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University of Brighton

Contact details

University of Brighton in Hastings Havelock Road Hastings East Sussex TN34 1BE telephone 08456 020607

UCAS institutional code University of Brighton Hastings campus (BRITN) B72 campus code U

www.brighton.ac.uk/hastings

Hastings prospectus 2013

Central contact details University of Brighton Mithras House Lewes Road Brighton BN2 4AT telephone 01273 644644 fax 01273 642607

Priory Square, the newest addition to the University of Brighton in Hastings, is enabling us to help many more students in Hastings, and is home to specialist facilities for our biology students.


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Havelock Road Building

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Priory Square Building

www.brighton.ac.uk/hastings


Choosing the right course and the right university has never been more important. Here at the University of Brighton we understand the importance of this decision for you and your family and we will help you make the right choice. We support our students throughout their university experience from the day they first ask us about studying here, right up to graduation and beyond. We are committed to inspiring and supporting students from all kinds of backgrounds, experience and education. We offer qualifications in subjects including TV and radio production, broadcast journalism, business, computing, English literature, history, education, environmental and human biology, mathematics and sociology. Our graduates are achieving significant success in their careers because our courses meet their needs and those of their employers. You can find out about courses and work placements from page 16. Our students tell us that they really value our friendly and supportive environment. Class sizes are small and students receive a great deal of personal support from course tutors and support staff. Our second building will open in summer 2012 and will enable us to offer nursing, science and healthcare courses as well as additional student facilities. Our students and staff feature in this prospectus and you can find out what it’s like from them to study here by coming to one of our open days, or by talking to Dan and Jen on Facebook and Twitter see page 15. I look forward to meeting you.

Margaret Wallis Director of the Hastings campus

CONTENTS Choosing the University of Brighton 02–17 Innovative and relevant 02 A leading university with a professional approach 04 Career-focused 06 Industry-standard facilities 08 Putting our students first 10 Your university in the heart of Hastings 12 A day in the life... 14 Hastings online 15 Which type of course? 16 Courses 19–55 Single honours degrees 19–37 Joint honours degrees 39–55 All about... How to apply Entry requirements Do I have the right qualifications? Fees, funding and scholarships Living here Support for students

57–69 58 60 62 64 66 68

How to find us Course finder General index

70 72 73

HASTINGS CAMPUS OPEN DAYS Find out more about our courses, meet students and tutors and get a taste of our learning experience. • Saturday 10 November 2012 • Saturday 16 February 2013 • Saturday 16 March 2013 • Saturday 11 May 2013 Find out more and book your place at www.brighton.ac.uk/hastings.

www.brighton.ac.uk/hastings 01


The University of Brighton is one of the leading professional and vocational universities in the UK. We are committed to contributing to the success of Hastings by providing outstanding university-level courses and facilities for the community.

PIONEERING HIGHER EDUCATION

Hastings is our newest campus, and one of the latest examples of our ability to anticipate and respond to change, something we have been doing successfully over our 150-year history. The opening of our second Hastings building in Priory Square has enabled us to offer a number of new courses as well as improved facilities for our students.

RESEARCH WITH REAL-LIFE IMPACT

Research at the University of Brighton is having a real impact on the world around us. We contribute to a deeper understanding of issues that touch us all, including sustainability, ageing, diabetes and social inclusion.

02 www.brighton.ac.uk/hastings | innovative and relevant

Hastings is one of the outstanding places in the UK to study broadcast media, according to the Sunday Times.


RELEVANT FOR YOUR CAREER

Each year Hastings students graduate prepared for careers in fields including broadcasting, business, computing, education and social science. This year we’ve added some new courses, including Education and Sociology, Digital Film Production and Nursing.

Our innovative approach helps us to attract and support students from all kinds of non-traditional backgrounds. For more information about the range of course options, see page 16 or visit www.brighton.ac.uk/ hastings.

You can choose from a range of University of Brighton courses at foundation degree, honours degree and postgraduate level.

innovative and relevant | www.brighton.ac.uk/hastings 03


We work with many partners in industry, the professions and the community to make sure that our courses are up to date and reflect the latest professional knowledge. Our partners also provide work placements, and visit us to share their experiences with our students. We provide professional environments for our students to develop the right skills for their careers. Our staff have professional experience that complements their teaching and research. Many of our undergraduate courses are accredited by professional and statutory bodies.

LEARNING AND TEACHING

The consistently high quality of our learning and teaching has been recognised by positive evaluations from the Quality Assurance Agency and Ofsted. The university has been awarded five National Teaching Fellowships, and three Hastings-based staff have received university teaching fellowships in recognition of their outstanding approach to curriculum delivery and student support.

04 www.brighton.ac.uk/hastings | a leading university with a professional approach

Industry experts contribute to the teaching and development of our courses.


PROFESSIONAL ACCREDITATION

Our business, computing and broadcast media courses are accredited by professional and statutory bodies. Successful completion of a professionally accredited course indicates that you have reached the occupational standard required to practice that profession. This certified recognition means that our students have the chance to be equipped with industry-standard skills, industry contacts and a competitive advantage in the graduate marketplace.

A PROFESSIONAL FOCUS

Experts from industry, the community and the professions contribute to teaching and help keep our courses relevant by working with us on their development. Lecturers are engaged in research or are working professionally in their field, which informs and enhances their teaching. Many of our students undertake work experience as part of their studies, in projects, placements and workshops, preparing them for the workplace.

REAL-LIFE LEARNING ENVIRONMENTS

University of Brighton students are able to gain hands-on experience with industrystandard equipment through our well-equipped studios and other teaching facilities. These include a newsroom, a TV studio, a mac lab, digital gaming and professional-standard editing suites as well as a newly established laboratory with state-of-the-art bioscience equipment.

Nursing students spend around half of their course on placement, getting real-life on-the-job experience.

Our accreditations • Chartered Management Institute • British Computer Society • Broadcast Journalism Training Council (pending) • Avid Authorised Training Partner • Apple Authorised Training Centre Over ninety per cent of our 2010 graduates were in relevant employment or further study within six months of graduating.

Our award-winning student volunteer schemes also offer excellent opportunities for personal development.

a leading university with a professional approach | www.brighton.ac.uk/hastings 05


COURSES DESIGNED FOR EMPLOYMENT

The ways in which we teach and support your learning, together with our award-winning support services, will help you realise your career aspirations. You will focus on career planning from the start of your course, and project work is designed to prepare you for professional life, meeting your needs and those of your future employers.

Our courses are designed to meet your needs and those of your future employers. Many include practical, relevant work experience, so you can develop your skills, build your confidence and improve your employment prospects, whatever career you may choose.

PLACEMENT AND WORK EXPERIENCE OPPORTUNITIES

Work placements are a great opportunity to gain skills and experience that you can apply to your coursework, and give you the chance to impress potential employers and to develop contacts. Many students go on to work with the same companies after graduating. Your course tutor or a placements officer will help you arrange your placement.

06 www.brighton.ac.uk/hastings | career-focused

Our students start to realise their career ambitions from their first day at Hastings.


AWARD-WINNING VOLUNTEERING SERVICE

Active Student, our awardwinning volunteering service, will help to boost your career prospects and supported placements and make your CV stand out from the crowd. Find out more information at www.brighton.ac.uk/ volunteering.

SUPPORT FROM OUR CAREERS SERVICE – DURING AND AFTER YOUR STUDIES

The university’s Careers Service provides specialist guidance in career planning. Careers staff are in regular contact with over 1,800 businesses and organisations which advertise vacancies with us, attend our events and careers fairs and take part in employer presentations when you can meet company representatives more informally.

The Careers Service can help you make applications and gain interview experience. Support is available for up to two years after you graduate and for life if you join the Brighton Graduate Association, which is free. Find out more at www.brighton.ac.uk/careers.

Graduate to success: for many of our students, gaining their qualifications opens up exciting new careers.

Becki Adams English Literature and Education joint honours graduate After graduating in 2011 I went on to do the PGCE Secondary English course in Brighton and have been working on placement in a local secondary school as part of this. Learning about the local educational practices on my degree gave me an insight into the area and the course allowed me to progress in my career and realise that I have the capability to succeed in teaching, thanks to the skills and knowledge I gained.

career-focused | www.brighton.ac.uk/hastings 07


The University of Brighton’s campus in Hastings is set in modern buildings that have benefited from over £7m of investment. Our buildings accommodate all teaching styles, from lectures to seminars and one-toone tutorials. As a student at the university’s campus in Hastings, you have access to excellent facilities to help you achieve success on your course and prepare you for the world of work. Our industry-standard broadcast media facilities include a green screen television studio and a three-room radio broadcast facility, home of the student radio station, Burst. Our students have use of two online editing suites with ProTools 5.1 surround sound audio mixing/encoding, a macbased Avid Media Composer editing room, a ProTools audio post production room, a macbased digital post production room and many other tools that match those they’ll find in the workplace. Digital games production students can create and test their work on Microsoft platforms in our brand new games lab which is built around Xbox 360 consoles, Kinect controllers and Windows Phone devices.

ONLINE ENVIRONMENT You’ll have access to studentcentral, our online student portal.

For example, you can access ebooks, journals and other study materials tailored to your course, an online library, email, newsfeeds, blogs, urgent announcements relevant to you – and you can connect with other students. When you accept our offer, you will receive your university email account and access to a special area on studentcentral. From there you will be able to view personalised new student information including important dates, checklists and FAQs.

08 www.brighton.ac.uk/hastings | industry-standard facilities

You can meet other students online before you arrive, and also access the new student discussion forum and blogs. You’ll be allocated your own lifelong email address and 10GB of storage space. We have dedicated online student ambassadors who operate through various social networking sites and are happy to answer any queries that you may have. Details of how to contact them can be found on page 15.

Our broadcast media and computing facilities reflect what you’ll find in the workplace.


In addition to books supporting our courses, the library also contains special collections including the National Chess Library and the Hastings & Rother Family History Society library.

OPEN ACCESS COMPUTER ROOMS

Our students have access to two computer rooms in Hastings, open six days a week in term time. These machines have internet access and are networked to printers. Some computers have specialist software from the teaching rooms, allowing students to work with the software out of class hours. Technical support is normally available Monday to Friday from 8.30am–9pm in term time.

LIBRARY – MORE THAN BOOKS, OPEN TO ALL

Our library is open six days a week in term time and Monday to Friday during the vacation. It contains books, journals, newspapers, teaching resources and audiovisual items, and has access to online journals and databases, and the internet. Students from any course can hire video recording equipment for project work from the library. Library services include arranging loans from other libraries and information skills sessions.

University of Brighton at Hastings has facilities that prepare you for the future.

CAFE AND STUDENT LOUNGE

Our cafes serve drinks and snacks throughout the day, and the student lounge offers students a space to relax on comfortable sofas, play pool or just hang out and socialise.

INDUSTRY-STANDARD EQUIPMENT

Our broadcast media, radio and television production students work on their projects using a range of industry-standard equipment that ensures they have relevant and practical experience to start their careers.

industry-standard facilities | www.brighton.ac.uk/hastings 09


Brighton is one of a handful of universities to achieve the Matrix Standard in recognition of the quality of our student advice and guidance services. Student Services in Hastings offer careers advice, personal counselling and learning support.

PERSONAL SUPPORT

Our dedicated student support tutor offers a confidential service for advice on academic and non-academic issues.

INDIVIDUAL SUPPORT FOR SPECIFIC PERSONAL NEEDS

We offer specialist disability support, mental health support and learning mentors for students who declare a specific learning difficulty, such as dyslexia or dyspraxia.

We are proud to have received the Frank Buttle Trust Quality Mark for our commitment to helping care leavers through university. We have a qualified, experienced counsellor with whom you can discuss your worries and concerns about university life or personal matters. Our chaplain is available for students and staff of all faiths and those with none, to support them in whatever way is most needed.

10 www.brighton.ac.uk/hastings | putting our students first


CHILDCARE

We offer advice and support for a wide range of personal, academic and other issues while you study here.

improve the physical, spiritual and mental wellbeing of students. Very important to all of our students is the Activities and Events Zone, we support the Societies Federation, Sports Federation, sports clubs and the Eastbourne and Hastings entertainments and events reps.

We can recommend local nurseries and may be able to advise you about grants for full-time students with children. We also structure many of our courses around the needs of students with other major commitments, including family life. More information on this can be found at www.brighton.ac.uk/ childcare.

