about their career journeys in the following pages, I hope their stories will spark inspiration in your own lives. Alumni who transform into key decision-makers and influencers in their respective fields are a testament to the foundation provided by University of Indianapolis faculty and staff. We aim to equip our students with the skills and confidence to take a seat at the table where decisions are made. Our connections to one another are vital in this process. Throughout this edition of Portico, you’ll find other inspiring examples of how connections make large-scale ideas come to fruition. The River Fish sculpture project brought together Art & Design faculty James Viewegh, Nathan Foley, and student Maya Johnson ’20 (studio art)

As we make new connections that explore innovative possibilities, we also celebrate the traditions that keep us grounded. In that regard, I am thrilled to announce the return of the University’s live mascot program for the first time in nearly 40 years. The University welcomed Grady the Greyhound to the UIndy family in Fall 2019, and I look forward to the continuation of this great University tradition in the coming years. I invite you to explore your own University of Indianapolis connections by visiting campus and keeping in touch. Whether you are connecting for the first time since graduating or renewing cherished relationships, the University of Indianapolis will always be a place that you can call home.

-R  obert L. Manuel University President

ALUMNI WHO TRANSFORM INTO KEY DECISION-MAKERS AND INFLUENCERS IN THEIR RESPECTIVE FIELDS ARE A TESTAMENT TO THE FOUNDATION PROVIDED BY UNIVERSITY OF INDIANAPOLIS FACULTY AND STAFF.

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CONNECTING THE LOCAL TO THE GLOBAL 4

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hantal Uwizera ’06 was just a teenager when she left Rwanda, her country of birth, to settle in the United States with her family. While a career in international development always beckoned, Uwizera tells students that a series of unexpected opportunities led to meeting her goals— with the University of Indianapolis providing the spark. On a warm fall afternoon at the start of the 2019 Homecoming Weekend, Uwizera spoke before a rapt audience of students and faculty from the Department of History and Political Science. She recalled for them the moment during a campus visit when she realized that the University of Indianapolis was the right place for her. “I was looking for that perfect university that would allow me to excel and have the close relationships that I wanted with professors,” said Uwizera, who was honored with the 2019 Distinguished Young Alumni Award. Now the director of global programs at the Africa-America Institute, an international nongovernmental organization based in New York, Uwizera designs higher education programs to increase the capacity of young Africans across the continent. The position is fulfilling Uwizera’s goal of developing sustainable programs with a strong social impact. It’s inspiring—and how she got there is an equally compelling story.

“You have to have a desire to succeed. You have to believe in yourself and have a willingness to keep going even when faced with doubts.” Uwizera told the students that tackling a double major in political science/pre-law and international relations was one of “the best decisions I’ve ever made at the University because that gave me an opportunity to be exposed to different theories and see the world in a more global way.” Uwizera was set on attending law school, but the Introduction to International Relations class, taught by Dr. Jyotika Saksena, associate professor of international relations, was a game-changer.

M E E T I N G W I T H C O T E D ’ I V O I R E P R E S I D E N T A L A S S A N E O U AT TA R A .

“I knew at some point in my life I wanted to have an international career. [Dr. Saksena’s] class gave me the ability to see that there were other opportunities and to just have an open mind,” Uwizera said. A five-month internship at the Council for Africa in Washington, D.C., solidified her goals to pursue international work. “Chantal truly lives the UIndy motto, ‘Education for Service,’” Saksena said. “Through her work at the United Nations and the Africa-America Institute, she has strived to serve the larger world community by helping improve the quality of education in Africa. As an international relations major she truly understands the meaning of connecting the local to the global.” After graduating from the University of Indianapolis, Uwizera worked for the prosecutor’s office in Elkhart, Indiana, and then served as a civil rights investigator for the City of Fort Wayne Human Relations Commission at a time when an increasing number of refugees from Burma were moving to the city. “At the commission, we worked with the local businesses and communities on how to better integrate the Burmese refugee community,” Uwizera said. “As a result of that experience, I decided that I wanted to pursue a graduate degree in conflict resolution.” Uwizera went on to obtain her master’s degree from American University in international conflict resolution with a concentration in peace-building. After completing a fellowship in Burundi, she was offered a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to join the team of diplomats from the Government of Rwanda at the United Nations during the country’s two-year term on the UN Security Council. Rwanda was returning to the Council for the first time since the 1994 genocide against the Tutsi.

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LAUNCHPAD TO SUCCESS

THE JOHN C. ADAMS FINANCE INSTITUTE PROVIDES NEW COMPETITIVE PATHWAYS FOR SCHOOL OF BUSINESS STUDENTS When Olivia Vormohr ’19 (finance) ’20 (MBA) applied to the University of Indianapolis, she set out to study occupational therapy. But late in her senior year of high school, she decided to switch her intended major to business. That decision would prove to open the door to a new range of possibilities, including an invitation to participate in a case competition that the University sponsors every year. The result? She received a scholarship and her business education was off and running. “That taught me very early on to not be afraid of taking extra opportunities,” Vormohr said. “The worst thing that can happen is you aren’t selected or someone says no to you. There are far more benefits to be gained.” Vormohr took that lesson to heart as she remained highly involved throughout her time at the University. She took an active role in leading School of Business students through the Student Business Leadership Academy (SBLA) and BizHounds, a mentoring organization geared toward freshman business students. The SBLA connects students to business professionals and strives to develop student leaders by building business, organizational, and leadership skills through mentorship, opportunity, and service. As a member of these organizations, Vormohr found herself attending regional and national conferences to talk to prospective high school students about what UIndy has to offer as well as activities like planning two Habitat for Humanity spring break trips and a charity golf outing.

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O L I V I A V O R M O H R ’ 1 9 & ’ 2 0 S P E A K S AT T H E L A U N C H O F T H E J O H N C . A D A M S F I N A N C E I N S T I T U T E I N S E P T E M B E R . F R O M L E F T, T H E INSTITUTE’S NAMESAKE, JOHN C. ADAMS ’73; DR. ROBERT L. MANUEL, U N I V E R S I T Y P R E S I D E N T ; O L I V I A V O R M O H R ; S T E P H E N F. F R Y ’ 8 7, UNIVERSITY BOARD OF TRUSTEES CHAIR; AND DR. LARRY BELCHER, SCHOOL OF BUSINESS DEAN.

new Institute will support student participation in national and regional competitions; sponsor research projects; and strategically complement the new Martin Family Finance Lab as it supports students and the lab curriculum. The Institute will also facilitate student mentoring relationships with faculty as well as with alumni and friends of the University.

“One of the great things about UIndy is how the experiences you get are driven by real-world opportunities,” Vormohr said. “You’re not just in a book or in a classroom; you’re doing real things that have real impact.” Experiential learning is woven throughout the School of Business curriculum. “In one class we had a project with the Indianapolis Rotary Foundation. We had someone come in and give us a real-world problem that they had, and at the end of the semester we presented our solutions to one of their board members,” Vormohr said.

“The John C. Adams Finance Institute aligns with the University’s tradition of forming students through real-world learning,” said Dr. Larry Belcher, School of Business dean. “Our goal is to provide another level of experiential learning by complementing our existing facilities and preparing our students for internships and their eventual careers in finance. Participation in student competitions develops research, critical thinking, and presentation skills that are a necessity in a hypercompetitive job market.” The experiential learning opportunities throughout her time at the University helped Vormohr know she was on the right track. She interned last summer at Eli Lilly and is currently working part-time as a financial analyst. When she graduates in May she will have a full-time opportunity waiting for her at Eli Lilly. Being the student ambassador that she is, she made sure her fellow interns left with an appreciation of the education she received at the University of Indianapolis. “UIndy is really at the forefront of business education regionally,” she said.

L E G A C Y F A M I LY : OLIVIA VORMOHR’S PA R E N T S M E T O N CAMPUS, FIVE OF

Many of the classes within the School of Business are project-based, and students often participate in team activities. Vormohr has found this especially helpful during her recent internship at Eli Lilly & Co.

H E R F AT H E R ’ S E I G H T

“Being able to work with other ideas that you might not personally agree with is huge,” she said. “In the real world, there’s always a competition of ideas so learning how to work with people and communicate respectfully has been an invaluable lesson thanks to these team-based projects.”

“WE ALL HAD VERY

The recently launched John C. Adams Finance Institute ensures that students such as Vormohr continue to have enhanced opportunities to engage in research, competitions, and internships in preparation for the workforce. Made possible by a generous gift from John C. Adams ’73, the

S I B L I N G S AT T E N D E D U I N D Y, A N D S H E H A S TWO OLDER SISTERS WHO ARE ALUMNI. D I F F E R E N T, B U T G R E AT, E X P E R I E N C E S H E R E ,” S H E S A I D . “ I R E A L LY C A N ’ T S AY E N O U G H G O O D T H I N G S A B O U T W H AT UINDY HAS MEANT TO ME AND MY F A M I LY.”

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RIVER FISH SCULPTURE E X PA N D S U I N D Y ’ S F O O T P R I N T A school of stainless steel fish swims majestically in the air along the banks of the White River just south of the Michigan Street bridge. Metallic fins glint in the afternoon sunlight as they move and catch reflections from the quiet river. This peaceful vista is just minutes away from the bustling heart of downtown Indianapolis. This latest addition to the city’s public art scene is the brainchild of University of Indianapolis Art & Design faculty James Viewegh and Nathaniel Foley. The 12 kinetic sculptures, representing four fish species native to the White River, are within sight of the new Riverview Apartment complex just opposite the White River Trail. The public art project is a collaboration between the University of Indianapolis and Riverview Apartments, developed by Strategic Capital Partners and Goodwill of Central & Southern Indiana through the

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City of Indianapolis’ Public Art for Neighborhoods Program. “These projects are important because they put art in the public realm,” explained Viewegh, Department of Art & Design chair and professor. “We’re taking the sculpture we have here and extending it beyond campus. People bike, walk, and jog along the White River corridor. Now they’ll be able to engage this artwork in a way they couldn’t if it was in a gallery.” Viewegh conceived the design for the artwork, while Foley, who heads the new sculpture program at the University of Indianapolis, brought it to life. “Nathan, with his amazing talents, took a raw idea and made it into something tangible,” Viewegh said. The River Fish project acknowledges the fishing culture that has long been part of the local community, including the nearby Westside Bait

and Tackle Shop, now closed, which had a 67-year history on the White River Parkway. The artwork pays homage to the wildlife of the river through its representation of four species of fish that inhabit the river: bass, bluegill, crappie, and catfish. Positioned along the banks of the White River, the sculptures can be viewed with the river behind them. “We hope that by highlighting the fishing heritage of the area through our public sculpture, we can contribute to the revitalization efforts of the waterways in Indianapolis,” Foley said. Hired, in part, to bring his experience in sculpture to projects like River Fish, Foley was able to utilize the University’s broad expertise and talented students to make the project a reality. He collaborated with the R.B. Annis School of Engineering to use the department’s water jet cutter and welding equipment to fabricate the sculptures. The collaboration with engineering problem-solved the kinetic elements of the pieces, which ensured successful movement.


T A K I N G

S H A P E

M O R E S PA C E

The Christel DeHaan Fine Arts Center has been home to the Department of Art & Design since 1994. In Fall 2019, the University announced the department’s expansion to the facilities management building and a reorganization within the Christel DeHaan Fine Arts Center that will grow the department’s space from 15,000 square feet to 26,000. The Department’s Sculpture and Ceramics Studios will relocate from the Christel DeHaan Fine Arts Center to the newly renovated building on campus, bringing new creative opportunities for students and faculty.

THE CAMPUS SCULPTURE WALK SPONSORED BY FIFTH THIRD BANK NOW INCLUDES TWODOZEN PERMANENT AND TEMPORARY WORKS F R O M B O T H L O C A L A N D N AT I O N A L A R T I S T S . THE RIVER FISH SCULPTURES ARE THE THIRD PROJECT PRODUCED THROUGH THE CITY OF INDIANAPOLIS PUBLIC ART FOR NEIGHBORHOODS PROGRAM, ADMINISTERED BY THE ARTS COUNCIL OF INDIANAPOLIS AND T H E D E PA R T M E N T O F M E T R O P O L I TA N D E V E L O P M E N T.

“This highlights what the potential is for the Department of Art & Design,” Foley added. “That we can achieve anything we’d want and create any ideas or concepts we have in our mind and collaborate with other organizations in the community.” While Viewegh and Foley provided the idea and supervision in the year-long effort, Maya Johnson ’20 (studio art) was able to put a student’s touch on this lasting project. The first sculpture major in the department, Johnson was responsible for adding the textures to the fish, giving them life and features that masked the welding marks of production. She was able to learn new techniques in the truest form of experiential education. “It was really fantastic, honestly,” said Johnson, whose dream is to open her own art studio and teach people outside of the art

community. “This [project] has been an incredible chance to build my résumé and get out in the world and really experiment with things.” River Fish signifies many of the strongest values of the University of Indianapolis: unique student experience, collaboration across departments, new ideas, and lasting community impact. Viewegh celebrates the coming expansion. “This department is really growing and this project is a great opportunity to show who we are now.”

W AT C H H O W T H E S C U L P T U R E S W E N T FROM CONCEPT TO COMPLETION. U I N D Y. E D U / R I V E R - F I S H WINTER/SPRING 2020

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REFLECTS

KERMIT BERG ’73

ON A REMARKABLE CAREER IN PHOTOGRAPHY

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“LEAVING THE FARMLAND COMMUNITY OF BREMEN, INDIANA, TO ATTEND INDIANA CENTRAL COLLEGE WAS MY FIRST STEP ON A WORLD JOURNEY OF DISCOVERY.” - KERMIT BERG


TO LEARN MORE ABOUT BERG’S WORK AND UPCOMING E X H I B I T I O N S , V I S I T: K E R M I T B E R G S T U D I O . C O M

For Kermit Berg ’73, a solo retrospective exhibition at the Christel DeHaan Fine Arts Center Gallery was a true homecoming. Starting with a reception on the eve of Homecoming Weekend, the show traced the creative evolution of a world-renowned artist who began his remarkable journey at the University of Indianapolis. Berg was raised in the small community of Bremen, Indiana, and his transition to then-Indiana Central College was the jump start he needed to advance beyond the familiarity of his childhood bubble. It would plant the seeds of fascination to comprehend the world beyond the borders of his town, his state, and his own understanding.

