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WINTER/SPRING 2019 • THE INNOVATIVE PARTNERSHIPS ISSUE

PORTICO THE MAGAZINE

OPENING NEW DOORS FOR STEM PROFESSIONALS Jas’minique Potter ’18 fulfills her dream to teach // p. 12

I N N O VAT I V E PA R T N E R S H I P S // p. 4

BUILDING A BIOTECH TA L E N T P I P E L I N E // p. 6

AN INTERDISCIPLINARY APPROACH // p. 18


T H E I N N O VAT I V E PA R T N E R S H I P S I S S U E ABOUT THE MAGAZINE Portico, the official magazine of the University of Indianapolis, is produced by the Office of University Communications and Marketing. The cornerstone publication shares stories, impact and achievements of students, faculty, staff and alumni as well as friends and supporters of the institution. Portico, published twice a year, is mailed to over 35,000 individuals including alumni, donors, friends and community and business leaders. The magazine’s digital issue includes expanded content, interviews and video at portico.uindy.edu. We welcome your thoughts and comments about each issue at portico@uindy.edu.

PRESIDENT Robert L. Manuel, PhD

18 // CROSS-CAMPUS COLLABORATIONS

PROVOST Stephen H. Kolison, Jr., PhD

BOARD OF TRUSTEES John C. Adams; Kevin R. Armstrong; Carolyn M. Coleman; Gregory Corsaro; Deborah J. Daniels; Linda M. Dillman; Christopher Doehring; Murvin S. Enders; Stephen F. Fry; Sue Anne Gilroy; Adolf Hansen; Emmanuel D. Harris; Polly Horton Hix; Kent Holaday; Barry S. Howard; Charles Edwin Johnston; William R. Kiesel; Kenneth Loyd; Robert L. Manuel; Thomas C. Martin; Michael McCarty; Ersal Ozdemir; Vicki F. Perry; Edwin O. Qualls; Pamela S. Qualls; Dennis J. Reinbold; David Resnick; David G. Sease; Yvonne H. Shaheen; Richard E. Stierwalt; Laura Strain; Phillip A. Terry; James G. Terwilliger; Larry G. Thompson; Bishop Julius C. Trimble; Michael J. Watkins; Gordon D. Wishard

4 // 6 //

BUILDING A BIOTECH TA L E N T PI P E L I N E How the Roche Academy is changing education

8 //

LEARNING AND LIVING BUSINESS

10 //

12 //

14 //

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WICR: THE DIAMOND OF PUBLIC RADIO Campus station dials up unique programming and experiential learning for students

18 //

INTERDISCIPLINARY APPROACH R.B. Annis School of Engineering’s cross-curriculum partnerships

20 //

1902 SOCIETY

PARTNERS IN JUSTICE

22 //

THEN & NOW

Criminal Justice Education Lab is a partnership between students and city investigators

28 //

U N I V E R S I T Y U P DAT E S

Partnering students with businesses to solve real-world problems

Meet some of the University’s most devoted donors How student gear has changed since the early 1900s Updates, news and more about the campus community

OPENING NEW DOORS FOR STEM PROFESSIONALS

36 // A T H L E T I C U P D A T E S

Jas’minique Potter ’18 fulfills her dream to teach

40 // C L A S S N O T E S

TAC K L I N G A N AT I O N W I D E S H O R TAG E University and Community Health Network lead the way

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16 //

A part of our DNA

CABINET Michael Cartwright, PhD; Steven Herriford; Lara Mann; Christopher Molloy; Andrea Newsom; Neil Perdue, PhD; Kory Vitangeli; Suzanne Willey, PED; Ron Wilks; and Corey Wilson

I N N OVAT I V E PARTNERSHIPS

One era ends and a new one begins Latest news from UIndy alumni


INNOVATE. PARTNER. INSPIRE. We hear the term “lab”

to contribute and lead.

a lot. And when we do,

Employers truly value

many of us tend to think of

that — especially those

a scientist in a white coat

with whom we have built

surrounded by beakers.

lasting partnerships.

Labs take many forms,

These relationships

and at the University of

extend far beyond

Indianapolis we are creating

our local community.

new and innovative

Each partnership

applications for those

guides our students

spaces and experiences

to move seamlessly

through a network of

into influential roles in

industry partnerships.

the workforce, making a lasting and positive

The broader concept of a lab is a controlled

impact in the world.

environment that provides hands-on learning

I welcome you to visit campus and to

and real-world applications. These are the

appreciate two things: all that’s new and

types of experiences you find at UIndy —

exciting at UIndy and everything that still holds

embracing a wide variety of specialties across

true. You will see a network of innovation and

our curriculum, from chemistry and biology

collaboration with steadfast respect for the

to financial planning, criminal justice, arts and

preservation of tradition. Experiential learning

education.

does not have to end at graduation. It is a

This edition of Portico focuses on the innovative partnerships we have built with businesses and organizations to solve real-

lifelong endeavor. I hope that the stories in this issue remind you of that, and I look forward to seeing you on campus again soon.

world problems. Our faculty understand the value of exposing students to challenging scenarios that inspire problem-solving and critical thinking. Such experiences uniquely prepare our graduates

— Robert L. Manuel University President

OUR FACULTY UNDERSTAND THE VALUE OF EXPOSING STUDENTS TO CHALLENGING SCENARIOS THAT INSPIRE PROBLEM-SOLVING AND CRITICAL THINKING.

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PARTNERSHIPS

INNOVATIVE 4

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A PART T

he vision of the University of Indianapolis has long been tied to student engagement through strategic efforts that reach beyond the physical footprint. As the community has expanded around us, we have also grown. We have continued to seek opportunities to engage with our city and region while establishing a record of innovative partnerships that benefit the student experience, foster faculty engagement, improve business and impact our community. These partnerships position UIndy to be a driving force for education now and for future generations. For students, immersion into the business world is one advantage of these partnerships, which bridge the tenets of critical thinking, discovery and creativity with theory and practice. For businesses, communities and organizations, these partnerships address workforce development needs by growing talent pipelines and solving problems specific to the industry. The diverse portfolio of partnerships connects science and humanities as students, mentored by faculty, dive into real-world situations. From these experiences, graduates are prepared to create solutions through collaborations, science, research and innovation. Throughout this issue of Portico, you will read about such experiences forming a culture that is built into our DNA.

ROCHE ACADEMY PARTNERSHIP

SEE STORY ON PAGE 6

When one of the world’s leading biotech companies began experiencing a talent pipeline gap, it turned to UIndy. The solution was the Roche Academy, a partnership between Roche Diagnostics and the institution. STEM students who are accepted into the Roche Academy and successfully complete the program receive educational opportunities, professional mentoring and financial incentives, including a job offer from Roche upon graduation. See page 6.


OF OUR TH E B U SI N E SS O F LO G ISTICS

SEE STORY ON PAGE 8

DNA SC HOOL OF NURSING INITIATIVES

The growing demand for business improvement resulted in School of Business students attaining Six Sigma certification at Caterpillar and gaining a deeper understanding of logistic processes. Under the mentorship of business faculty such as Dr. Craig Seidelson, assistant professor of operations and supply chain management, students are advancing data analytics and changing the roles of leadership and supply chain management. See page 8. C RI ME LA B BE N E F ITS MU LTIPL E AGE NCIE S The Criminal Justice Education Lab, launched last year, is a dedicated facility for simulating crime scene investigations while serving as a training ground for local professionals through the Indianapolis-Marion County Forensic Services Agency (IMCFSA). Students gain valuable experiences, according to Dr. Kevin Whiteacre, associate professor and chair of the Department of Criminal Justice, while police and other investigative organizations partner with UIndy to train their officers. See page 10. (STEM ) 3 P R O G R A M CR E ATE S O PPO R TU NITIE S Meeting an employer talent pipeline need is also at the heart of an effective partnership. One example is the Teach (STEM)³ program, which is creating opportunities for career changers to teach. With STEM jobs increasing in Indiana by 13 percent over the past decade, a STEM teacher shortage still exists statewide with a 37-percent drop in education graduates from 2004 to 2014. Recognizing the need to fill that shortage, this program offers grant-subsidized education for individuals like former Rolls-Royce engineer Jas’minique Potter ’18 to receive a Master of Arts in Teaching with STEM licensure. See page 12.

The School of Nursing is partnering with one of the nation’s leading integrated healthcare providers, Community Health Network (CHN), to develop new clinical experiences to meet the demand for patient treatment in non-traditional settings and outpatient treatment. These initiatives build upon professional opportunities for students to gain nursing and administrative leadership experiences in all areas of healthcare. Two cohorts have graduated to-date with all 19 graduates securing full-time jobs with CHN. See page 14. C OLLA B ORATION AC ROSS THE C URRIC ULUM

SEE STORY ON PAGE 18

Students in the R.B. Annis School of Engineering, housed in the Shaheen College of Arts & Sciences, are designing solutions through real-life problem-solving. Working with a variety of partners including the Greyhound swim team and the School of Occupational Therapy, students put theory and training into professional practice, designing new ways to train athletes and for coaches to improve conditioning and performance. See page 18. WINTER/SPRING 2019

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THE ROCHE ACADEMY

BUILDING A BIOTECH TALENT PIPELINE W

hen one of the world’s leading biotech companies began experiencing a workforce development gap, the solution was to partner with the University of Indianapolis to create the Roche Academy. What makes the Roche Academy truly innovative is a focus on creating an early-in-career talent pipeline. Historically, Roche had recruited professionals from other companies and industries. UIndy students who successfully complete the program receive educational opportunities, professional development and financial incentives, including a job offer from Roche upon graduation. It’s a partnership that specifically prepares students for employment at the biotech firm. Russ Fellows, project leader for Roche Diagnostics, has worked in myriad roles during his more than 25 years with the company.

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“The Roche Academy is critical to our business. It develops a pipeline of early-in-career talent with new and fresh ideas to the organization, who can be mentored by tenured Roche employees with many years of experience,” said Fellows. “This program truly provides highly skilled reinforcements to our workforce. It allows us to hire UIndy graduates with the skills and attributes we value in an employee, who we then continue to develop with Roche-specific training and professional development.” One of the students on this path is Will Durchholz ’20 (chemistry). Durchholz completed a Roche-influenced curriculum path and summer internship focused on further developing life science and engineering skills with the goal of becoming a biomedical equipment technician. As an intern with Roche Support Network providing customer and instrument support, Durchholz took part in professional development workshops and gained valuable science and computer skills.


RUSS FELLOWS, PROJECT LEADER FOR ROCHE DIAGNOSTICS, WORKS WITH WILL DURCHHOLZ ’20

ROCHE BY THE NUMBERS

93,000

EMPLOYEES WORLDWIDE

4,500

EMPLOYEES AT U.S. HEADQUARTERS IN INDIANAPOLIS

“I had the opportunity to spend time with each part of this organization to get the ‘full circle’ perspective of how everything worked,” said Durchholz. “I learned a little bit about the business world that I had never been exposed to as a chemistry major.” “Roche chose UIndy because we know our students,” explained Dr. Levi Mielke, assistant professor of chemistry and recipient of the University’s 2018 Teacher of the Year Award. “Our primary job as faculty is the development and evaluation of talent. We inspire students to problem-solve and diagnose.” STEM faculty are vital in supporting the Roche Academy by elevating student development through innovative lab experiences and adjusting coursework to meet the needs of the program. Several critical factors informed Roche’s decision to partner with UIndy, ultimately identifying the institution as being the best equipped to develop talent in an agile environment. In all, Roche reviewed 38 programs from universities across the state.

“UIndy was also willing to have students target specific electives and create new courses to further adapt the curriculum to adhere to Roche’s desired skill sets,” said Fellows. “We were very impressed by the enthusiasm of UIndy’s faculty and appreciate their relentless drive to prepare students. It is a unique level of engagement that is focused on adjusting the curriculum to make students work-ready.” Fellows describes UIndy students as “remarkably mature and adaptable with a level of professionalism that is not an entrylevel mindset.” By establishing a partnership benefitting both student and employer, the Roche Academy sets each up for future success, including developing relationships with the Office of Admissions and the Professional Edge Center for a broader range of employment opportunities. The partnership gives students the opportunity to walk into an industry-leading organization after graduation, having already proven themselves as valuable assets.

Learn more at uindy.edu/roche-academy and roche.com

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FROM

LEARNING BUSINESS TO LIVING BUSINESS From Supply Chain Management to Six Sigma Certification, UIndy’s School of Business is partnering students with businesses to solve real-world problems.

F

or decades, businesses have sought to reduce inefficiencies and drive improvement. Industry leaders such as Jack Welch, former CEO of General Electric, and countless other corporate executives and management teams have focused on developing management innovations to transform and improve the bottom line. For students in the University of Indianapolis School of Business, reaching beyond business improvement theory and experiencing these processes firsthand is integral to the curriculum. Such was the case for Nick Williams ’19 (operations & supply chain management), who worked with Dr. Craig Seidelson, assistant professor of operations and supply chain management in the School of Business. Williams, under the mentorship of Seidelson, dedicated over 140 hours during the fall 2018 semester at Caterpillar Remanufacturing in Franklin, IN, analyzing business processes and identifying quality and process improvement opportunities. The experience deepened Williams’ understanding of Lean Six Sigma’s management methodology, which allows companies to use data to eliminate defects in any process and put theory into practice. “We recommended changes to their inbound logistics area to recover lost time from their previous value stream transformation and eliminate any possible wastes,” said Williams. “This included changing their tugger (mobile cart) routes, installing new software to prevent “traffic-jamming” in their inventory-sorting machines and implementing a flag kanban system for their “dirty core” inventory.”

Seidelson explains the value: “It’s about getting to the location where value is created to know the truth. We do this by sending our students to a real warehouse to solve real problems.” Partnerships have a multi-tiered benefit, delivering experiential learning opportunities for students and invaluable insights to local businesses that improve their operations. This, in turn, strengthens the community by bolstering employers in the area.

SIX SIGMA CERTIFICATION AT CATERPILLAR The collaboration between the School of Business and Caterpillar began as a research consulting project through the Institute for Postindustrial Leadership, co-founded by Dr. Terry Schindler, assistant professor of management, and Matt Chodkowski, adjunct professor of business. The consulting project evolved into a professional certification opportunity for UIndy students. At Caterpillar, students are tested on their proficiency in process management and eventually earn Six Sigma Yellow and Green Belt certification before graduation. It provides them with an introduction to the fundamentals of Six Sigma, allowing students to make meaningful contributions to an organization’s objectives. It’s the sort of thing that stands out on a resume, and places UIndy graduates ahead of their peers, including some professionals already in the workforce.

SEE “BUSINESS” ON PAGE 25 8

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WHERE WALL STREET MEETS HANNA AVENUE WELCOME TO THE SCHOOL OF BUSINESS The School of Business Martin Family Finance Lab, launched in September 2018, connects the vision of faculty and the generosity of donors. Stephen Fry ‘87 (business, information systems), senior vice president of human resources and diversity for Eli Lilly and Company, and Tom Martin, president of Bloomington Ford, both of whom are on the University’s Board of Trustees (Fry as current board chair, and Martin as a past chair), seeded a $100,000 project that students are now managing with Bloomberg-certified terminals.

“WE PUT STUDENTS IN UNDEFINED SCENARIOS SO THEY LEARN HOW TO WORK THROUGH A PROBLEM AND BECOME MORE COMFORTABLE WITH OPEN-ENDED SITUATIONS.”

- Craig Seidelson Assistant Professor of Operations and Supply Chain Management

This technology is the gold standard in financial markets – the same equipment used by the world’s most influential decision makers. That means students graduate having already mastered the tools of the trade while managing assets with complete fiduciary responsibility. Emi Ohiomah ’18 (finance, economics), who is pursuing her MBA with a focus on applied data analytics – the first program of its kind in the state – describes the Finance Lab’s value to students: “Exposure to situations and challenges I’ll face every day after I graduate, while I’m still in school, will be the defining moments of my future success. The Finance Lab will provide those opportunities. The chance to use the new technology and feel the energy of Wall Street is amazing. Best of all, I can do that right here on campus in the School of Business. It gives me the confidence to know that I’ll be ready for the workforce when I graduate.”