CAREERS SERVICE – THROUGHOUT YOUR TIME HERE AND BEYOND

We support our students on their journey to success in their chosen careers from the day they begin their course until after they have graduated. You’ll have guidance via a personal career plan from the start of your course. Our Careers Service can provide advice to help you make an effective transition to employment or further study for up to two years after you have completed your course, or indefinitely for members of the Brighton Graduate Association (it’s free to join for our graduates). You can read more about our careers support and the Brighton Graduate Association on page 68–69.

Bruno Batista is the Students’ Union administrator here at the Hastings campus As SU administrator I work alongside the campus rep and the rest of the SU team to make sure that students have the representation and support they need should they have a problem, and also to make sure that they can access all the services we provide. We divide our services up into four zones. In the Academic Affairs Zone we make sure the students’ views are listened and acted upon. The Campus Zone deals with community and campus issues, making our students part of the university community but also a part of the local area and community that they live in. We believe that the students’ wellbeing is an essential part of the student experience; the Wellbeing Zone provides services and runs campaigns to

We run regular social evenings which are an informal space for students to gather for a table tennis game, Xbox or Wii competitions or just good old Scrabble and those that want to can continue their evening at one of the local pubs or clubs. I actively encourage our students to come by the SU office and give us ideas for events and/or activities they would like to see organised. We have a campus development team in Hastings which works towards making the students’ ideas come to reality. There is someone in the SU office every week day during term time, our doors are always open for every one of our students and if we can’t help out with your query then we will point you in the direction of our excellent student services team. For further information visit www.ubsu.net.

putting our students first | www.brighton.ac.uk/hastings 11


The University of Brighton’s story in Hastings is one of achievement and success, of making a local impact that has received national recognition. Our campus is at the heart of the extensive regeneration programme that is ensuring that Hastings and Rother realise their full potential as highly desirable places to live, study, work and visit.

OUR COMMITMENT TO EDUCATION IN HASTINGS

We are committed to supporting achievement and success in the local area. By bringing our experience and excellence to Hastings, we are helping to make it a centre of aspiration and achievement for people in the local area as well as those who come from further afield to study here. We have been given sponsorship for students from the area from local patrons to provide aspiration awards and employability grants to support their study and transition in to work.

OPEN TO ALL

Our buildings are open to everyone. Even if you’re not a student, you can come in to read the books, newspapers and journals or use the copying facilities in the library, or pick up a snack in our cafe. We are available during office hours for anyone to drop in and ask about studying here – as some of our students have done. Local businesses and groups also use our facilities for meetings and events.

12 www.brighton.ac.uk/hastings | your university in the heart of hastings

OUR CONTACT WITH LOCAL SERVICES

We work with learning centres in Hastings to make sure that anyone wishing to improve their prospects through study has that option open to them. We work closely with local education services to provide pathways through education for local children, children in care, care leavers and mature students, and to support those students through their university experience.

Karen Stunt, one of the 2012 Aspiration award winners – the awards provide additional support for students from the Hastings and Rother area.


WIDENING PARTICIPATION

We have two dedicated members of staff who work in the local community, visiting schools and colleges to help to raise aspirations. They provide advice and guidance about university study and the application process for students of any age.

Our widening participation coordinators: Wendy Philcox and Rachael Roser.

OUR COMMITMENT TO IMPROVING LOCAL EDUCATION

As lead sponsors of the Hastings and St Leonards Academies, which have transformed education opportunities for many local children, the University of Brighton has played a large part in setting up and supporting the new academies. Staff and governors are members of the board of trustees and governing bodies and play a major part in the development of staff, curriculum and enrichment activities, working alongside BT and East Sussex County Council.

HASTINGS COMMUNITY RESEARCH CENTRE

Working with the community to assess the impact of educationled regeneration on the local area, our research hub carries out research to guide the regeneration process and raise the profile of Hastings and the surrounding area. Everyone is welcome to our open days, events and guest lectures. You are welcome to drop into our office to ask us what’s coming up. Details of forthcoming open days can be found on page 01.

your university in the heart of hastings | www.brighton.ac.uk/hastings 13


Gemma Fry First year student studying a joint honours degree in Education and English Literature I currently study at university three days a week. The teaching hours vary from an hour to four hours a day. This gives me an opportunity to study in my own personal time. 8.30am–9am I walk into university for my 9am lecture. I live in the university halls of residence so every morning I get to enjoy the beautiful views along the seafront. 9am My lecture begins. On a Friday I study English literature, we’re studying narrative texts ranging from fairy tales to medieval literature. During the seminar we discuss what we have read during the week as well as our views and opinions of the text.

14 www.brighton.ac.uk/hastings | a day in the life

11am After a two hour discussion we have a break. A group of us tend to go to the student canteen where we discuss the reading we have just analysed. This is a great opportunity to discuss issues and questions we may have and also to socialise as a group. 12 noon–1pm We get into small groups to analyse the text. We talk about why a piece of text is written in a particular way and also how it is written as a narrative. During this period of time we learn about the writer and how the text emphasises everyday life. 2pm When the seminar has finished I walk back to the halls and spend an hour or two writing my reflective journal which will include a more in depth analysis on the author. 7pm We all meet for dinner around this time. On a Thursday night the Students’ Union often hold a social event which many of us attend. This is a great opportunity to get to know other students and afterwards experience the night life that Hastings has to offer.


Our website is full of useful information for people interested in studying at Hastings, and our helpful enquiries team is online is on Facebook and Twitter to keep you up to date. And if you’d like to find out what it is like to study here from a real student, our online ambassadors, Jen and Dan are on Facebook and Twitter too. Whether you are a first-time enquirer, partway through the application process, or already a student at Hastings Jen and Dan are ready and able to answer your questions, and to fill you in on campus news. www.brighton.ac.uk/hastings University of Brighton in Hastings Jen McGee UniBrighton Dan Pothecary UniBrighton @hastingsinfo @Jen_UniBrighton @Hastings_Dan

Jen McGee Second year Broadcast Journalism student and student ambassador

Dan Pothecary Second year Education and English Literature student and student ambassador

My lecturers told me about becoming a student ambassador. My job involves representing our uni and our campus in the best way possible and offering support at various events like open days. I’ve recently started working on Facebook and Twitter to communicate with people who are thinking about studying here or have just joined. I’m online frequently throughout the week to update you all with the news from the campus, any events or taster days and I run regular Q&A sessions on a variety of subjects.

I am delighted to be one of the first social media ambassadors for the uni. I enjoy helping applicants and their families as they apply to university and also when they arrive at the Hastings campus.

I think social media is a fantastic way of promoting our university and providing support and guidance to prospective or current students in a fun and human way.

I lived in halls in my first year and now share a flat with six friends so I’m happy to answer any questions you may have about living in Hastings. As well as being an ambassador, I’m also a presenter on Burst, the university radio station. You can contact me or Jen with any query, however big or small and if we can’t help then we’ll point you in the direction of someone who can!

hastings online | www.brighton.ac.uk/hastings 15


Single and joint honours degrees Award BA(Hons), BSc(Hons) Duration 3 years full-time (6 years parttime), 1 year full-time (2 years part-time) if you have completed DipHE, FdA or FdSc in a related subject What can I do when I’ve finished? Postgraduate course / graduate training scheme or conversion course / straight into work These courses involve three or four years of full-time study and lead to qualifications such as BA(Hons) and BSc(Hons). Single honours courses mean that you’ll study one subject throughout the course, such as Broadcast Journalism. Joint honours degree courses combine two subject areas, like Mathematics and Business. Single and joint honours students do the same amount of work, and are assessed in the same way. Read more about our joint honours courses on pages 40–55. Most of our courses involve work-based learning through workshops, short placements or a year in the workplace (usually your third year) where you apply your new skills in real situations, gain valuable experience that looks great on your CV and make important contacts in the industry.

16 www.brighton.ac.uk/hastings | which type of course?

Why study a joint honours degree? • Keep your options open By studying two subjects you’ll open up a wide range of career opportunities. • Put yourself ahead in the jobs market Combining two complementary subjects can give you a good foundation for employment in a range of careers. For instance, Mathematics and Computing aims to develop analytical, problemsolving and communication skills. • Variety and flexibility You’ll enjoy more than one subject area with a greater range of topics to explore. Top-up degrees A top-up degree typically lasts for one year (full-time) and enables you to top up your foundation degree to an honours degree.

If you’re not sure about which course is right for you, why not speak to a member of our team? Drop into our office or call 08456 020607.


Foundation degrees

Postgraduate courses

Award FdA, FdSc and DipHE Duration 2 years full-time (4 years part-time) What can I do when I’ve finished? Honours degree top-up / straight into work

Award PGCE, GTP, MSc Duration 1 year full-time What can I do when I’ve finished? Graduate-level employment / further postgraduate research

Foundation degrees are job-related qualifications which usually take two years full-time or four years of part-time study to complete. They are designed with help from employers, so you will be equipped with practical skills needed to succeed in a range of exciting careers. Foundation degrees also allow you to keep your options open in the future. Graduates can continue studying and top up to an honours degree or receive credits toward a professional qualification. Why study a foundation degree? • Courses related to work Foundation degrees are designed and delivered with employers. A work placement is usually part of your course. • Shorter, more flexible courses Foundation degrees usually take two years, or you can study part-time which takes longer but means you can fit in study with other commitments.

The first level of postgraduate degree, a master’s degree, typically takes one year of full-time study. More advanced studies may take longer. Postgraduate degrees include PGCE, MA, MSc, MPhil and PhD. A postgraduate degree is an opportunity to specialise further by focusing on more research and individual study. Some people choose to come back to study for a postgraduate degree after a break from education, when they have had the chance to develop a career. Postgraduate study at Hastings includes the postgraduate certificate in education (PGCE) and graduate teacher programme. Why study a postgraduate degree? • Expert knowledge If you wish to further develop a career in your chosen area you’ll need to gain greater understanding of your subject. Postgraduate courses give you the opportunity to become expert in your chosen field. • Show your initiative There is more emphasis on personal choice and study. You’ll come away with key skills in research and writing, whilst also demonstrating your personal commitment to your field of work.

which type of course? | www.brighton.ac.uk/hastings 17


18 www.brighton.ac.uk/hastings | single honours courses


undergraduate degrees, top-up degrees and foundation degrees

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Our broadcast media courses equip students with practical experience as well as enabling them to explore the academic aspects of media studies. Successful graduates have the professional skills needed to secure a first job in the industry, and the scope to develop and progress quickly in their chosen area. Production and media courses explore the creation of material for film, television and radio production, editing and post production techniques, digital post production, sound recording and soundtrack editing. Broadcast Journalism addresses writing for broadcasting in television, radio or film. Media studies modules introduce key debates and concepts and offer opportunities to explore topics relating to contemporary media industries, practices and products. What will I learn? You’ll get the opportunity to develop a firm understanding of the demands of the industry, and the theories behind successful programming and journalism. You’ll also get hands-on, practical experience making films and editing material with industry-standard equipment. Placements Work placements are an important feature of our courses and give you the chance to build real-world experience, confidence and contacts in the industry. Our students have been on placement with ITN – Channel 4 News, Big Talk Productions, So Television, The Farm Post House, CTV Outside Broadcasting, Envy Post House and Ian Johnson Publicity.

20 www.brighton.ac.uk/hastings | broadcast media

Who will teach me? Our lecturers are experienced industry professionals, people who know the industry and its challenges. Staff have worked in television, film and radio. Most combine work in the industry with their teaching here. This professional engagement helps keep courses relevant and provides contacts for work placements. Career options Career paths for broadcast media graduates include creative and production roles in film, television, radio and online media. Broadcast Journalism graduates are expected to find work in a range of radio, television and cross-platform broadcasting environments in the public service or commercial sectors. Digital Post Production graduates will be equipped to enter the field of post production within the public service, commercial and independent film and broadcasting sectors and Digital Film Production graduates will be qualified to work within the commercial, independent and public service film and television sectors. Postgraduate study and teacher training are options for all graduates.


Basia Lalik Broadcast Media graduate The Broadcast Media course helped me to gain knowledge and necessary skills for my first running job in Envy Post Production in Soho which I started the day after the end of term. While at Envy I was promoted to head runner and a receptionist. After a year of hard work and valuable training I was offered a job as a post production coordinator at BBC medical drama, Holby City. My next role was at Steam Motion and Sound, a production company in Soho, specialising in theatre and music adverts. I started as a production assistant and soon performed coordinator duties. I’m now back at Holby working as a post production coordinator. During my time in Hastings I was made aware of numerous roles within the industry which I would not have previously considered. Being taught and supported by industry professionals gave me a great understanding of the media industry and confidence to pursue my goal.