As Berg recalled during the unveiling of his exhibit, leaving rural Indiana and becoming part of an international culture in a capital city “began my progress toward understanding what inclusiveness means in everyday life and helped ground me as I later lived in New York, Berlin, and recently Shanghai.” After earning his bachelor’s degree in art, Berg pursued study at Indiana University and the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. In his early work in graphic design, Berg found immediate success, both as an artist and as an instructor. His first digital print was produced in 1985 as a guest instructor at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago.

The core value of inclusion, which Berg learned from his time as an undergraduate, has served his artistic eye, finding connections across cultures. His goal in all of his work is to create engaging photographs that enhance a viewer’s visual vocabulary. Among the works on exhibit for the retrospective was “Nuclear Family,” photographically documenting a friendship story between a German family and an American one following World War II, with some of the narrative taking place in Berg’s hometown of Bremen. Berg called it “especially gratifying to present this 54-part installation in the DeHaan Fine Arts Center given the German and other

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CREATING A FRAMEWORK FOR INNOVATION SHAHEEN SCHOLARS

FR O M I NT ER NAT I O NA L L EA R NI NG EXPER I E N C E S TO UNI Q UE R ES EA R CH PR OJ ECTS , S HA HEEN G R AN TS AR E O PENI NG T HE D O O R TO A WO R L D O F D I S C OV E RY. Students within the Shaheen College of Arts & Sciences are eligible to apply for Shaheen Grants, made possible as part of the generous multimilliondollar naming gift in 2015 by Yvonne Shaheen, immediate past chair of the Board of Trustees and current chair of the Campaign for the University of Indianapolis. Grants are available for students and faculty in the following areas: research, leadership and career readiness, educational travel, and community engagement. “Shaheen Grants helped support nearly two dozen student and faculty projects during the past year,” said Dr. Debra Feakes, dean of the Shaheen College of Arts & Sciences.

“We express our gratitude to Mrs. Yvonne Shaheen for her generosity, but also extend it to our faculty who facilitated research and travel opportunities, allowing students to maximize the advantages of their grants.” 12

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M R S . Y V O N N E S H A H E E N ( T H I R D F R O M R I G H T, S E C O N D R O W ) W A S H O N O R E D AT T H E I N A U G U R A L R I A D & Y V O N N E S H A H E E N C O L L O Q U I U M I N O C T O B E R 2 0 1 9 . P H O T O I N C L U D E S S H A H E E N G R A N T F A C U LT Y A N D S T U D E N T R E C I P I E N T S ; P R E S I D E N T R O B E R T L . M A N U E L ( F A R R I G H T, S E C O N D R O W ) ; A N D D E B R A F E A K E S , D E A N O F T H E S H A H E E N C O L L E G E O F A R T S & S C I E N C E S ( S E C O N D F R O M L E F T, S E C O N D R O W ) . Brenda Nunez ’20 (biology) traveled to Scotland for a study abroad opportunity as a Shaheen Global Fellow. She was able to focus on a love of hers that, as a biology major, she doesn’t get to experience as often as she’d like: literature. She also learned how to travel independently and adapt to different environments. “When I first came to UIndy, I knew that I wanted to study abroad, but I did not know if that would be possible,” Nunez said. “The Shaheen Grants made it possible.”

( L- R ) K A L I A D A I LY ’ 1 8 & ’ 2 1 , K Y L E A G N E W ’ 1 9 , R A C H E L W E S T ’ 2 0 , A M A N D A T H O M P S O N ’ 2 1 , K AT H E R I N E F R I E S Katherine Fries ’07 ’11, assistant professor of art & design, and four students accepted an invitation to be specialized volunteers for the Hamilton Wood Type & Printing Museum in Two Rivers, Wisconsin. The group assisted in cleaning, cataloging, and organizing the museum’s massive and important wood type and woodcut collections. Corrie Lykins ’20 (political science and philosophy major, legal studies minor) also traveled to Scotland for her first trip outside of the United States. “Thanks to this grant, I now have a different vision and goal for myself. I want to be someone who is able to give back to my community,” Lykins said.

“As a student, UIndy instilled in me that hard work and creative, critical thinking can lead to wonderful opportunities,” Fries said. “Thanks to the Shaheen Grants, we were able to blend the letterpress mantra ‘Preservation Through Production’ with UIndy’s motto, ‘Education for Service.’”

Dr. Milind Thakar, associate professor of international relations, and Dr. Jennifer Camden, professor of English and the Beverley J. Pitts Distinguished Professor of the Ron & Laura Strain Honors College, led the program.

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SWEET HOME CHICAGO

COLIN BOWLES ’15 FINDS A HOME IN THE SECOND CITY

During a scene on the set of an upcoming movie, Colin Bowles ’15 gets to practice his

acting skills by shoving an Oscar-winning actor. The film’s writer and director Aaron Sorkin, also an Academy Award holder, addresses Bowles before the next take. “Aaron Sorkin gave me a direction,” Bowles recalled with a laugh. “It was just to lift my hand higher, but still—he gave me a direction!”

T

his is one of the increasingly frequent times that Bowles cannot believe this is the life he’s living, a mere five years after graduating from the University of Indianapolis with a communications degree and a job lined up as a sports broadcaster. Bowles’ circuitous career path took him from internships at WISH and WTHR in Indianapolis to sports anchoring jobs at WVVA in southern West Virginia and WLFI in Lafayette before he ultimately decided to pursue acting and comedy in Chicago. This winding journey culminated in September 2019 when Bowles’ television series “Yuppies” premiered on Amazon Prime. As Bowles sets his sights on his next project, producing a short film, he can’t help his amazement at his unexpected yet rewarding career path. At the University of Indianapolis, Bowles was a studentbroadcasting mainstay. He was involved in TV production and was a four-year member of WICR’s student management team, traveling with various sports teams to cover their games with play-by-play duties. From his junior year of college to shortly after graduation, Bowles endured several personal tragedies, including the

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loss of his mother to breast cancer. “I remember the day my mom passed away, one of the first people who messaged me was Dr. [Robert] Manuel,” Bowles said. “For the president of a university to reach out to a then-junior was pretty impactful for me. I still talk with him and he has provided me with advice and helped me in many ways.” As Bowles settled into his career path, he questioned if it was something that would ultimately fulfill him. “I had two awful things happen kind of back-to-back,” he said. “It was a real eye-opener and I started to re-evaluate.” “I always was more interested in telling stories in my TV packages. I never wanted to be the guy who broke the big news,” he continued. “I wanted to see how many jokes I could fit into my sportscast.” After deciding to leave television, Bowles ended up writing for the nationally syndicated “Bob and Tom” show. “Writing jokes for the first time, seeing the different comedians come in, I was able to see that there really wasn’t any difference between them and me,” Bowles said. “That gave me the first sense that comedy could be something I could pursue.” Bowles did his research and continued to find that many


■ Colin Bowles ’15, Photo by Adam Mahn Williams.

famous comedians shared a common “everyman” background with himself. “Reading all of these people’s stories really kind of motivated me and got me to the point of going ‘Why not me?’” With newfound confidence, Bowles decided to embark on his second career by moving to Chicago and taking improv and sketch comedy classes at Second City, one of the most influential and prolific comedy theatres in the world. It was while Bowles was working, studying, and performing at Second City that he had the idea for “Yuppies,” loosely based on his own experience as a young person, dealing with tragedy, moving to Chicago, and pressing “reset” on life. “Being around sketch and being around all these funny people so often you just kind of pick stuff up and slowly add it to the idea,” he said. “It was really kind of a comedy snowball.” “As I started writing it, it became therapeutic and more than just a show,” he said. “It was a big ball of creative energy that was built up in me from my time in broadcasting and having these ideas I couldn’t get out because I had to be professional, and from being around all of these people at Second City.” Bowles leaned into his new contacts in the

world of comedy and TV production and quickly found willing participants for his undertaking. Everyone who is cast in “Yuppies” is someone that Bowles met through improv classes and his time at Second City. He used crowdfunding and a small loan in order to get the production underway. “That was a good motivator. Once I took out the loan there was no backing out,” he said with a laugh. Aside from giving him the opportunity to create something and to write comedy, the story of “Yuppies” was important to Bowles. “I had this tragedy, and I don’t think people knew how to talk to me about it,” he said. “They didn’t understand how I could say ‘I’m okay,’ didn’t understand what I was going through—so this was kind of my vessel for communicating that.” Bowles hopes his burgeoning career in comedy and writing will continue to flourish and provide new and exciting opportunities— like the one he received when he attended a Saturday Night Live showcase last spring.

WATCH SEASON 1 ON AMAZON PRIME: 25-YEAR-OLD DECKER MOVES TO CHICAGO TO RECONNECT WITH HIS COLLEGE BUDDIES AND RUN FROM PAST EXPERIENCES. DECKER LEARNS THAT CHICAGO IS A HARD PLACE TO ADAPT TO AND RUNS INTO AN INOPPORTUNE RELATIONSHIP ALONG THE WAY AS HE LOOKS TO FIND HIMSELF AND HIS PURPOSE IN A NEW PLACE WITH OLD FRIENDS.

“It was an obvious longshot, but I was in the room,” Bowles said. “Being at home in Indianapolis wishing I could do that is one thing, but I’m in a position now where I can do that—if I’m really talented. And that’s a cool feeling.”

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FOUN

DING

NEW

TRAD

GOOD HALL, NAMED AFTER THE UNIVERSITY OF INDIANAPOLIS’ THIRD PRESIDENT, I.J. GOOD, HAS SERVED AS AN ICONIC PRESENCE FOR GENERATIONS OF STUDENTS, ALUMNI, AND COMMUNITY MEMBERS WHO HAVE PASSED THROUGH ITS COLUMNS. Today, Good Hall represents the strength and history of the University’s liberal arts core education and is now home to the Shaheen College of Arts & Sciences. A historic renovation and restoration project in 2018 has inspired a new tradition around the building’s six pillars, which have stood tall for nearly 120 years. The restoration was made possible by more than 500 supporters, including two who will be recognized in perpetuity on a Good Hall pillar for their generosity: F. A. Wilhelm and 16

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Phyllis Webster Doles in memory of her late husband, Virgil. Each year, the remaining pillars will honor four individuals, organizations, or groups connected to the University of Indianapolis, who represent the institutional core values of inquiry, innovation, leadership, and service. The first four honorees were recognized during the September 2019 Homecoming President’s Lunch and Founders Day Celebration, marking the start of a new annual Homecoming tradition.


DR. LeALICE BRIGGS

DAVID MANLEY ’23 Born to a family of war refugees in the British colony of Sierra Leone, David Manley and his brothers were given shelter by United Brethren missionaries. Manley enrolled at Indiana Central College in 1919, becoming the University’s first international student and the founding editor-in-chief of The Reflector newspaper. He was widely admired for his wit as a communicator. He returned to Sierra Leone to serve as vice principal at the Albert Academy, known for training the first generation of Sierra Leone’s leaders. His work paved the way for Sierra Leone’s independence in 1961.

THE HANNI & H I AT T FA M I L I E S The Hanni and Hiatt families are two of the largest legacy families in the University’s history, with almost 40 Greyhounds ranging from the Class of 1927 to the most recent Class of 2019. The families have provided decades of service to support education and health needs in the community. Both families have remained dedicated to the University over multiple generations with family members serving on the Board of Trustees, Alumni Board, Greyhound Club Board, faculty, and staff. Combined, the families have funded 13 endowed scholarships for UIndy students.

Dr. Briggs is a distinguished dean emerita and professor of nursing who offered significant leadership during a period of rapid growth and development at the University. She served as dean of the School of Nursing for 18 years and received the Honorary Alumni Award in 1992 upon her retirement. She later returned to campus to help with the School for Adult Learning, developing collaborations through outreach programs and coordinating the delivery of onsite educational programs. She was awarded an honorary doctor of science degree in 2003. Dr. Briggs set the standard for faculty-student engagement at a university where the faculty take pride in personal attention to student needs. Her legacy continues with the LeAlice Briggs Endowed Nursing Scholarship funded by Dr. Briggs, her husband Max, and more than 250 faculty, staff, alumni, and friends.

DR. RANDY LEE ’72 Dr. Lee’s service as an internal medicine physician has made a significant and positive impact on regional and international communities—including his alma mater—and his leadership in medical education has expanded access to needed health care. He has been in private practice for more than 44 years in Martinsville, Indiana. Since 2010, Dr. Lee has served as the director of medical education and vice president for medical affairs at Community Hospital South while serving as one of the hospitalists on staff. The Lee family—which includes his wife, Susie; son, Jim; daughter, Laura ’05; and son-inlaw, Elijah Hammans ’04—have been strong supporters of UIndy, particularly through scholarships. Dr. Lee has served on the UIndy Alumni Board and enjoys a close relationship with current and former members of the University community. He is a member and former president of the Indiana Society of Internal Medicine and a fellow of the American College of Physicians.

S EE MO R E O NL I NE! See a complete list of Hanni and Hiatt alumni family members at portico.uindy.edu

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TRAILBLAZING HOOSIER RECEIVES RECOGNITION THANKS TO STUDENTF A C U LT Y C O L L A B O R AT I O N

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S T H E N AT I O N C O M M E M O R AT E S THE WOMEN’S SUFFRAGE CENTENNIAL IN 2020, TWO W O M E N AT T H E U N I V E R S I T Y O F INDIANAPOLIS ARE WORKING BEHIND T H E S C E N E S T O C E L E B R AT E A F O R G O T T E N FIGURE IN INDIANA POLITICS.

