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The New is Now the Norm When you look at the 50-year history of UCF, there is a clear line of demarcation. There are those students who went to class with pencils and paper, and those who carry smartphones. There are students who sat in desks and listened to professors’ lectures in real time, and students who take online or blended classes from the convenience of their homes, dorms or the neighborhood coffee shop. “Today, online classes are an expectation,” says Dr. Thomas Cavanagh, associate vice president of the Center for Distributed Learning. “Students don’t care about modality. They want what they want when they want it.” “I remember leaving notes on a bulletin board in the library to let someone know where and when to meet me,” Marisabel Wolfinger, ’89, recalls. “It seems so Fred Flintstone now.” “We can replicate the birth of the universe and observe it over and over again,” says Dr. Joel Hartman, vice provost for Information Technologies and Resources. “We can even replicate nuclear explosions and evaluate their effects. You couldn’t do that [20 years ago] in a lab.” “I can’t even imagine how long it must have taken for students in generations before me to sift through the card catalog doing research,” Heather Masessa, ’10, exclaims. “I could turn on my computer and get answers instantly.” LEARNING IS CHANGING.

Dr. Thomas Cavanagh, Center for Distributed Learning

Pegasus Magazine Spring 2013  

The 50th Anniversary of UCF issue

Pegasus Magazine Spring 2013  

The 50th Anniversary of UCF issue