Courses

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Broadcast Journalism BA(Hons) Broadcast Media FdA Broadcast Media BA(Hons) top-up Digital Post Production FdA Radio Production FdA Television Production FdA Digital Film production

Joanna MacDonnell, Course leader Broadcast Media and Television Production foundation degrees Working in the media industry is an amazing career with so many possibilities – from starting work at the crack of dawn in a cold remote location on a drama shoot to working all day to get a live television or radio programme to air; all of them exciting, adrenalin filled and hugely fulfilling. Every cog in the wheel to get the production to transmission is essential and whatever your role you know you matter. If you are creative, dynamic, thrive on a challenge, and have bags of energy then this is the career for you!

Related courses Digital Games Production BSc(Hons) Media Studies and Education BA(Hons) Media Studies and Sociology BA(Hons)

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Industry-standard facilities We are an accredited Avid Academic Partner and an Apple Authorised Training Centre. We have a fully equipped broadcast media suite including high definition camera kits and DSLR cameras, a newsroom with live newsfeed, industrystandard radio station and television studio, and are committed to building our reputation further. The Sunday Times has recommended us as one of the best places in the UK to study broadcast media.

broadcast media | www.brighton.ac.uk/hastings 21


Single honours

Broadcast Journalism BA(Hons)

Broadcast Media Foundation degree

Our Broadcast Journalism degree is aimed at people wishing to pursue a career in journalism in the broadcasting and multimedia sectors. It equips students to become thinking practitioners with relevant journalistic skills, enabling them to be part of future developments in the most exciting areas of modern journalism.

Our Broadcast Media foundation degree is for students who want to build a career in broadcast media, across television, film, radio or through multi-platform broadcasting.

The course has Broadcast Journalism Training Council (BJTC) accreditation pending status (this is due to become the prestigious full accreditation in 2013) and is taught using industry-standard broadcast media facilities including a fully operational radio station, a television studio and a newsroom containing Press Association and Sky audio live news feeds. Students experience a diverse mix of lectures, seminars, practical workshops and masterclass sessions as well as individual and group work and live newsdays. During year 3 you’ll be able to explore in depth a topic that really interests you for the research project, and you’ll have an opportunity to take part in a work placement. Syllabus Modules include: Multimedia News Journalism • Television Journalism • Radio Journalism • Media Regulation and Law • Media Ethics • Research project • Work placement

You will be taught by academics and industry professionals who are experts in their field using facilities that include industry-standard high definition camera kits, DSLR cameras, a television studio, radio station, outside broadcast kit, Avid editing suites with Pro Tools audio editing software and solid state audio recorders. This course will give you skills and knowledge to build a career in broadcast media or to progress to the one-year Broadcast Media top-up degree. Our students take part in a diverse mixture of lectures, hands-on workshops, seminars, screenings and masterclasses with industry professionals, with an opportunity to undertake a work placement in year 2. Syllabus Year 1 Camera: Sound: Edit • Documentary Production • Radio Production • Broadcast Media: a critical introduction • Researching for Film, TV and Radio • Writing for Film, TV and Radio • Multi-camera Studio Production • Drama Production Year 2 Outside Broadcast (OB) Production • Live Radio Production • Editing and Post Production • Visual Methodologies • Professional practice and development, or industry work placement • Final project

22 www.brighton.ac.uk/courses | single honour courses

Entry requirements page 60–61 Find out more University of Brighton in Hastings 08456 020607 hastingsinfo@brighton.ac.uk www.brighton.ac.uk/courses


Single honours

Broadcast Media BA(Hons) top-up

Digital Post Production Foundation degree

Our Broadcast Media top-up degree is for students who have completed a foundation degree in media production. It will help you to develop a range of creative and professional skills relevant to working in the broadcasting industry at graduate level.

Our Digital Post Production foundation degree is aimed at people who would like a career in the film and television post production sector.

Our students take part in a diverse mixture of lectures, hands-on workshops, seminars, screenings and masterclasses with industry professionals, and you will graduate with a relevant showreel demonstrating your media skills. You will use industry-standard equipment and software whilst being taught by experienced broadcast media professionals.

Our students use high-end industrystandard broadcast media facilities, including two 24-suite Avid and Final Cut Pro training facilities, online mastering studios and Pro Tools editing suites as well as a fully operational radio station and television studio. You will gain real in-depth experience of working with post production technologies, techniques and practices.

Students are guided and supported to plan, research, and report on an aspect of television, radio or film principles, practice, standards and techniques. A mentor will help you to produce a television, radio or film production relevant to the Broadcast Media degree.

You will experience a mix of studio and lab work, lectures, seminars and practical workshops and training masterclass sessions taught by Apple and Avid certified trainers. In addition, all staff have industry experience that adds to your academic understanding. As well as individual and group work you will also have an opportunity to do a professional work placement with a post production company, such as Envy.

Syllabus Modules include: Advanced Radio Production • Advanced Video Production: documentary • Audio Visual Narratives • Digital Media Content: design, delivery and broadcast • Final individual project • Specialised Production Role: showreel

Syllabus Year 1 Camera: Sound: Edit • Digital Media Foundations • Documentary Production • 3D Animation • Sound Production and Design • Drama Production • Broadcast Media: a critical introduction

Entry requirements page 60–61 Find out more University of Brighton in Hastings 08456 020607 hastingsinfo@brighton.ac.uk www.brighton.ac.uk/courses

Year 2 Editing and Post Production • Industry placement • Visual Methodologies • Grading, Visual Effects and Compositing • 3D Compositing • Final project

single honour courses | www.brighton.ac.uk/courses 23


Single honours

Radio Production Foundation degree

Television Production Foundation degree

Our Radio Production foundation degree is aimed at people who would like a career in the radio production and broadcast sector.

Are you interested in a career in television production? This practical and work-related course will provide you with a range of skills for working in television production and broadcasting.

We have professional equipment and facilities (including broadcast studios, location kit and Pro Tools editing suite), and you’ll be taught by people working in the industry, so during your time here, you’ll learn how to produce radio to a high technical standard. But you’ll also be encouraged to develop the qualities you need to succeed in the media – thriving under pressure, selling your ideas, working to deadlines and creating amazing and original radio. The course also introduces you to the world of academic research and discussion, and helps you develop as a responsible and thoughtful programmemaker. There are work experience opportunities in both years, with broadcasters and production companies such as BBC Sussex and Inspiration FM. From the start, you can see your work reach a growing audience via Burst Radio, our student radio station. Syllabus Year 1 Radio Features Production • Radio Broadcast: industry and contexts • Broadcast Media: a critical introduction • Writing for Radio • Radio Drama Production • Radio Studio Production Year 2 Research and Editorial • Live Radio Production • Editing and Post Production • Professional practice and development or industry work placement • Final project

You will be taught by experienced professionals from the television industry, and will use industry-standard high definition camera kits, DSLR cameras, a television studio, an outside broadcast kit and Final Cut Pro Avid editing suites with Pro Tools audio editing software. You will take part in a diverse mix of lectures, hands-on workshops, seminars, screenings and masterclasses with industry professionals. There is also an opportunity for a work placement during year 2 with companies including Silver River Productions and Big Talk Productions. Syllabus Year 1 Camera: Sound: Edit • Documentary Production • TV Broadcast: industry and contexts • Broadcast Media: a critical introduction • Researching for Television and Film • Writing for Television and Film • Drama Production • Multi-camera Studio Production Year 2 Outside Broadcast Production • Editing and Post Production • Research and Editorial • Visual Methodologies • Professional practice and development, or industry work placement • Final project

24 www.brighton.ac.uk/courses | single honour courses

Entry requirements page 60–61 Find out more University of Brighton in Hastings 08456 020607 hastingsinfo@brighton.ac.uk www.brighton.ac.uk/courses


Single honours

Digital Film Production BA(Hons) Our Digital Film Production degree is aimed at students who are seeking a career in the film industry. It will equip you to become a film practitioner by developing creative and industryrelevant skills, preparing you for graduate entry into the film industry as well as postgraduate study. You will be taught by internationally respected academics and award-winning professionals using industry-standard high-definition filming kits, Final Cut Pro Editing suites, Avid editing suites with Pro Tools audio editing, solid state audio recorders and a TV studio with green screen facilities. Our students enjoy a diverse mix of lectures, seminars, practical workshops and masterclasses with industry professionals, with an opportunity to undertake a work placement in year 2. Syllabus Year 1 Introduction to Film: key concepts and debates • Art Design and Cinematography • Film Form and Style • Editing and Post Production • Introduction to Story • Sound Production and Design Year 2 Film Industries • Screenwriting • Film Technologies: principles and techniques • Short Film • Documentary • Placement/ professional practice

Irmi Karl Media academic programme leader Our brand new Digital Film Production BA(Hons) offers the opportunity to enhance career opportunities for those who thrive in a competitive and fast-paced film industry environment. We will help you to develop the academic and professional knowledge needed to excel as a creative and multi-skilled film practitioner in this exciting and challenging business. From screenwriting, shooting and editing to a solid understanding of film form, the workings of the film industry itself, marketing and distribution, this exciting new course captures the essence of film making in the digital era.

Entry requirements page 60–61 Find out more University of Brighton in Hastings 08456 020607 hastingsinfo@brighton.ac.uk www.brighton.ac.uk/courses

Year 3 Film Marketing and Distribution • Audio Visual Narratives • Advanced Screenwriting • Specialised Production Role: Show Reel and Website • Final individual project

single honour courses | www.brighton.ac.uk/courses 25


Our business and management courses put an emphasis on developing practical business skills alongside academic knowledge. The University of Brighton was the first in the UK to develop an undergraduate award in computing. Our computing courses equip you with specialist skills along with business, interpersonal, communication and analytical skills, preparing you for a career in a variety of business and IT environments. What will I learn? Our business courses explore marketing, business law, accounting and human resource management. You also develop important skills including writing and making presentations and reporting. Computing students develop vital core skills before choosing specialist subjects including creating complex software applications, programming digital games, designing the content and structure of complex multimedia systems, designing complex 3D models and delivering to mobile platforms

26 www.brighton.ac.uk/hastings | business and computing

Placements Work placements are a key feature of these courses, giving you the chance to build confidence, make contacts and gain hands-on experience. Business students have a placement module during the second year. Computing students can take an optional placement year between the second and final years of study. A placement officer will help you find a suitable placement. Who will teach me? Our lecturers are all experienced teachers. They have all previously worked in business and industry and bring a wealth of experience to their teaching. Professional accreditation Our business courses are accredited by the Chartered Management Institute, and computing courses are accredited by the British Computer Society.


Courses xx

pxx page pxx xx pxx Business xx with Enterprise 28 pxx Business xx pxx Management BA(Hons) top-up 28 Internet Related Computing courses BSc(Hons) 29 Digital xx Games Production pxx xx pxx BSc(Hons) 29

Courses xx

Career options Our business courses will help you develop specific and transferable skills equipping you for success in the private or public sector, or for independent consultancy. Computing graduates who understand how technology can support and enhance businesses are valued across all sectors. University of Brighton graduates are developing careers as web and database developers, games designers, programmers, analysts and technical consultants for businesses including HSBC, BT, Legal and General, and Xerox. Other graduates choose further study or teacher training.

Sue Greener Business with Enterprise Course leader Our Business with Enterprise course is rare among business and enterprise courses in that it offers small group learning with dedicated tutors, a range of digital resources and real business problems to work on which drive your research and learning. We will help you develop an entrepreneurial mindset, one which you will need either to run your own business successfully or become the kind of entrepreneurial talent which businesses are looking for.

Related courses Computing and Business BSc(Hons) Computing and Education BSc(Hons) Mathematics and Business BSc(Hons) Mathematics and Computing BSc(Hons) Mathematics and Education BSc(Hons)

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Tara Mulvey Business Management BA(Hons) top-up Studying for my Business Management degree has made me consider many other options, such as further training for teaching. I do feel that gaining a degree will help to change my life. I would not have been able to travel and would not be studying, had the Hastings campus not been here.

business and computing | www.brighton.ac.uk/hastings 27


Single honours

Business with Enterprise BSc(Hons)

Business Management BA(Hons) top-up

Our Business with Enterprise degree will enable you to develop the skills you need to succeed in business. Graduates will be ready to make an immediate contribution to employment or develop their own business ideas for new ventures.

Having successfully achieved the foundation degree or HND, the Business Management top-up degree is an opportunity to convert your qualification to a full honours degree. You will continue to learn and demonstrate your business capabilities, and will be able to investigate in depth a topic that really interests you for the dissertation.

You will be taught by staff who are active researchers in a variety of subjects and who will treat you as an apprentice professional. You will undertake a work placement or internship before your final year of study unless you have equivalent experience to offer.