A

In Spring 2019, Karlee Taylor ’20 (political science) and Dr. Laura Merrifield Wilson, assistant professor of political science, were awarded a $2,000 Shaheen Scholarly Activity Grant from the University. That was the impetus for rediscovering the legacy of Harriette Bailey Conn, a political pioneer who was both the first woman and the first African-American to be appointed State Public Defender in 1970, a position she held until her untimely death in 1981.

“S HE WAS A PUBLIC LEADER, AND THE PUBLIC SHOULD KNOW ABOUT HER.”

–Laura Wilson

Bailey Conn was also the first Republican AfricanAmerican woman elected to the Indiana General Assembly, and the first African-American to earn a Juris Doctor degree from Indiana University Law School. Yet many people don’t know of her remarkable accomplishments. “I’m a lifelong Hoosier and so is she, but I’d never heard of her,” said Taylor. “She’s a phenomenal woman everybody should know about. It’s remarkable that she broke so many barriers despite all the odds she was facing.” In addition to raising seven children and going through a divorce, Bailey Conn was deeply involved with her community and civic organizations such as the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, the Indianapolis Urban League, the Indianapolis Women’s Caucus, the American Bar Association, and the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights. During the research process, Taylor and Wilson met three of Bailey Conn’s children, including Sidney, the informal family archivist. He donated several boxes of materials related to his mother’s career to the Indiana State Library following her death, a kind of hidden treasure Taylor and Wilson were thrilled to uncover decades later.

They each found meaningful personal connections to Bailey Conn’s story. “This kind of project is so important to me–and to both of us really–because there aren’t many women involved in government and that kind of representation really matters. There’s no greater inspiration and motivation to know you can do it too,” Wilson said. “I’m a biracial woman, and I can’t even comprehend the struggles she faced. I go to sleep thinking about her sometimes,” added Taylor, a first-generation college student. The more they learned about Bailey Conn, the more they felt compelled to do something special in her honor. Wilson and Taylor submitted a proposal to the Indiana State Historical Marker Program, requesting a plaque be installed near the Indiana Statehouse. The request was accepted, and they were granted an Indiana Women’s Suffrage Centennial May Wright Sewall Fellowship from Indiana Humanities in support of their work. “We never envisioned the project going this far!” Taylor said. The historical marker will be installed in Spring 2020 in downtown Indianapolis. The pair is planning a community celebration in Bailey Conn’s honor on Friday, May 1, commemorating the 50th anniversary, to the day, of her groundbreaking appointment as State Public Defender. “I hope someone reads the marker and learns her name. I hope a little girl walking down the street can see it and have some inspiration,” said Taylor. “Plus, she’s getting the recognition she deserves and I know her kids are excited for that.” “She was a public leader, and the public should know about her,” Wilson said.

FOLLOW THE UNIVERSITY OF INDIANAPOLIS O N S O C I A L M E D I A F O R I N F O R M AT I O N A B O U T T H E M AY 1

D E D I C AT I O N O F T H E

H I S T O R I C A L M A R K E R C O M M E M O R AT I N G HARRIETTE BAILEY CONN. /UINDY

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PAWS WHAT YOU’RE DOING!

F O R T H E F I R S T T I M E I N N E A R LY 4 0 Y E A R S , U I N D Y ’ S L I V E M A S C O T P R O G R A M H A S R E T U R N E D . M E E T G R A D Y, A T W O Y E A R - O L D R E T I R E D R A C E R F R O M D AY T O N A , F L O R I D A .

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GRADY’S FULL NAME IS C. GREYSON VERITAS, A NOD TO THE SCHOOL COLORS OF CRIMSON AND GREY AND THE LATIN WORD FOR TRUTH. “VERITAS” APPEARED IN THE OFFICIAL SEAL WHEN THE UNIVERSITY WAS KNOWN AS INDIANA CENTRAL COLLEGE (AS PART OF THE MOTTO,

s

on Verita

C. Greys

“TRUTH THROUGH FAITH AND SCIENCE.”)

Grady Staff

GRADY WAS FORMALLY INTRODUCED IN NOVEMBER WITH HELP FROM SOME NEW FRIENDS, INCLUDING ACE AND BUTLER BLUE III.

IN HIS PREVIOUS CAREER, HE WAS KNOWN TO REACH SPEEDS OF 70 KM PER HOUR WITHIN 30 METERS! NOW, HE’S HAPPY TO TAKE LEISURELY WALKS AROUND CAMPUS WITH HIS HANDLER, CORAN SIGMAN ‘14 (SOCIOLOGY/COMMUNICATIONS), WHO ALSO SERVES AS THE UNIVERSITY’S ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR OF ALUMNI ENGAGEMENT.

Grady has discovered 137 new scents (and counting!), chased his fair share of squirrels, and made friends with everyone he’s met since arriving on campus. As an official staff member, his job entails increasing school spirit, spreading goodwill, and making memories with fellow Greyhounds for many dog years to come.

JANUARY 1966: The campus

OCTOBER 1978: Indiana Central

NOVEMBER 2019:

community welcomes three-year-old

University announces the arrival of its

C. Greyson Veritas, aka “Grady,”

Dixie as the first live mascot. The

second live mascot. Timothy O’Toole, a

becomes the third live mascot.

retired racer lived on campus for about

five-year-old retired racing Greyhound

two years before returning to her home

from Florida, proudly represented the

#GRADYPACK

state of Florida in December 1967.

school until 1981.

@UINDYHOUND

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■ Walt Koon ’74 (economics and finance) and wife Janette Koon ’75 (sociology)

A PASSIONATE COMMITMENT hen the newest members of the 1902 Society began giving, it was 1994, and the University of Indianapolis celebrated the opening of the Christel DeHaan Fine Arts Center. That same year, 1958 alumnus William Raspberry received a Pulitzer Prize in Commentary, and the University mourned the passing of longtime president Dr. I. Lynd Esch. Elsewhere in the world, South Africans elected Nelson Mandela president, travelers could use the newly opened Channel Tunnel to travel quickly between England and France, and NBC debuted “E.R.” and “Friends.”

W

While a lot has changed in the past 25

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years, the steadfast commitment of these supporters to the University of Indianapolis has not. The 1902 Society, named for the founding year of the University of Indianapolis, recognizes the University’s most loyal alumni and friends who have made gifts during 25 or more fiscal years. Even small gifts over time have a significant effect on the institution, students, and faculty. The 1902 Society’s impact continues to grow, with 1,271 dedicated supporters (771 households) and a combined lifetime giving of $22,248,240.95. The 1902 Society celebrates this group of loyal alumni and friends. Society supporters are recognized for gifts of any size to any

fund, and membership is perpetual. Members receive special communications and event invitations throughout the year, as well as a special gift from the University. Society members represent a broad spectrum of interests and backgrounds; whether they are an alumni couple who met in a German class on campus or proud supporters of UIndy as parents of a former student, all share a passion for the University of Indianapolis. Walt Koon ’74 (economics and finance) and Janette Koon ’75 (sociology) shared their first date at Dr. Marga Meier’s “all German (no speaking English allowed)” Christmas party. Now approaching their 44th anniversary, Janette said that while German class was


where they met, “statistics class kept us together. I could not be mad at Walter (during those brief dating spats) for long that semester because I needed him to get me through the required class!” Janette and Walt both experienced UIndy in such personal ways, from the liberal arts schooling that provided foundations for their careers to close friendships they still have to this day. Walt shared how UIndy gave him the opportunity to develop a personalized course of study, of which he took full advantage. “My degree is in economics, which was a small department in the early 1970s, and I was able to take a variety of courses in philosophy in addition to the liberal arts courses prescribed for all of us. Through these courses, I developed a broad appreciation for different cultures, disciplines, and people. Problem-solving skills and critical thinking are by-products of the classroom and social interactions with other students on campus. These are the elements of college that stay with you as you mature.” Walt received grants and scholarships while attending UIndy and wanted to continue to pay it forward for future generations. “Supporting the University through our unrestricted giving allows the University to support those areas of greatest need,” he explained. “We’ve also contributed to specific programs and events over the years. We are excited about the direction of the University. We are amazed at the diversity of the campus community and the exceptional reputation many of the degree programs enjoy.” Small-town natives Allen and Jane Milburn came to the UIndy family as proud parents of Kirk Milburn ’81 (management science). They fell in love with that same small-town feel on the campus of UIndy. “The size is a great advantage. It is not too small, and it is not too large. The relationship-building options provide you the accessibility to administration and staff, and provides a really good balance.”

As active parents, the Milburns enjoyed watching their son grow and develop on campus within the UIndy culture and religious connection that continued throughout their son’s four years. “Universities need ongoing support, just like a life. In our case, it is not a one-time gift; it is more of a long-term commitment.” They continue to see the value in supporting “the positive influence and contributions UIndy graduates are having on their professions and throughout the community. That is the value of what we do.” Faithful annual gifts to the University mean many more UIndy supporters are on their way to membership in this society. For more information about the 1902 Society, please contact Carrie Sorensen, donor relations and stewardship coordinator, at 317-788-2070 or sorensenc@uindy.edu.

■ Allen and Jane Milburn

UINDY STUDENTS APPRECIATE THE SUPPORT OF THESE LOYAL ALUMNI AND FRIENDS. “UIndy has provided me with so many opportunities to grow as a person. Without your generosity, I would not be able to partake in these experiences. Thank you for your willingness to give and support my education at UIndy!” -JENSON HARRIS ’21

“UIndy has opened up a world of possibilities for me, and for that opportunity I am grateful to the school, and especially you.” -HOPE COLEMAN ’22

“I have made meaningful friendships and countless unforgettable memories in my time here so far. I can’t wait to see what my future at UIndy will hold. Thank you again for your donation. I really appreciate it.” -HANNA STAMM ’22

“Thank you for your gift! You provide endless opportunities and help students have access to higher education.” -NOEL WOLFE ’19

“Being able to go to a college, especially UIndy, is such a privilege and an honor. Thanks to your donations, I can be here at UIndy receiving a world-class education.” -JENNA CRAFTS ’23

NEW 1902 SOCIETY MEMBERS Lorin Clemenz and Kathie Clemenz Jennifer Fogo Steve Goddard and Barbara Goddard Lisa Hicks Barbara Johnson and Richard Johnson Elizabeth Johnson and Michael Johnson John Kelly and Stephanie Kelly

Bruce Kercheval and Judy Kercheval Linda Richard and Michael Richard Suzanne Ruth and Richard Ruth Robert Showalter Joseph Watson and Linda Watson Mary-Margaret Willbanks

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C O N T I N U E D F R O M PA G E 5

»UWIZERA “This was a really important moment for Rwanda to reflect on its past and share its experience and lessons learned on the global stage,” she said. “It just so happened that what I studied really fit the position they were looking for. It was an incredible opportunity to work with a team on the Security Council for two years.” Uwizera’s time at the United Nations included serving on the committee addressing economic and financial matters. She led and facilitated intergovernmental negotiations, including the UN 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and on issues related to women’s empowerment and conflict resolution in Africa. Since taking on her current role at the Africa-America

Institute in 2016, Uwizera has worked with governments throughout Africa, development partners, and the private sector in transforming universities on the continent into globally competitive institutions. Reflecting on her own career path, Uwizera told students not to expect immediate success, but instead to start with small, incremental goals. “Even if you end up working in a place you didn’t envision, set yourself a timeline for what you want to accomplish and think about the skills you can acquire for your next job. You already have the education coupled with a strong belief in yourself. Nothing can stop you!”

C O N T I N U E D F R O M PA G E 1 1

»BERG

immigrant roots of so many alumni and faculty, and the fact that this artwork is based in an Indiana narrative.” Berg’s work has led him all over the globe, including a recent stay in Shanghai, China, where he compiled a portfolio exploring historic buildings from the 1900s that are scheduled to be destroyed. After living in Berlin for many years, he now alternates working out of his San Francisco studio with frequent stays in Berlin. Since 2007 the artist has had two solo museum exhibitions in the German capital and completed a major twelve-part work commissioned for the Microsoft Berlin Policy Center. He is currently creating an exhibition for the German Federal Parliament.

T H E U N I V E R S I T Y O F I N D I A N A P O L I S I S G R AT E F U L T O K E R M I T B E R G A N D S P O U S E M A LT E S C H U T Z , M D , F O R T H E I R G E N E R O U S D O N AT I O N O F B E R G ’ S P I V O TA L P H O T O G R A P H , “ R E C E P T I O N , B E R L I N ,” T O THE UNIVERSITY’S PERMANENT ART COLLECTION.

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“I’ve found it a challenge to buck the trend and not produce the same five photographs for thirty years in a row,” he reflected as his exhibition opened last fall. “Looking back on a career is a bit shocking, even when one is very close to the early artwork as well as current works in progress.”

Berg’s activity is being documented by Iranian-born film producer Sahand Samani, who has been filming him for two years for an upcoming documentary of his life and projects in Berlin. While his work visually appears minimalistic, the complexities of his locations and their cultures inform a greater purpose in his art, something that comes full circle to his formative years in Indianapolis. “I think my take-away all these years after getting my degree at the University of Indianapolis is the phrase used by [President Robert Manuel] when he was asked why he was leaving his previous position to go to UIndy. Dr. Manuel responded that he had immediately discovered the University of Indianapolis to be very much in the middle of everywhere.” Berg continued, “I find that this rings true and bodes well with the current leadership for impressive growth—in the arts and in the University as a whole.”