To hear more about Emi Ohiomah’s experiences in the School of Business, check out our video. portico.uindy.edu WINTER/SPRING 2019

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E C I T S U J IN

UINDY TEAMS UP WITH THE INDIANAPOLISMARION COUNTY FORENSIC SERVICES AGENCY TO PROVIDE A CRIME LAB FOR S T U D E N T S A N D C I T Y I N V E S T I G AT O R S

S R E N T

R A P

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CHRISTINE HAGAN, IMCFSA CRIME SCENE SUPERVISOR, AND DOUG BOXLER, FORENSIC S C I E N T I S T A N D I N S T R U C T O R AT U I N D Y

modest home, previously unoccupied, is visited by a team of forensic specialists. Once inside, the group moves methodically throughout the house, carefully examining the scene to document facts and collect evidence with the deliberate precision that this task requires in the real-world. Except they are not there to investigate an actual crime; it’s a simulation to prepare the next generation of experts in this field. The scenario routinely takes place on Bowman Avenue, just south of campus, thanks to a unique partnership between the City and the University of Indianapolis, leading to the groundbreaking opportunity to establish the Criminal Justice Education Lab, the first-of-itskind in the state. The Lab, launched in 2018, provides valuable experiences for students and training opportunities for the Indianapolis-Marion County Forensic Services Agency (IMCFSA). “Every course we teach has real-world, experiential learning opportunities,” said Dr. Kevin Whiteacre, associate professor and chair of the Department of Criminal Justice. Such experiences are crucial to graduates who pursue careers in this area because of time spent developing field skills. The department celebrated its 45th anniversary in 2017, making it one of the longest-running criminal justice programs in Indiana.

To learn more about the department’s 45th anniversary and the Lab, visit: portico.uindy.edu

The positive impact of the Criminal Justice Education Lab extends into the broader community, as well. Before a new field agent is put to work, agents visit the Lab regularly to conduct tests and training exercises using simulated crime scenes. “We needed a place to simulate what a true crime scene would be like. Having a more complex, realistic training facility allows us to put more crime scene specialists to work in the city at a time when we desperately need the help,” said IMCFSA Crime Scene Supervisor Christine Hagan. “The UIndy Crime Lab provides better training for our specialists, which means they are prepared to work at real crime scenes and provide better public service. That value is huge,” said Doug Boxler, a forensic scientist in the firearms unit. He’s worked at

“You can talk about fingerprints and crime scenes in class, but seeing it and having firsthand experience is a lot different.” -Olivia Spiegel ’21

Students practice securing and evaluating a crime scene, interviewing witnesses and victims, and gathering information. Preservation, documentation and protection are essential skills and the Lab gives students a place to gain that firsthand knowledge early in the program. “The Lab creates an environment similar to

what one might expect arriving on a crime scene. This hands-on approach to learning can open a student’s eyes to something that’s more challenging to understand in a verbal lecture,” said Olivia Spiegel ’21 (criminal justice).

IMCFSA for 18 years and began teaching a class at UIndy in fall of 2018. Boxler, whose class meets weekly at the Lab, said it would’ve been a “dream come true” to have access to a similar facility when he was training to be a forensic scientist. “Rather than using a public park or abandoned property, the Lab offers awesome opportunities for practical crime

SEE “PARTNERS IN JUSTICE” ON PAGE 27 WINTER/SPRING 2019

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ROLLS-ROYCE ENGINEER FULFILLS

DREAM TO T TRANSITION TO TEACHING PROGRAM OPENS NEW DOORS FOR STEM PROFESSIONALS

J

ust two years ago, Jas’minique Potter played a vital role as a design engineer at Rolls-Royce. This fall, she walked into a seventh-grade classroom with the skills to begin a career as a math teacher.

For Potter ’18 (Master of Arts in Teaching), the switch from engineering to education was a passion that became purpose, made possible with the launch of a new program that transitions STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) experts into teachers. Potter and other STEM professionals are filling the critical shortage of teachers through the University of Indianapolis Teach (STEM)³ Program, funded through the National Science Foundation’s Robert Noyce Teacher Scholarship Program. Teach (STEM)³ offers individuals with a STEM background the opportunity to obtain a Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT) and a teaching license. Equally innovative is the program’s stipend and clinical residency, a unique graduate experience that pairs candidates with a master teacher in a classroom throughout the school year. Partnerships with Wayne, Decatur and Perry Township school districts form the backbone of those experiences for teachers-in-training. Potter began her career designing structural components for airplane turbine engines at Rolls-Royce, yet she always knew she wanted to teach. After a few years as a design engineer, Potter decided to take a leap of faith, and UIndy would provide the avenue.

SEE “STEM PROFESSIONALS” ON PAGE 24 12

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P O T T E R R E C E N T LY R E C E I V E D T H E A W A R D ‘ N E W E D U C AT O R S S U C C E E D I N G THROUGH INDIANA COUNCIL OF T E A C H E R S O F M AT H E M AT I C S ’

As of fall of 2018, Indiana school corporations reported only 32% of Indiana K-12 teachers were prepared in problemproject- and inquiry-based approaches to learning. The plan calls for 100% of teachers to be trained in these areas by 2025. From: https://www.doe.in.gov/sites/default/ files/wf-stem/20181108154535030.pdf


TEACH

“THE SUPPORT I’VE RECEIVED FROM THE TEACHERS, FROM MY MENTORS AND THE WORKSHOPS HAS JUST BEEN AMAZING.”

- Jas’minique Potter ’18

DID YOU KNOW? Job prep: The University of Indianapolis School of Education arranges annual spring sessions with human resources managers from area school districts for graduates at every level. Opportunities for STEM majors: Mini-internships are available for junior and senior UIndy STEM majors interested in exploring teaching careers. Project-based learning curriculum: In addition to local school districts, Teach (STEM)³ candidates work with community partners such as the Indiana Blood Bank and local churches. Calling all STEM career changers: Teach (STEM)³ is open to anyone with a STEM degree who wants to become a teacher.

You can learn more about the UIndy Teach (STEM)³ program components at uindy.edu/stem3

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TACKLING A

NAT I ON WIDE PIONEERING COMMUNITY-BASED NURSING

C

ollaborating with healthcare providers across the region, School of Nursing faculty are leading strategies to identify innovative healthcare practices to address community needs, while at the same time enriching educational opportunities for healthcare practitioners and nursing students. A partnership between UIndy and one of central Indiana’s leading healthcare providers, Community Health Network (CHN), is transforming the ways students are educated and trained in health-related fields while addressing nursing shortages and meeting new healthcare demands. This integrated approach benefits the student, the patient and community wellness. “We’re training students to treat patients in non-traditional settings, like outpatient clinics,” said Dr. Norma Hall, School of Nursing dean. “We’re serving the community in a way it needs today by bringing care to patients where they are, which is outside the hospital. Student learning is happening where the care needs to take place. We’re meeting patients where they need to be seen.”

EVOLUTION OF ACUTE CARE In 2018, CHN received a $2.5-million federal grant to expand its educational partnership with UIndy’s School of Nursing by addressing the shift from acute care to outpatient settings.

Dr. Norma Hall

“What used to be done in the hospital acute care setting is now done outpatient. The workforce wasn’t prepared for that,” said Hall. “You still have the same need for nurses in

the hospital that you’ve always had, but now there’s the extra need in community spaces.” Through the grant, the School of Nursing will offer in 2019 an elective perioperative nursing course for undergraduate students and the first-of-its-kind minor in primary care nursing, preparing students to care for patients in a variety of settings. “There’s excitement on both sides for this,” added Karen Elsea, undergraduate program director and assistant professor in the School of Nursing. “The idea is to give students fundamental understanding that they wouldn’t normally get in the program. It’s a great pipeline opportunity. We couldn’t do these things without partnerships.”

THE NURSING ACADEMY The Nursing Academy, a partnership between UIndy and CHN, was launched in 2016 to prepare graduates to treat patients effectively from day one, no matter the setting. The Academy builds workplace experience into the curriculum by requiring students to work a minimum of 12 hours every two weeks as paid interns at CHN. “Academia and practice go hand in hand; you must have both,” explains Dr. Tia Bell, online program director and assistant professor in the School of Nursing. By the time Betha Doyle ’19 (nursing) graduates from the Nursing Academy, she will already have eight months of clinical experience in her field of interest. “The Academy is great because I’ll earn my bachelor of science in nursing degree in a much shorter time, allowing me to get involved in the community, at the hospital

SEE “NURSING” ON PAGE 26 14

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SHORTAGE DID YOU KNOW?

The U.S. is experiencing a shortage of Registered Nurses (RNs) that is expected to intensify as Baby Boomers age and the need for healthcare grows. Source: American Association of Colleges of Nursing https://www. aacnnursing.org/NewsInformation/Fact-Sheets/ Nursing-Shortage

H

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RE

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OF NURSING STUDENTS

IO

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95% A GRADU

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WICR (88.7 FM)

THE ‘DIAMOND’ OF PUBLIC RADIO’S JAZZ/ CLASSICAL GENRE

O

perated on the University of Indianapolis campus, ‘The Diamond’ is an apt nickname for a public radio station that provides unique programming to central Indiana while preparing the next generation of broadcast talent, which is a rare and valuable combination that few stations can claim. WICR is the only jazz/classical formatted station in Indianapolis and every year launches another class of experienced communication graduates into successful careers in the local broadcast market and beyond. Scott Uecker, WICR general manager and instructor of communication, has been with the station since 1997. He places a high value on mentoring students and providing them with on-air experience as well as opportunities behind the scenes.

SCOTT UECKER, WICR GENERAL MANAGER AND INSTRUCTOR O F C O M M U N I C AT I O N ( R I G H T ) , M E N T O R S S T U D E N T S A B O U T THE BUSINESS OF BROADCASTING.

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“I don’t know of another station in the country, much less one in a top-40 Nielsen market, that plays jazz and classical music and puts 50 students on the air each semester. When I attend conferences, my colleagues say, ‘You can’t possibly do that.’ And I tell them, ‘I know, but that’s what we do,” says Uecker.


UINDY GRADS MAKING IT

BIG

IN ALL AREAS OF RADIO See portico.uindy.edu for a full list Programming Jenna Tucker ’09, midday air personality/digital director WFMS-FM 95.5, Indianapolis Sales/Promotions “ T H E R E ’ S J U S T N O S U B S T I T U T E F O R R E A L- W O R L D E X P E R I E N C E W H E N Y O U ’ R E T R Y I N G T O B R E A K I N T O T H I S I N D U S T R Y.” –MALLORY MORENO ’19 2019 AWARD OF EXCELLENCE RECIPIENT, BROADCAST EDUCATION ASSOCIATION, FESTIVAL OF MEDIA ARTS COMPETITION

Being an independent station as opposed to an affiliate of the Corporation for Public Broadcasting (CPB) is an advantage for the student experience, according to Uecker. This allows the station to create more local content instead of being required to air nationally syndicated programming. The WICR model provides opportunities for students to get experience in every aspect of running a radio station, from the sales and marketing techniques of advertising and promotions to the timing and confidence skills of becoming an on-air personality. Since her freshman year, Mallory Moreno ’19 (communication) has been involved with WICR, building an impressive portfolio as she prepares for a career in the industry. She is already working part-time in promotions and on-air at Radio One in Indianapolis. “I have seen and done it all as a UIndy communication student, from learning in the classroom to working at the studio to reporting in the field,” said Moreno. “WICR has exposed me to all of the excitement and challenges of successfully running a radio station and that has opened a lot of doors for me. I will walk away from WICR with both the confidence and ability to pursue my true passion.”

Over the years, UIndy’s alumni roll reads like a who’s who in broadcasting in Indianapolis and across the country. Take it from Nikki Reed ’07 (communication), an Indianapolis radio personality who co-hosts a popular morning radio show on WZPL-FM 99.5. UIndy guided her from a career path in theater and TV news to radio, where she found her passion. “It says a lot about a university where faculty work with you one-on-one and help you leverage your abilities to be successful,” said Reed. She notes that Uecker saw her outgoing personality as a match for radio performance. Through the financial support of UIndy and listeners, WICR has created a unique relationship with the Indianapolis radio market. The station reaches avid listeners of jazz and classical music in 22 central Indiana counties, and the attached academic program is a rich recruiting environment for local radio companies looking for talent.

Listen to live online broadcasts at wicronline.org/listen-online TWITTER-SQUARE @UIndyCOMM @WICRonline

Stephani Remetta ’01, senior sales executive, Pandora, Indianapolis News/Sports Greg Rakestraw ’98, vice president, ISC Sports Network, Indianapolis Engineering Jason Ornellas ’09, director of engineering, Bonneville International, Sacramento, CA

WICR BY THE NUMBERS: WICR ranked 19th in the Indianapolis market with a 1.9% share of radio listening. An average of 59,600 people (six years and older) listened each week for four hours and 30 minutes. In morning drive (6 - 10 a.m.), WICR’s classical music programming is ranked 16th. When playing jazz in the evening (7 p.m. - Midnight), WICR jumps to 12th place in the ratings.* *Nielsen Media Research, November 2018.

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INTERDISCIPLINARY

APPROACH AN INTERSECTION OF ENGINEERING, TECHNOLOGY & OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY

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rom a swimming “treadmill” to a custom-designed brace, students at the University of Indianapolis R.B. Annis School of Engineering are working alongside faculty and industry experts to design solutions through partnerships and real-life problem-solving. Collaboration across the institution pairs a unique aspect of the curriculum, the DesignSpine, with clients including the Greyhound swim team and the University’s School of Occupational Therapy. As early as their sophomore year, students form interdisciplinary teams and work collectively to tackle a singular problem. Students may choose from seven specialized areas of study in the exciting and fast-growing fields of Computer Engineering, Electrical Engineering, Software Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, Industrial & Systems Engineering, Computer Science and General Engineering. These early hands-on mentoring experiences, coupled with the DesignSpine curriculum, create an incubator for exciting partnerships both on and off campus. Partners include Citizens Energy Group and Easterseals Crossroads Industrial Services, as well as clients even closer to home. Such was the case when Jason Hite, head coach of the men’s swimming & diving team, sought a solution to enhance training for swimmers. “We wanted to see if a group of engineering students might be interested in designing an ‘endless pool’ for the Greyhounds’ diving well,” Hite explained. Essentially a treadmill for swimmers, the “endless pool” includes equipment allowing coaches to

observe an athlete swimming in place from every angle with the goal of improving stroke technique. Engineering students such as Jared Hilt ’21 (mechanical engineering, physics and mathematics) were up to the challenge. Hilt’s group worked on the proposal and learned to support team decisions with math, simulation and testing. Hilt’s team often relied on principles that are typically taught in higherlevel courses. “I worked with professors separate from my courses to learn and manipulate equations for my needs,” Hilt said. The process included conceptualization, design cost analysis and feedback from various stakeholders, including engineering faculty, student peers and Coach Hite. The team will work on a prototype during the 2019 winter semester. “My hope is to continue the collaborative relationship between athletics and academic programs to impact future generations of student-athletes,” said Hite, who is also exploring partnerships with kinesiology to provide student-athletes with feedback on movement, diet and nutrition. “Interdisciplinary education is a cornerstone of the R.B. Annis School of Engineering curriculum,” said Dr. José Sánchez (left), associate dean of engineering. “These collaborative environments help narrow the skills gap and develop students for success in the 21st century.”