During induction students work with the Broadcast Media students to produce a viral marketing video for a local company or organisation.

This course will teach a broad range of transferable and relevant skills that will enable you to manage challenging situations in the dynamic business environment or go on to study at postgraduate level.

The course is taught through a diverse mix of lecture, seminar and workshop situations, enabling you to further develop your skills and improve your chances in the job market where the competition will be high.

Syllabus Year 1 Personal Learning and Professional Practice • Enquiry-based Business Learning (global business environment, organisation behaviour, marketing, commercial awareness, decision tools) • Business Enterprise

Syllabus Strategic Management • Managing Organisations • Operations and Process Management • Ecommerce • Public Relations • Employee Selection and Recruitment • Dissertation

Year 2 Personal Learning and Professional Practice • Enquiry-based Business Learning (systems analysis, operations, human resources, enterprise, law) • Business Enterprise Year 3 Personal Learning and Professional Practice • Business project • Business Enterprise • Strategic Practice

28 www.brighton.ac.uk/courses | single honour courses

Entry requirements page 60–61 Find out more University of Brighton in Hastings 08456 020607 hastingsinfo@brighton.ac.uk www.brighton.ac.uk/courses


Single honours

Internet Computing BSc(Hons)

Digital Games Production BSc(Hons)

This course is ideal for people wanting a general career in computing. The course equips you with the skills and experience to work in a wide range of industries. Our graduates are working for organisations like the BBC and the Bank of America.

Digital Games Production is ideal for people who want a career specialising in the creation of digital games.

The course is approved by the British Computing Society (BCS), and is built around core technical skills, including programming, database management website design and ecommerce development. The course includes an opportunity to spend a year in industry. This provides you with invaluable experience, enhancing your CV and helping you to build your future career. Syllabus Year 1 Programming • Databases • Dynamic Web Page Construction • Requirements Analysis • Multimedia Authoring • Professional Practice • Digital Media Year 2 Web Application Development • Objectoriented Design and Implementation • Business Environment for Internet Computing • Client Server Databases • Mobile Devices • Advanced Website Development

You will build your artistic and technical skills throughout the course using industrystandard hardware and software such as Autodesk Maya, Pro Tools and a TV studio for green-screen and motion capture. A games lab built around Xbox 360 consoles, Kinect controllers and Windows phone devices enables the creation and testing of games on Microsoft platforms. This fast-paced and practical course is taught through a mix of group and individual projects with an optional work placement in year 3. The skills and knowledge you develop over the course will prepare you for graduate entry into the interactive media industry as well as postgraduate study. Syllabus Year 1 3D Modelling and Animation • Principles of Game Design • Multimedia Authoring • Web Development • Introduction to Programming • Video and Sound Production for Games

Entry requirements page 60–61 Find out more University of Brighton in Hastings 08456 020607 hastingsinfo@brighton.ac.uk www.brighton.ac.uk/courses

Year 2 2D Game Development • Editing Sound and Video • 3D Compositing • Objectoriented Design and Implementation • Website Development and Technologies

Optional placement year Optional placement year Final year Individual project • Managing the eEnterprise • Object-oriented (OO) Design • Data Management • OO Analysis and Modelling Methods

Final year Major project • Internet Games Design and Development • Sound Design for Games • New Directions in Games • Entrepreneurship

single honour courses | www.brighton.ac.uk/courses 29


If you are already volunteering or working with children in an early years or primary school setting, you can enhance your career prospects by taking further training. Our courses bring university-based study together with your activities at work, so you make the most of the demands and opportunities within your role. What will I learn? You’ll consolidate your experience with babies, toddlers and/or young children by studying modules including Children and Young People’s Learning and Development, Safeguarding Children and Young People, Social Policy, Equality and Inclusion, and Reflective Professional Practice. You will explore subjects that are specific to your chosen profession. Placements Student placements are a key aspect of all of our education courses, giving you the opportunity to apply what you have learnt in the classroom and gain valuable experience.

30 www.brighton.ac.uk/hastings | education

Who will teach me? Our education staff are all experienced education practitioners whose specific interests in the theories and issues in education brings depth and relevance to their teaching. Career options The Early Years Care and Education foundation degree provides a recognised route towards the Early Years Professional Status. The Professional Studies in Primary Education foundation degree supports those wanting to work as a higher level teaching assistant. On successful completion, you may progress to further training. Most graduates of our PGCE course begin as primary school teachers with scope to develop their careers in a number of ways, for example, curriculum coordinator, special needs teacher or head teacher. To teach in a school, you need to attain Qualified Teacher Status (QTS). Please see pages 33 for details of our postgraduate teacher training options.


Courses Early Years Care and Education FdA Professional Studies in Primary Education FdA Primary Education PGCE Primary Education Graduate Teaching Programme (GTP)

Professional accreditation The University of Brighton’s School of Education is one of the UK’s largest providers of education and training for student teachers, teachers and other learning and development professionals. In 2008 we were the first university in the country to achieve the highest possible rating, ‘outstanding’, for management and quality assurance across the full range of primary, secondary and post-compulsory (16+) teacher education courses. Following another inspection by Ofsted, we retained our ‘outstanding’ rating for our primary and secondary initial teacher education (teacher training) provision in June 2010.

Annie Richardson Early Years Care and Education course leader I worked with pre-school children and their families in a variety of roles in East Sussex for 20 years, but studying for the University of Brighton’s Early Years Care and Education foundation degree turned out to be a catalyst for my own continuing professional development. I’m particularly passionate about helping students to join theory to practice and become reflective, enthusiastic and confident in their work, because I can see all of us in turn making a difference to the experiences of children and families in the early years sector.

Related courses Environmental Biology and Education BSc(Hons) Human Biology and Education BSc(Hons) Computing and Education BSc(Hons) Education and English Literature BA(Hons) Media Studies and Education BA(Hons) Mathematics and Education BSc(Hons) Education and Sociology BSc(Hons)

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Our education courses integrate university-based study with your activities at work, so you make the most of the demands and opportunities within your role.

education | www.brighton.ac.uk/hastings 31


Single honours

Early Years Care and Education Foundation degree

Professional Studies in Primary Education Foundation degree

Our Early Years Care and Education foundation degree is ideal for people wishing to progress in their career and gain academic recognition in the early years field.

This course is aimed at teaching assistants working at Key Stage 1 and 2, and wishing to further their career opportunities and academic development in this field.

Endorsed by the Children’s Workforce Development Council, this course will provide you with the specialist knowledge and skills to support your work with babies, toddlers and young children (from birth to five years) in private, voluntary, independent and maintained settings.

The programme will develop your curriculum knowledge in mathematics, English, science and ICT. You will also learn how to enhance your communication and presentation skills, how to plan, deliver and assess learning, and understand new initiatives and social and political issues in education.

Your work experience makes up a significant part of the learning process. You will be supported in your workplace by a facilitator and you will also have a university-based mentor. As well as attending university, you will undertake work-based activities, reflection and private study (one day per week in total). Syllabus Year 1 (April–June) Studying in HE for Professional Development in Working with Children and Young People • Children and Young People’s Learning and Development Year 2 (September–June) Applying Principles to Practice • Supporting the Whole Child • Play as a Developmental Learning Process • Safeguarding Children and Young People • Reflective Professional Practice Year 3 (September–June) Assessing Children’s Achievements • Families in Communities: the role of the setting • The Positive Learning Environment • Social Policy, Equality and Inclusion

The main focus is on your current workplace and there are opportunities to visit other schools. Your activities at work and university-based study are tightly integrated throughout the course. Syllabus Year 1 (April-June) Studying in HE for Professional Development in Working with Children and Young People • Children and Young People’s Learning and Development Year 2 (September-June) Readers and Texts • Learning and Teaching Number at KS1 and 2 • An Introduction to Science at KS1 and 2 • Safeguarding and Promoting Welfare and Wellbeing • Professional Reflective Practice in Learning and Development Year 3 (September-June) Spoken and Written Language and How We Use It • ICT at KS1 and 2 • Learning and Teaching • Mathematics at KS1 and 2 • Social Policy, Equality and Inclusion • Further Professional Reflective Practice in Learning and Development

32 www.brighton.ac.uk/courses | single honour courses

Entry requirements page 60–61 Find out more University of Brighton in Hastings 08456 020607 hastingsinfo@brighton.ac.uk www.brighton.ac.uk/courses


Single honours

Primary Education (5–11 years) PGCE

Primary Graduate Teaching Programme (GTP)

This established and highly popular course is for people who already have a degree, and qualifies them to teach in a Key Stage 1/Key Stage 2 setting (5–11 years).

The Graduate Teacher Programme (GTP) is an work-based route leading to Qualified Teacher Status. From classroom teacher, your career could develop into a number of roles, for example, special educational needs teacher or head teacher.

You will develop the ability to evaluate critically and reflect upon the principles of teaching and learning. You will gain a thorough knowledge and understanding of teaching, learning and assessment strategies, and learn how to use and adapt them to meet the varying needs of students in the 5–11 age group. Your studies will be split between university-based studies and two block school placements, so you will develop both the theoretical knowledge and practical experience required for a successful career in teaching.

GTP trainees already have a degree, and are employed by a school as an instructor, while they train and attend sessions at the university. The school plays an important role in training the GTP trainee and provides them with a mentor. As the GTP is a training route, trainees are not expected to teach a full timetable; they are given flexibility and freedom to undertake development activities such as observations, to plan and assess and to collect evidence to meet the training requirements. A significant part of the training is in the school but trainees are released to attend specified modules at the university. As such they are full-time members of the university and so have university library and IT access. All GTP trainees engage in 60 days training which takes place both at the university and in schools.

Entry requirements page 60–61 Find out more University of Brighton in Hastings 08456 020607 hastingsinfo@brighton.ac.uk www.brighton.ac.uk/courses

On passing the final assessment trainees are recommended for QTS but do not receive an academic award from the university. GTP trainees also have a second placement opportunity in order to meet their training needs. This is six weeks in total.

single honour courses | www.brighton.ac.uk/courses 33


In studying applied social science, you’ll develop your understanding of intellectual traditions, theoretical perspectives and debates in social science. You’ll come away with transferable skills in critical thinking, reading and writing that will open up a range of career options including working with people in social or cultural contexts. What will I learn? Over three years of study, you’ll be introduced to a broad range of theories, research and applications, engaging with progressively more complex understanding of key debates and critical thinking. This means that you’ll develop key transferable academic and life skills, not just knowledge about a subject. In Applied Social Science, your critical understanding will develop from studying four main areas: criminology, social policy, sociology and psychology.

Skills and support We have an outstanding reputation for student support, especially in the first year as you make the transition to universitylevel education. To be successful, you’ll need to become an independent learner, developing transferable skills including skilled reading, writing and debating; analysis and critical and creative thinking; and to be organised and self-motivated.

Related courses Media Studies and Sociology BA(Hons) Sociology and Community History BA(Hons) Sociology and English Literature BA(Hons) Education and Sociology BA(Hons)

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Who will teach me? Our lecturers in applied social science are all engaged in research and debate across their fields of expertise. This is reflected in their teaching, making it informed and relevant.

Jodie Taylor Applied Social Science graduate

Career options Applied Social Science graduates have a varied choice of career opportunities including government, social services and voluntary sectors; youth work, the probation service, prison service, the police (via the fast track graduate scheme); human resources, advertising, marketing, public relations, research and development and many others.

My tutors encouraged me to challenge myself and consider future prospects. They supported me and offered advice and guidance, which I feel is very different from what you get at a bigger campus. It is definitely a much more personalised approach which impacts on your own individual development.

You’ll also be qualified to apply for a masters degree in social work or a PGCE course for a career in teaching.

Since graduating in 2009, Jodie has completed a Community Psychology MA while working part-time at the Hastings Trust – an independent charity. She now works full-time for the trust.

34 www.brighton.ac.uk/hastings | applied social science


Single honours

Applied Social Science BA(Hons) Our Applied Social Science degree provides a foundation of knowledge and understanding of intellectual traditions, theoretical perspectives and debates in social science. In the first two years, you’ll gain an understanding of core social science disciplines. You will be able to develop your particular interests in the different disciplines of social science, allowing you to specialise in your third year dissertation. The course is delivered through seminars, workshops and lectures with an opportunity to undertake a work placement in the second year. Syllabus Year 1 Sociological Imaginations • Introduction to Applied Psychology • Introduction to Social Policy • Foundations of Sociology • Theories of Crime • Social Science Research Methods Year 2 Theorising the Social World • Social and Developmental Psychology • Community Participation and Development • Sociology and the Life Course • Social Policy: Welfare and Control • Research project

Marylynn Fyvie-Gauld Applied social science course leader Applied social science has been a great passion of mine from school days – it answers questions about society that always seem to be lacking anywhere else; questions such as why it is that certain people are defined as dangerous while others are said to be deserving, and that these definitions are not static but change over time. There is never a right or wrong answer, just a different way of looking at things and because of this it encourages debate and encourages students to develop an interest in the world around us.