C O N T I N U E D F R O M PA G E 1 3

»SHAHEEN SCHOLARS

Nicholas Tibbs ’19 (archaeology) ’20 (M.S. anthropology) used his Shaheen Scholar Grant to complete an archaeological survey of an early pioneering site in Delphi, Indiana, as he works toward completing his thesis. Tibbs and his team of students used archaeological methods to find a farmstead and family cemetery that had long since disappeared from maps and surveys but were mentioned in family oral histories. Tibbs and his project are part of a larger collaborative effort, the Wildcat Archaeological Research Project, led by associate professor and chair of anthropology Dr. Christopher Schmidt.

“THIS PROJECT ALLOWED ME TO PUT MY EXPERTISE INTO PRACTICE,” TIBBS SAID. “I WAS PUT IN A LEADERSHIP POSITION AND I WAS ABLE TO PASS ON WHAT I HAD LEARNED IN MY UNDERGRADUATE WORK.” The research conducted by Rachel Hurrell ’20 (chemistry major, biology minor) deals with investigating the purity of drugs obtained from developing countries. She uses High-Performance Liquid Chromatography, looking for drugs that are either substandard or falsified. Hurrell developed a method to facilitate the quantification of ingredients in the antibiotic at the center of her research. The Shaheen Grant gave her the ability to purchase resources for her project, conducted with guidance from Dr. Levi Mielke, associate professor of chemistry. “My research, as a result of this grant, has taught me numerous invaluable skills,” Hurrell said. “The method development process taught me to think critically, work independently, and also use resources both internal and external to UIndy to solve unfamiliar problems.”

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UNIVERSITY UPDATES SCHOOL OF BUSINESS The School of Business Real Estate Club presented a proposal to redevelop Broad Ripple High School. Deepayan Sen ’20 (operations & supply chain management), Trix Rosewood ’20 (English/creative writing), Priyam Patel ’21 (finance), Shivanch Puri ’20 (finance) and Stephen Possell ’20 (finance) made it to the final round of the 2019 NAIOP Commercial Real Estate Development Association competition. With contributions and support from Rachel Cuza ’23 (business administration), student advisors Michael Taft ’20 and David Wesner ’20 (MPS real estate development) and faculty advisors Eric Harvey, program director, and Rich Byrd, adjunct faculty.

Jackson Taylor ’20 (MPS real estate development) published an article in the Thomson Reuters Real Estate Review, Volume 48 Issue 1: “Workforce Without Housing: Why Indiana Needs to Incentivize Workforce Housing Development.” Anne McKinley ’18 (MPS real estate development) was awarded low-income housing tax credits for two projects in

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The University Updates section is a snapshot of the accomplishments of students, faculty, and the larger University community. For a full selection of news and stories, visit news.uindy.edu.

which she is the developer: Near West Village in Indianapolis and Historic Gallatin Square in Marion. Bryan Conn ’20 and Anthony Heygood ’20 competed in a national real estate development case competition hosted by the Urban Land Institute. Conn and Heygood, who are enrolled in the Master’s in Real Estate Development program, were tasked with creating a plan for reuse of land along the Ohio River in downtown Cincinnati, Ohio. Heygood also appeared on the reality television program Flipping Exes on Bravo TV in August. Dr. Larry DeGaris, professor of sports marketing, was cited as a faculty expert in news articles for the Indianapolis Business Journal, Indy Star, and other regional news outlets, and had an article published in BizEd on the benefits of sponsored research. The John C. Adams Finance Institute, made possible by a generous gift from John C. Adams ’73, launched in Fall 2019 to grow the successful student experience that is the hallmark of the School of Business. See page 6 for details. The University of Indianapolis and Vincennes University announced a partnership between the UIndy School of Business Department of Operations and Supply Chain Management and the Vincennes University Logistics Training & Education Center (VU LTEC). The

partnership provides educational training experiences with VU LTEC’s cutting-edge technology and industry-tested equipment in Plainfield, Indiana. The UIndy Logistics Learning Lab, located inside VU LTEC, gives students the opportunity to participate in lab simulations developed by VU LTEC staff and Dr. Craig Seidelson, assistant professor of operations and supply chain management.

Students in Seidelson’s Quantitative Methods course collaborated with the University’s Facilities Management and Ray’s Recycling for a sustainability project. The students calculated how much waste the University generates and how much recycling occurs on campus. Seidelson was invited by the Confucius Institute to speak to international business students and faculty at Akron University on the US-China trade situation. The Confucius Institute is a cooperative project of the University of Akron, the National Office of Teaching Chinese as a Foreign Language, the Chinese Ministry of Education, and Henan University in Kaifeng, China. The School of Business launched a master’s program in Data Analytics in Fall 2019. SAS

professional statistical analysis software is being installed and will be used extensively in the program to complement existing Bloomberg software.

SCHOOL OF EDUCATION The UIndy Education MakerSpace opened in Fall 2019, providing a collaborative workspace for pre-service teachers to learn and create new teaching devices and modules for students. The School of Education launched two new graduate programs in Fall 2019: the Master of Arts in School Leadership and Management to prepare school leaders to bring schools up to world-class levels, and the Master of Arts in Special Education Leadership and Practice to prepare high-quality leaders with the best practices in special education and make a difference in the lives of children and families. Dr. Angelia Ridgway, professor and director of secondary education, along with co-authors Nate Ridgway ’14 (history and special education) and Matt Miller, released a book, Don’t Ditch That Tech, a teacher-tailored guide that provides tips on how to develop attention-grabbing strategies and build metacognitive practices.


The Ridgways also presented “Don’t Ditch that Tech: Using Technology to Upgrade to a Differentiated Classroom” at the International Society for Technology in Education Conference in June and at three of Indiana’s Summer of e-Learning Conferences. In October, Dr. Greta Pennell, professor of teacher education, presented “SOS: The Selling of Our Schools” at the annual meeting of the Association for Humanist Sociology in El Paso, Texas.

Dr. Pennell’s intalgio print, “My Sweet Baboon” was awarded first place by the Indiana Wildlife Artists Association at their annual exhibition. Beth Kiggins, adjunct professor and instructional technologist, along with co-presenter Dr. Julie Gahimer, professor of physical therapy, led a half-day workshop titled “Harnessing the Power of Google Tools” at the 35th Annual Conference on Distance Teaching and Learning in Madison, Wisconsin. Deb Sachs, assistant professor of education, co-authored a book chapter, “A clinical residency model for preparing effective STEM teachers,” in the book, “Best Practices in Chemistry Teacher Education.” Sachs presented “Brain Research and Its Implications for EE: Making the Connection” in November at the Environmental

Education Association of Indiana 50th Annual Conference. She also presented two sessions, “Getting Beyond Forgetting: Capitalizing on What We Know About Learning and Memory” and “The Adolescent Brain: What’s Going On In There” in September at the Indiana Middle Level Educators Association Annual Conference in Indianapolis. Dr. Jean Lee, associate professor of secondary education and Department of Teaching & Learning chair, received a grant through the Center of Excellence in Leadership of Learning’s STEM Teach IV program to host a workshop supporting elementary and secondary teachers in designing projectbased learning units. Lee also received a National Council of Teachers of Mathematics Cummins Partner Affiliate Grant to support beginning math teachers. She presented a talk at the Indiana Council for Teaching of Mathematics in the fall.

preparation of elementary teachers to teach STEM content and explore how to integrate makerspace activities for students with disabilities and diverse needs.

August. Prior to arriving on campus, Wilson most recently served as associate professor of clinical psychology at the Illinois School of Professional Psychology at Argosy University.

Somers and Lynn Wheeler, assistant professor emerita of education, received a Lilly Endowment Comprehensive School Counseling Grant to produce curricular materials that will increase principals’ knowledge of Comprehensive School Counseling models. This grant supports the development of 11 case studies, five mixedmedia simulations, and three webinars.

Research by Dr. Aaron Kivisto, associate professor of clinical and forensic psychology, explored the link between gun ownership and greater incidences of domestic homicides. The study was published in the American Journal of Preventative Medicine. His co-authors included Peter Phalen ’18 (PsyD). Kivisto’s research was featured in an NBC News story in August that was distributed by nearly 30 affiliates across the country.

Dr. John Kuykendall, School of Education dean and associate professor, presented research at the National Symposium for Student Success and the National Association for Black School Educators fall professional conferences. He also contributed to the American Association of Colleges for Teacher Education EdPrepMatters blog. Dr. Jennifer Grace, assistant professor of education, presented research at the University Council for Education Administrators conference.

Dr. John Somers, associate professor of education and co-chair of the Department of Leadership & Educational Studies, received a grant through the CELL STEM Teach IV program to host a workshop for elementary educators on the utilization of a makerspace within a formal learning environment. Somers also received a 100Kin10 Collaboration Grant to establish a partnership between the University of Indianapolis and Purdue University to improve

The School of Education hosted Indiana’s Third Annual Computer Science Conference at the University of Indianapolis through a partnership with the CS Higher Education Advisory Board, the Indiana Department of Education, and Indiana University School of Informatics, Computing & Engineering.

COLLEGE OF APPLIED BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES Dr. Torrey Wilson became the dean of the College of Applied and Behavioral Sciences in

Dr. Michael Poulakis, assistant professor of clinical psychology, presented research at Boston College with two of his students, Rebecca McCormic and Aylin Acosta, who are in their third year of the PsyD program. The presentation, “Working with Individuals of a Minority Racial or Ethnic Background When Part of the Majority,” was part of the Institute for the Study and Promotion of Race and Culture’s Diversity Challenge 2019. Dr. Kathryn Boucher, assistant professor of psychology, is participating in a large collaborative grant through the Raikes Foundation called the Student Experience Project, which was created to tackle inequalities in college success by transforming the student experience. Boucher contributed to the College Transition WINTER/SPRING 2020

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Collaborative, which supports the Student Experience Project.

summer internships with the Department of Defense:

Art & Des ign

Dr. Erin Fekete, interim associate dean and director of psychological sciences, co-authored a study in the Journal of Positive Psychology entitled, “Gratitude enhances the beneficial effects of social support on psychological wellbeing.” The study was mentioned in an article published by Greater Good Magazine.

Meredith Magee ’22 (software engineering), a Ron & Laura Strain Honors College student and UIndy soccer player, participated in the HighPerformance Computing Internship Program through the Air Force Institute of Technology at Wright Patterson Air Force Base in Dayton, Ohio.

Sarah Pfohl, assistant professor of digital photography, was shortlisted for the 2019 Palm Photo Prize. The 104-image shortlist was selected from 3,860 submissions. Her work was also featured in a photography exhibition hosted by theprintspace gallery in London, England.

Miles Furr ’21 (software engineering and computer science) participated in the Naval Research Enterprise Internship Program at the Oceana Annex Base in Dam Neck, Virginia, working in the division responsible for advancing the capabilities of radar systems on today’s naval fleet.

The Greyhound community celebrated student work from the Social Practice Art master’s program with a retrospective event in August at the Efroymson Gallery at Tube Factory Artspace. The second cohort has initiated socially engaged projects around Indianapolis while examining such issues as pollinators and sustainability, aging in place, and human trafficking.

Jessica Simpson ’21 (PsyD) is conducting an analysis of a life skills program for 7th and 8th graders in a South African township for her dissertation. She partnered with the nonprofit iThemba and spent two weeks in South Africa in August to conduct research on the program.

SHAHEEN COLLEGE OF ARTS & SCIENCES Ant h ro p o lo g y

Dr. Kendra Thomas, assistant professor of psychology, is Simpson’s doctoral adviser. Senior psychology students contribute every semester to an ongoing project to provide quantitative program evaluation to iThemba. The Commission on Accreditation, as part of the Council on Social Work Education, has granted initial accreditation to the University of Indianapolis Master of Social Work Program through July 2023.

R.B. ANNIS SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING Two R.B. Annis School of Engineering students completed 28

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A faculty-alumni collaboration played a major role in the relocation of a 19th-century cemetery near the Indianapolis International Airport. A joint effort led by Ryan Peterson ’96 (anthropology, biology) and Dr. Christopher Schmidt, professor of anthropology, the project entailed exhuming and relocating the remains of about 500 people to Concordia Cemetery in Indianapolis. See news.uindy.edu for the story. Dr. Christopher Moore, associate professor and chair of anthropology, coauthored a paper, “The Case for Radiocarbon Dating and Bayesian Analysis in Historical Archaeology,” which was published in the journal Historical Archaeology.

A solo retrospective exhibition by Kermit Berg ’73 was featured at the Christel DeHaan Fine Arts Center Gallery September– October. Berg is a worldrenowned artist whose work has been displayed at galleries in Berlin, Munich, New York, Washington, D.C., Chicago, and other cities around the world. See more on page 10.

Artist Titus Kaphar presented a lecture, “Making Space for

Black History: Amending the Landscape of American Art,” at the Ruth Lilly Performance Center in November as part of the Sutphin Lecture Series. Kaphar is a 2018 MacArthur Fellow and a 2018 Art for Justice Fund grantee, among other accolades. In November, AJ Nafziger ’08 (studio art) ’13 (MA studio art) returned to exhibit a collection of work, “The Horizon Unfolds,” at the Christel DeHaan Fine Arts Center Gallery. The exhibition featured drawings in pencil and liquid graphite. Rhonda Wolverton, assistant professor of art & design, spoke at the “Voices of Healing from Our Immigrant Neighbors” event in November at the Indiana Interchurch Center in Indianapolis. She also exhibited “Building Barrios Not Barriers,” an installation that is part of her work to subvert known language and American symbols of immigration to create dialogue and share real immigration experiences. A new public art installation created by Art & Design faculty Nathan Foley, assistant professor, and Jim Viewegh, chair, is on display in downtown Indianapolis. “River Fish” features 12 kinetic sculptures representing four fish species native to the White River. See page 8 for details. B iology Savannah Phipps ’21 (biology) presented research in August at the 2019 Annual Meeting for the Ecological Society of America in Louisville, Ky. She collaborated with Dr. Daniel Scholes, assistant professor of biology, on research that was supported by Phipps’ participation in the Shaheen College of Arts & Sciences


Research Fellows Program. The presentation was supported by a Student Career Readiness and Leadership Development grant made possible by Yvonne Shaheen. See page 12 for more about the Shaheen Grants program.