To learn more about DesignSpine, visit www.uindy.edu/cas/engineering/design-spine. 18

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“I WORKED WITH PROFESSORS SEPARATE FROM MY COURSES TO LEARN AND MANIPULATE EQUATIONS FOR MY NEEDS,”

- Jared Hilt ’21

LEARNING THROUGH CONTINUITY An equally innovative collaboration is occurring between the R.B. Annis School of Engineering and the College of Health Sciences. When Dr. Erin Peterson, assistant professor of occupational therapy, wanted to improve a medical device for patients with wrist injuries, engineering students shared their expertise to design a custom orthosis, a brace that fits over the patient’s wrist. The 2017-18 cohort began the project, and a new group of students refined the original design during the current academic year. Marko Tasic ’21 (industrial and systems engineering, mathematics) was part of the team working on the wrist brace. “It’s really great to work with another department like the School of Occupational Therapy because it gives us a different perspective on problem-solving. We get to see things outside of an engineering aspect,” Tasic said. Peterson and her colleagues hope to use the prototype in a future research study conducted by UIndy occupational therapy doctoral students. “This new design for a custom wrist orthosis [brace] has the potential to be mass-produced, marketed and used by patients and clinicians, so it is exciting that the students get to engage in real-life, problem-based learning,” Peterson said. “The DesignSpine has been a great opportunity for the School of Occupational Therapy to collaborate with the School of Engineering to make tangible products for use by patients and clinicians.” The groups are now in the process of building prototypes of their designs, which they will unveil during the spring semester.

A 1/6 SCALE PROTOTYPE OF THE ENDLESS POOL DIVING WELL DEVICE

“I think it’s phenomenal. I’m only a sophomore and I’m already working on a real project that has the potential to positively impact a lot of people,” Tasic said.

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THE 1902 SOCIETY

A TRADITION OF SUSTAINED SUPPORT The 1902 Society, named for the founding year of the University of Indianapolis, recognizes donors who have made gifts during 25 or more fiscal years. Even small gifts over time have a significant effect on the institution, students and faculty. Recently, the 1902 Society reached several milestones, including 1,277 dedicated supporters (771 households) with a combined lifetime giving impact of $20,843,760.58. 1902 Society donors are recognized for gifts of any size to any fund, and membership is perpetual. Members receive special communications and event invitations throughout the year, as well as a special gift from the University.

to pay it forward by giving back to the University of Indianapolis, so that someone else can benefit from the same opportunities I had.” Pauline (Milhouse) Vermillion ’61, a biology major, was a member of the University’s first nursing class. Her commitment to annual giving underscores a legacy of dedication.

PA U L I N E A N D A R T H U R VERMILLION

Society members represent a broad spectrum of interests and backgrounds, but they have in common a passion for the University of Indianapolis. Two of these donors recently shared why sustained support of UIndy is so important. Rich Reasoner ’57 (health and physical education, U.S. history and business) supports UIndy in commemoration of his educational experiences as a student, in and outside of the classroom, which were thought-provoking and relevant to preparing him for a rewarding career. “The University reinforced lessons I learned from my parents prior to attending Indiana Central College, and I have many pleasant memories of my time on campus,” said Reasoner.

RICH AND BETTY LOU REASONER

“My parents shared their love of UIndy and it made a strong impression on us all,” explains Vermillion, whose sister, brother and brother-in-law are all alumni. “It was truly our family’s school. It was ingrained in us to go there.” And that legacy has continued. Her two children chose UIndy even though the family was living in New Mexico at that time. Her son, Brian Vermillion, now teaches at UIndy, and two of the Vermillions’ grandchildren are current students. Vermillion has many treasured memories of the camaraderie she shared with campus friends and attests, “The University was truly a part of our lives.” She and her husband, Arthur, reside in Robin Run Village, along with four fellow classmates. They still get together to talk about their memories of Indiana Central.

“My education prepared me for the real-world and gave me the opportunity to develop the skills and values essential to becoming a lifelong learner. I am still reaping the rewards of that experience, including cherished relationships with the lifelong friends I met as a student. That is why I choose

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These days, Vermillion encounters UIndy grads all the time, especially physical therapy graduates, and is impressed that Greyhounds are “providing so many services in so many places.”

For more information about the 1902 Society, please contact Carrie Sorensen, donor relations and stewardship coordinator, at 317-788-2070 or sorensenc@uindy.edu.


INDIANA RESIDENTS THE 1902 SOCIETY WELCOMES NEW MEMBERS Jean Adams Raymond and Nancy Alexander Marvin and Lou Anderson Curtis and Doris Atteberry Paul and Linda Austin Frederick and Mary Beth Bagg Shelby and James Baker Paul Bangura Karen and David Bauman Richard and Judith Beeson Joseph and Cynthia Bickel Laura and Larry Blair Robert and Julia Burton James and Rita Butts Randall and Rebecca Craig Gregory and Kathryn Dietz Matthew Donovan and Angela White Karen and Richard Doughty Diane Drewes James and Colleen Drews David Elliott William and Cynthia Gasper Judith and Tom Grubbs Keith and Marna Guenin Linda and Byron Hamrick Albert and Loretta Hauck Leonard and Natalie Hickam Gregory and Jayne Hill Carol Hoyermann Marilyn and John Hubbard Stanley and Christine Jackson Jack and Ruth Johnson James and Judith Jones Jason Kau William and Cynthia Lapworth Beverly and Alfred Long Thomas and Angela Martin

Mary and David Melsheimer Opal Mozingo Carolyn Nay Judith Padgett Charles and Donna Patrick Gary and Lesa Paul Anne and Ted Polk Paula and James Ream Timothy and Carla Ryan Mark and Julanne Sausser Stephen and Pamela Schug Stephen and Barbara Shay Genette and Larry Sheets Dennis and Elizabeth Shoemaker Carol Siegmann Karol and Rich Speer Sylvia and Norman Stabler Michael and Catherine Stevens Linda and Edward Sweetman David Swift and Celeste Allen-Swift Jennifer and Thomas Szott Gary Thompson Carolyn and Roger Tuggle Phyllis VanAbeele Doris Vandine Alonzo and Deborah Walker Donald and Nancy Watson Derek and LaDonna Weber Sharyl White Sylvia and David White Sr. Helen Whitis Robert and Barbara Williams Michael and Mary Ann Willoughby John and Judy Wirtz Michael and Jennifer Wishnevski Annonymous

T HE RE DE S I GNED UINDY LICE NSE P LAT E IS NOW AVA ILA BLE $25 of your $40 annual distinctive plate fee supports University of Indianapolis scholarships and makes a great gift for recent graduates. Order your plate today through the BMV, in.gov/bmv, or visit your local license branch. The plate can be used on your car, motorcycle, RV or truck.

CHECK TO GET CREDIT FOR YOUR GIFT Select the consent box on your registration form to allow the BMV to share your information with us. This lets us know that you are a UIndy license plate supporter!

For more information visit in.gov/bmv.

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The gear that students carry to class has changed significantly over the years, but Greyhounds still bring the same enthusiasm for learning to the steps of Good Hall every day.

THEN

1920s

E A R LY 1 9 0 0 s

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NOW

Pocket watches have evolved into cell phones and smart watches that keep the time, feature calendars, alerts and myriad ways to stay connected with each other: Apps to stay on track, calls, email and social media. These modern communication tools go beyond mere convenience – they equip students for success in academics and the workplace.

2019

The hardcover textbooks that were a mainstay still have an important role – and today’s students have so many more options to organize their studies, such as e-books, laptops, tablets and smartphones.

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C ONTI NUED F ROM PAGE 12

» STEM PROFESSIONALS “When I dreamed of teaching when I was working at RollsRoyce, I had no idea what all the responsibilities would be in that position. UIndy has prepared me tremendously for this actual career,” Potter said. The emphasis on hands-on experience and immediately applying new techniques meant that Potter already had a classroom management plan in place when she greeted her classes for the first time, a month after completing the program. “From the very first day, that was one of the tools UIndy helped me develop. Students respond and behave better when you have standards and procedures in place that are reinforced,” said Potter, who now teaches at Chapel Hill Seventh and Eighth Grade Center in Wayne Township.

According to Dr. John Kuykendall, dean of the School of Education, “A critical component of the program is to increase the number of excellent science and math educators. Students completing the program are well-prepared, through a variety of innovative experiences and rigorous feedback to meet the demands of teaching in a high school setting.” UIndy works with a clinical faculty member at each school to determine optimal classroom placement for each candidate. All students in the second cohort are now teaching in classrooms with UIndy partner districts, and all of the graduates in the first cohort have obtained teaching positions with Wayne Township Schools.

DR. JOHN KUYKENDALL, DEAN OF THE SCHOOL OF EDUCATION

Sachs said developing relationships with schools, administrators and teachers is key to the success of the program.

DEB SACHS, ASSISTANT PROFESSOR

POTTER AT COMMENCEMENT WITH FELLOW STEM GRADUATES “The clinical residency piece is so valuable in seeing how the teacher sets up the culture and climate of their classroom to seeing the developmental spectrum of a student across time,” explained Deb Sachs, assistant professor of teacher education and program facilitator. After graduation, students continue to receive support from UIndy through mentors who observe classes and provide feedback. Alumni participate in “Super Saturdays,” quarterly workshops to encourage further professional development. “One thing that really stands out about this program is that UIndy continues to support the educators they help prepare,” said Potter. 24

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“Because our program is a OF TEACHER EDUCATION AND clinical residency program, we need to find top-notch PROGRAM FACILITATOR teachers whose classrooms they’re going to be in. Having developed those partnerships with the schools allows us to find those teachers,” Sachs said. UIndy continues to provide the perspective and experience required for success in her new position, according to Potter. “The support I’ve received from the teachers, from my mentors and the workshops has just been amazing.”

Learn more about UIndy’s Teach (STEM)³ Program uindy.edu/stem3


C ONTINUED F ROM PAG E 8

» BUSINESS Christopher Gurski ’19 (business administration, supply chain management) is reaping the rewards. “The Value Stream Transformation project we did at Caterpillar resulted in a Lean Six Sigma Green Belt and gives me relevant hands-on experience toward my aspiration of pursuing a Business Consultant career,” said Gurski.

S I X S I G M A C E R T I F I C AT I O N S T R U C T U R E MBB BLACK BELT

MASTER BLACK BELT ADVISES ON SIX SIGMA. A BLACK BELT WITH AT LEAST TWO YEARS EXPERIENCE

BLACK BELT FULL-TIME PROJECT LEADER

GREEN BELT

GREEN BELT USES ANALYTICAL TOOLS AND DMAIC

YELLOW BELT

YELLOW BELT AWARE OF SIX SIGMA PRINCIPLES

BUSI N ESS SIMULATIO NS LEA D TO ‘ THE S O URCE’ Another valuable partnership emerged when Seidelson obtained full access to a logistic lab in Plainfield, allowing students hands-on experience in supply chain management. The facility is operated by a not-for-profit children’s books distributor. All of the equipment is donated by Toyota, a supplier of warehousing equipment that sends their salespeople to train on the equipment in the warehouse.

through a problem and become more comfortable with open-ended situations.” The experience is truly eye-opening for students, who perform tasks they intuitively believe will be easy before actually learning how they are done. This approach results in a much deeper understanding of processes and ultimately prepares them to become more effective managers. “One of the things we’re trying to get across to students is you can’t effectively manage from your office. Get involved on the shop floor. You’ll gain the perspective needed to know what’s working and what needs to change,” said Seidelson. Shelby Winner ’19 (accounting) describes it like this: “Getting to gemba made me appreciate the complexity of logistics operations and the importance of training. When we went in without it, each task was very difficult. The experience has given me great respect for the trained professionals who work in warehouses every day.”

UINDY STUDENTS RECEIVE HANDS-ON EXPERIENCE IN ACTIVE SUPPLY CHAIN SITUATIONS

Seidelson’s MBA and undergrad students are experiencing logistic operations through a series of timed training simulations UIndy has designed – from sorting items in the pick process and packing boxes to receiving shipments and unloading trucks.

G ET TI N G TO GEMBA “The goal is getting to gemba, the Japanese term for the source,” explains Seidelson. “We put students in undefined scenarios so they learn how to work

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C ONTI NUED F ROM PAGE 14

» NURSING and in an internship that I want,” said Doyle, who is working in the neonatal intensive care unit at Community East. A guaranteed job with CHN upon graduation is the most attractive quality about the Nursing Academy for many students like Doyle. Thanks to this talent pipeline, two cohorts have graduated so far, and all 19 members secured full-time jobs at CHN. “We hire as many UIndy nursing graduates as we can,” said Dr. Jean Putnam ’17 (doctor of nursing practice), chief nursing officer at CHN. “We know they’re going to be high-quality employees.”

MAKING AN IMPACT THROUGH SERVICE Despite its ambitious yet humble beginnings in 1959, the “Education for Service” motto has been deeply embedded in the nursing curriculum. Students continue to find community engagement opportunities in their coursework and through a variety of volunteer and mission opportunities all over the world each year. Over the last decade, School of Nursing faculty have led annual service trips to Haiti and Ecuador, where nursing students teach life-saving skills and gain practical experience. For nursing student Nikolaus Clark ’19 (nursing, minor in gerontology and psychology), this experience was truly inspiring. “I learned a lot about the human qualities that make you a better nurse on the medical mission trip to Ecuador. We set up some mobile clinics to help the local population and delivered medical supplies to people in need. It was eye-opening,” Clark said. Since 1996, more than 250 nursing students have been commissioned for service through a parish nurse training program focused on advancing the wellness of their congregations through health promotion. The program, founded by Cheryl Larson ’66, ’71, will be reintroduced by Associate Professor Dr. Kathy Hetzler in 2019. “It’s good for churches and it’s good for students. It opens students’ eyes to different faith traditions and teaches them to use holistic care within the church to help the members. Not only are we making an impact on the community medically, but

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JOY’S HOUSE GIVES STUDENTS THE OPPORTUNITY TO SERVE we’re making an impact spiritually,” said Hetzler, who brings her faith’s values of empathy and compassion to the medical practice of nursing.

CONNECTING WITH THE COMMUNITY The School of Nursing also collaborates with Eli Lilly and Company, Franciscan Health, Joy’s House and a number of local congregations, schools and community centers. At Lilly, undergraduate and graduate nursing students are paired with preceptors to learn about project management, clinical research and other roles at the global company. The School of Nursing has hosted tailored cohort training for Franciscan staff for decades. Meanwhile, the University of Indianapolis Center for Aging & Community, a program that works to improve the quality of life for all people as they age, partners with Joy’s House, a not-for-profit adult day service that provides physical, mental and financial relief for families caring for a loved one.

For more info on the Center for Aging & Community, visit uindy.edu/cac.


C ONTI NUED F ROM PAGE 11

» PARTNERS IN JUSTICE scene simulations,” said Boxler. “It’s a great benefit to new people entering the field. Violent crime rates are high; we have to use all available resources to do our jobs better.” The new learning space also contributes to the revitalization of the University Heights neighborhood. The school purchased an unoccupied home and partnered with IMCFSA to have the lot rezoned for educational use. The IMCFSA partnership can also connect students to a variety of networking opportunities and potential jobs.

STUDENTS INVESTIGATE A MOCK CRIME SCENE

“In the hiring process, UIndy criminal justice students automatically stand out above other candidates because of the familiarity this partnership facilitates.” - Christine Hagan IMCFSA Crime Scene Supervisor

Planning a wedding? Contact UIndy Event Services about some of the wonderful event spaces and services we have to offer! uindy.edu/weddings WINTER/SPRING 2019

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UPDATES

The University Updates section is a snapshot of the accomplishments of students, faculty and the larger University community. For a full selection of news and stories, visit portico.uindy.edu SCHOOL OF BUSINESS

business administration, published “Return on Instructional Investment

Publications & Presentations Dr. Larry Belcher, School of Business dean, co-authored a presentation

(ROII) Model: A Practical Guide for School Leaders” in the Academy of Educational Leadership Journal.

with his son, Landon J. Belcher,

Dr. Chi (Cathy) Zhang, assistant

“Does ‘Experience’ Matter? Expertise,

professor of marketing, presented

Knowledge Transfer and Voting

research, “‘Too Good to Be True’:

Patterns in a Student-Managed

The Effect of Positive Online

Investments Program,” at the

Word of Mouth and Observational

Academy of Economics and Finance

Learning on Consumer’s Decision-

Annual Meeting.