Entry requirements page 60–61 Find out more University of Brighton in Hastings 08456 020607 hastingsinfo@brighton.ac.uk www.brighton.ac.uk/courses

Year 3 Dissertation • Options: Sociological Analysis: critical methodologies • Sociological Analysis: special topic • Critical Criminology and Criminal Justice • Health Policy in the UK • Transport and Society • Global Social Policy • Policy Analysis • Critical Psychology • Contemporary Studies in Crime and Justice • Organisation and Management of Health and Social Care • Ecopsychology • Critical Addiction Studies • Developing Therapeutic Relationships • Psychology and Social Change

single honour courses | www.brighton.ac.uk/courses 35


As a nurse in the adult field you will work at the centre of a multiprofessional team that includes doctors, physiotherapists, radiographers and many others. You will have close contact with patients and their families, and can be based in a hospital or in the community. You will assess, plan, implement and evaluate care for individual patients. Adult nurses work with old and young adults with diverse health conditions in a variety of settings. They juggle numerous priorities and use caring, counselling, managing, teaching and all aspects of interpersonal skills to improve the quality of patients’ lives, sometimes in difficult situations. What will I learn? Learning takes place at the university and in community and hospital practice settings. Our well-equipped skills facilities allow students to simulate practice in the class room. There is a 50:50 split between theoretical and practical learning. You will gain experience in the core competencies required for nursing at an early stage in the course. Your communication and interpersonal skills will be developed throughout. The programmes are flexible and allow you to choose from a range of optional modules where possible. This allows you to specialise in areas of personal interest.

36 www.brighton.ac.uk/hastings | nursing

Placements Clinical practice placements take place in community and hospital settings across Sussex. For more information please visit www.brighton.ac.uk/snm/placements. A range of exciting opportunities are available for you to experience nursing in another country and gain academic credit. International placements can last between two weeks and three months.

Career options These courses provide an excellent foundation for working in a range of health contexts and for further professional development in clinical practice, education, management and research. After a period of consolidation and further study you can work as a specialist practitioner in the community in areas such as practice nursing, community psychiatric nursing, health visiting or as a nurse consultant.


Single honours

Nursing (Adult) BSc(Hons) This nursing degree will enable you to become a nursing practitioner who is responsive to the changing needs of the adult client in a variety of care settings. The course meets Nursing and Midwifery Council (NMC) Standards and throughout the course you will work with professionals from across the healthcare sector. You will be taught through a diverse mix of theoretical and practical work which provides a firm foundation for a career in a range of health contexts and for further professional development in clinical practice, education, management and research. Syllabus Year 1 What is Nursing? • Human Qualities in Nursing • Introduction to Biological Sciences in Nursing • Psychosocial Studies: personhood and patienthood • Professional Practice Year 2 Public Health in Nursing • Acute Care Across Care Settings • Option • Appreciating the Research Process in Nursing • Long Term Conditions • Professional Practice Adult Year 3 Dissertation • End of Life Care • Physical Assessment • Leadership • Professional Practice Adult

Jo Complin Nursing (Adult) BSc(Hons) I had reached a point in my life where I wanted to spend the majority of my time doing something that I felt was worthwhile, something that was people-orientated and not about making money. I also wanted a career with variety, where I would constantly be learning new things and have opportunities for professional progress as well as personal development. Nursing fulfils these criteria and lots more besides. I love being on placement where I can start putting the theory into practice by actually getting involved in procedures and in helping the patients; even as a student I can really make a positive difference to someone’s day. I have also made some great friends and contacts.

Entry requirements page 60–61 Find out more University of Brighton in Hastings 08456 020607 hastingsinfo@brighton.ac.uk www.brighton.ac.uk/courses

single honour courses | www.brighton.ac.uk/courses 37


38 www.brighton.ac.uk/hastings | joint honours courses


undergraduate degrees combining two subject areas In this section you will find out more about the individual subjects, and the degrees that combine them.

joint honours courses | www.brighton.ac.uk/hastings 39


Environmental biology Joint honours pathway

Courses page Biology BSc(Hons) 50 Environmental Biology and Education BSc(Hons) 50

Environmental biology is the study of the relationship between organisms and their physical and biological environments, and the interactions of these processes with human society. You’ll explore subjects like biodiversity, sustainability, ecology and climate change, and gain skills that will enable you to follow a career in these growing and critical areas. What will I learn? You’ll study biodiversity, ecology, physiology, evolution, and biological and environmental sustainability. During your first year, you will develop knowledge in scientific methods, ecology, plant and animal physiology, and the diversity of life. In the second year, you’ll learn about habitat ecology and evolution and behaviour. You’ll have the opportunity of an overseas field visit to South Africa, when you will be able to gain extensive field skills experience. The third year focuses on ecological field skills and you will explore environmental biology issues, including climate change, the potential conflicts between biodiversity conservation and the environmental impacts, and consequences of resource exploitation. Throughout the course, you’ll be taught in seminars and lectures. Laboratory and field-based sessions help you to gain essential practical skills. The research project and dissertation are great opportunities for you to explore in detail questions that really interest you, and to apply your new knowledge to those questions.

Throughout the course, we help you become an independent learner, equipped with in-depth subject knowledge and transferable academic, practical and analytical skills. Placements In addition to the overseas field visit, there is an work placement opportunity in year 2 when you will be able to put your skills and knowledge into practice in the workplace. Who will teach me? Our lecturers are research active and leaders in their respective fields, including herpetology, mammalogy, ecological entomology and plant ecology. This means that our teaching and expertise is up to date and relevant. Career options Career paths include working in research, support roles in community or industry, and public and private sector environmental agencies. Graduates may be eligible to apply for a PGCE course for teaching, or to progress onto masterslevel courses, such as the university’s Bioscience MRes.

40 www.brighton.ac.uk/courses | joint honours pathways

Angelo Pernetta Environmental biology pathway leader Environmental biology is a fascinating crossroads of subjects: evolutionary biology, ecological processes, animal behaviour and ultimately the consequences of human alteration of these processes. There are so many approaches to such a wide range of topics. I have worked on research from the population ecology of lizards on islands in the Indian Ocean, to genetic studies of the UK’s rarest snake, and studies of human impacts on reptiles through the global wildlife trade. Students of environmental biology can explore a vast range of topics, and find their own niche.


Human biology

Joint honours pathway

Course Biology BSc(Hons) Human Biology and Education BSc(Hons)

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Our understanding of human biology underpins many of the important advances that have transformed the quality of human life. You will develop your understanding of how the healthy human body functions, the processes that lead to disorders in cellular function and methods of detecting and treating disease. Careers using biology skills include research and clinical trials. What will I learn? You will explore normal body function, and then discover how physiological imbalance or microbial infection affect human physiology. You’ll also examine the routes of transmission for human pathogens and explore the factors that determine how and why disease spreads in the population. You will cover levels of biology from individual cells to the whole body, and the mechanisms that lead to disease. The strong focus on practical laboratory and analytical research skills means that you’ll develop independent learning skills and become equipped with useful transferable skills as well as in-depth subject specialist knowledge and experience. The first year enables you to develop understanding in cell and molecular biology, and provides key biology skills. In the second year you will also study microbiology and advanced human physiology. During the third year you’ll focus on cellular and molecular basis of disease and on specialist topics in human health and disease, and develop key professional skills.

Placements In the second year, you will have the opportunity of carrying out a placement in a subject area that particularly interests you, which your tutor will help you to find. Who will teach me? Your lecturers work in specialist fields of human biology, for example microbiology and infection, cell biology and molecular genetics. They are active researchers and their research interests ensure that the curriculum is up to date with our understanding of human disease and treatment. Their experience and support will be particularly useful for your final year research project. Career options Graduates can use their specialist skills and knowledge in human biology in their career as a foundation for work in research in university or biopharmaceutical industry laboratories, clinical trials, scientific writing as well as teaching. Some specialist career paths may require students to gain advanced skills in postgraduate study, such as the university’s Bioscience MRes.

Ian Cooper Microbiology and disease biology lecturer Microbiology is of fundamental importance to everyday life. It encompasses the bacteria, fungi and viruses that colonise our bodies, to those in the food and water that we ingest. It also includes those which provide benefit to us, and those which cause disease. Many disease-causing organisms have an environmental niche where they are able to reside in between outbreaks of disease, and this is where my primary research interests lie: how can microbes survive undetected in the environment to pose a threat to human health?

joint honours pathways | www.brighton.ac.uk/courses 41


Business

Joint honours pathway

Course page Computing and Business BSc(Hons) 51 Mathematics and Business BSc(Hons) 53

In studying business here, you’ll learn about the theories and practices needed for a career in business or management. You’ll gain essential transferable skills that will equip you for success in any size organisation or for setting up your own business. What will I learn? You’ll cover subjects including marketing, an introduction to business law and accounting, and human resource (HR) management. In addition to gaining academic knowledge, you will develop specific skills for business, including presenting and reporting, analysis and strategy. Over the first two years, you will develop critical understanding in subjects including business decision-making, human resources management, marketing, finance and business law. The third year brings opportunities to explore more advanced areas such as strategic management and continuing professional development. You will be able to use your new understanding whilst exploring questions that interest you in the research project and dissertation. Opportunities will be provided for you to network with students from other disciplines and to develop your entrepreneurial skills. Placements There is a placement module in year 2 when you will have the opportunity to apply the knowledge you have developed in the workplace.

Who will teach me? Our lecturers in business and management are experienced in their field. Their work at the forefront of business teaching and as consultants informs their teaching, ensuring it is up to date and relevant. They will support you as you begin university in the first year, and encourage you to develop the high levels of personal organisation and self-motivation needed to become a successful, independent business professional. Career options Career paths from business and management degrees include work in management and administration in the private and public sector, eventually leading to opportunities for independent consultancy or strategy development. Our students who have previous experience in business choose this course because it enhances their career potential and opens up routes to more senior roles. Industry placements are a key feature of our business courses, giving you the chance to build confidence, make contacts and gain hands-on experience.

42 www.brighton.ac.uk/courses | joint honours pathways

Andrea Benn Business pathway leader A business degree will provide you with the skills to achieve your own goals and to progress in the everchanging and challenging business world of today. For me it is about having the chance to be creative, independent and constantly being able to update or develop new skills – so never a dull moment, always a challenge to keep life interesting.


Computing

Joint honours pathway

Course page Computing and Business BSc(Hons) 51 Computing and Education BSc(Hons) 51 Mathematics and Computing BSc(Hons) 53

The University of Brighton was the first in the UK to develop an undergraduate award in computing. Our computing courses equip you with specialist skills and opportunities to learn business, interpersonal, communication and analytical skills, preparing you to use your practical skills across a variety of business and IT environments. What will I learn? During the first year, you’ll learn the core skills in computing. During the rest of your course, you’ll choose from a range of specialist areas, including: • creating complex software applications • programming digital games • designing the content and structure of complex multimedia systems • designing complex 3D models • delivering to mobile platforms • creating a range of multimedia resources including images, sounds, animation, video, 3D and interactive elements – and learning how to assemble them into engaging, usable and useful products and services. Placements The placement module during the second year enables you to apply your new specialist skills in paid employment and to gain valuable hands-on experience. It also helps you to build industry contacts that will be invaluable when you graduate. We support our students to help them find suitable placements. Recent graduates have also benefited from employers’ training schemes.

Who will teach me? As a computing student at our campus in Hastings, you will be part of a large and thriving department. Members of staff come from careers in the industry and bring a wealth of experience to their teaching, enhanced by their involvement in current practice and developments. Career options All types of organisations need graduates who understand both how businesses operate and how information and communication technologies can be used to support and enhance their activities. Recent University of Brighton graduates have started careers as technology analyst (Bank of America), web developer (Xerox) and database developer (BT). Some graduates go on to further study; our postgraduate programmes cover areas such as digital television management and production, and software engineering.