Dr. Greg Weber, assistant professor of biology, was coorganizer of the 2019 Xenopus Resources and Emerging Technologies meeting at the Marine Biological Laboratory in Woods Hole, Mass. The biennial event brought together nearly 100 participants from Japan, Europe, and the U.S. Weber also presented research in a talk titled, “Forced association: examining junctional intermediate filament dynamics.”

biology students. Latham, who also serves as director of UIndy’s Human Identification Center, was mentioned in a Wired article, “The Strange Life and Mysterious Death of a Virtuoso Coder,” for her role in the case.

Latham and five students were invited to discuss the graduate and undergraduate human biology programs at the West Lafayette Public Library for “The Crime Scene!,” an event open to young adults interested in law enforcement or forensic science careers. In November, Sidney Thompson ’22 (human biology) and Latham were instructors for the Indiana Law Enforcement Academy, part of the Indiana State Police’s Recruit Academy Training Program.

Jessica Merkling ’12 (biology), an urban biologist for the Indiana Department of Natural Resources, visited campus to talk with students about career opportunities. Katie Beverley ’16 (biology) presented her University of Wisconsin doctoral research, titled “Kir7.1 Channel Mutation in the Inner Pore Results in Channel Construction” to faculty and undergraduate students. Dr. Krista Latham, associate professor of forensic anthropology and biology, attended the annual scientific meeting of the FLAG Forensic Anthropologists with 11 human

Dr. Marc Milne, assistant professor of biology, presented his Indiana Dunes spider research and led an hour-long spider-searching hike to about 20 members of the public at the Indiana Dunes National Park. Milne also discussed his spider research as the featured guest on “Hoosier History Live” on WICR 88.7 FM. In July, Milne and Gabby Madriz ’18 (human biology) ’19 (MAT) published “Revision of the spider

genus Epiceraticelus (Araneae, Linyphiidae)” with a description of a new species in Zootaxa.

College student and Shaheen Grant recipient, presented

Milne and BaoThu Dinh ’18 (biology) published a scientific manuscript in Arthropod-Plant Interactions in November. Celebrate Science 2019, an opportunity to engage with future scientists, was well attended at the Indiana State Fairgrounds by UIndy science faculty and students. A contingent of biology and chemistry majors representing the Community for the Advancement of Learning and Understanding Biology Club and Sigma Zeta Science Honors Society organized and contributed to the success of this year’s program. A research manuscript by Dr. Daniel Scholes, assistant professor of biology, was accepted for publication in the International Journal of Plant Sciences. The Scientech Foundation donated $10,000 to Mary Gobbett’s Junior Scientist Mindset Program. Gobbett is an assistant professor of biology. Dr. Nelson Kraus, associate adjunct professor of biology, and Caroline LaPlant ’23 (nursing) co-authored “SUPER SIMPLE Anatomy & Physiology Workbook” published by Cognella Academic Publishing. Dr. Kraus presented a workshop titled “Reduce and Flip to Engage Your Students” at the Central Region Human Anatomy and Physiology Society at Columbus State University in October. Chem is tr y Rachel Hurrell ’20 (chemistry), a Ron & Laura Strain Honors

research at the 49th annual Turkey Run Analytical Conference in September. Dr. Levi Mielke, associate professor of chemistry, co-authored the paper entitled, “Method Development for the Simultaneous Quantification of Ampicillin and Cloxacillin in Ampiclox using RP-HPLC.” Megan Hay ’20 (medical laboratory science), who is conducting a year-long internship at Franciscan Hospitals, received the prestigious Dr. Driver Scholarship from the Consortium of Indiana Medical Laboratory Educators. Com m unic ation Jeanne Criswell, associate professor, adviser to the Reflector, and director of the journalism program, received the Outstanding Reviewer Award from the Cultural and Critical Studies Division of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication at the national conference in Toronto, Ontario, Canada, in August. Criswell also was re-elected as the division’s Professional Freedom and Responsibility Chair. Congratulations to the Reflector staff on winning four national awards at the ACP/CMA National College Media Convention in Washington, D.C. Dr. Stephanie Wideman, assistant professor of communication, authored a chapter in the forthcoming book WINTER/SPRING 2020

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Michelle Obama and the FLOTUS Effect, published in November by Lexington Books. The chapter is entitled, “Visuality and the Pathetic First Lady.” Wideman also serves as director of the UIndy Forensics Speech & Debate Team. Cri m i n a l J u st i ce The Department of Criminal Justice, in collaboration with Macy’s, hosted the first annual Midwest Loss Prevention Conference in June. The twoday event featured discussions with industry leaders from Lowe’s, Whole Foods, DSW Inc., T-Mobile, and more. Dr. Kevin Whiteacre, chair and associate professor of criminal justice, traveled to Belize in October to survey 165 prison officers inside the Belize Central Prison regarding job satisfaction, correctional orientation, and other aspects of the job to help prison administration improve conditions for staff and inmates. He’ll be presenting the research at the Third Belize National Research Conference in March 2020. Engli sh Three poems by Liz Whiteacre, assistant professor of English, “The Butterfly Effect,” “The Law of Inertia,” and “The Stoic’s Universe,” were published in the 50th issue of Wordgathering, an online quarterly journal on disability poetry literature and art. Etchings Press, a studentrun publisher, released Etchings Literary & Fine Arts Magazine Issue 32.1 in December, featuring work 30

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submitted by students, alumni, faculty, and staff. Barney Haney, assistant professor of English, published a short story, “The Passage” in the Madison Review (Fall, 2019); the story was the winner of Madison Review’s Chris O’Malley Fiction Prize. Rebecca McKanna’s “Interpreting American Gothic” was published in Best American Mystery Stories 2019. McKanna is an assistant professor of English. The Department of English hosted the Indiana College English Association Conference in October, which included student and faculty presentations. G lo b al Lan g u ag e s & Cross C u ltu ral Stu d ie s

French, German, and Spanish) scavenger hunt, students engaged in real-life situations, such as asking for information about the Red Line, counting, and naming restaurants and researching historic sites. Garmann was selected as one of 20 professors in the United States to participate in a oneweek Formation en Relations Internationales offered by the Chamber of Commerce of Paris. She completed the training course at the Paul Nitze School of Advanced International Studies in Washington, D.C. in June 2019. Garmann’s exhibit “Where Beauty Meets Resilience” was on display at the Athenaeum in Indianapolis during June 2019. The show featured 40 vibrant artworks that invite the viewer to contemplate what it means for women to overcome adversity. The Indianapolis Review featured Garmann’s artwork in the Fall 2019 issue.

Dr. Eduard Arriaga, assistant professor of Spanish, presented a talk in October at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Department of Literature related to his research on digital humanities and ethnic studies. Arriaga is project director for the “Data in Humanities. Humanities in Data” workshop series and faculty advisor to the Student Organization of Latinos.

Dr. Dan Briere, chair and associate professor of Spanish, delivered a presentation titled “The Unique Spanish Don Juan” at the 2019 Humanities Education and Research Association (HERA) Conference in Philadelphia, and will give a presentation at the 2020 HERA Conference in Chicago titled “The Demise of the Traditional Don Juan.”

Dr. Gerburg Garmann, professor of German and French language and literature, took students on a multilingual guided tour of the Red Line in Indianapolis. As part of their multilingual (English,

Internationa l Relations Dr. Jyotika Saksena, associate professor and graduate director of the International Relations Program, presented research on Congolese refugee women at the 13th Pan-European Conference on International Relations, held at Sofia University, Bulgaria, in September. She presented on the same topic at

the University of Indianapolis in October, and presented findings from the research to the Indiana Minority Health Coalition, which provided funding for the project. Dr. Shannon McMorrow from Western Michigan University was a co-recipient of the original 2016 grant and co-presented.

Students from the Department of History and Political Science majoring in international relations and political science turned in an exceptionally strong performance and won several awards at the Model United Nations Conference hosted on campus in November. See intercom.uindy. edu for a list of participants. Mus ic The 25th annual summer piano camp welcomed 22 elementary students to campus in June. They were taught by founding director Dr. Rebecca Sorley, professor of music, along with Mary Branscum Wynn ’04 (music teaching), Matthew Bridgham ’13 (music performance), Marcus Click ’21 (music education), and Luke Sherar ’22 (music therapy). Sorley was chosen as a 2019 National Association of Music Merchants (NAMM) Foundation/ College Music Society GenNext Fellow and participated in a Nashville, Tennessee, program in July as part of the Summer NAMM conference to learn strategies for developing programs and experiences that advance career options for music majors in colleges and universities.


Sorley was also a masterclass clinician for the National Collegiate Honors Conference in New Orleans in November, where she accompanied Kourtney Christensen ’21 (music teaching) in performances. A song by Dr. John Berners, professor of music, “The Sarcasm,” premiered along with a performance of “From the Diary of the Queen of Russia” from his Cabaret Songs at the Ann Arbor Song Fest in July 2019. In August, he was named a finalist in the 2019 Flute New Music Consortium Composition Competition. Logan Purcell ’21 (music performance) won third prize at the BorGuitar International Festival and Competition in Borgo Val di Taro, Italy, in July. Nolan Winters ’22 (music performance, composition) placed fourth. Tori Zimmerman ’17 (music) completed a music therapy internship with AccessAbilities in July and was awarded the university’s first Music Therapy Equivalency Certificate. Katie Snider ’19 completed an internship at Tampa Bay Institute for Music Therapy in December, fulfilling the requirements to become the first Music Therapy Bachelor of Science graduate. Assistant professor of music Dr. Jon Noworyta began his

third season as the assistant conductor of the Summermusik Festival with the Cincinnati Chamber Orchestra in July and August, working closely with the music director, musicians, and administration throughout the summer to prepare and execute festival performances. Joana Genova, visiting assistant professor of music, spent four weeks teaching and performing at Taconic Music Summer Festival in Manchester, Vermont, with colleagues from across the United States and Europe, and with the Indianapolis Quartet, the University’s resident ensemble. The Quartet also appeared on Vermont Public Radio for interviews and a live performance. The Indianapolis Quartet launched its fourth season of concerts at the University of Indianapolis in October with a program featuring guest artists Carrie Dennis, viola, and Nicholas Canellakis, cello. The event was part of the Faculty Artist Concert Series sponsored by Katz, Sapper & Miller. Dr. Brett Leonard, assistant professor of music, was elected to the executive committee of the Central Indiana section of the Audio Engineering Society, taking over the role of secretary. He also presented a co-authored paper, “Subjective Assessment of the Versatility of Three-Dimensional Near-Field Microphone Arrays for Vertical and Three-Dimensional Imaging,” at the 147th Convention of the Audio Engineering Society in New York. Over the summer, assistant professor or music, Dr. Gregory Martin was a featured performer at Grieg Society of Great Britain’s annual gala concert at St. Olav’s in London, as well as

a recital series at Lady Margaret Hall, Oxford, and the Oxford University Faculty of Music. In October, he presented a paper on Grieg’s Op. 54 Lyric Pieces at the International Grieg Society Conference in Bergen, Norway. Dr. Elisabeth Honn Hoegberg, associate professor and chair of music, read a paper, Untrammeled Imagination: The Women of Wa-Wan Press” at the 2nd International Conference on Women’s Work in Music in Bangor, Wales, in September. Nemanja ´ Ostojic, associate adjunct professor of guitar, was featured in Radio Television Serbia’s documentary on the 2019 Guitar Art Festival, which included a TV interview and live footage from the concert in commemoration of 20 years of the Guitar Art Festival. Department of Music faculty are preparing to host the prestigious Guitar Foundation of America International Convention and Competition at the University of Indianapolis in 2020. The six-day convention, June 22-27, 2020, will gather hundreds of classical guitar masters and enthusiasts from all over the world, including the most elite performers of the genre. P hilos op hy & Religion Dr. Greg Clapper, professor of religion and philosophy, was asked by the family of United Airlines Captain Al Haynes to be a part of his funeral service in October. Captain Haynes was

in charge of Flight 232, which made a crash landing in Iowa in July 1989. Dr. Clapper was the Air Force chaplain on the scene of the crash. Politica l Scien ce Karlee Taylor ’20 (political science) and Dr. Laura Merrifield Wilson, assistant professor of political science, submitted a proposal to the Indiana State Historical Marker Program. The pair’s request was accepted, and they were granted an Indiana Women’s Suffrage Centennial May Wright Sewall Fellowship from Indiana Humanities in support of their work. See more on page 18. Wilson was named as a Class of 2020 participant in United Way’s Leadership United community leadership and board development program, which combines learning and practical experiences to help individuals develop leadership skills, increase their knowledge of the community, and acquire the skills needed to serve as board members and community leaders. Ally Nickerson ’21 (political science and communication, honors concentration) appeared on Inside Indiana Business and WFYI to discuss a grant received from Indiana Campus Compact in support of the UIndy Votes! project, and the impact of civic engagement on community attachment among college students. Dr. Wilson organized the project and worked with Nickerson to apply for the grant. Evan Smiley ’19 (political science major, international relations and pre-law minor) was named the 2019 University of Indianapolis Law Scholar. He WINTER/SPRING 2020