Making Process,” and “The Effect

Dr. Marcos Hashimoto, associate

of Non-Monetary and Monetary

professor of entrepreneurship, presented a conference paper at the United States Association of Small Business and Entrepreneurship Annual Meeting in January 2019, “Innovations in Entrepreneurship Teaching and Learning: Lessons from

Threshold-based Promotions on Product Perceived Quality” at the Decision Science Institute Annual Conference in Chicago.

R.B. ANNIS SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING

the Hybrid Schools.” Dr. Hashimoto

D R . D AV I D O L A W A L E W I T H ENGINEERING STUDENTS

Dr. David Olawale, assistant professor of engineering, was co-author of “Enhanced fabrication process for in situ triboluminescent optical fiber sensor for multifunctional composites,” in Measurement. Dr. Olawale also was co-author of “Development of friction-induced triboluminescent sensor for load monitoring,” in Intelligent Material Systems and Structures.

DesignSpine Gains Awareness Dr. Olawale, Dr. José Sánchez, associate dean of engineering, and Dr. Stephen Spicklemire, chair and associate professor of physics, presented “UIndy engineering DesignSpine: engineering leadership development through interdisciplinary teams and early exposure to reallife problems,” at the 2018 ASEE Illinois/Indiana Conference, Purdue University.

Professor Honored by Colleagues

Optimization,” in Data.

Dr. Olawale was selected as a KEEN Innovative Teaching Faculty, a unique cohort of faculty who are committed to improving engineering education. He was awarded a $2,000 grant to participate in the Integrating Curriculum with Entrepreneurial Mindset Workshop in January 2019 in Dallas, Texas.

Institute’s Leader Education and

Dr. Herzog was co-author of a

Interdisciplinary Collaboration

Development (LEAD) program

SPIE (The International Society for

was published in “Perspectives”

Optics and Photonics) conference

by Inside Indiana Business. Visit

presentation, “Localized surface

uindy.edu/postindustrial for details.

plasmons on periodic monolayer

Dr. Rachel Smith, associate

black phosphorene nanoribbons

published the paper in a Brazilian journal, Revista de Pensamento Contemporaneo em Administracao. The Institute for Postindustrial Leadership held a seminar in November, “Rediscovering Leadership in the 21st Century,” with business, industry and government professionals. The nine-hour graduate-level Postindustrial Leadership Certificate received faculty approval. A series of four articles about the

professor of finance, and Dr. Karl Knapp, associate professor of 28

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Faculty Authors Dr. Joseph Herzog, assistant professor of engineering, was co-author of research, “The Role of Rayleigh-Wood Anomalies and Surface Plasmons in Optical Enhancement for Nano-Gratings,” in Nanomaterials. Dr. Herzog also was co-author of “Dataset for SERS Plasmonic Array: Width, Spacing, and Thin Film Oxide Thickness

tuned in the infrared region with a dielectric substrate.”

Engineering students presented an interdisciplinary collaboration, “Improved Custom Orthoses Design for Enhanced Patient’s Comfort and Healing Outcomes,” between the R.B. Annis School of Engineering and the School of Occupational

Therapy, at the 2018 ASEE Illinois/ Indiana Conference. Faculty advisors were Dr. Olawale and Dr. Erin Peterson, assistant professor of occupational therapy. Presented by: Pilar Echeverria ’20 (industrial engineering), TJ LeSeure ’20 (mechanical engineering), Josh Love ’20 (software engineering), Evan Parduhn ’20 (software engineering), Allison Zwickl ’20 (software engineering).

Expertise in Action Dr. Paul Talaga, assistant professor of engineering, had a paper, “Model AI Assignments 2019,” accepted for publication in Educational Advances in Artificial Intelligence 2019. Dr. Talaga presented a preconference workshop, “Course-ina-Box: Big Data,” at the Consortium for Computing Sciences in College: Midwest, Ball State University. Dr. Talaga also presented, “Experience Report: 4 Years of Teaching Cloud Computing and Big Data at the University Level,” at EduHPC-18, Dallas, Texas, in November.

SHAHEEN COLLEGE OF ARTS & SCIENCES Anthrop olo g y Research & Recognition Dr. Christopher Moore ’04, chair and associate professor of anthropology, published a public archaeology booklet, “Early Pioneers of Carroll County, Indiana,” on the department’s archaeological research at the Baum’s Landing site. The project was funded through a matching grant from Indiana Humanities. Katie Lutzmann ’19 (archaeology and anthropology) was recognized as the 2018 winner of the undergraduate student paper competition at the Midwest Archaeological Conference in South Bend. Christopher Moore also attended the conference.


Dr. Christopher Schmidt, professor of anthropology, published “Dental Macrowear and Microwear” in the International Encyclopedia of Biological Anthropology, a peerreviewed compendium of topics in biological anthropology.

Art & De si gn Faculty & Student Exhibitions Nathaniel Foley, assistant professor of art & design, exhibited his work, “Flight of Obscurity XVII,” at the Rosemary Duffy Larson Gallery at Broward College, Davie, Florida. Katherine Fries, assistant professor of art & design, held exhibitions at the Nance Gallery in Evansville and at the Garfield Park Arts Center in Indianapolis. Fries designed the 2019 commemorative membership cards for the College Book Art Association, which were letterpress printed at UIndy’s Hullabaloo Press. Fries collaborated with the Indianapolis Public Library to create a series of events, “Then & Now – Printing in Indy,” by curating an exhibition and co-hosting a letterpress workshop with David Peat. Hullabaloo Press held a studentrun open house in October. Auna Winters ’20 (M.A.), ’18 (art & design, printmaking concentration) and Kalia Daily ’20 (M.A.), ’18 (studio art major, art history minor, painting and printmaking concentrations) produced a commissioned letterpress promotional poster for the series, which showcased the history and community of printing in Indianapolis.

“THEN & NOW – PRINTING IN INDY” POSTER

Grants & Scholarships Fries was a UIndy InQuery Research Grant Recipient for “The Peat Project,” a student and faculty research initiative. She co-presented research with Erin Beckloff of Miami University at Atypi: Association Typographique Internationale, in Antwerp, Belgium, and presented “Scouting for Letterpress” at “Makeready: A letterpress symposium for educators,” Hamilton Wood Type & Printing Museum in Wisconsin. Kalia Daily earned a Caxton Club Grant of $2,500 (Chicago, Illinois) for “The Peat Project.” Auna Winters & Kalia Daily both received Hamilton Wood Type & Printing Museum Scholarships.

Bio lo g y Faculty Publications

U I N D Y S T U D E N T S AT T H E F L A G F O R E N S I C ANTHROPOLOGISTS ANNUAL MEETING

October. Dr. Latham, who directs the University of Indianapolis Human Identification Center, and Dr. Stephen Nawrocki, professor of biology, also attended. UIndy attendees gave seven presentations. In January 2019, Dr. Latham and graduate students in human biology who comprise the UIndy Beyond Borders Team returned to southern Texas to continue their humanitarian work to identify those who died while crossing the southern border of the United States. Since 2013, the team has participated in “Operation Identification” in Brooks County, Texas, assisting in the exhumation of hundreds of unidentified people and in the identification process of 30 of these individuals.

Ground-breaking Research Continues

Dr. Nelson Kraus, associate adjunct biology professor, published “Super Simple Anatomy and Physiology: The Ultimate Learning Tool.” Dr. Krista Latham, associate professor of forensic anthropology and biology, Dr. Alyson O’Daniel, associate professor of anthropology and Justin Maiers ’17 (M.S., human biology) contributed a chapter, “Migrant Death and Identification: Theory, Science, and Sociopolitics,” in “Massacres: Bioarchaeology and Forensic Anthropology Approaches.”

Dr. Marc Milne, assistant professor of biology, published new research in Ecosphere, an online Ecology journal: “Carnivorous plants eat a diet of certain spiders, regardless of what’s on the menu.”

Dr. Daniel Scholes, assistant professor of biology, received a Senior Research Grant from the Indiana Academy of Science in the amount of $2,050. Preliminary data serving as the basis for the proposed study were collected by undergraduate students William Buelsing ’17 (environmental science), Kyle Barkovich ’18 (nursing), Grace Buck ’18 (human biology) and Savannah Phipps ’21 (biology).

Com m unic ation Service Awards Dr. Rebekah Watson Gaidis, assistant professor of communication, was honored with the “Outstanding Service to the Division” award from the National Communication Association‘s Political Communication Division. WICR Radio received a Cardinal Community Service Award from the Indiana Broadcasters Association for the WICR Arts Organization of the Month program, which provides complimentary spot production and $1,000 of air time to promote the Arts Council of Indianapolis’ featured organization and upcoming events. Indiana Congressman André Carson presented the award.

Students & Faculty Present Work in Human Identification

Englis h

Fourteen students from the human biology graduate program participated in the FLAG Forensic Anthropologists annual meeting in

Conference Showcases Talent & Research In October, the Department of English

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hosted the Indiana College English Association’s annual conference featuring well-known creative writers and scholars. Dr. Leah Milne, assistant professor, organized the conference and Dr. Stephen Zimmerly, assistant professor, presented an original paper. Dr. Liz Whiteacre, assistant professor, presented research and sponsored a student session. Dr. Jessica Bannon, assistant professor, sponsored a student panel. Other presenting faculty included assistant professors Dr. Rebecca McKanna and Dr. Kip Robisch. English graduate students Julie Breeden and Alison SigmanPowell presented papers. Dr. Milne moderated an INConversation with science fiction author Victor LaValle for an Indiana Humanities event at the Indianapolis Public Library. Mr. LaValle also met with English capstone students.

Etchings Press Staff Honored The Etchings Press staff received first place in the 2018 American Scholastic Press Association’s review and competition for the 30.1 and 30.2 editions. (See portico.uindy.edu for details.) Kylie Seitz ’19 (English), former editor-in-chief of Etchings Magazine, participated in an internship with Zionsville-based Tipton Poetry Journal during the summer of 2018 and helped publish the journal’s summer issue. The Tipton Poetry Journal now partners with Professional Edge Center and will offer additional internships to UIndy students in the future. Seitz also designed the 2018 Whirling Prize Bookplate.

Faculty Fiction & Non-Fiction Natalie McCann ’19 (English) wrote a chapbook for ENGL 471, Maria, I’m Drunk, which was one of five finalists for the 2018 Digging Press Chapbook Series among 250 submissions. Dr. Liz Whiteacre, assistant professor of English, published four persona poems in Wordgathering Magazine for the September 2018 issue. Dr. Stephen Zimmerly, assistant professor of English, has a book in progress with Lexington Books researching how young adult literature has changed the characterparadigm of the sidekick. The project was granted an Honorable Mention by the Northeast Modern Language Association. Dr. Zimmerly is also participating as an academic advisor to an entry in an upcoming edition of Gale/Cengage Learning’s Literature Criticism Series.

I nterd is c ip lin ar y C o llab o rat io n s Conference Presentations

Dr. Marcos Hashimoto, associate professor of entrepreneurship in the School of Business Dr. Leah Milne, assistant professor of English Dr. Alison Nichols, assistant professor of occupational therapy Dr. Angelia Ridgway, professor and director of secondary education Dr. Jyotika Saksena, associate professor of international relations, graduate program director of international relations Dr. Lochana Siriwardena, assistant professor of mathematics Drs. Shaw, Miller, Milne and Nichols attended the conference, where they discussed how the Faculty Fellows program was implemented to address faculty professional development needs at UIndy.

The following faculty presented research, “Faculty Fellows: An Innovative Model for Enhancing and Expanding Faculty Development,” at the Original Lilly Conference on College Teaching at Miami University, Oxford, Ohio, in November 2018: Dr. Lynn Shaw, assistant professor and Master of Social Work field director Dr. Amanda Miller, associate professor and sociology chair Dr. Lisa Borrero, assistant professor of Interprofessional Health and Aging Studies

The University of Indianapolis Faculty Learning Community (FLC) on the Digital Humanities received an Indiana Humanities Quantum Leap Grant of $4,000 to cover the cost of three workshops during the 2018-19 academic year.

Internationa l Relations UIndy students competed against universities in Indiana and Kentucky to earn several awards at the November 2018 Model United Nations on the IU Southeast campus. Participating students were from the Department of History and Political Science, majoring in international relations, political science and history. W I C R R A D I O S TA F F A N D FA C U LT Y W I T H A N D R É C A R S O N

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Mus ic

The Indianapolis Quartet returned to the Christel DeHaan Fine Arts Center in October with a program that continued their exploration of the Beethoven quartets, an awardwinning work by New York Citybased composer Robert Paterson and Schoenberg’s groundbreaking string sextet. The Quartet is looking forward to a busy spring with five performances and a masterclass. See indianapolisquartet.uindy.edu for a complete schedule.

Faculty & Alumni Honored Music education majors and members of the Collegiate Chapter of the National Association for Music Education, as well as several music faculty and UIndy alumni, attended the annual Professional Development Conference held in January 2019. Faculty and alumni presented research on a dozen topics and the following participants received awards: Outstanding Hoosier Musician Award - Mick Bridgewater ‘73; Outstanding Collegiate Educator of the Year Award - Dr. Brenda Clark, associate professor and assistant dean for the Shaheen College of Arts & Sciences (Clark also received this award in 2013 and is the only person to have been selected twice for the award); Outstanding Future Music Educator Award - Anna Miller ‘20 (choral/general music education) and Jacqueline Wiernicki ‘19 (instrumental/general music education major).

Gala Opening Marks Maestro Leppard’s Farewell Concert Maestro Raymond Leppard, 91, celebrated his 25th season as artistin-residence at the Gala Opening


Concert sponsored by Katz, Sapper & Miller. The maestro’s concert featured the premiere of Leppard’s “Summoned for Love” song trilogy with Mitzi Westra, assistant professor of music, Daniel Narducci and the UIndy Concert Choir. Indianapolis Quartet member Joana Genova performed Bach’s E-Major Violin Concerto. The standing-room-only audience honored Leppard with a prolonged ovation.

Recordings & Performances Peter Nichols, instructor and operations manager for Ruth Lilly Performance Hall, recorded and edited a CD for Minju Choi released on the Navona record label in November. The album is called BOUNDLESS and is available on Amazon, iTunes and at Barnes & Noble. Dr. Jon Noworyta, visiting assistant professor and director of UIndy Wind Ensembles, completed his second season as the assistant conductor of the Cincinnati Chamber Orchestra, where he prepares performances for the orchestra’s Summermusik concert series. Dr. Noworyta is also the director and conductor of the Cincinnati Brass Band, a Britishstyle all-brass community group that performs public concerts in the greater Cincinnati area. The Cincinnati Brass Band will travel to Fort Wayne in April to participate in the North American Brass Band Association Championships. In his role at UIndy, Dr. Noworyta has worked with several area high school groups and led an Indiana Bandmasters Association All-District Honor Band in November.