Gerard Allsop Digital Games Production course leader Being the course leader for the Digital Games Production degree allows me to engage in my passion every day – programming. Year in year out, the world of software development undergoes huge change with new tools and methods of working continually altering the way we work. Every new set of students is learning something fresh. It’s an incredibly exciting working environment and quite a challenge for the students, but the amazing thing is, they are always up for that challenge! We have a really diverse range of students and though some are technically very competent, some start the course with very little technical skill. Hastings is quite a small campus and our students tend to bond quickly. They help each other and that too is an important aspect of studying here.

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Education

Joint honours pathway

Course page Education and English Literature BA(Hons) 52 Education and Sociology BA(Hons) 55 Media Studies and Education BA(Hons) 54 Mathematics and Education BSc(Hons) 54 Computing and Education BSc(Hons) 51 Environmental Biology and Education BSc(Hons) 50 Human Biology and Education BSc(Hons) 50

Studying education gives you the chance to explore the systems and structures that provide the framework for education today, looking at both formal and informal learning across a range of life stages. By developing a critically informed understanding of education, you’ll also gain transferable skills that you will be able to use in a range of sectors, in roles covering youth work and education services. What will I learn? You’ll examine education in its widest contexts. You’ll develop an awareness of the aims and values of education and its relationship to society, and how government ideology and policies shape this. You will examine the ways which formal education settings address inclusion, and look at education in the UK and internationally. You’ll also gain a critical perspective of educational theory, policy and practice. Placements During your second year, your tutor will help you to find a placement matching an area of your specific interest, which may reflect the education part of your degree or the other subject.

Who will teach me? Our lecturers are experienced and current practitioners. We have an excellent reputation for developing flexible, high quality programmes, which respond to both local employer needs and emerging national strategies. The University of Brighton’s School of Education has been rated outstanding in consecutive years by Ofsted, and our primary education provision has the highest quality rating (category A) as awarded by the Training and Development Agency (TDA). Career options Areas in which you may be able to apply your knowledge of education theory include leisure services, youth and community work, educational management and administration, the museums, libraries and galleries education services, and educational research. Employment opportunities also include non-government organisations concerned with overseas development, environmental change and sustainable development. To teach in a school, you need to attain Qualifed Teacher Status (QTS). After successfully gaining a BA(Hons) or BSc(Hons) degree, you may be eligible for further study to gain QTS. Postgraduate teacher training courses last for one year full-time.

44 www.brighton.ac.uk/courses | joint honours pathways

Jane Cawdell Education pathway leader My background in teacher training enabled me to contribute towards the shaping of young people’s experiences of education and is a role that I feel privileged to have undertaken. Education is something that affects us all and it can impact on the way we see the world and the choices we make. You will be encouraged to challenge those experiences and emerge with your own personal philosophy of what education is, and should be, about.


English literature

Joint honours pathway

Course page English Literature and Community History BA(Hons) 52 English Literature and Media Studies BA(Hons) 52 Education and English Literature BA(Hons) 52

In studying literature, you’ll investigate how authors construct meanings in their writing, and how these are transformed by different cultural and social contexts. By taking literature alongside another discipline, for example media studies or sociology, you’ll have the chance to choose complementary options in critical theory and practice. By developing your insights in this subject, you will gain a range of key transferable skills that you’ll be able to apply to careers including journalism and communications. What will I learn? Over three years of study, you’ll be introduced to a range of theories and research, developing a progressively more complex understanding of key critical debates to develop your understanding of writing and texts. You’ll also learn about social context – how external and individual factors affect what people understand from language and writing, and how writers address particular audiences and issues. Options include creative writing, journalism, writing and social purpose, studying travel writing and American literature 1850–1960. By developing your critical abilities in comprehension and writing, you will gain transferable skills that will support career aspirations in a range of areas.

Placements During your second year, you have the opportunity of a work placement reflecting an area of personal interest, which a member of staff will help you to find. Who will teach me? Literature staff in Hastings are leading figures in their areas of literary specialism. We encourage active learning so that our students gain independence and critical skills. You’ll be taught in lectures, seminars and in individual tutorials. Members of the team have been nominated for Excellence in Teaching awards, and have a strong record of publication and research, and the department plays a central role in the development of our literary community. Career options Literature students can achieve success in a range of careers. You’ll have a good foundation to consider further specialist training in journalism, publishing, communications or work in cultural industries. Some graduates take further study within the arts or a teaching qualification. You may also be able to work in Teaching English as a Foreign Language (TEFL).

Katy Shaw English literature senior lecturer I have always been inspired by literature and, as the first person to go to university in my family, I can identify with the ethos of the University of Brighton in Hastings. We encourage a contextual approach to the study of literature, which bears a natural sympathy to my work in marginal writers and working class cultures. The community feeling at the Hastings campus, coupled with the enrichment offered by a joint honours programme, leads to a diverse and exciting exchange of ideas between staff and students. I have learnt more from my students in Hastings than anywhere else!

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Community history

Joint honours pathway

Course English Literature and Community History BA(Hons) Sociology and Community History BA(Hons)

page 52 55

You’ll gain a foundation of knowledge about issues and themes from the past by investigating topics and events from a local perspective, gradually developing a complex understanding of theories, key debates and critical thinking. You’ll learn how to prepare clear, detailed arguments from a range of contradictory viewpoints. Studying history will provide you with an academic grounding in a challenging discipline and a range of transferable skills including critical analysis, writing and presenting factual arguments, which you’ll be able to apply to work in areas including cultural industries or the public sector. What will I learn? You’ll begin by developing critical understanding of what it means to study history in a university and what we mean by community history. From the perspective of Hastings and southern England, you’ll look at the main themes in social history, and through these themes you’ll examine the key approaches to the study of history. In your first year, you’ll investigate social and political change. In year 2, you’ll look at popular culture and leisure, and consider the study of history using personal sources such as letters, diaries and oral history. In the third year, you’ll study war and social change via the concept of public history, which examines approaches to history by museums, television documentaries and films.

You’ll be able to investigate an area of specific personal interest in depth for the dissertation. You’ll study the main themes in social history, including voting rights and welfare, from a local perspective. Placements During your second year, you have the opportunity of a work placement reflecting an area of personal interest, which a member of staff will help you to find. Who will teach me? You will be taught by lecturers who are involved in investigations and debate in their subject, ensuring their teaching is contemporary and dynamic. We have an outstanding reputation for both tuition and student support, especially in the first year while you make the transition to universitylevel education. Career options In studying history, you are choosing an academic discipline enables you to develop a wide range of transferable skills. Successful graduates have a good foundation to follow careers in a variety of areas including work in the public sector, local government, business or the cultural industries. You may also be able to apply for postgraduate teacher training or continue your studies.

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Nicola Smith Community history pathway leader Social history fascinates me. I am curious to know how people like me and my neighbours and friends lived in the past. What was it like to live in a Sussex town in 1900? What sort of education would I have had, what sort of jobs would have been open to me? Hastings is a wonderful place to study history. We know that people have lived here for well over 2000 years. Don’t just imagine the huge changes during that time – investigate them for yourself.


Mathematics

Joint honours pathway

Course page Mathematics and Business BSc (Hons) 53 Mathematics and Computing BSc (Hons) 53 Mathematics and Education BSc(Hons) 54

You’ll study core mathematical concepts and problem solving, developing your analytical skills and ability for logical thinking. You’ll gain the capacity to analyse and solve problems in many different contexts. The attributes and insights you’ll gain can be applied to roles including finance and statistics, across a range of professions and industries. What will I learn? You’ll become familiar with fundamental mathematical concepts and apply this knowledge in different contexts. You’ll also gain experience in problem solving using various techniques and appropriate software packages. In addition to core mathematical skills you will also develop advanced skills in analysis, teamwork, communication, report writing and presentation skills. During the first two years, the emphasis is on developing essential knowledge and techniques in mathematics. In year 1, you will cover key mathematical and modelling skills and an introduction to the fundamentals of logic and mathematical structures. In year 2, you will study vector and multivariable calculus, numerical methods and linear mathematics. The final year provides opportunities to study topics more deeply or to apply mathematics in new areas. Our mathematics option gives you opportunities to work with maths in a variety of contexts, including problemsolving using computer software, reportwriting and presentations, so that you gain an excellent basis for work in industry.

Placements During your second year, you will have the opportunity to undertake a placement in an area of specific personal interest, which a member of staff will help you to find. Who will teach me? Staff research activity informs the content and development of our courses. Our staff have experience in applying mathematical modelling techniques in diverse contexts including acoustics (loudspeaker design), bubble formation in fluids (damage to underwater structures) and the human spine (understanding medical conditions). Career options Successful mathematical graduates who can apply their analytical and logical abilities to practical purposes are equipped for roles in a wide range of industries including finance, logistics and operations management, project management and statistics, in the private or public sector. You may also progress to further study for roles including accountancy or teacher training.

John Taylor Mathematics principal lecturer For me, mathematics is about understanding patterns, connections and structures. Mathematicians use the power of pure reason both to explore abstract mathematical worlds and to apply their ideas to real-world situations. It is especially pleasing when abstract mathematics finds an unexpected application; a classic example of this is the use of number theory in the encryption of data that is now used as a standard for transmitting information securely over the internet. Educationally, mathematics is fantastic for developing precise reasoning skills which is one reason why mathematics graduates are sought after. Personally, it is a real joy when students share an appreciation of the beauty and elegance of the subject.

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Media studies

Joint honours pathway

Course page English Literature and Media Studies BA(Hons) 52 Media Studies and Education BA(Hons) 54 Media Studies and Sociology BA(Hons) 54

This course addresses the dynamic relationship between media and culture in contemporary societies. It provides you with a solid foundation of media concepts, theories and debates, and you will come away with transferable skills in critical analysis, research and written presentation that you can apply to roles within the media or related industries. What will I learn? You’ll explore contemporary media and culture through media theories, debates and practices. The course gives you the opportunity to develop research and analysis skills and to gain insights into the relationship between information and communication technologies, industries and society both nationally and globally. By the end of the course, you should know how to critically evaluate interactions between media and society and how to analyse audiovisual texts. You should also understand relationships between media and everyday lived experiences, and how to communicate efficiently using sound, image and the written word.

Who will teach me? Our lecturers are involved in a range of research areas of media theory and cultural practices. Many have also worked in the media industry. Throughout the course, you will be guided in your development of transferable skills in personal organisation, team working, communication and presentation. Career options Career paths include work or progression to specialist qualifications in media and related industries, such as marketing and public relations. Successful graduates will have transferable skills in critical analysis and written presentation. Our courses equip students with the skills required for the exciting and rapidly changing media industry, as you’re taught by professionals who are active in the world of media theory.

Placements During your second year, you will have the opportunity of a placement in an area of specific personal interest, which a member of staff will help you to find.

48 www.brighton.ac.uk/courses | joint honours pathways

Rebecca Bramall Media studies pathway leader Before joining the University of Brighton in Hastings, I worked at the Institute of Contemporary Arts and the British Film Institute in film distribution and programming. I was also part of the development and management team of The Women’s Library at London Metropolitan University. My research is in the field of cultural studies, examining concepts of remembering and forgetting in twentieth-century cultural and social theory. Most recently, I’ve been investigating discourses of anti-consumerism, environmentalism and nationalism.


Sociology

Joint honours pathway

Course page Media Studies and Sociology BA(Hons) 54 Education and Sociology BA(Hons) 55 Sociology and English Literature BA(Hons) 55 Sociology and Community History BA(Hons) 55

Sociology examines how individual lives fit into their societies, and questions the extent to which individuals control their own behaviour and relationships within pre-existing social patterns. It can help us draw attention to hidden suffering, exploitation and repression, to change the world for the better, and be used to examine topics including social class and mobility, secularisation, law and deviance. By focusing on the social processes that affect the lives of people today you’ll develop transferable skills in investigation and analysis that you will be able to use in work with people in a social context, or in many other career options. What will I learn? Over the first two years, you’ll develop critical understanding in four areas. You’ll explore what it means to think sociologically, the origins and relevance of sociological traditions, what contemporary social theory says about the formation of individuals and how people progress through life from a sociological perspective. The third year brings opportunities to look at specific topics in depth, such as globalisation, leisure, social movements and human rights. You’ll be able to investigate questions of specific personal interest in research and dissertation modules. Previous topics include suicide and religion, childhood innocence, online identities, and fear and racism.

Throughout the course, you will be guided in your development of transferable skills in personal organisation, team working, communication and presentation. In Hastings, we believe sociology should be a critical science, drawing attention to hidden suffering, exploitation and repression and to change the world for the better.

James Ormrod Sociology pathway leader

Placements During your second year, you will have the opportunity of a placement in an area of specific personal interest, which a member of staff will help you to find.

A sociological imagination can be turned to anything, as my own research on activists supporting the exploration, development and settlement of outer space goes to show!