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will receive a minimum halftuition scholarship throughout his studies at IU McKinney School of Law, and a guaranteed experiential learning opportunity of either an externship in the Indianapolis Bar or a research assistantship at IU McKinney. Jessica Parra ’20 (political science and Spanish, minor in international relations and a concentration in multilingual translation) was named part of the Axis Leadership Program’s 2020 cohort. Axis is an eightmonth leadership program designed for Latinx professionals between the ages of 21 and 28 to develop personally and professionally and to prepare them to engage with civic and community leadership activities. Sociolo gy A publication co-authored by Dr. Amanda Miller, associate professor and chair of sociology, “Stalled for Whom? Change in the Division of Particular Housework Tasks and Their Consequences for Middle- to Low-Income Couples,” was 36th on the annual list of most downloaded articles published by the American Sociological Association. Miller co-authored “Scaffolding Space to Speak: Student Storytelling as Long-term Strategy for Developing Faculty Cultural Competence,” which was published in the Journal of Faculty Development. Her article “His Career, Her Job, Their Future: Cohabitors’ Orientations Toward Paid Work” was published in Volume 40, Issue 11 of Journal of Family Issues. Miller was cited in a November New York Times article, “The Allure of the White Dress,” and in lifestyle expert Marni Jameson’s new book, 32

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Downsizing the Blended Home. Dr. Colleen Wynn, assistant professor of sociology, co-authored research published in the journal Demography. “Muslim–NonMuslim Locational Attainment in Philadelphia: A New Fault Line in Residential Inequality?” examines Muslim–non-Muslim disparities in locational attainment. Her research was also featured on the American Sociological Association blog “Work in Progress.” Dr. Jim Pennell, professor of sociology, presented “Changing Hearts and Minds: Songs and Social Movements,” at Rutgers University in October and at the annual meeting of the Association for Humanist Sociology, which was held in El Paso, Texas, and Juarez, Chihuahua, Mexico, in November. Megan Blaising ’16 (MA, applied sociology), adjunct professor of sociology, published “Blunts, Bullets and Belligerence” with BoardHouse Publishing. Blaising has served in various lowperforming schools, providing detailed accounts of challenges students face. In this memoir, Blaising examines the lingering effect of discrimination and the way it has impacted schools, students, and current societal constructs. The Community Research Center, co-directed by Dr. Wynn and Dr. Pennell, is assisting South

Indy Quality of Life Plan (SoIndy) with cataloging properties along the Shelby Street Corridor and evaluating community perceptions of SoIndy’s work. Brandon Mouser, instructor of sociology, presented “Borderlands and the Self” at the annual Association for Humanist Sociology meeting in November. An article by Dr. Elizabeth Ziff, assistant professor of sociology, “‘Honey, I Want to Be a Surrogate’: How Military Spouses Negotiate and Navigate Surrogacy with their ServiceMember Husbands,” was accepted for publication by the Journal of Family Issues. Ziff also co-authored “I’m Not Your ‘Typical’ Military Wife: The Construction of Gender and Agency Through Stereotypes,” which was accepted for publication by Armed Forces and Society. T heatre Two productions from the Underground Series played to sold-out audiences in November. These performances were part of senior capstone projects: Danny and the Deep Blue Sea by John Patrick Shanley, directed by Destiny Heugel ’20 (theatre) The Vagina Monologues by Eve Ensler, directed by Zoe Cunningham ’20 (theatre education) Assistant professor of theatre James Leagre advised both student directors. Liesel Schmitz ’19 (theatre

design/production) graduated a semester early and is working at two local theatres. She is a stage manager at the Phoenix Theatre in downtown Indianapolis and a stage manager and props designer at the Storefront Theatre in Broad Ripple. Schmitz joins a host of Greyhound alumni with full-time jobs at the Phoenix Theatre, including general manager Delia (Neylon) Robertson ’06 (theatre), artistic manager Chelsea Anderson ’10 (theatre), resident stage manager Chelsey (Wood) Stauffer ’11 (theatre), and costume and properties manager Danielle Buckel ’11 (theatre) ’15 (MBA). Interdi sci p lina r y Deb Sachs, assistant professor of education, Dr. Kim Baker, assistant professor of biology, and Dr. Katherine Stickney, associate professor of chemistry, co-authored a book chapter, “A clinical residency model for preparing effective STEM teachers,” in the book, Best Practices in Chemistry Teacher Education. It was published by American Chemical Society Books: Washington, D.C. 2019. Sachs, Baker, and Stickney traveled to St. Louis in November to participate in the 2019 Midwest Noyce Regional Meeting. The trio discussed their work during two presentations: “The Two-Way Flow of Knowledge: the Scholar & Cooperating Mentor Teacher Connection” and “UniversityProvided Mentoring: Ensuring Professional Growth and Teacher Retention in Beginning STEM Teachers.” Dr. Lisa Borrero, associate professor of gerontology, and Dr. Amanda Miller, chair of


sociology, published “Supporting Underprepared Students in the Online Classroom” in Faculty Focus.

COLLEGE OF HEALTH SCIENCES Dr. Jim Bellew, professor of physical therapy, and Dr. Trent Cayot, assistant professor of exercise science, published an article, “Changes in microvascular oxygenation and total hemoglobin concentration of the vastus lateralis during neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES),” in the August 2019 issue of Journal of Physiotherapy Theory and Practice. Dr. Cayot was elected to serve a three-year term as a Member at Large for the Midwest Chapter of the American College of Sports Medicine Board of Directors. Cayot and fellow exercise science faculty Dr. Mindy Mayol, Dr. Riggs Klika, Dr. Chad Odaffer, and Dr. Rich Robinson co-authored three posters presented at the Midwest Chapter of the American College of Sports Medicine Meeting with Master of Science in Exercise Science students Brooklyn Herbert ’19 ’23 and Tyrah Brewer ’23.

of Physical Therapy, took secondyear Doctor of Physical Therapy students to an interprofessional education event with students from Butler University’s Pharmacy, Communications Disorders, and Physician Assistant programs. Fiems and colleagues shared the model and its advantages at the Heartland Interprofessional Educational Conference in Omaha, Nebraska, last summer. Dr. Riggs Klika, associate professor and director of exercise science programs, is serving as co-principal investigator on a cancer survivor wellness study based at the newly formed Indiana Cancer Wellness Center. The study is evaluating physical outcomes and quality of life experienced by people ages 15–37 who complete an individualized plan of treatment. Dr. Anne Mejia-Downs, adjunct faculty in the public health program, published an article, “An Intervention Enhances Resilience in Entry-Level Physical Therapy Students: A Preliminary Randomized Controlled Trial,” in the Journal of Physical Therapy Education. The study assessed the impact of a resilience curriculum on stress levels, resilience, and protective factors among physical therapy students during academic stress.

Dr. Heidi Ewen, associate professor and director of the master’s in healthcare management, published “Social lives and cliques within senior housing communities,” in Housing & Society.

Dr. Isabell Mills, assistant professor of kinesiology, health and sport sciences, published a paper, “Branding in women’s sports: A literature review,” in the Sport Journal.

Dr. Connie Fiems, assistant professor in the Krannert School

Dr. Paul Salamh, assistant professor of physical therapy,

co-authored an article published in the Strength and Conditioning Journal. The article, “Stem Cell Injections for Musculoskeletal Pathology: An Overview for Sports Medicine Professionals,” discusses the use of stem cell injections for the treatment of musculoskeletal disorders in sports medicine. Dr. Laura Santurri, chair of the Department of Interprofessional Health & Aging Studies and director of the Doctor of Health Science Program, ran 100 miles in 30 hours to raise money in support of retired greyhound dogs. In October, Santurri participated in the Indiana Trail 100 to raise $1,000—enough to provide 10 greyhounds transportation by Victory Lap Greyhound Transport to new forever homes. The University of Indianapolis School of Occupational Therapy (SOT) is pleased to announce three new faculty members this year. All three are familiar faces at UIndy: Dr. Penny Moyers, founding School of Occupational Therapy Dean, has made a return to teaching, accepting a position as professor of occupational therapy. Dr. Christine Kroll ’89 (occupational therapy) has joined the faculty as an assistant professor and doctoral capstone coordinator. Dr. Kristina Watkins, who received undergraduate and graduate degrees at UIndy, also joins the faculty as an assistant professor and OTD academic

fieldwork coordinator. Dr. Carla Brown, assistant professor in the public health program, was elected to the Indiana Society for Public Health Education Board of Directors as director of health education advocacy. Dr. Lisa Borrero, associate professor of gerontology, was a panelist at the Association of Gerontology in Higher Education’s 9th Annual Teaching Institute—“From 18 to 108: What Teaching and Training Could Look Like at an Age-Friendly University.” Dr. Kathy Martin, Krannert School of Physical Therapy professor, presented “Putting Your Best Foot Forward: The PTOrthotist Team” at the Academy of Pediatric Physical Therapy’s Annual Conference in November. Martin also offered a sevenhour workshop on pediatric orthoses at the Utah chapter of the American Physical Therapy Association’s fall conference. Dr. Emily Slaven and Dr. Ed Jones, physical therapy faculty, presented “Generation Z, What Do You Want from Me? Manual Therapy and Today’s Physical Therapy Student” at the American Association of Manual Physical Therapy annual conference in October. Dr. Heidi Hancher-Rauch, director of the Public Health Program, presented on the importance of credentialing in relation to the current opioid crisis at the Society of Public Health Education’s (SOPHE) Annual Advocacy Summit in WINTER/SPRING 2020

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Washington, D.C. She serves as the SOPHE advocacy and resolutions trustee.

schools more quickly implement the Early College high school model.

SCHOOL OF NURSING

Thanks to a $2.4-million award from the Indiana Commission for Higher Education, CELL and Independent Colleges of Indiana are able to continue their successful STEM Teach initiative. This program aids high school teachers needing graduate-level courses in STEM discipline areas to meet the Higher Learning Commission requirement for teaching dual-credit courses by 2022.

Lambda Epsilon, the international nursing honor society chapter affiliated with UIndy, received a Key Award at the international Sigma Theta Tau convention in November. Alex Kemery, assistant professor of nursing, was invited to present a talk on LGBTQ healthcare perspectives at the Illinois Hospice and Palliative Care Conference. Kemery was also featured on the cover of the Journal of Hospice and Palliative Nursing in August. Author and researcher Dr. Elizabeth M. Norman visited campus in November to host a discussion about her book, We Band of Angels: The Untold Story of American Nurses Trapped on the Bataan by the Japanese. This special event was part of the University’s Penrod Lecture Series, in conjunction with Veterans Day and the year-long celebration of 60 years of the School of Nursing.

CENTERS Center of Exce l l e n c e in Lea dersh i p of Le a r n in g The Center of Excellence in Leadership of Learning (CELL) at the University of Indianapolis received a $7.9-million grant as part of the federal Education Innovation and Research program administered by the U.S. Department of Education’s Office of Elementary and Secondary Education. CELL will establish a Rural Early College Network to help rural Indiana

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Janet Boyle, executive director of CELL, published an op-ed in the South Bend Tribune about early college. Boyle also began serving on the Indiana Commission for Higher Education’s Dual Credit Advisory Council at the request of Commissioner Teresa Lubbers. C e nte r fo r S e r v ic eLe ar n in g & C o mmunity En g ag e ment The biannual Community Partners Fair, hosted in September, was attended by more than 500 students and faculty who networked with more than 50 local and national nonprofit agencies to explore service-learning and community engagement opportunities. In November, Kiera White was welcomed as the new program assistant, a role focused on developing community partnership collaborations in service-learning. Her background includes a bachelor’s degree in political science from Valparaiso

University and a master’s degree in educational administration from the University of South Dakota. Center for Glob a l Enga gem ent The third annual International Education Month was hosted in October with a variety of performing arts, film, lectures, and interactive events that showcased international cultures and the rich benefits of intercultural exchange.

Three of the Lab’s peer tutors, Rebeka Wilder ’20 (English teaching), Amelia Lasbury ’20 (biology), and Kylie Sabol ’22 (human biology), pictured left to right, gave a panel presentation entitled “Creating a Diverse Writing Center: Painting with Different Strokes.”

STAFF & ADMINISTRATIVE NEWS

Highlights included the 31st Annual Celebration of the Flags on Smith Mall, with students, faculty, and staff carrying nearly 90 flags that represent the many nations of the University of Indianapolis community. Writing La b In October, the University of Indianapolis Writing Lab was well represented at the International Writing Center Association’s Annual Conference in Columbus, Ohio. Director Richard Marshall and Associate Director Dawn Hershberger conducted a special interest group entitled “Working with International Students.” Hershberger also gave two individual presentations: “The Art of Outreach on a Shoestring” and “The Lagniappe Concept: How the ‘Art of Something Extra’ Can Aid Writing Center Assessment.”

Kathy Bauchle, facilities management, starred in Go Be Joan by Nathaniel Adams and produced by Fat Turtle Theatre Company in July 2019. Visit intercom.uindy.edu for the full story. Steve Herriford, vice president and chief technology officer, was named 2019 CTO of the Year by the Indianapolis Business Journal. Francesca “Chessie” Zappia, technical support specialist, published a new young adult novel, Now Entering Addamsville, in October. Zappia ’15 (computer science), is also the author of the young adult novels Made You Up and Eliza and Her Monsters. She was chosen as the 2017 Emerging Author at the Indiana Authors Awards.


The University of Indianapolis has named Amber R. Smith as Vice President for Inclusion and Equity. Smith’s selection follows a nationwide search for the cabinet position dedicated to leading and enhancing a universitywide culture of diversity and inclusion. Smith began work on January 1, 2020, and will build upon existing initiatives of inclusivity and equity at the University of Indianapolis. She joins a leadership team committed to expanding the scope of the institution, both academically and through community impact.