Dr. Sorley, along with daughter Allegra, performed with Mu Phi Epsilon International Competition winner, clarinetist Katsuya Yuasa, in August at a concert in the Christel DeHaan Fine Arts Center. The recital was in conjunction with the Mu Phi Epsilon International Board 2017 AMERICAN PIANISTS AWARD annual meeting and WINNER, CHRISTEL DEHA AN FELLOW hosted by the Beta Psi UIndy AND UNIVERSIT Y OF INDIANPOLIS ARTIST-IN-RESIDENCE, DREW PETERSEN, chapter along with the Kappa INSTRUCTS STUDENTS DURING HIS Butler chapter. Dr. Sorley serves MASTERCLASS IN NOVEMBER as Beta Psi collegiate advisor along with 4th International Vice Acclaimed American pianist Drew President, Music Advisor, of Mu Phi Petersen, now in his second year as Epsilon. artist-in-residence at the University of The 2018 Trumpet Conference was Indianapolis, performed an October featured in an article published by the solo recital featuring the music of International Trumpet Guild Journal. Mozart, Beethoven (the Appassionata The story includes the upcoming Sonata, Op. 57), and Liszt (including Trumpet Conference on March 9, the rarely performed Illustrations 2019, featuring Jens Lindemann and du Prophète de Meyerbeer). Mr. Brassfire. See uindytrumpet.com for Petersen is the 2017 American more information. Pianists Association award winner,

Strauss and Sarah Knight, the event featured faculty Susan Chan and Ari Rudiakov, and guests Yu Jin, Greg Noland and Emma Strohbusch.

Christel DeHaan Fellow and the recent recipient of a prestigious Avery Fisher Career Grant.

The Pre-Law Student Association (PLSA) established a partnership with the Perry Township Small Claims Court, for which PLSA members will be selected as judicial interns each semester to assist Judge-Elect Cheryl Rivera. Efforts to establish the partnership were conducted by Dr. David A. Root, assistant professor of political science and pre-law advisor, in his capacity as faculty advisor to PLSA. Drake Abramson ’21 (political science, legal studies minor, business administration minor) was selected as the first PLSA Perry Township Judicial Intern.

Dr. Rebecca Sorley, professor of music, presented a community engagement program entitled “Connecting Through Music” as part of the College Music Society National Convention in Vancouver, B.C. in October. This program, at an area assisted living facility, was geared toward residents with dementia and focused on folk songs and popular music from when the residents were in early adulthood.

2018 TRUMPET CONFERENCE

A New Tradition Begins The first annual Viola Day was held at the Christel DeHaan Fine Arts Center in October for high school and middle school students. Organized by Department of Music faculty Michael

M A E S T R O R AY M O N D L E P PA R D C O N D U C T E D H I S FA R E W E L L P E R F O R M A N C E AT T H E G A L A O P E N I N G CONCERT IN SEPTEMBER.

P hys ics & Earth - Space Science Three University of Indianapolis students presented research to an audience of 6,000 scientists at the 2018 annual meeting of The Geological Society of America in November in Indianapolis. Vanessa Bump ’19 (environmental science and earth-space science), Stephanie Burdsall ’19 (environmental science and earth-space science) and Sarah Ruehl ’20 (environmental science and sustainability major, earth-space science and biology minor) presented their work. Dr. Leah Courtland, assistant professor, was the faculty advisor for all three research projects.

Politica l Scien ce

Kaitlin McDonald ’20 (political science, international relations, legal studies minor) completed an internship during fall 2018 at the Children’s Policy and Law Initiative of Indiana. Ben Osborne ’19 (political science, legal studies minor) obtained an internship with the Marion County Prosecutor’s Office for Spring 2019.

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at Indy Fringe, an Indianapolis summer theatre festival held in August. The students performed “Too Much Light Makes the Baby Go Blind” by Greg Allen. The Department of Theatre also presented, “It’s a Wonderful Life, the Radio Play,” for on-campus performances and a broadcast on WICR.

University Welcomes Circuit Court Judge

Sociological Research in a Dynamic World.

In November, Pulaski County Circuit Court Judge Michael Shurn ’75 (English) delivered the keynote address for the PLSA Judicial Lecture Series, organized by Dr. Root. Judge Shurn regaled students with interesting, insightful and sometimes zany stories from more than 30 years of experience on the bench. Judge Shurn was also the 2018 Education for Service Award recipient.

Dr. Miller’s blog with Sharon Sassler on Psychology Today, “Cohabitation Nation,” reached more than 28,000 readers. Miller also provided an interview and appeared in U.S. News & World Report about cohabitation and finances.

Faculty Share Expertise Dr. Root published an article in the Journal of the Indiana Association of the Social Sciences titled “Chief Justice Leadership: A Brief Sketch of its Landscape, Structure and Operation.” It discusses small group and behavioral leadership of the United States Supreme Court. Dr. Laura Wilson, assistant professor of political science, provided expert analysis for national and regional news outlets on the midterm elections, including the London School of Economics U.S. Centre, WalletHub, the Indianapolis Business Journal, WTHR, The Hoosier Times and more.

Sociolo gy Important Research from UIndy Faculty Dr. Amanda Miller, chair of sociology, published research, “Stalled for Whom? Change in the Division of Particular Housework Tasks and Their Consequences for Middle- to LowIncome Couples” with Daniel Carlson and Sharon Sassler. It was listed as “most read” by the journal Socius:

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Dr. Miller and Dr. Alyson O’Daniel, associate professor of anthropology, presented “Scaffolding Space to Speak: Student Storytelling as Long-term Strategy for Developing Faculty Cultural Competence” at the Original Lilly Conference on College Teaching. Dr. Jim Pennell, professor of sociology, participated in an authormeets-critics session on his book, “Local Vino: The Winery Boom in the Heartland,” at the Association for Humanist Sociology Annual Meeting, Detroit, Michigan, in November. He participated in an Indiana authors book-signing event at the Indianapolis Public Library in October, sponsored by the library and the Eugene & Marilyn Glick Indiana Authors Award. Dr. Colleen Wynn, who joined the Department of Sociology as assistant professor in Fall 2018, published research, “Assessing the Role of Family Structure in Racial/Ethnic Residential Isolation,” in a special issue of the journal Social Sciences on social inequality and residential segregation in urban neighborhoods and communities.

T h e at re The UIndy Theatre Company, featuring students from the Department of Theatre, debuted

In January 2019, 26 theatre students and four faculty members traveled to Madison College in Madison, Wisconsin, to participate in the Kennedy Center American College Theatre Festival. Zech Saenz ’19 (theatre education) received the Crafts, Engineering & Management Award for “The Love Talker.” Saenz was a finalist for the Regional Design Projects Award for “Haroun & the Sea of Stories” and he also received a Certificate of Merit for Props Designs for the “Complete Works of William Shakespeare.” Haley Rigsby ’20 (theatre) received the Theatre Design Excellence Recipient for Vectorworks Award for “I & You,” and Jill Wooster ’22 (theatre education) received the Design Storm Award for “Arcadia.” Liesel Schmitz ’20 (theatre) received a Certificate of Merit in Stage Management for “I & You.” See portico.uindy.edu for more details.

SCHOOL OF EDUCATION Leading the Way Around the Globe Dr. Jennifer Grace, assistant professor of educational leadership, presented “State Takeover and Black Communities: Discussing Educational Equity and Educational Racism Beyond Test Scores” at the International School Choice and Reform Conference in Lisbon, Portugal. Dr. Grace and Dr. John Somers, associate professor and School of Education graduate programs director, presented at the University Council for Education Administration Conference. Dr. John Kuykendall, School of Education dean, presented research at the National Alliance of Black

D E PA R T M E N T O F T H E AT R E STUDENTS PERFORM “IT’S A WONDERFUL LIFE, THE R A D I O P L AY.”

School Educators Conference and the Association for the Study of Higher Education Conference. Dr. Angelia Ridgway, professor and director of secondary education, Dr. Katrina Reinhardt, secondary coordinator for teaching and learning, and Mizraim Lorenzo-Aguilar ’17 (education) presented in November at the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages in New Orleans, Louisiana. Nearly a dozen School of Education students participated in the 2018 Kappa Delta Pi Convocation in Indianapolis, a conference where educators exchange teaching and learning ideas and engage in networking opportunities. Deborah Sachs, assistant professor of teacher education, Donna Stephenson, instructor and licensing advisor, Dr. Somers and Dr. Ridgway presented at the convocation. Dr. Greta Pennell, professor of teacher education, presented “Going to the dogs: A growing trend in Toyland” in December, along with Dr. Jim Pennell, professor of sociology. The video conference presentation was hosted by the Federal University of Paraíba in João Pessoa, Paraíba, Brazil. The Pennells also presented a paper entitled, “Becoming a WWOOFer: The Challenges and Rewards of a Bartered Exchange Relationship Mediated by a Loosely


Coupled Organization” at the annual meeting of the Association for Humanist Sociology (AHS) in Detroit, Michigan, in November. Dr. Greta Pennell participated in the 18th International Symposium, Workshop and Exhibition on Toy Design and Inclusive Play in Berlin, Germany, in January 2019. She was recently honored with a research fellowship at The Strong National Museum of Play and was elected vice president of the International Toy Research Association at the World Congress in Paris, France, during the summer of 2018, where she presented a paper with Dr. Jim Pennell. In August 2018, she was honored with the Teaching in the Core Award at the Faculty-Staff Institute for her first-year seminar, “Doing Gender in Toyland.”

Stephenson is also looking forward to taking care of her grandson, volunteering and taking photography classes.

BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES Phy lis Lan L in De p a rtm ent of S o c ial Wo r k Four social work students received the Mildred Myers Reynolds Endowed Scholarship: Brittany Singh ’19 (MSW), Yessely Parra ’19 (MSW), Sarah Niemier ’20 (BSW) and Felicia Seals ’20 (BSW). Dr. Reynolds developed the scholarship to promote interest among social work students to work with the late-

MEAGHAN OWENS ’19

adult population. Four social work students received the Toni Peabody Scholarship. Funded by Toni Peabody and Richard King, this award was created to provide financial assistance for social work students enrolled in a practicum course. The recipients are: Bailey Bonebright ’19 (BSW), Haley Hawver ’20 (BSW), Meaghan Owens ’19 (BSW) and Felicia Seals ’20 (BSW).

Donna Stephenson retired from her full-time instructor position in the School of Education at the end of the fall 2018 semester. “Donna has been a wonderful addition to the University, students and department for 18 years. We are thrilled she will continue as a School of Education adjunct after retirement,” said Dr. John Kuykendall, School of Education dean.

Psychology

COLLEGE OF APPLIED

Dr. Jean Lee, associate professor of teacher education, edited a book, “Rigor, Relevance, and Relationships: Making Mathematics Come Alive with Project-Based Learning.” She also was invited to present a conference session, “UDL + PBL = A Perfect Match,” at IUPUC’s Symposium on Universal Design for Instruction & Learning.

Donna Stephenson Retirement

Poster Competition and co-facilitator of the Annual Council of Art Therapy Educators Meeting.

Pre - ar t T h erapy Rachel Feldwisch, assistant professor and director of counseling programs, presented at the American Art Therapy Association (AATA) National Conference on service learning in undergraduate art therapy education and social justice advocacy training in graduate art therapy education. Feldwisch also served as chair of the first Undergraduate

Dr. Aaron Kivisto and Dr. Katherine Kivisto, assistant professors of psychology, published “Risk Management with Clients Who Stalk, Threaten, and Harass Mental Health Professionals” in the American Journal of Psychotherapy. Jenifer Gregory ‘14 (M.A., clinical psychology) ‘17 (PsyD) published “Father-child play, child emotional dysregulation, and adolescent internalizing symptoms: A longitudinal multiple mediation analysis,” in Development & Psychopathology. Dr. Katherine Kivisto and Dr. Neil Perdue, associate professor of psychology, vice president and chief operating officer, were among the co-authors. Psychology doctoral student Del Monteiro, ’17 (M.A.) and Dr. Michael Poulakis, PsyD (’94, ’98, ’02), assistant professor, presented Monteiro’s doctoral research findings in August at the Philadelphia Trans Wellness Conference. The title of the presentation was “Qualitative Findings on the Effects of Cisnormative Beauty Standards on Transgender Women’s Beauty.” Dr. Poulakis’ CQR Lab presented research in August at the American Psychological Association Convention. Doctoral student Dr. Nour Abdelghani ’18 (PsyD) and Dr. Poulakis presented Abdelghani’s doctoral research findings, “Understanding Enmeshment in Arab American Mother-Child Relationships.” Abdelghani’s research received the 2016 Diversity Research Grant for PreDoctoral Candidates from Division 29 of the American Psychological Association: Society for the Advancement of Psychotherapy. Dr. Abdelghani will be a postdoctoral fellow at the Institute for Child and Family Health in Miami. Angeliki Menediatou ’03 (M.A.), Nikos Nakopoulos, Sebastian Del Corral Winder ’18 (M.A.) and

Dr. Poulakis presented groundbreaking research related to mental health in Greece: “Participant Satisfaction With Self-Help Groups in Greece.” Sebastian Del Corral Winder, ’18 (M.A.), TJ Lesher ’16 (M.A.) and Dr. Poulakis presented community proposal findings related to Latina women: “Life After Domestic Violence: Support Groups for Latina Immigrant Survivors.” Second-year doctoral student Rebecca McCormic ’22 recently published an article as first author in the Journal of Clinical Psychology. The article, “‘Me too’ decision: An analog study of therapist self-disclosure of psychological problems,” is based on her thesis. Students working with Dr. Kendra Thomas, assistant professor of psychology, presented data gathered for their capstone projects to iThemba, a non-profit organization in Hilton, South Africa. Every semester, students conduct literature reviews on subjects including HIV/AIDS, pregnancy prevention and gender inequality to analyze data on the impact of iThemba’s intervention work. The non-profit works with 800 middle school students in 10 schools annually.

COLLEGE OF HEALTH SCIENCES Athletic Train in g Long-time head athletic trainer Ned Shannon and faculty member Dr. Connie Pumpelly were honored with the establishment of the Ned Shannon and Connie Pumpelly Athletic Training Fund to help students with costs related to taking the Athletic Training Board of Certification exam. Nick Voelker ’14 (athletic training) was named Athletic Trainer of the Year for the Dominican Summer League in Minor League Baseball. WINTER/SPRING 2019

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Voelker is a trainer for the Oakland Athletics Dominican Republic team.

I nterp rofe ssi on a l Healt h & Agi n g Stu di e s Leading the Way in Gerontology Dr. Sharon Baggett, associate professor of aging studies, is the author of a chapter, “Training Advocates to Undertake Livable Community Initiatives: A Pilot Program,” published in “The Global Age-Friendly Community Movement: A Critical Assessment” (Stafford, 2018). Dr. Lisa Borrero, assistant professor in the Doctor of Health Science and the graduate gerontology program, has been appointed editor of AGHExchange, which is published by the Academy for Gerontology in Higher Education. Dr. Borrero received the Outstanding Faculty Award at the annual Faculty/ Staff Institute. Taylor Etchison ’18 (M.S., gerontology) presented “House Call Primary Care: If We Are to Rise to Meet the Future, Gerontology is the Best Medicine” at the Indiana Geriatrics Society Annual Fall Conference. Etchison’s presentation was a summation of her capstone and practicum experiences with Grace at Home, a primary care house calls provider. Dr. Heidi Ewen, associate professor and director of the Master of Science in Healthcare Management Program, was the lead author of a poster presented at the annual meeting of the Gerontological Society of America: “The influence of religious beliefs: Is aging punishment for sin?” Dr. Laura Santurri and Dr. Elizabeth Moore, assistant professors, received an InQuery Collaborative Grant for their research, Interstitial Cystitis Hope Project. Dr. Santurri was also featured in a Runner’s World magazine article about how she uses

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training for and running in ultramarathons as a way to cope with her diagnosis of interstitial cystitis. Dr. Moore was a co-presenter of a poster at the American Physical Therapy Association’s NEXT 2018 Conference and Exposition in Orlando, Florida. The lead author of the poster, “Can lower extremity strength and lower extremity blood flow predict the score on the Functional Gait Assessment?” was Marcia Himes ’17 (DHSc).