Once you have studied sociology the world never looks the same again. Exploring how human society is structured, and how it develops and functions is fascinating.

Who will teach me? Your lecturers are involved in national and international research, publish the results of their research regularly and are engaged with a number of sociological topics, including social movements, nongovernmental organisations, consumption and lifestyle, the internet, the environment and migration. Career options The insights you will develop are particularly useful in jobs dealing with people in a social context. Career areas include drug and alcohol services, youth work, the police and probation, social work, social policy and local government and charity work. You may also be able to apply for postgraduate teacher training or continue your studies.

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Joint honours courses

Environmental Biology and Education BSc(Hons)

Human Biology and Education BSc(Hons)

Biology BSc(Hons)

Our Environmental Biology and Education degree is aimed at people interested in a career in areas such as research, environmental work, teaching, support roles in community, industry or environmental agencies.

Our Human Biology and Education degree is aimed at people interested in a career in areas such as bioscience laboratory or research work, scientific consultancy or teaching. Our graduates have also developed careers in the police, law and human rights fields, as well as working in industry. Graduates interested in a teaching career would be eligible to apply for the graduate teacher programme and various postgraduate certificates in education (PGCE) run at our Falmer campus.

This course is a unique opportunity to study both environmental biology and human biology together.

You will be taught by research-active staff in a diverse range of seminars, lectures, laboratory practicals, field work, site visits, workshops and group work, with an opportunity for a work placement or international field trip in year 2. This is a fascinating area in which you will develop skills that will prepare you for graduate entry into employment as well as postgraduate study, such as the university’s Ecology MRes degree. Graduates would also be eligible to apply for various postgraduate certificates in education (PGCE) or the graduate teacher programme run at our Falmer campus. Syllabus Year 1 Biological Systems • Ecology • Including All Learners • Systems and Structures in Education • Approaches to Learning • Subject Approaches Year 2 Evolution and Behaviour • Habitat Ecology • Developing Inclusive Education • Comparative Education • Learning Through Practice • Research Practices Year 3 Ecology Field Skills • Environmental Issues • Critical Perspectives on Learning and Development • Education, Policy and Government • Dissertation/project

The course is delivered through lectures and seminars by leaders in the fields of human biology and education. Biology classes will be taught in our brand new state-of-the-art laboratory. In year 2 you will have an opportunity to undertake a work placement in a subject or setting that really interests you. Syllabus Year 1 Practical Skills in Laboratory Bioscience and Microbiology • Molecular Cell Biology and Physiology • Socio-cultural Contexts for Education • Systems and Structures in Education • Approaches to Learning • Subject Approaches Year 2 Human Biology of Disease • Human Microbiology • Comparative Education • Critiques of Inclusive Policy and Practice • Learning Through Practice • Research Practices Year 3 Biomedicine • Frontiers in Human Biosciences • Reframing Identity • Critical Perspectives on Learning and Education • Dissertation/project

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Our Biology degree is for you, if you are interested in laboratory or research work, scientific consultancy, environmental careers or teaching. You will develop skills, preparing you for graduate entry into employment and for postgraduate study. Some graduates have developed careers in the police, law and human rights, as well as working in industry. You will be taught by lecturers who are research-active within their fields of expertise, and will use the facilities in our brand new state-of-the-art laboratory, which has been designed specifically for the needs of our biology students. You will take part in seminars, lectures, lab practicals, field work, site visits, workshops, and group work with an opportunity to undertake a work placement or international field trip in year 2. Syllabus Year 1 Biological Systems • Practical Skills in Laboratory Bioscience and Microbiology • Molecular Cell Biology and Physiology • Ecology • Approaches to Learning • Subject Approaches Year 2 Biology of Disease • Human Microbiology • Evolution and Behaviour • Habitat Ecology • Learning Through Practice • Research Practices Year 3 Biomedicine • Frontiers in Human Biosciences • Ecology Field Skills • Environmental Issues • Dissertation/project


Joint honours courses

Computing and Business BSc(Hons)

Computing and Education BSc(Hons)

Our Computing and Business degree is aimed at people interested in careers in business management, particularly providing IT solutions. It will enable you to develop your knowledge and skills in a range of commercial computing areas.

Our Computing and Education degree is aimed at people interested in a career in IT training or teaching. It will help you to develop your knowledge and skills in a range of computing areas. You will look into the nature and purpose of education, alongside the systems and structures that shape it, through an exploration of educational policy and practice.

You will take part in a diverse mix of seminars, lectures and practical laboratory classes, and be taught by specialists who will help you understand theory and practice in both disciplines. In the second year there are opportunities to undertake a short placement. This is a fascinating area where the opportunities of career progression for a well-qualified individual are excellent. Syllabus Year 1 Introduction to Object-oriented Programming • Introduction to Database Management Systems • Enquiry-based Business Learning • Approaches to Learning • Subject Approaches Year 2 Web Application Programming • Database Design • Enquiry-based Business Learning • Learning Through Practice • Research Practices Year 3 Advanced Internet Application Design • Data Management • Business Enterprise • Strategic Practice • Dissertation/project Find out more Computing pathway page Business pathway page

The course is taught through seminars, lectures and practical classes with the opportunity to undertake a work placement in year 2. After graduating you will be well equipped to teach ICT in organisations and have a firm foundation for a career in teaching or postgraduate study. Graduates interested in teaching would be eligible to apply for the university’s Post-compulsory Education or (Secondary) Information Communication Technology postgraduate certificate in education (PGCE). Syllabus Year 1 Object-oriented Programming • Database Management Systems • Systems and Structures in Education • Socio-Cultural Contexts for Education • Approaches to Learning • Subject Approaches Year 2 Web Application Programming • Database Design • Critiques of Inclusive Policy and Practice • Comparative Education • Learning Through Practice • Research Practices Year 3 Advanced Internet Application Design • Data Management • Critical Perspectives on Learning and Education • Reframing Identity • Dissertation/project

Entry requirements page 60–61 Find out more University of Brighton in Hastings 08456 020607 hastingsinfo@brighton.ac.uk www.brighton.ac.uk/courses

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Joint honours courses

Education and English Literature BA(Hons)

English Literature and Community History BA(Hons)

English Literature and Media Studies BA(Hons)

Our Education and English Literature degree is aimed at people interested in careers in the education and cultural industries. You will look into the nature and purpose of education, alongside the systems and structures that shape it, through an exploration of educational policy and practice.

Our English Literature and Community History degree can open up careers in research, publishing and journalism or the public sector. You’ll develop skills needed to enter employment at graduate level, and be well prepared for postgraduate study.

Our English Literature and Media Studies degree can open up a career in publishing, journalism, marketing, public relations, research, teaching, or careers in the cultural and arts industries. As well as developing skills that will prepare you for graduate entry into employment, this course will also provide a firm foundation for postgraduate study.

You will be taught through seminars and lectures, with an opportunity to undertake a work placement in year 2. For those interested in going into teaching, this placement could be in a local primary or secondary school. This is a fascinating area which provides a firm foundation for a career in teaching or postgraduate study in either discipline. Those graduates interested in a career in teaching would be eligible to apply for the graduate teacher programme or a relevant postgraduate certificate in education run at our Falmer campus. Syllabus Year 1 Systems and Structures in Education • Socio-Cultural Contexts for Education • Narrative and Narratives • Year 2 Critiques of Inclusive Policy and Practice • Comparative Education • The Nineteenth Century in Literature • The Child in Literature • Research project • Learning through Practice • Research Practices Year 3 Critical Perspectives on Learning and Education • Reframing Identity • New English Writing and Voices • Women’s Writing • Dissertation/project

Through a detailed reading of ancient and contemporary texts you’ll develop an understanding of the processes and traditions of literature in English. You will explore patterns of social relationships and structures, with the study of community history, while developing your historical research techniques in modules that use southern England as a case study. The course is delivered through workshops, seminars, and lectures and individual tutorials and is assessed through coursework. There is an opportunity to undertake a work placement in year 2. Syllabus Year 1 Narrative and Narratives • Powerful Texts • Studying Community History • Social and Political Change in Southern England, 1800–2000 • Approaches to Learning • Subject Approaches and Practices Year 2 The Nineteenth Century in Literature • The Child in Literature • Personal Histories • Popular Culture and Leisure in Southern England from 1800 to the Present • Learning Through Practice • Research Practices Year 3 New English Writing and Voices • Women’s Writing and Feminist Theory • Public History and Community Identity • War and Social Change in Twentieth-century Southern England • Dissertation/project

52 www.brighton.ac.uk/courses | joint honours courses

Through varying concepts, theories and approaches, you will explore practices of representation, discourse and identity. Close analysis of literature and media texts, from a variety of historical periods and genres, will develop your skills of interpretation, evaluation and critical judgement. The course is delivered through seminars, lectures, workshops and individual tutorials, and is assessed through coursework. There is also an opportunity to undertake a work placement in year 2. Syllabus Year 1 Modules include: Media: A Critical Introduction • Visual Communication • Narrative and Narratives • Powerful Texts • Subject Approaches and Practices • Approaches to Learning Year 2 Modules include: Visual Methodologies • Adaptation for the Screen • The Nineteenth Century in Literature • The Child in Literature • Learning Through Practice • Research Practices Year 3 Modules include: Audio-visual Narratives • Women’s Writing • New English Writing and Voices • Media Geographies • Dissertation/research project


Joint honours courses

Mathematics and Business BSc(Hons)

Mathematics and Computing BSc(Hons)

Our Mathematics and Business degree is aimed at people interested in a career in areas such as finance, consultancy, accounting and actuarial work, project or operations management.

Our Mathematics and Computing degree is aimed at people interested in a career in areas such as software engineering, IT services, project management, finance, consultancy, and operations management.

You will learn to combine mathematical concepts and their applications with business theory and practice as well as developing a broad range of relevant skills that will prepare you for graduate entry into employment as well as postgraduate study.

You will combine the development of software products with the exploration of key mathematical concepts and their practical applications while developing a broad range of relevant skills that will prepare you for graduate entry into employment as well as postgraduate study.

You will take part in a diverse mix of seminars, lectures and practical computer classes with an opportunity to undertake a work placement in year 2. Syllabus Year 1 Mathematical Skills • Discrete Maths and Algebra • Enquiry-based Business Learning including global business environment, marketing and finance • Approaches to Learning • Subject Approaches Year 2 Multivariable and Numerical Methods • Linear Maths • Enquiry-based Business Learning including business law and operations management and systems • Learning through Practice • Research Practices Year 3 Business Enterprise • Strategic Practice • Dissertation/project • Options including: Maths of Finance • Graph Theory • Topology • Complex Variables

You will take part in a diverse mix of seminars, lectures and practical laboratory classes with an opportunity to undertake a work placement in year 2. Syllabus Year 1 Mathematical Skills • Discrete Maths and Algebra • Object-oriented Programming • Introduction to Database Management Systems • Approaches to Learning • Subject Approaches Year 2 Multivariable and Numerical Methods • Linear Maths • Web Application Programming • Database Design • Learning Through Practice • Research Practices Year 3 Object-oriented Analysis and Design • Data Management • Dissertation/project • Options including: Graph Theory • Topology • Mathematics of Finance • Complex Variables

Entry requirements page 60–61 Find out more University of Brighton in Hastings 08456 020607 hastingsinfo@brighton.ac.uk www.brighton.ac.uk/courses

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Joint honours courses

Mathematics and Education BSc(Hons)

Media Studies and Education BA(Hons)

Media Studies and Sociology BA(Hons)

Mathematics and Education is aimed at people interested in a career in areas such as teaching, finance, consultancy or operations management. You will develop knowledge and skills in mathematical concepts and their practical applications. You will look into the nature and purpose of education through an exploration of educational policy and practice.

Our Media Studies and Education degree can open up a career in teaching, research or the cultural industries. As well as developing skills that will prepare you for graduate entry into employment, this course will also provide a firm foundation for postgraduate study.

Our Media Studies and Sociology degree can open up a career in the public sector or the cultural industries. As well as developing a broad range of relevant skills that will prepare you for graduate entry into employment, this course will also provide a firm foundation for postgraduate study.

You will look into the nature and purpose of education through an exploration of educational policy and practice. The media strand examines the role of media in contemporary societies. The course is delivered through seminars, lectures and workshops, and you will be assessed through coursework, with an opportunity to undertake a work placement in year 2.

You will examine social structures, social change, and the role of media in contemporary societies. In depth analysis of theoretical and media texts will develop your skills of interpretation, evaluation and critical judgement.