Dr. Lawrence Sondhaus, professor of history, was announced as the inaugural

A new classification by Carnegie Classification of Institutions of Higher Education puts the University of Indianapolis in the same U.S. News & World Report category as the country’s elite institutions. UIndy is now recognized as a national Doctoral/Professional University and is ranked nationally for the first time in the Social Mobility category, which recognizes institutions that are committed to enrolling economically disadvantaged students.

recipient of the Gerald and Marjorie Morgan Endowed Professorship of European History at a dedication ceremony during the 2019 Family Weekend. The generous gift, made possible through the estate of Gerald and Marjorie Morgan, will create exciting new academic opportunities at the University of Indianapolis. Sondhaus has published 13 books, most of which focus on the history of Germany and Austria in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Four of his books have been translated into a total of eight editions in other languages, including German, Italian, Slovenian, Portuguese, Korean, and Chinese. Sondhaus also has authored twelve journal articles, thirteen published conference papers or book chapters, fifteen published commentaries or brief articles, and over fifty book reviews. Gerald Morgan obtained bachelor’s and master’s degrees in history from the University of Indianapolis in 1973 and 1983, respectively. Morgan was a career soldier who served in Army finance and logistics. His career took Morgan and his wife, Marjorie all over the world, eventually settling at the finance and accounting service at Fort Harrison in Indianapolis. Gerald and Marjorie Morgan both became postmasters in Indianapolis in their second careers.

Take Portico with you wherever you go! Visit: portico.uindy.edu

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PIONEERING LEGACY

DR. SUE WILLEY

ANNOUNCES RETIREMENT After 45 years of service as a leader, administrator, and coach, Dr. Sue Willey ’75, vice president of intercollegiate athletics, announced her decision to retire effective September 1, 2020. As the search gets underway for Dr. Willey’s successor, the University recognizes her legacy.

equal opportunity in sports and passed those lessons of empowerment down to our athletes. She broke barriers when she became the University’s first female director of athletics and one of the first women to be a member of the President’s Cabinet.

Under Dr. Willey’s leadership, University of Indianapolis athletic programs and facilities have seen tremendous growth. The number of varsity teams on campus has increased to 23, and the number of student-athletes who call UIndy home has grown to nearly 700. Key Stadium and Nicoson Hall have seen modernizing renovations, and the Athletics and Recreation Center was constructed during her tenure.

Her accomplishments as a student-athlete and coach foretold her success in leadership roles. A 1993 inductee into the UIndy Athletic Hall of Fame, she earned an incredible 19 letters and 11 MVP awards in her four-year career. She was the Female Athlete of the Year from 1972 to 1975 and went on to coach 23 years at UIndy, directing 43 teams in five sports. She was the GLVC softball Coach of the Year in 1989, and her softball teams earned national academic honors in 1996 and 1997.

Her legacy at UIndy is highlighted by her tireless efforts to raise UIndy’s profile on the national stage. She also oversaw UIndy’s rise in competitiveness at the NCAA level. UIndy has been honored with over 90 Academic AllAmerica honorees, a mark that is in the top 10 in Division II. During the 2018-19 academic year, the average overall GPA for all student-athletes was 3.32. In 2018 only 13% of Division I or II institutions’ athletic departments were helmed by women. Dr. Willey has proudly forged a path for women in athletics from the moment she was hired in 1975. Seeing firsthand how the roles of women have changed in the industry during her career, she has remained at the forefront of the fight for

Dr. Willey is a national example of leadership in athletics as well. She was honored as the Under Armour Division II Athletic Director of the Year in 2012-2013, the Under Armour Central Division II Central Region AD of the Year in 2010, and the NACWAA Division II Administrator of the Year in 2005. Dr. Willey joins a storied University history of longserving athletic directors, including Dr. David Huffman ’64, Bill Bright ’54, and Angus Nicoson ’42, among many dedicated leaders in the Department of Athletics through the years.

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FOOTBALL The Greyhounds capped another successful football season with a program first: a third consecutive NCAA Division II postseason berth. UIndy ran off seven straight wins to start the season, including a 49-6 victory in front of nearly 8,000 fans during Homecoming. They went on to finish the regular season at 9-1 before dropping a first-round playoff game at Central Missouri. UIndy garnered a league-high 20 All-GLVC honorees, including unanimous first-team selections for cornerback Mitch Dewitt ’21 (business administration & management), offensive lineman Clay Hadley ’21 (business administration & management), linebacker Joe Lambright ’20 (exercise science) and running back Al McKeller ’21 (criminal justice). McKeller had a particularly successful campaign, breaking both school and conference records for career rushing touchdowns (39). He also became the first rusher in program history with three 1,000-yard seasons to his credit and later went on to garner a nomination for the prestigious Harlon Hill Trophy and All-America Second Team honors from the Associated Press.

CROSS COUNTRY After steady improvements throughout the regular season, the UIndy cross country teams racked up a number of accolades when it mattered most. Both the Greyhound men and women placed third at the GLVC Championships, with the former’s finish good for their best showing since 2000. Lauren Bailey ’21 (public health education & promotion) took the runner-up spot in the women’s race, and Chris Switzer ’22 (exercise science) placed third in the men’s, both netting All-GLVC accolades. Both student-athletes later garnered All-Region honors, while Bailey went on to earn All-America status after a ninth-place finish at the NCAA DII Championships.

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WOMEN’S SOCCER The UIndy women’s soccer team engineered a historic postseason run this past fall. After securing their first NCAA tournament berth under Head Coach Holly Cox, the Hounds posted back-to-back shutout wins to advance to the “Sweet 16” for the second time ever. Though the Hounds ultimately fell to Grand Valley State in the regional final, they finished the year at 15-5-1, matching the second-highest win total in program history. The Greyhounds racked up a number of postseason accolades. Cox was voted the GLVC Coach of the Year by her peers, while junior Taylor Peck ’21 (exercise science) was dubbed the conference Offensive Player of the Year and goalkeeper Sophia Saucerman ’23 (exercise science) was named the league’s top freshman. Seniors Amanda Meyer ’20 (psychology) and Alyse Dutcher ’20 (chemistry) joined Peck on the All-Midwest Region team.

MEN’S SOCCER The men’s soccer team’s magical season finally came to a close in the semifinals of the NCAA Division II Championship, as the Greyhounds dropped a 3-0 decision to third-ranked and topseeded Cal State LA at Highmark Stadium in Pittsburgh on Dec. 12. After winning the program’s first-ever NCAA tournament game in late November, the Hounds’ postseason run extended all the way to the Final Four, where they finished the season with a 16-6-1 record to set a new school record for wins.

The Greyhounds earned their first trip to the NCAA Tournament since 2014, winning 21 matches for the team’s second-most victories under Head Coach Jason Reed. UIndy knocked off No. 6 Lewis during the season, while picking up victories over four regionally ranked programs.

Five Hounds garnered All-GLVC accolades, while senior forward Javier Steinwascher ’20 (sport management) went on to become just the second player in program history to earn All-America honors after leading the nation in assists.

Senior Alyssa Spears ’20 (social work) earned the program’s first-ever CoSIDA Academic All-America honor, posting a 3.91 GPA in Social Work and leading the GLVC in assists per set. The Heltonville, Ind., native was also a unanimous All-GLVC First Team selection, joining teammates Katie Furlong ’21 (exercise science) and Taylor Jacquay ’20 (elementary education) on the all-league list. Furlong was named to the All-Midwest Region squad for the second straight year.

VOLLEYBALL

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GEAR FOR GRADS! GRADUATION IS JUST AROUND THE CORNER GET YOUR GRAD A GIFT TODAY! • ATHLETIC CASUAL WEAR • BACKPACKS

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2010–2019 Jeffrey Jay Smith ’18 is an ocean exports logistic coordinator for BDP International. Lajuana Warren ’18 is the director for learning and development for Damar Services. Kylen J. Butler ’18 is a graduate assistant for the men’s basketball team at Clemson University in Clemson, South Carolina.

The alumni network of the University of Indianapolis is 34,000 strong and growing. Share your news with fellow Greyhounds—from the personal to the professional to the monumental moments in your life. Class notes are published in the University’s digital and print editions of Portico . All original photos are returned. Mail a print to UIndy Alumni Engagement, 1400 Hanna Ave., Indianapolis, IN 46227, or submit a high-resolution digital image to alumni@uindy.edu. C O N N E C T !

Updating your contact information ensures that you’ll receive the latest news about your alma mater and invitations to alumni and University events. Update your information at uindy.edu/alumni. facebook.com/uindyalumni @UIndyAlumni

A L U M N I

Taylor DeLong ’17 is the owner of DeLong Landscaping. Cori Davis ’17 is a formulation support technician with Corteva Agriscience. Samuel H. Daggy ’17 has been promoted to audit senior at Dauby O’Connor & Zalewski in Carmel, Indiana. Kali Flores ’16 is the director of student learning services at Park Tudor School in Indianapolis. Tyler Whetstone ’16 is employed with Striker Endoscopy working with orthopedic robots. Christopher Walker ’16 is the owner of 148 Wellness in Greenwood, Indiana.

317-788-3295

Y O U R

Aspen Lovejoy ’17 teaches language arts and social studies at Perry Meridian 6th Grade Academy in Indianapolis.

C O N T A C T S

ANDY KOCHER ’98 ’15

LORA TELIHA

CORAN SIGMAN ’14

Associate Vice President of Alumni Engagement akocher@uindy.edu

Director of Alumni Engagement lteliha@uindy.edu

Associate Director of Alumni Engagement sigmanc@uindy.edu

Class notes in this issue of Portico represent those submitted between June 1, 2019, and October 31, 2019. Class notes submitted after October 31, 2019 will be featured in the next issue.

Alexandria Kessens ’16 ’18 is an occupational therapist with the Children’s TherAplay Foundation Inc. She married Travis Schebler on July 13, 2019. Hailey Brown ’16 ’19 works for Greenfield Health Care Center and Community Rehab Hospital South as an occupational therapist. Hannah Johnson ’16 graduated from the Indiana University Robert H. McKinney School of Law in May 2019 WINTER/SPRING 2020

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CLASS NOTES 1

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and recently sat for the bar. She works at the Marion County Prosecutor’s Office. Andrew R. Bryant ’16 has been promoted to audit senior at Dauby O’Connor & Zaleski in Carmel, Indiana. 1 Nicole Meert ’16 ’18 is an occupational therapist and was selected to be the Indiana Arthritis Foundation’s Medical Honoree for the 2019 Arthritis Foundation Walk to Cure Arthritis in Portage, Indiana. Melissa R. Hicks ’14 ’19 has been promoted to chief nursing officer at IU Health Tipton Hospital. Georgene R. Nitzsche ’13 has been honored by the Gerontological Society of America in the part-time/adjunct faculty category. Meghan Teunis McLeod ’12 was featured in the May 27 issue of Chemical & Engineering News. She is employed with Heritage, working in atomic force microscopy (and other techniques) in the asphalt division. Jeremy VanAndel ’12 has joined Franklin College as the founding director of the Hive at Franklin College along with serving as an instructor of business. Robert J. Doyle, Jr. ’12 has been promoted to audit senior manager at Dauby O’Connor & Zaleski in Carmel, Indiana. Amanda M. Fruland ’11 ’16 is the new corporate communications manager at

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AgReliant Genetics in Westfield, Indiana. Abigail Brickler ’10 completed her master of arts degree in arts administration at the University of Akron in Ohio. Rachel H. Yates Halleck ’10 is the new deputy director and chief of staff for the Division of Mental Health and Addiction at the Indiana Family and Social Services Administration. 2 0 0 0 –2009 2 Chris ’08 ’10 and Lindsey (Fischer) Horty ’08 welcomed their second child, daughter Allison Marie Horty, on August 4. Whitney Miles Miller ’08 is the owner and founder of Transcend Health & Wellness. She is an RRCA Certified Running Coach and ICF Certified Health & Life Coach. Transcend Health & Wellness opened in 2018. Whitney and Matthew Miller were married on April 15, 2017. 3 Uche Unogu ’08 is an international evangelist and enterprise architect and was the featured speaker at a meeting organized by his Indianapolis- based ministry, Onyx Evangelistic Association, in Bhawanigarh, India, which drew 10,000 attendees in September. Michael Fields ’07 graduated from Indiana Institute of Technology (Indiana Tech) with a doctorate of philosophy in global leadership and concentration in organizational

4

management. He will begin his fifth year as a faculty member in the College of Business at Eastern Oregon University in September 2019. Lani Jones ’07 ’13, a clinical psychologist, and Brad Dobson ’07 ’09, a pastoral and addictions counselor, recently opened a faith-based mental health practice, Providence Behavioral Group, in Fortville, Indiana. Daren P. Johnson ’07 is a commercial relationship officer at Indiana Members Credit Union in Indianapolis. 4 Joe Boehnlein ’07 is the new afternoon drive host for WFYI-FM 90. He also does voice-tracking for the afternoon drive programming for WBAA in Lafayette. He will continue to teach at UIndy as an adjunct faculty member and to host and produce the program “A Blast from the Past” on 88.7 WICR. Barbara Olszewski ’06 is the new dean at Noblesville High School. She is also the new leader of the Little Millers Preschool and Miller Explorers before/after school programs. Corrine Michel ’06 participated in Miami University’s Earth Expeditions global field course in Mongolia. 5 Keith Fechtman ’06 ’08 is the owner of Books and Brews South, located next to campus in the former Shelby Bowl building.


Alicia Rader ’05 has been promoted to senior audit manager at Greenwalt CPAs in Indianapolis. 6 Matthew Byerly ’04 performed at Carnegie Hall in July 2019 while participating in the Summer Music Educators Workshop. He will also assist with piloting and evaluating Carnegie Hall’s new “Great Music Teaching Framework” curriculum guide. He is the general music teacher and choral director in the Lake Ridge New Tech School System in Gary, Indiana. Michael Sullivan-Tibbs ’01 ’03 published “Sleep disturbances and suicide—New battles for veterans of U.S. wars in Afghanistan and Iraq: A retrospective review” in the Journal of Social Work and Mental Health.