Kin e s io lo g y, Hea lth & Sp ort S c ie n c e s The former Department of Kinesiology is now the Department of Kinesiology, Health and Sport Sciences (KHSS). KHSS hosted a statewide clinic for the National Strength and Conditioning Association (NSCA). Presenter Trent Cayot, assistant professor, was instrumental in the planning and execution of the event, which was attended by strength and conditioning professionals from across the Midwest. KHSS instructor Chad Odaffer was also a presenter at the day-long clinic.

Growing Programs & Experience Dr. Riggs Klika joined UIndy as the new director of the undergraduate and graduate exercise science programs. Under Klika’s direction, UIndy will launch a new Master of Science in Exercise Science degree in August 2019. Students who enroll in the program will choose a concentration in human performance, which has an athletic focus, or clinical exercise physiology. Dr. Brian Reagan, assistant professor, earned his designation as a registered dietitian (RD). To achieve this status, Reagan completed 1,200 hours of clinical work, advanced education and passed a national certification exam. His eligibility was made possible through the partnership with Community Health Network.

Advocating on Important Public Health Initiatives

The Master of Science in Sport Management program, under the direction of Dr. Jennifer VanSickle, professor and program director, welcomed nearly two dozen new students this fall – double any previous cohort. Dr. Heidi Hancher Rauch, director of the public health program, and students Any’e Carson ’18 (Master of Public Health) and Yordanos Gebru ’18 (Master of Public Health) published “Building Advocacy Capacity and Skills Through a Statehouse Advocacy Day: Indiana SOPHE Experience” in Health Promotion Practice. Yordanos Gebru also earned the Stephen Jay Award for Leadership in Public Health at the 2018 Indiana Public Health Association Annual Dinner. The award recognizes current MPH students across Indiana who have contributed to the improvement of public health in the state. Public health students and faculty presented advocacy strategies to reduce gun violence at the Society for Public Health Advocacy (SOPHE) Advocacy Summit in October, held in Washington, D.C. The UIndy delegation included Master of Public Health students Yordanos Gebru and Shawn Schweitzer ’19 (PHEP) ’20 (MPH), undergraduate Megan Davish ’19 (PHEP) and Dr. Hancher Rauch. Their presentation, “Strategies for the Novice Advocate: Creating Advocacy Plans to Fight Gun Violence,” provided a toolkit for professionals to make a difference in their community.

Recumbent Stepper Submaximal Exercise Tests After Traumatic Brain Injury.” Several Krannert School of Physical Therapy faculty participated in the American Physical Therapy Association Combined Sections Meeting in Washington, D.C. Dr. Emily Slaven, associate professor and president of the Indiana Physical Therapy Association, met with U.S. Surgeon General Jerome Adams. Dr. Stephanie Kelly, College of Health Sciences dean, participated in a panel presentation geared toward new and developing faculty. Dr. Paul Salamh, assistant professor, received the University’s Emerging Scholar Award at the annual Faculty/ Staff Institute. Dr. Slaven and Dr. Nathan Eckert, assistant professor of kinesiology, were awarded a grant from the American Association of Manual Physical Therapy for a study titled, “The impact of a thrust manipulation to the hip joint; A biomechanical or neurophysiological response, or both?” Dr. Slaven and Dr. Renee Van Veld, assistant professor and director of clinical education, published a study, “First-Year Doctor of Physical Therapy Students Demonstrate Change in Coping with Stress,” in the Journal of Physical Therapy Education. Doctor of Physical Therapy Class of 2016 alumni Ben Reynolds, Paul Shupe and Creola Woolery were co-authors on the publication.

Occup ational Th erapy Leading Edge Research Published

Kra nnert School of P hys ica l T hera py Dr. Connie Fiems, assistant professor, received an InQuery Collaborative Grant from UIndy for her research on the “Reliability of

Dr. Brenda Howard, assistant professor of occupational therapy, and several 2016 master of occupational therapy alumni published an article, “Investigating Older Adults’ Expressed Needs Regarding Falls Prevention,” in the Journal Physical and Occupational Therapy in Geriatrics.


Dr. Beth Ann Walker, associate professor of occupational therapy, published “Establishing the reliability and validity of Health in Motion automated falls screening tool” in Advances in Aging Research. Coauthors included Krista Hoke and Molly Manley, MOT Class of 2016 alumni. Dr. Alison Nichols, assistant professor of occupational therapy, and several doctor of occupational therapy (OTD) alumni published an article, “Differences in the Use and Perceptions of Evidence-Based Practice between Occupational Therapy Students and Practitioners,” in the peer-reviewed Journal of Occupational Therapy Education. Co-authors are 2018 graduates of the UIndy OTD program: Paige Creighton, Annie DeRolf, Shelby Hale, LeAnn VanDeman, Kersten Laughlin and Kelsie Long, who are all registered occupational therapists. Dr. Nichols published “Parental perceptions: Raising a child with a feeding and eating disorder” in the Special Interest Section Quarterly Practice Connections publication of the American Occupational Therapy Association. Co-authors of the publication were School of Occupational Therapy adjunct professor Colleen Wasemann and Master of Occupational Therapy (MOT) Class of 2017 alumni Danielle Coatie, Erica Moon and Jennifer Weller. Dr. Erin Peterson, assistant professor of occupational therapy, earned her Certified Hand Therapist credential, which requires a minimum of three years of clinical experience, including 4,000 hours or more in direct practice in hand therapy and a comprehensive test of advanced clinical skills and theory in upper quarter rehabilitation. Mandy Fabry ’19 (OTD) was named the Indiana Occupational Therapy Association OT Student of the Year.

S c h o o l of N u rs ing Faculty & Student Achievements Stephanie Kemery, assistant professor of nursing, was invited to speak at the Hospice and Palliative Nurses Association Leadership Weekend in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, in July about LGBTQ Inclusive Principles for Hospice and Palliative Care. Based on that conference work, they have accepted two other opportunities to speak on the topic in early 2019. Kemery has research in press with coauthor Briyana Morrell, “Differences in psychomotor skills teaching and evaluation practices in undergraduate nursing programs,” Nursing Education Perspectives. Morrell has additional papers in press, including “Emergency on campus!: Quantitative analysis of the effects of an interprofessional simulation on healthcare students” and “Care across campus: Athletic training, nursing, and occupational therapy student experiences in an interprofessional simulation,” Athletic Training Education Journal. For a full list of co-authors, visit portico.uindy.edu. Krista Searles, assistant professor of nursing, presented a juried poster, “Concept Mapping to Teach Clinical Reasoning During Problem-Focused Assessment.”

CENTER FOR EXCELLENCE IN LEADERSHIP OF LEARNING The Education Workforce Innovation Network (EWIN), an initiative of the Center of Excellence in Leadership of Learning (CELL), granted $15,000 to three community partnerships and provided technical support for each to develop career pathways

in their regions of Indiana. EWIN finished its work with these partnerships at the end of 2018, including facilitating collaboration within their communities, researching promising models, site visits to explore innovative approaches and development of plans customized to each area’s needs and resources. Each partnership involved K-12 education, postsecondary, businesses/industry, and other community agencies such as workforce development. Read more at news.uindy.edu.

CENTER FOR SERVICELEARNING & COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT The annual Service Expo & Student Engagement Forum provided an opportunity for students and faculty to showcase the many ways they have been involved through service and service-learning projects. The event exposes students to UIndy service initiatives, as well as faculty and community leaders who discuss the importance of young professionals engaging through service and promoting social justice.

INSTITUTE FOR CIVIC LEADERSHIP & MAYORAL

such a bold move would disrupt the transportation energy market and free the U.S. from costly wars in the Middle East.

COMMUNICATIONS & MARKETING The University of Indianapolis received national recognition from the Association of Marketing and Communications Professionals (AMCP) and Council for the Advancement and Support of Education Region V (CASE V) for the institution’s communications and marketing efforts, including a new website and redesigned magazine. The honors include a Platinum Award for the University of Indianapolis website (category: digital media and website – industry); a Platinum Award for Portico (category: print media/ publication – higher education) and a Gold Award for the explore.uindy.edu microsite (digital media and website – higher education). Nearly 6,500 entries from across the USA, Canada and more than 20 other countries participated, and the award-winning uindy.edu website competed with all industries. The University also received the Silver Award for CASE V: Best Recruitment Website or Microsite for the uindy.edu redesign.

ARCHIVES Gregory A. Ballard, former Indianapolis mayor and University of Indianapolis visiting fellow, published “Less Oil or More Caskets: The National Security Argument for Moving Away from Oil,” Indiana University Press. The book presents a rationale for the United States and the world to safely move away from oil as a transportation fuel. Ballard argues that making

Take Portico with you wherever you go! Visit: portico.uindy.edu

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S D N U O

The University of Indianapolis Athletic Department saw seismic change in 2018, first with the retirement of Gary Vaught, head coach of the baseball program for the past 24 years, and more recently with the announcement that Bob Bartolomeo, head coach of the football program, would retire after nine years with the Greyhounds and more than 40 total seasons on the sidelines. These two coaching giants have set their programs up for continued success with the culture they helped shape. The positive momentum of last year’s successes also carried over into 2019 for all sports. Here are some highlights, both on and off the field, from our Greyhound student athletes and the teams they represent.

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ONE ERA ENDS A NEW ONE BEGINS

NED SHANNON RETIRES AFTER 25 YEARS

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Ned Shannon retired from UIndy for a new business venture November 20, 2018, after 25 years of service as UIndy’s Head Athletic Trainer. Shannon worked with all 21 of the University’s sports, including the main athletic trainer for football and wrestling. He was president of the Indiana Athletic Trainers Association from 2004 to 2006; participated as a volunteer athletic trainer for the 2005 and 2006 USA Outdoor Track and Field Championships and 2001 World Fire and Police Games; and was named 1998 USOC athletic trainer for the Goodwill Games in New York City. Shannon was also a volunteer athletic trainer at the U.S. Olympic Training Center in Colorado Springs, Colorado, and in that same year participated as a staff athletic trainer at the Games of the XXVI Olympiad in Atlanta, Georgia. He was inducted into the Indiana Athletic Trainers Association Hall of Fame in 2011.

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COACH BARTOLOMEO RETIRES Football Head Coach Bob Bartolomeo announced his retirement December 4, 2018. During his nine years as the UIndy head man, the Greyhound football program enjoyed its most successful era, compiling a 79-26 overall record, six conference titles and five NCAA playoffs appearances. “’Coach Bart’ has had an immeasurable effect not only on the UIndy football program, but on UIndy Athletics and the University as a whole,” said Vice President for Intercollegiate Athletics Dr. Sue Willey. “It has been an honor and privilege to work with him over the last 12 years and witness how he transformed the football program into the Division II powerhouse with his integrity and professionalism. Our friendship is invaluable and will always have a special place in my heart. Coach Bart will forever be a Greyhound.” Since being hired as the team’s defensive coordinator in 2004 and taking over the head job in 2010, Bartolomeo has lifted the UIndy football program to national prominence. The Greyhounds won GLVC championships six times in the last seven seasons, compiling a stellar 49-4 (.925) mark in league play over that span. Five NCAA Division II playoff appearances followed, including first-round wins in 2012 and this past November. The team is currently in the midst of a program-record 24 consecutive weeks of being ranked in the Division II top 25. “I’ve given my whole life to this great game of football – the last 15 years here at the University of Indianapolis – and I couldn’t have asked for a better person to work under than Dr. Sue Willey,” added Bartolomeo. “She’s been awesome. She’s given our program everything it needs to win, and she’s done it the right way. I’m eternally grateful to her for giving me the opportunity to be the head coach at this university. “With that being said, I’m going to announce my retirement from this great game. It’s been fun. We’ve won a lot of games, graduated a lot of kids, most importantly, and that’s something I’m more proud of than the championships, the playoff appearances and all those things.” Four times voted the GLVC Coach of the Year by his peers, Bartolomeo leaves UIndy as the program’s all-time leader in winning percentage (.752) and third all-time in total wins (79).

SUPPORT THE PACK!

With all the success UIndy has enjoyed, Coach Bart leaves the game with many great memories but looks forward to the next chapter.

Full schedules at uindyathletics.com WINTER/SPRING 2019

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ACADEMIC H ONORS

MEET THE NEW COACH The Greyhounds looked from within to replace the legendary Coach Bart by promoting longtime assistant Chris Keevers to the head football coaching position. It’s the first NCAA head coaching position for Keevers, an Indianapolis native, but he is extremely familiar with the UIndy program after spending the previous 25 years as an assistant, including the last nine seasons as the Greyhounds’ defensive coordinator. He becomes the 15th coach in program history, following the recent retirement of Bob Bartolomeo. “I would like to thank [President] Dr. Robert Manuel and [Vice President for Intercollegiate Athletics] Dr. Sue Willey for giving me this opportunity,” said Keevers. “I’m excited and honored. I’d also like to thank Bob Bartolomeo. Our 15 years together at UIndy have been a fantastic learning experience for me. The staff and I are excited to get back on the road and continue working on our 2019 recruiting class.” When asked about his successor, Bartolomeo gladly offered his endorsement. “I wholeheartedly support Chris Keevers for this job,” said the recently retired coach. “He’s a guy that’s a Greyhound through and through. He’s been here for over 20 years and loves this university, loves this athletics department. He has a lot of respect, a lot of caring, a lot of deep ties with UIndy, and I think he deserves a chance. “Besides being a loyal guy to this university, he’s a very good football coach. He’s been the architect of our defense the last few years and we’ve been very good on defense; since he took over (the defense), we haven’t missed a beat. I know he gets along with the rest of the staff, and hopefully keeping all those guys intact will be very important to this program. But he’s a very good football coach; a great communicator with the kids and a tenacious recruiter that’s brought some very good football players into this program.” “When you have a successful head coach like Coach Bart, you put a lot of stock in what he says. And when he says we have the next head coach right here on our staff, well, that certainly spoke volumes to me. We currently have an exceptional group of coaches and we want to keep them together and move this program forward,” said Willey.

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PORTICO

The Greyhounds impressed in the classroom, with UIndy’s 600+ studentathletes combining for a 3.24 GPA. A league-high 306 Hounds earned Academic All-GLVC accolades (3.3 GPA or higher), including 19 who maintained a perfect 4.0 throughout the 2017-18 year. UIndy also brought home five GLVC Scholar Athlete of the Year awards and five Academic All-America honors, while senior women’s golfer Annika Haynes ’18, ’19 (MBA) earned her sport’s NCAA Elite 90 Award, given to the student-athlete with the highest GPA competing at each of the NCAA’s 90 championships.

SW IMMING & DIVING The swimming & diving teams are off to a stellar start to the 2018-19 season, both in the pool and on the boards. The teams are ranked in the top five in Division II by the College Swimming & Diving Coaches Association of America, with the women at No. 4 and the men securing their first-ever No. 1 ranking. The fall warmed up quickly with the men defeating four-time-defendingnational-champion Queens University in an early-season duel, and it remained hot with a number of school records and NCAA time standards coming at the annual House of Champions meet in November. Meanwhile, the UIndy divers rewrote nearly the entire record book before the calendar turned to 2019.

games, including a first-round playoff game versus No. 19 Fort Hays State, 38-27, at Key Stadium on Nov. 17. The Hounds’ senior class finished with a combined record of 37-10 over the last four years, good for the secondhighest win total over any four-year span in program history. Sophomore running back Al McKeller ’21 (criminal justice) was voted the GLVC Offensive Player of the Year after leading the league in rushing yards (1,300) and rushing touchdowns (12). Fellow-backfield-mate Toriano Clinton ’22 (sport management) was dubbed GLVC Freshman of the Year after setting the school record for rushing yards per attempt (8.3) and leading the nation in kickoff return average (37.9). In addition, a total of 20 Greyhounds garnered All-GLVC accolades, including 11 on the first team. Clay Hadley ’21 (business administration and management) (OL), Malik Higgins ’19 (sport management) (WR), McKeller (RB), Lucas Rice ’19 (business administration and management) (DL), Jacob Schmatz ’20 (business administration and management) (DL) and Cole Sigmund ’19 (operations and supply chain management) (LB) each picked up their second All-GLVC First Team recognition.

PHOTO BY JOSEPH HARRISON The Greyhounds competed for GLVC titles Feb. 6-9 in WOMEN’S CROSS Crawfordsville. The NCAA Division II COU NT RY Championships take place at the IU Natatorium in downtown Indianapolis March 13-16. The women’s cross country team capped off one of its most FOOT BALL successful seasons in recent memory, highlighted by the team’s first GLVC The football team concluded another championship since 1992. successful season in 2018, racking Seniors Mickayla Wenzel ’19 up 10 wins, a Great Lakes Valley (psychology) and Briana Leonard Conference (GLVC) title and an NCAA ’19 (physical therapy), along with Division II postseason berth. The sophomore Lauren Bailey ’21 (public Greyhounds won 10 consecutive


health education and promotion), earned All-GLVC recognition for their respective top-15 finishes at the event, held in Louisville. Meanwhile, Head Coach Brad Robinson was named the GLVC Women’s Cross Country Coach of the Year. Two weeks later at the NCAA Midwest Regional race in Hillsdale, MI, the Greyhounds finished seventh for their best finish since 2015. Wenzel and Bailey were each dubbed all-region for placing 12th and 17th, respectively.

BASKE T BA L L Bolstered by the return of point guard Jimmy King ’19 (biology), the men’s basketball team achieved its best start since 2014-15. The season kicked off with an exhibition win at Division I Valparaiso and followed with region wins versus the likes of Grand Valley State and Lake Superior State. The Greyhounds women’s basketball team also racked up some allimportant region wins in the early going, earning a two-point victory at Hillsdale to open the season and later hanging 90 points on an overmatched Tiffin team. Both teams hosted Bellarmine University on Saturday, Feb. 9, for the annual “Pack the House” night. The GLVC Championship Tournament is scheduled for March 7-10 in Edwardsville, IL, on the campus of Southern Illinois University Edwardsville. Jordan Loyd ’16 (environmental sustainability) became the first Greyhound men’s basketball player to sign a contract with an NBA organization when he inked a twoway deal with the Toronto Raptors in August 2018. Since the beginning of the 2018-19 NBA season, Loyd has averaged 5.5 minutes of action in four contests, scoring 3.0 points and grabbing 1.8 rebounds per game. As of publication, Loyd is just one of four players to average at least 20 points, five rebounds, and five assists in NBA G-League action.

win February 2, 2019, with a victory over Illinois Springfield. He becomes just the second men’s basketball coach to reach 200 wins at UIndy, as he trails only Angus Nicoson (483 wins) on the program’s all-time list. Jesse Kempson ’19 (finance) surpassed 1,000 career points at Drury University on January 10, 2019, to become the 41st Greyhound in program history to reach the milestone. The Indianapolis native is just 21 rebounds from 500 career boards, which would make him the 16th UIndy men’s basketball player ever to reach 1,000 points and 500 rebounds. The men’s swimming & diving team captured the 2019 GLVC title in February. With the championship meet taking place in nearby Crawfordsville, Ind., the Greyhounds held off Missouri S&T by 32.5 points to win its second straight league crown. Meanwhile, the women took runner-up honors, trailing only Drury in the final team standings. The Hounds garnered three major awards at the conclusion of the meet, with senior Rodrigo Codo Berti ’19 earning GLVC Men’s Swimmer of the Year honors, junior Payton Staman ’20 garnering GLVC Men’s Diver of Year and sophomore Cassie Kury ’21 picking up GLVC Women’s Diver of the Year accolades.

JORDAN LOYD ’16 WHEN HE P L AY E D F O R T H E H O U N D S .

GARY VAUGHT RETIRES After 24 years of service to the University of Indianapolis as the head coach of the baseball program, Gary Vaught is retiring as the mostwinningest coach in Greyhound history. Vaught resigns from his post with 808 career victories, two trips to the NCAA Division II Championships, and two GLVC tournament titles. A two-time conference Coach of the Year, Vaught had 118 players named to the all-GLVC list in his 24 seasons, including four Freshmen of the Year, two Pitchers of the Year, and two GLVC ScholarAthletes of the Year. The Greyhounds picked up two victories in the team’s first NCAA DII Championship appearance in 2000. “Everyone talks about family, but it really is a family here,” Vaught said when asked what it meant to be the head coach for 24 years. Vaught wanted to thank more people than he could remember, but talked about the day he was interviewed, citing the elements as a possible deterrent from leaving the state of Oklahoma. “Dr. David Huffman and Dr. Kenneth Borden were on the committee when they hired me, and they truly made me feel at home from the beginning. It was the greatest decision of my coaching career to come here. “I’ve been blessed with a ton of stops in my career. If you stay somewhere for 24 years, you develop memories and friendships. Dr. Sue Willey has been more than a tremendous athletics director; she’s been a great friend. “Scott Young was my right-hand man when I began 24 years ago. He was not only a great assistant coach, but he’s become such an amazing administrator and great leader for this university.” It is not the game Vaught is going to miss, at least not the most. It is the relationships that were planted, blossomed, and bloomed after this long that makes him forever grateful and humbled for this opportunity.

Men’s basketball head coach Stan Gouard marked a milestone coaching

WINTER/SPRING 2019

39


A

The alumni network of the University of Indianapolis is 34,000 strong and growing. Share the news with our fellow

B

Greyhounds – from personal to professional to monumental moments in your life. Class notes are published in the University’s digital and print editions of Portico. All original photos are returned. Mail a print to UIndy Alumni Engagement, 1400 Hanna Ave., Indianapolis, IN 46227, or submit a high-resolution digital image to alumni@ uindy.edu. C O N N E C T !

Updating your contact information ensures that you’ll receive the latest news about your alma mater and invitations to alumni and University events. Update your information at uindy. edu/alumni.

Justin Kemker ’10 ’15 and Erika Kemker ’12 welcomed daughter Marley Ann on May 13, 2018. (photo A) Bryan ’09 and Julie Brackemyre welcomed a son, Hudson Chase,

facebook.com/uindyalumni

on December 2, 2017. Bryan was

@UIndyAlumni

promoted to vice president of member services at the Indiana Municipal Power Agency in June 2018.

Y O U R

A L U M N I

C O N T A C T S

Elizabeth Coleman ’09 married Jacob Thompson in July 2017.

ANDY KOCHER ’98 ’15

LORA TELIHA

CORAN SIGMAN ’14

Associate Vice President of Alumni Engagement akocher@uindy.edu

Director of Alumni Engagement lteliha@uindy.edu

Associate Director of Alumni Engagement sigmanc@uindy.edu

The couple welcomed their first child, Eleanor Grace Thompson, in February 2018. The couple resides in Indianapolis. Elizabeth oversees the international outreach and education initiatives for the NCAA. (photo B)

Class notes in this issue of Portico represent those submitted between May 15, 2018 and November 30, 2018. Class notes submitted after November 30, 2018, will be featured in the next issue of Portico.

40

PORTICO


CLASS NOTES

E

C

F D

Kaley Gatto ’18 and Dallas Thacker ’17 were married on September 8, 2018. Dr. Gregory Clapper, professor of philosophy and religion, performed the ceremony with several alumni and

Chamroeun Kong ’15 has been

Tyonka P. Rimawi ’14 has been

Andrew B. “Andy” Troxel ’10

promoted to vice president of

selected as the new program

is director of client success at

origination at ACES in Carmel, IN.

director for community partnerships

SteadyServ in Fishers, IN.

at the Robins Foundation in Alexa M. Alfaro ’15 is the new

Richmond, VA.

assistant softball coach at the University of Evansville.

Jessica Arnett Ebinger ’10 graduated from an obstetrics and

Elizabeth J. “Betsy” Bigler ’13 has

gynecology residency at University

been promoted to chief operating

of South Carolina and has accepted

other UIndy professors in attendance.

Abby Stimpson ’15 has been hired

(photo C)

officer at Northwind Pharmaceuticals

a position as an OB/GYN physician

as a government relations specialist

in Indianapolis.

with St. Vincent Medical Group in

George R. “Rob” Dury ’17 is a consultant for the healthcare

at the Indiana Municipal Power Agency in Indianapolis.

performance advisory services team

Nicholas J. “Nick” Voelker ’14 has

at BKD in Indianapolis.

been named Athletic Trainer of the

Jordan Loyd ’16 made history as the first University of Indianapolis men’s basketball alumnus to play in the NBA. On a two-way contract with the Toronto

Fishers, IN. Jaclyn L. “Jacki” Klintoe ’12 is an attorney at Cline Williams Wright

Jennifer B. “Jen” Conely ’09

Johnson & Oldfather in Omaha, NE.

has been hired as the new head women’s basketball coach at the

Year for the Minor League Baseball

Bryttenny Sands ’12 was featured

Dominican Summer League by

in a touching June 22, 2018, article

the Professional Baseball Athletic

in the Pharos-Tribune (Logansport,

Alison Baker ’09 has been

Trainers Society.

IN) about how she helped fulfill the

promoted to retail experience

last request of a grandmother who

manager at International Game

wanted to see her out-of-town family.

Technology (IGT) in Indianapolis.

University of Wisconsin – Parkside.

Raptors, he scored his first points in

James ’14 and Stephanie Figy

the NBA regular season against the

’12 moved to the Twin Cities in

Chicago Bulls on Nov. 17.

Minnesota after James completed

Paul G. Corsaro ’12 ’14 has been

Katharine “Katie” Kirkton ’08 has

his Master of Fine Arts in creative

hired as an assistant coach for the

been promoted to creative manager

writing at Minnesota State University,

men’s basketball program at Indiana

at the Indiana CPA Society in

Mankato, in May. Stephanie now

University-Purdue University Fort

Indianapolis.

works as a marketing specialist

Wayne.

Thomas (Tom) Hakim ’15 has been named principal of Westfield’s Washington Woods Elementary School. Hakim is the second principal in the school’s history. Becca Christensen ’15 and Matt Harrison ’13 were married on

Matthew E. “Matt” Zimmerman

for Warners’ Stellian Appliance, and James works as a marketing

Seth Smoker ’11 is a staff attorney in

’07 is an economic development

communications specialist for

the Taft Indianapolis office litigation

specialist at One Dearborn in

Beckhoff Automation USA. (photo E)

group. (photo F)

Dearborn County, IN.

September 22, 2018. (photo D)

WINTER/SPRING 2019

41


J

H

G Elizabeth M. “Liz” Ramsey ’01 is I

director of basketball operations and intelligence for the Sacramento Kings in Sacramento, CA.

Dr. Nathan Sanderson ’05 has been

Virginia M. Sanders ’03 was

named executive director of the

nominated for a scholarship at the

South Dakota Retailers Association

2018 Women & Hi Tech Leading

in Pierre, SD. He currently serves as

Light Awards. The Leading Light

director of policy and operations for

Awards recognize and celebrate

Beenu Sikand ’99 earned

the governor of South Dakota.

women of achievement in STEM

“Chairman’s Circle Gold” distinction

who are innovators in their industries

at Berkshire Hathaway in 2017.

Mi’Chelle Z. Bettner ’99 is the new director of marketing at Relocation Strategies in Indianapolis.

Shannon R. Schwier ’04 has

and have shown expertise,

been appointed manager of the

professionalism, leadership, service,

Tina M. Seymour ’98 is the new

Manhattan Landmark Four Seasons

senior director of school support at

Jenna Brown ’07 married Jeremy

courage and tenacity throughout

Hotel New York Downtown in New

their careers.

The Mind Trust in Indianapolis.

Baier on May 22, 2010, in Normal, IL.

York City. Sumeeta Bhatia ’02 was added

Austin Hamner ’98 is serving in the

Azalea May and Jersey Marie, into

Timothy K. Gilford ’04, ’06 is the

to the Community Health Network

United Nations Command Military

their home on December 28, 2017,

new director of marketing and sales

Foundation board of directors in

Armistice Commission in the Korean

and they became a forever family

at LightStream in Buffalo, IN.

March, and appointed president-

Demilitarized Zone.

They welcomed two beautiful girls,

on August 6, 2018.

Adam J. George ’04 has been

elect for the Board of Directors, Sycamore School, Indianapolis in

Carl Dodd ’97, director of finance

Corrine Michel ’06 participated in

promoted to principal at Waccamaw

Miami University’s Earth Expeditions

High School in Pawleys Island, SC,

global field course in Baja during the

after serving as vice principal for the

summer of 2018.

past two years.

Amy Schlessman ’06 is an assistant

Matthew Byerly ’04 has been

professor in the physical therapy

hired as the new instructor in music

program at the University of Findlay

and middle school choir director for

while she continues to work as a

the Lake Ridge New Tech School

school-based physical therapist.

Corporation in Northwest Indiana.

Amy is the author of “Recycle

He has also been selected to serve

Stephani Remetta ’01 joined

Bin Boogie: Move and Learn with

as the secretary for the Northwest

Pandora Media in January 2018 as

Recyclables,” an activity guide to

Indiana Excellence in Theatre

the senior sales executive covering

combining movement and learning

Foundation, a non-profit organization

Indiana and Kentucky.

with common household recyclables.

that serves to market and network

Therapist of the Year by the

regional theatre productions.

South Dakota Physical Therapy

2018-2019 and will serve as the president for 2019-2020 & 20202021. (photo G) Angela M. Bratina ’01, ’06 has been appointed the administrative director for the Center of Women and Children at Franciscan Health Indianapolis and Mooresville.

at Endangered Species Chocolate, has been named “CFO of the Year” for 2018 by the Indianapolis Business Journal. Gregory S. “Greg” Smith ’95 is the new head volleyball coach at Cedarville University in Cedarville, OH. Patrick L. Hauer ’95, professor of physical therapy at Briar Cliff University (Sioux City, IA), has been honored as the 2018 Physical

Association.

42

PORTICO


CLASS NOTES

K

M L

Amber L. Denney ’95 is on the

Corine Konz List ’92 and Alan List

that included 10 days of running

James Dennis Rippy ’78 retired from

Indianapolis Children’s Choir board

’92 celebrated their 25th wedding

in Indiana and passed through

teaching at the John Glenn school

of directors.

anniversary on June 5, 2018. They

Indianapolis on June 26, 2018.

corporation in Walkerton, IN, after 40

have six children.

(photo J)

years of service. He taught business

recently joined the accounting firm

Jeffrey S. “Jeff” Mitchell ’91 has

Juleen Henderson ’85 is on the

freshman physical education,

Sponsel CPA Group as a tax services

been elected to the DecisionLink

board of directors for a free health

weightlifting and conditioning. He

manager. (photo H)

board of directors.

care clinic in Siesta Key, FL.

was also a head coach in four sports

Bradley R. Brownell ’94 has agreed

Pamela D. Ritzline ’87 PT, EdD,

Alan Grieger ’84 competed in his

to a six-year contract extension

received the Lucy Blair Service

first Naturally Fit Federation (NFF)

through 2024 as head coach of the

Award from the American Physical

Classic Physique show in April 2018

men’s basketball team at Clemson

Therapy Association at the 2018

where he placed fifth in the novice

University.

NEXT Conference in Orlando, FL.

division and second in the masters

(photo I)

division. (photo K)

interim president of Endicott College

Randall L. “Randy” Heisler ’86 is

Dr. James W. “Jim” Hurrell ’84 has

this success, the high school named

in Beverly, MA.

the new track and cross country

been named the Walter Scott, Jr.,

the Dennis Rippy Track Invitational in

coach at Vincennes University.