Barbara Schuetter Dill ’98 retired from Monroe County Community School Corp., where she had been an elementary educator since 1999, and from Ivy Tech Community College-Bloomington, where she had been an elementary and early childhood adjunct since 2009. Justin Barrett ’96 is the Associate General Counsel for Golars, LLC in Noblesville. He lives with his wife, Kathleen, and children, Noah and Emma, in Carmel, Indiana. Brian E. Kemple ’94 is founder of a new company called Your Legacy Advisors in Indianapolis. Charles M. “Chad” Cassinelli ’93 ’99 is a new member of the Schools on Wheels board of directors in Indianapolis.

19 8 0–19 8 9 Robert F. Marchesani Jr. ’89 has been added to the Isofol medical board of directors. John R. “Rick” Schooler ’89 has been named chief information officer for Lee Health in Fort Myers, Florida. 8 Steve R. Herriford ’87, vice president and chief technology officer at UIndy, has been honored as one of the CTOs of the Year for 2019 in the non-for-profit/ government category by the Indianapolis Business Journal and TechPoint. Donald C. Gillespie ’86 became President and CEO of CrossRoads Financial FCU in Portland, Indiana, on January 2, 2020.

Christopher R. Peterson ’01 has been named chief financial officer at Hillside Family of Agencies in New York.

Frank R. Horvath ’92 has been appointed to the Fairfield Glade Fire Department board of directors in Crossville, Tennessee.

1970–1979

Kevin J. Brown ’00 ’02 began his tenure on July 1 as the next president of Asbury University in Wilmore, Kentucky.

Mark L. Marchino ’90 is the new director of clinical education in the doctor of physical therapy program at the University of Evansville. Most recently, he served as executive director of practice operations at Good Samaritan Hospital in Vincennes, Indiana.

Catherine Burton ’78 has owned and operated a state-licensed child care center and preschool since 1980. She serves as the president of the Marion County Alliance of Neighborhood Associations and as the Land Use Chairman and Family Assistance Chairman of the Franklin Township Civic League.

Adrienne Harvey ’00 is an occupational therapist at Park County Schools in Powell, Wyoming.

7 Carol Hatfield ’90 published her first book of poetry, entitled “Diary of the Soft World.”

1990-1 9 9 9 Kareem A. Richardson ’99 has been hired as the assistant men’s basketball coach at Indiana State University in Terre Haute.

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7

Bruce D. Jennings ’78, the principal at Bremen High School in Bremen, Indiana, was honored with a lifetime achievement award by the Bremen Chamber of Commerce on September 19, 2019.

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CLASS NOTES 9 E. Elaine Barrett ’77, executive assistant to the senior vice president of basketball at the NCAA, was named the 2019 President’s Award recipient during the annual Staff Appreciation Day. The award is presented to a staff member who best exemplifies national office core values. Barrett was presented with a trophy by President Mark Emmert. 10 Harley Robinson ’74, was awarded the 2019 Lifetime Achievement Award by the Indiana Veterinary Medical Association. Jon Burroughs ’72 ’76 is retired from Indianapolis Public Schools. His latest novel, Karma and Crime, will be published through Bastet Publishing. Last December, his story, “The Reindeer Murder Case,” appeared in the anthology Homicide for the Holidays. 11 David W. Bowman ’72 retired in 2017 from 25 years of creating and hosting national cable automotive television shows. With a business partner in 1991, he founded Brenton Productions and created the popular “Shadetree Mechanic” series seen on the former Nashville Network. He later created and hosted the “Crank & Chrome” and “Two Guys Garage” automotive shows. After semi-retiring, he joined with Masters Entertainment to both start and host “Motorhead Garage,” now seen on Motor Trend Television Network. Earlier, he retired after 20 years with Honeywell International, where he worked in the automotive aftermarket division in advertising and was the manager of motorsports with the Fram, Autolite, and Bendix product lines. Mr. Bowman and his wife, Karen, live in Lutz, Florida.

J. Donald Cossairt ’70 and co-author Matthew Quinn, PhD, recently published a new textbook entitled “Accelerator Radiation Physics for Personnel and Environmental Protection.” Despite profound developments in particle accelerators over the past four decades, this book is the first new textbook on this topic published since 1973. Dr. Cossairt is a Distinguished Scientist at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory in Batavia, Illinois. David Geible ’70 has retired from fulltime work as a mapping specialist for the Fremont County Assessor’s Office, Lander, Wyoming, but continues to work as a consultant performing archival and regulatory research, specializing in mineral rights ownership, grazing rights, and water rights. 12 Samuel Pieh ’72 received the Honorary Lifetime Achievement Award during the third annual National Entertainment Awards in Sierra Leone. He is a descendant of Sengbe Pieh, who led a revolt in 1839 on the Spanish slave ship, La Amistad, and then won his freedom in a landmark case before the U.S. Supreme Court. Pieh served as a dialect coach and played a role in the 1997 Steven Spielberg film based on these events. He is currently being filmed for a new series titled “One Thousand Years of Slavery” for London, U.K.-based Channel 5. 1 9 6 0 –19 6 9 Gregory Hoback ’69 retired after 35 years from Haynes International, Kokomo, Indiana. He and his wife, Ellen, recently celebrated their 50th wedding anniversary.

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IN MEMORIAM

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Jessie Gormong ’35—April 27, 2019 Melvin L. “Mel” Ollman ’40—July 30, 2019 Dorothy E. Orahood ’42—October 6, 2019 George R. “Bob” Wagner ’47—September 17, 2019 Kathaleen R. Larsen ’49—July 19, 2019 Dr. John A. Rawlings ’50—September 5, 2019 Faith Turner ’52—September 12, 2019 Oscar L. Harper ’53—October 16, 2019 James R. Lucas ’53—July 7, 2019 Allen W. Meyerrose ’54—October 1, 2019 Elbert R. “Bert” Strain ’55—June 26, 2019 Joseph A. Ridenour ’56—July 2, 2019 Ernest W. “Wayne” Overmyer ’56—October 9, 2019 Neysa R. Wilt ’56—August 21, 2019 Mary Ann McGruder ’58—July 21, 2019 Charles D. “Dave” Curts ’59—September 16, 2019 Donald L. “Don” Watson ’59—October 20, 2019 James E. “Jim” Ware ’63—September 4, 2019 Donovan L. Trowbridge ’65—March 17, 2019 Maxine Coleman ’65—September 29, 2019 Donald G. Pence II ’66—June 28, 2019 Billy Joe “B.J.” Kritzer ’67—October 4, 2019 Ronald E. Gill ’67—October 16, 2019 Herbert W. Lepper Jr. ’67—July 5, 2019 Richard L. “Rick” Everhart ’71—October 25, 2019 Luann Reabe ’72—August 25, 2019 Linda E. McPhail ’72—September 22, 2019 Reba K. Stuckey ’72—October 9, 2019 Deborah K. “Debby” Mattox ’73—October 8, 2019 Darl E. Hall ’74—June 29, 2019 Gena L. Cress ’75—June 17, 2019 D. Scott “Army” Armstrong ’82—October 1, 2019 Sandra A. Smith ’82—June 2, 2019 John A. Beard ’82—October 27, 2019 Patricia A. Satterwhite ’82 ’02 ’06—October 14, 2019 John P. “Jack” Henderson, Jr. ’82—June 3, 2019 Joanna M. Jaggar ’83—October 12, 2019 Terry L. Bowen ’86—October 8, 2019 Donna F. Cross ’86 ’91—October 20, 2019 Carolyn J. Hamann ’90—August 15, 2019 Laura A. DeAtley ’99—August 14, 2019 Elayne L. Steindorf ’07—August 21, 2019 Jacqueline D. Fann ’11—July 1, 2019 Katherine W. “Kate” Dolan ’12—September 30, 2019 Mary Jo Saffran ’12—October 25, 2019 Katherine S. “Katie” Schura ’17—July 19, 2019

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life. Through her outstanding leadership of the School of Nursing, she contributed significantly to the growth of the School’s nationally recognized reputation. She oversaw the launch of several new degree programs, including the accelerated BSN program and the doctoral program in nursing.

ANNE THOMAS 1961-2019

The University of Indianapolis was deeply saddened to learn of the passing of Dr. Anne Thomas, immediate past dean of the University of Indianapolis School of Nursing. Thomas created a legacy of caring and compassion throughout her career and her

Thomas joined the School of Nursing in 1997 as a part-time instructor and became full-time faculty in 2008, when she also assumed the role of graduate programs director. She served in the School of Nursing dean role from 2009 to 2016. Thomas’s optimism shone through every aspect of her life and impacted many of her colleagues at the University. As an adult/gerontological nurse practitioner, Thomas worked in rural primary care as well as occupational and mental health care settings, and she received several awards for her work in developing and implementing nurse-managed clinics.

He received an honorary degree from the University in 1991 and an honorary alumni award in 2014. During his career at the University of Indianapolis, he conducted ensembles and held performances that showcased his talents as a pianist, harpsichordist, lecturer, composer, and arranger. In 2017, the University celebrated Maestro Leppard’s 90th birthday with a special on-campus performance before a standing-room-only audience.

MAESTRO RAYMOND LEPPARD 1927-2019 The University of Indianapolis mourns the loss of Maestro Raymond Leppard, one of the most respected international conductors of our time and artist-in-residence at the University of Indianapolis. Maestro Leppard spent 25 seasons as the University of Indianapolis artist-in-residence.

The Conductor Laureate of the Indianapolis Symphony Orchestra, Maestro Leppard appeared with nearly all the world’s leading orchestras in more than 60 years on the podium, conducting more than 170 recordings and earning five Grammy Awards, among many other accomplishments. “The University of Indianapolis Department of Music was privileged to collaborate with Maestro Leppard for a quarter-century, and generations of students—as well as faculty and the University community—were

She also held academic leadership positions at the University of Texas at Arlington, Indiana State University, and the University of Michigan. Thomas’s leadership roles within national health organizations reflected her broad expertise in the field. She served as a research director at the National Cancer Institute and the National Institute for Nursing Research. In 2012, she was inducted into the Fellows of the American Academy of Nurse Practitioners. Thomas served as president of the National Organization of Nurse Practitioner Faculties, a global network of educators devoted to promoting quality nurse practitioner education. Donations in Anne Thomas’s memory may be made to the Dr. Anne Thomas Memorial Fund at the National Organization of Nurse Practitioner Faculties (https://www.nonpf.org/ donations).

touched and inspired through the generosity of Maestro Leppard’s contributions,” said Elisabeth Honn Hoegberg, associate professor and chair of the University of Indianapolis Department of Music. “Maestro Leppard’s popular opening concerts at Ruth Lilly Performance Hall often featured a substantial work for choir, soloists and orchestra such as the Schubert G-Major Mass (one of his personal favorites), Mozart Vespers, or Haydn St. Nicholas Mass,” said Richard Ratliff, professor of music. “Raymond grew very fond of his annual evenings on Hanna Avenue (as he called them) in recent years.” During his concert in September 2018, Maestro Leppard led a memorable performance of his new song cycle “Summoned for Love” and a touching “Ave verum corpus” of Mozart to conclude, followed by a prolonged ovation.

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YOU UINDY S TART S W I TH

$75 MILLION G

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$70 MILLION

R

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J U LY 2 0 1 2 – J A N U A R Y 2 0 2 0

THANKS TO SUPPORTERS LIKE YOU

YOUR SUPPORT, SINCE THE CAMPAIGN LAUNCH, HAS ALREADY BENEFITED OVER 12,000 STUDENTS AND GRADUATES AND GREATLY INCREASED THE ROLE OF UINDY AS A SUBSTANTIAL PILLAR IN THE INDIANAPOLIS COMMUNITY.

GIFTS OF ALL SIZES MAKE A DIFFERENCE! Consider a one-time or monthly recurring gift to the fund of your choice or to the UIndy Fund to benefit student support initiatives. Create your legacy with an endowed scholarship. Endowed scholarships begin at $25,000 and may be established across a five-year pledge period. Contact Stephanie Hays-Mussoni, associate vice president for development, at 317-791-7988 or haysmussonis@uindy.edu for more information.

THERE IS STILL TIME FOR YOU T O P R O V I D E T R A N S F O R M AT I O N A L OPPORTUNITIES Every day UIndy students are emerging as global citizens. They are serving the community as students, excelling academically, and preparing for their future careers. You make this possible for UIndy students. Your support can directly affect programs and initiatives, students scholarships, and education for service. Your support to any area at UIndy will make a difference, including:

■ Student scholarships ■ Creating a new endowed student scholarship ■ Gifts to any school, college, department, or athletic team ■ UIndy’s greatest need: Faculty and student resources to provide excellent educational opportunities ■ Student research opportunities ■ Building renovations and upgrades

M U LT I P LY Y O U R I M PA C T ! VISIT MATCHINGGIFTS.COM/UINDY TO SEE IF YOUR EMPLOYER WILL M ATCH YOUR GIFT.

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APRIL 22, 2020

UINDY.EDU/UINDYDAY DONOR-SCHOLAR LUNCHEON

LE T ’ S UN I T E O N UI N DY DAY 20 20 A ND S HOW T HE WO R LD O U R GR E YHO UN D PR I D E !

S AT U R D AY, A P R I L 2 5 , 2 0 2 0

WEAR your favorite

GIVE back to UIndy

UIndy gear to work, the

by making a gift to the

gym—wherever you go!

UIndy Fund or your favorite department.

LOOK FOR YOUR SPECIAL INVITATION IN EARLY APRIL FOR THE DONOR-SCHOLAR LUNCHEON.

This event, on Saturday, April 25, brings together UIndy scholarship recipients and their generous scholarship donors.

SHARE your favorite UIndy photos and memories

Please contact donor relations & stewardship coordinator Carrie Sorensen at 317-788-2070 or sorensenc@uindy.edu for more information.

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Portico - Winter/Spring 2020  

Portico - Winter/Spring 2020  

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