Presidential Chair in Environmental

his honor. He also received the John

Science and Engineering at

Glenn Falcon award for his years

Colorado State University.

of service in athletics at John Glenn

Philip Jackson ’94 is a CPA who

law, marketing, general business,

Kathleen Barnes ’93 was appointed

Cindy Bickel ’93 has been promoted to scrum master at Zotec

Donald Gillespie ’86 serves as

Partners.

Portland City Court Judge and is

over the course of 28 years. He was honored with the school corporation teacher of the year (2004), Region 2 Division 2 football coach of the year (1987-90), and coached the smallest school to win the Penn track sectional (1995). Because of

(2008) and the Northern States

the runner’s coordinator for The

Glenn L. Woods, Jr. ’80 is a teacher

Katherine E. Welch ’93 has

Conference service award for years

Run Across America/ Run For The

in the clay studio at the Marco Island

been named one of the “25

of service in the Northern Lakes

Fallen. Participants in the event

Center for the Arts in Florida.

Most Influential Hoosiers” by the

Conference (2008). He and his wife,

run from Ft. Irwin, CA, to Arlington

Indianapolis Business Journal.

National Cemetery in honor of the

Charlie Sparks ’79, president

Dr. Welch is the founder of

20,000 service men and women

and CEO of the Greater Kokomo

Relentless, a nonprofit that helps

who have paid the ultimate sacrifice

Economic Development Alliance,

healthcare professionals and global

since the bombing of the USS Cole

was one of eight people to receive

organizations assist victims of human

in 2000. The run lasted 120 days,

statewide recognition from the

trafficking.

passed through 19 states and totaled

Indiana Economic Development

6,000 miles. Gillespie coordinated

Association for having a significant

more than 400 runners for a relay

impact on the Hoosier economy.

Sarah, also class of 1978, celebrated their 40th wedding anniversary on July 30, 2018.

WINTER/SPRING 2019

43


Robert G. “Bob” Smock ’69 will be inducted into the Indiana Basketball Hall of Fame in March 2019. Patricia Youmans ’67 and husband, Al, have traded the beaches of Florida for the mountains of Las Vegas. Both of their sons live in Nevada, so they made the move in May 2018 to a suburb of Las Vegas to enjoy family and the dry air. Jim Ellars ’66 retired in June 2018 after 52 years of service in N

the Greenfield-Central (IN) School Corporation. He taught third, fourth, in Greenfield. Jim and his wife,

THE CAMPUS COMMUNITY

controller and accountant for more

Georgia, a former UIndy student, are

T H I S PA S T Y E A R .

than 35 years. Prior to becoming a

enjoying retirement in Indianapolis.

married for 45 years and has two daughters and four grandsons.

Ray Trisler ’65 fondly remembers pitching against Steve Carlton (who was named one of the top 25 greatest pitchers of all time) in 1964 as a member of the Milwaukee

Royce D. Thrush ’72 retired in 2017

Braves (now Atlanta Braves) farm

from 32 years teaching music at Park

team in Greenville, SC. Trisler was

Tudor School in Indianapolis. Prior

the only pitcher to beat Carlton that

David G. Sease ’77 is on the

to Park Tudor, he was an instructor

year. Trisler retired from Eli Lilly and

Indianapolis Urban League board of

of piano at Butler University and

Company after 25 years of service

directors.

freelance musician, serving as

in 1993.

pianist for, among others, the Indiana Mike Cagle ’77 celebrated 35 years

Repertory Theatre, Indianapolis

of excellent service to the F.C. Tucker

Opera, Indianapolis Arts Chorale,

Company. (photo L previous page)

and Indianapolis Maennerchor.

Manny McGuire ’73 helped host

David Geible ’70 retired from the

more than 50 alumni and guests

Fremont County Assessor’s Office

for the 11th annual baseball team

September 30, 2017, and from the

reunion at Victory Field and McQ’s

Fremont County Fire Protection

during the weekend of July 27-28,

District as a volunteer in 2015. He

2018. (photo M, previous page)

plans to continue to improve the

Consumer Counselor. He previously

mountain cabin he built near the townsite of Atlantic City, WY, during the summer and enjoy it for crosscountry skiing and snowshoeing in

Brenda Cosey ’62 retired from the East Orange School District in June 2015 after 31 years of service.

C L A S S N O T E S

Submit your class notes at uindy.edu/alumni.

the winter. (photo N)

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44

PORTICO

T H E PA S S I N G O F T H E

served as a financial officer,

more than five years. He has been

with the Indiana Office of Utility

R E S P E C T F U L LY R E C O G N I Z E S FOLLOWING MEMBERS OF

in the United States Marine Corps for

September 2017 as a utility analyst

OF INDIANAPOLIS

fifth and sixth grades at four schools

student at Indiana Central, he served

Charles Patrick ’72 retired in

THE UNIVERSITY

Clarena E. Huffington ’41 passed away July 28, 2018. She was a teacher of English for more than 34 years and taught at Arsenal Technical High School and Arlington High School, where she was head of the English department. Clarena was a member of Meridian Street United Methodist Church. Dr. Robert L. “Bob” Frey ’60 passed away June 28, 2018. He served over 40 years in college teaching and administration and authored, co-authored or edited eight books, numerous articles and many presentations. After retirement, he became interested in the history of the Evangelical United Brethren (EUB) Church and served for many years on the Advisory Council for the EUB Heritage Center at United Theological Seminary. Dr. Stephen Anthony Graham passed away February 7, 2018. Dr. Graham was a UIndy history and political science faculty member and was named the 1992 “Teacher of the Year.” While at the University, he authored several books on the worldfamous 20th century missionaryevangelist Dr. E. Stanley Jones. Dr. Graham retired in 2009 after serving on the UIndy faculty for 25 years.


Mary L. “Wimp” Baumgartner ’57 passed away June 2, 2018. Mary played in the All-American Girls Professional Baseball League and was named to the 1953 all-star team. She taught and coached at Jimtown High School in Elkhart, IN, from 1957 to 1969, then at Leo High School in Leo, IN, from 1969 until her retirement in 1985. She was inducted into the UIndy Athletic Hall of Fame in 1989 and the softball field was named after her in 2012.

Donald Everet Ray ’50 passed away December 19, 2018. Don began his career at L.S. Ayres before being drafted into the Army, where he served as a psychologist. He returned to Ayres after his service duty. His career flourished, becoming Vice President of Stores in 1971. Later, the Ayres family sold the store to Associated Dry Goods, which sent him to Baltimore to run Stewart & Co. in 1978, then in 1982 he went to St. Louis to head Stix, Baer & Fuller. He ended his career with Sibley’s of New York in Rochester. Don was awarded the Sagamore of the Wabash and was also commissioned a Kentucky colonel. Don’s family, above all, was the most important part of his life.

Anna F. Dawson ’37 – January 12, 2018 Clarena E. Huffington ’41 – July 28, 2018 Daisy P. Torrence ’42 – August 11, 2018 Genevieve M. Whitson ’43 – October 6, 2018 Slee O. Smith ’43 – November 11, 2018 Rev. Charles H. McClung, Jr. ’43 – December 5, 2018 Betty J. Esmon ’46 – August 27, 2018 Joe Burkhardt ’49 – October 3, 2018 Bert M. Keck ’49 – October 23, 2018 Rebecca S. Easley ’50 – May 29, 2018 Paul E. Dodson ’50 – October 25, 2018 Wayne E. Fansler ’50 – November 10, 2018 Donald E. Ray ’50 – December 19, 2018 Rev. Russell F. “Russ” Coats ’51 – September 11, 2018 Gloria L. McGrath ’52 – May 17, 2018 Robert J. DeNoon ’52 – August 3, 2018 Rose M. Wooden ’52 – August 11, 2018 Haldon T. “Hal” Cole ’54 – May 24, 2018 Donna T. Zigler ’54 – November 9, 2018 Bob C. Wood ’56 – June 10, 2018 Mary L. “Wimp” Baumgartner ’57 – June 2, 2018 Otis L. Cassetty ’57 – October 8, 2018 Clara Herring ’58 – September 11, 2018 Leo F. Moye ’59 – June 27, 2018 Richard E. “Dick” Bunnell ’59 – November 16, 2018 Dr. Robert L. Frey ’60 – June 28, 2018 Marilyn J. Raker ’60 – September 5, 2018 Alice Moore ’62 – November 20, 2018 Bette Lou Groves ’62 – December 1, 2018 Nancey J. Acree ’63 – October 29, 2018 Velma C. “Carole” Spawn Marschke Graf ’64 – November 6, 2018 Robert B. “Bob” Turner ’65 – May 22, 2018 Karen L. Paswater ’67 ’71 – July 21, 2018 Doretta Faust ’69 – August 12, 2018

Joseph D. “Joe” Cathcart ’84 passed away September 30, 2018. Joseph worked at F.A. Wilhelm Construction since 1996 as the chief financial officer. He was involved in his community including Holy Spirit Catholic Church, Scecina Memorial High School, the University of Indianapolis, Big Brothers Big Sisters, College Mentor for Kids, and the Catholic Youth Organization, where he coached youth football for 20 years.

Dr. Kathleen Koval passed away November 10, 2018. Dr. Koval was a faculty member of the UIndy School of Nursing from 1987 until her retirement in 2010. In 1996, the University opened the Koval Center, an on-campus clinic that provided services such as immunizations and health screenings to UIndy employees. Dr. Koval was instrumental in the development of the center, which also continues to play an important role in training nursing students through real clinical experiences.

Frederic P. “Fred” Dausch ’69 – December 9, 2018 James A. Wesner ’70 – May 18, 2018 Sharon K. Huehls ’70 – November 30, 2018 Sister Juliann Babcock ’71 – June 15, 2018 Austin N. Douglas, Jr. ’72 – October 13, 2018 Kevin A. Ruschhaupt ’74 – November 18, 2018 Ramona P. McLean ’75 – June 30, 2018 Rodger D. Coleman ’75 – October 19, 2018 Kenneth M. “Ken” Low ’76 – August 11, 2018 Jane A. White ’77 – September 1, 2018 Thomas L. “Tom” Clymer ’78 – July 27, 2018 Nancy A. Sharp ’78 – August 25, 2018 Daylian R. Doan ’78 – September 1, 2018 Douglas E. “Doug” Weber ’78 – November 8, 2018 Peter T. Wenzel ’80 – November 1, 2018 Kimberly A. Huffman ’81 – May 25, 2018 Sarah L. Isaak ’81 – August 26, 2018 Dinah L. Woelfel ’83 – December 23, 2018 Joseph D. “Joe” Cathcart ’84 – September 30, 2018 John R. Healey ’86 – December 12, 2018 Sylvia A. Patten ’88 – September 22, 2018 Vicki A. Thalls ’88 – October 16, 2018 Judith A. “Judy” Stadler ’90 ’95 – July 29, 2018 Virginia E. “Gini” Collier ’94 – May 29, 2018 Todd A. Sturgeon ’94 – November 12, 2018 Amanda L. Langdon ’97 ’02 – July 26, 2018 Sarah K. Baker ’98 – June 7, 2018 Lawrence D. Seawood ’98 – September 10, 2018 Jacquelin Gamble “Pebbles” Johnson ’07 – September 14, 2018 Janelle M. Leary ’15 – September 16, 2018 Dr. Stephen A. Graham* – February 7, 2018 Shirley V. Spangler* – December 29, 2018 *Retired faculty and staff

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35,341 T O TA L C A M PA I G N DONORS THROUGH 2 01 8

With your support of the Campaign, the University of Indianapolis has expanded experiential learning, added a school of engineering and increased

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opportunity for the more than 40 percent of first-generation students at UIndy.

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Building on the success and momentum of the Campaign, the University of Indianapolis is continuing with a second phase of the Campaign that will conclude in 2022, commemorating the institution’s 120th anniversary. This marks a pivotal moment for the University to continue forward, providing more student opportunities and launching new programs to prepare UIndy students to become change-makers in our world.

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$63 MILLION

“WE HAVE ACCOMPLISHED GREAT THINGS TOGETHER, BUT THIS IS JUST THE BEGINNING. WE HAVE A RESPONSIBILITY TO CONTINUE FORWARD IN THE UNIVERSITY’S VISION.”

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J U LY 2 0 1 2 – J A N 2 0 1 9

— Mrs. Yvonne Shaheen, Campaign Chair and University

9 6% OF STUDENTS

Board of Trustees, Immediate Past Chair

RECIEVE FINANCIAL AID

BUT WE’RE NOT STOPPING THERE!

Multiply your impact! Visit matchinggifts.com/uindy to see if your employer will match your gift.

Establish an endowed scholarship. More than 35 endowed scholarships have been established over the course of the campaign. Endowed scholarships can be established across a five-year pledge period and leave a legacy of support for generations of UIndy students.

SUPPORT UINDY 46

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Contact us at giving@uindy.edu for more information.

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Make an annual gift online or enroll in monthly gifts supporting your favorite department or UIndy initiative at uindy.edu/giving.

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Fundraising efforts have been extended an additional year to June 2022, when the University will celebrate its 120th anniversary.

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UINDY ALUMNI & FRIENDS ARE GREYHOUNDS FOREVER

GET INVOLVED! WHETHER YOU ARE CONNECTING WITH CLASSMATES, GETTING UP TO DATE ON THE ACCOMPLISHMENTS OF FELLOW ALUMS OR PARTICIPATING IN EXCITING EVENTS, WE HOPE THAT YOU WILL STAY CONNECTED WITH UINDY. JOIN THE ALUMNI ASSOCIATION AT ONE (OR MORE!) OF THESE EVENTS. FOR A FULL LIST OF EVENTS, VISIT GETINVOLVED.UINDY.EDU

BILL BRIGHT FIELD DEDICATION SATURDAY, APRIL 14, 2019

FAMILY WEEKEND SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 2019

Greyhound Baseball will dedicate the Bill Bright Field in honor of William Bright, who devoted 37 years to the University as a professor, coach and athletic director. The dedication ceremony will include brunch on campus and on-field ceremonies before the men’s baseball team takes on the William Jewel’s Cardinals.

Family Weekend, a longstanding Greyhound tradition at the University of Indianapolis, is the perfect time for students and their family and friends to experience together the undergraduate experience.

UINDY DAY — WEAR, SHARE, GIVE, GO! THURSDAY, APRIL 25, 2019

A hound always finds its way home. Relive favorite memories, relax and reconnect with UIndy friends at Homecoming 2019! Contact alumni@ uindy.edu to host an affinity reunion or to volunteer.

WEAR your favorite UIndy apparel that day, SHARE your favorite UIndy memory on social media, GO to a special event and GIVE to one of our many featured projects that day.

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/UINDY

/UINDY

/UINDY

/UINDY

HOMECOMING SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 2019

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/UINDYTV

/UNIVERSITY-OF -INDIANAPOLIS

NEWSDESK@ U I N D Y. E D U

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1400 East Hanna Avenue Indianapolis, IN 46227

Seeking Nominations FOR THE NAMING OF

THE GOOD HALL PILLARSÂ We are grateful for the overwhelming support of our fundraising efforts to renovate Good Hall. The project has inspired a new tradition that aligns our institutional values with the historic significance of Good Hall, whose pillars have stood tall for nearly 120 years. Starting this year, during each future Homecoming celebration, the University will honor four people connected to the University of Indianapolis, who represent the institutional core values (inquiry, innovation, leadership and service). Their names will be placed prominently on four of the six pillars and, together, we will celebrate how these honorees exemplify these values.

Submit nominations at uindy.edu/goodhallpillars 48

PORTICO

Profile for University of Indianapolis

Portico - Winter/Spring 2019  

Portico, the official magazine of the University of Indianapolis and produced by the Office of University Communications & Marketing, is a c...

Portico - Winter/Spring 2019  

Portico, the official magazine of the University of Indianapolis and produced by the Office of University Communications & Marketing, is a c...

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