The course is taught through seminars, lectures and computer-based classes with an opportunity to undertake a work placement in year 2. You will develop the skills needed to enter employment at graduate entry, as well as for postgraduate study. Graduates interested in teaching are eligible to apply for the graduate teacher programme and some of the postgraduate certificates in education (PGCE) run at our Falmer campus. Syllabus Year 1 Mathematical Skills • Discrete Maths and Algebra • Systems and Structures in Education • Socio-Cultural Contexts for Education • Approaches to Learning • Subject Approaches Year 2 Multivariable and Numerical Methods • Linear Maths • Comparative Education • Critiques of Inclusive Policy and Practice • Learning Through Practice • Research Practices Year 3 Critical Perspectives on Learning and Education • Reframing Identity • Dissertation/project • Options including: Graph Theory • Topology • Mathematics of Finance • Complex Variables

Graduates interested in teaching would be eligible to apply for the Post-compulsory Education PGCE, run at our Falmer campus. Syllabus Year 1 Media: a critical introduction • Visual Communication • Systems and Structures in Education • Socio-cultural Contexts for Education Year 2 Visual Methodologies • Adaptation for the Screen • Research Practices • Critiques of Inclusive Policy and Practice • Comparative Education • Learning Through Practice • Research Practices Year 3 Audio-visual Narratives • Media Geographies • Critical Perspectives on Learning and Education • Reframing Identity • Dissertation/project

54 www.brighton.ac.uk/courses | joint honours courses

The course is delivered through seminars, lectures and workshops, and you will be assessed through coursework and exams, with an opportunity to undertake a work placement in Year 2. Syllabus Year 1 Media: A Critical Introduction • Visual Communication • Foundations of Sociology • Sociological Imaginations • Approaches to Learning • Subject Approaches and Practices Year 2 Visual Methodologies • Adaptation for the Screen • Theorising the Social World • Sociology and the Life Course • Learning through Practice • Research Practices Year 3 Audio-visual Narratives • Media Geographies • Sociological Analysis: special topic • Sociological Analysis: concepts and theories • Dissertation/ project


Joint honours courses

Sociology and English Literature BA(Hons)

Sociology and Community History BA(Hons)

Education and Sociology BA(Hons)

Our Sociology and English Literature degree can open up careers in research, journalism, or the arts and cultural industries. As well as developing a broad range of relevant skills that will prepare you for graduate entry into employment, this course will also provide a firm foundation for postgraduate study.

Our Sociology and Community History degree is aimed at people that are interested in a career in social research and the public sector.

Our Education and Sociology degree is aimed at people interested in careers in the education and cultural industries. You will look into the nature and purpose of education, alongside the systems and structures that shape it, through an exploration of educational policy and practice.

Through reading ancient and contemporary texts you’ll develop an understanding of the processes and traditions of literature in English. You’ll also investigate how meaning is constructed through reading and writing, and how these are transformed by different historical, cultural and social contexts. The course is delivered through workshops, seminars, lectures and individual tutorials and is assessed through coursework. There is an opportunity to undertake a work placement in Year 2. Syllabus Year 1 Sociological Imaginations • Foundations of Sociology • Narrative and Narratives • Powerful Texts • Approaches to Learning • Subject Approaches and Practices Year 2 Theorising the Social World • Sociology and the Life Course • The Nineteenth Century in Literature • The Child in Literature • Learning through Practice • Research Practices Year 3 Sociological Analysis: special topics • Sociological Analysis: concepts and theories • New English Writing and Voices • Women’s Writing and Feminist Theory • Dissertation/research project

You will explore patterns of social relationships and structures, with the study of community history, while developing your historical research techniques using southern England as a case study. This course will equip you with a broad range of relevant skills that will prepare you for graduate entry into employment as well as postgraduate study. You will be taught in small groups through a mixture seminars and lectures, you will have an opportunity to undertake a work placement or work on a research project in either sociology or history in year 2. Syllabus Year 1 Sociological Imaginations • Foundations of Sociology • Studying Community History • Social and Political Change in Southern England, 1800–2000 • Approaches to Learning • Subject Approaches Year 2 Theorising the Social World • Sociology and the Life Course • Personal Histories • Popular Culture and Leisure in Southern England from 1800 to the Present • Learning Through Practice • Research Practices Year 3 Sociological Analysis: special topic • Sociological Analysis: concepts and theories • Public History and Community Identity • War and Social Change in Twentieth-century Southern England • Dissertation/project

You will be taught through seminars and lectures, with an opportunity to undertake a work placement in year 2. This is a fascinating area which provides a firm foundation for a career in teaching or postgraduate study in either discipline. Graduates interested in going into teaching would be eligible to apply for the Postcompulsory Education postgraduate certificate in education (PGCE). Syllabus Year 1 Systems and Structures in Education • Socio-cultural Contexts for Education • Foundations of Sociology • Sociological Imaginations • Approaches to Learning • Subject Approaches and Practices Year 2 Critiques of Inclusive Policy and Practice • Comparative Education • Theorising the Social World • Sociology and the Life Course • Learning through Practice • Research Practices Year 3 Critical Perspectives on Learning and Education • Reframing Identity • Sociological Analysis: special topic • Sociological Analysis: concepts and theories • Dissertation/project

joint honours courses | www.brighton.ac.uk/courses 55


56 www.brighton.ac.uk/hastings | all about


all about | www.brighton.ac.uk/hastings 57


How to apply

How do I apply for a full-time course? For full-time undergraduate degrees – BA(Hons) or BSc(Hons) – or foundation degrees – FdA or FdSc – you need to apply online through the Universities and Colleges Admissions Service (UCAS) at www.ucas.com. The application process The following process contains some or all of the stages you may need to complete, depending on your route to university. • • • • • • • •

You will need to apply separately for student funding. See www.brighton.ac.uk/ money for important advice and deadlines. You can also call us for advice.

Apply to UCAS Select choices Receive confirmation of offer Get exam results Receive final confirmation Accept confirmation Enrol on course Begin course

How do I complete the UCAS form? • Log onto www.ucas.com. • Select Student log-in. • Click on Register. • Read and accept terms and conditions • Select the option applying ‘through school’ or ‘as an individual’. • Follow the online instructions to register your details. • Choose a password and set a security question and answer (this should be a simple question which when answered correctly shows log-in details). • The system issues a username. • Your username and password are used to start the application. You can copy and paste personal statements and references. You can apply for up to five institution/course combinations. You cannot express a preference at this stage but do list them in the order in which they appear in the UCAS directory. • There is an administration fee for UCAS applications. Details are on the UCAS website.

58 www.brighton.ac.uk/hastings | how to apply

Our UCAS code is: University of Brighton (BRITN) B72. Each course also has its own UCAS code and Hastings has a campus code, U. What if I need further help with my UCAS application form? You can use a computer in our library to process your UCAS application form. Please call us on 01273 644640 to book the use of a computer. When do I need to apply? The important dates are listed below. • • •

For all UCAS courses, UCAS can receive applications from 1 September. The closing date for UK and other EU applicants is 15 January. For non-EU applicants, the closing date is 30 June, but it is advisable to apply earlier if possible.

What if I miss the deadline? Can I apply late? Yes, you can apply through Clearing, the period of time when students can gain places on courses that still have availability. The system operates mainly after students receive A-level results in August. Courses that have spare places after A-level results are listed on the UCAS website as well as in national newspapers. Applicants wishing to be considered for a place during this period should telephone the University of Brighton in Hastings on 08456 020607. You should ask to speak to the admissions tutor for the course, who will then discuss qualifications and, if appropriate, offer you a place.


What if I want to study for a part-time course? People wishing to study part-time don’t need to apply through the UCAS system. You can call us on 08456 020607 to ask for an application form, or download an application form from www.brighton.ac.uk/hastings. Please note that you will need a separate form for each course that you apply for. Come to an open day You can tour the campus, attend subject presentations and view facilities. Open days provide an excellent opportunity to ask questions about university life. Students and staff are on hand to discuss the courses, financing your studies, careers, accommodation, specific support for individual needs, and sport and social activities. Student ambassadors, wearing bright blue t-shirts, are also available throughout the day to chat and answer questions about studying and living here. Details of our open days can be found on page 01. Come on a taster course From time to time, you may be able participate in taster courses for a particular subject that interests you. Please call 08456 020607 for further details.

I’m Scott and, along with the rest of the enquiries team, I’m here to guide you through the application process and help you get ready for life at the University of Brighton – no matter which course or campus you’ll be studying on. As your first point of contact, we can answer questions about application procedures and deadlines, courses and entry requirements, and open days and visits. As well as answering your queries by phone and email, we also share inside information about life on the Sussex coast on Twitter @brightonstudent. Once you’ve accepted your offer, we’ll contact you to activate your student account. This means that before you arrive here you’ll be able to meet other new students online, prepare for your course, read FAQs and ask us your own questions.

If you are a school/college leaver or adult learner thinking of studying a course with us, coming to one of our open days can be a valuable experience. Please feel free to bring someone with you to discover what makes the university’s campus in Hastings such a special place to study.

Get in touch – we’re here to help!

how to apply | www.brighton.ac.uk/hastings 59


Entry requirements

Where possible, we have listed the typical A-level grades required for each course. Many of our courses also welcome applicants with different types of qualification such as BTEC or the International Baccalaureate. There is more information on the qualifications we accept, and how they equate to A-level grades, on the next pages (62–63). The University of Brighton in Hastings welcomes applications from students aged 21 and over who may not have formal qualifications but who can demonstrate appropriate experience and potential at interview. Please see the website for detailed entry requirements, which may also include specific required subjects for some courses.

www.brighton.ac.uk/hastings

UCAS code

Course title

Duration

Typical entry requirement

L541 (campus code U)

Applied Social Science BA(Hons)

3 years

BBB

C100 (campus code U)

Biology BSc(Hons)

3 years

ABB, including biology A-level. (Biology and chemistry required at AS-level.)

P501 (campus code U)

Broadcast Journalism BA(Hons)

3 years

BBB

P314 (campus code U)

Broadcast Media BA(Hons) top-up degree

1 year

HND or foundation degree in relevant subject.

P310 (campus code U)

Broadcast Media foundation degree

2 years

UCAS tariff: 160 points.

N201 (campus code U)

Business BSc(Hons) top-up degree

1 year

HND or foundation degree in relevant subject.

N190 (campus code U)

Business with Enterprise BSc(Hons)

3 years

BBB

GN01 (campus code U)

Computing and Business BSc(Hons)

3 years

BBB

GX03 (campus code U)

Computing and Education BSc(Hons)

3 years

BBB

P313 (campus code U)

Digital Film Production BA(Hons)

3 years

BBB

GG46 (campus code U)

Digital Games Production BSc(Hons)

3–4 years

BBB

W612 (campus code U)

Digital Post Production foundation degree

2 years

UCAS tariff: 160 points.

Apply direct to the university

Early Years Care and Education foundation degree

2 years part-time

See website for detailed entry requirements.

XQ33 (campus code U)

Education and English Literature BA(Hons)

3 years

BBB, including English.

XL33 (campus code U)

Education and Sociology BA(Hons)

3 years

BBB

QV33 (campus code U)

English Literature and Community History BA(Hons)

3 years

BBB

QP3H (campus code U)

English Literature and Media Studies BA(Hons)

3 years

ABB

60 www.brighton.ac.uk/hastings | entry requirements


UCAS code

Course title

Duration

Typical entry requirement

CX1H (campus code U)

Environmental Biology and Education BSc(Hons)

3 years

BBB

Apply direct to the university

Graduate Teacher Programme

1 year

See website for detailed entry requirements.

XC31 (campus code U)

Human Biology and Education BSc(Hons)

3 years

BBB, including biology at A-level. (Biology and chemistry required at AS-level.)

G453 (campus code U)

Internet Computing BSc(Hons)

3–4 years

BBB

GN11 (campus code U)

Mathematics and Business BSc(Hons)

3 years

BBB, including maths at A-level.

GG10 (campus code U)

Mathematics and Computing BSc(Hons)

3 years

BBB, including maths at A-level.

GX13 (campus code U)

Mathematics and Education BSc(Hons)

3 years

BBB, including maths at A-level.

PX33 (campus code U)

Media Studies and Education BA(Hons)

3 years

BBB

PL33 (campus code U)

Media Studies and Sociology BA(Hons)

3 years

BBB

B7L0 (campus code U)

Nursing (Adult) BSc(Hons)

3 years

BBB, a science and/ or social science is desirable.

X100U (apply at http://gttr.ac.uk)

Primary Education (5–11 years) PGCE

1 year

Honours degree, min 2.2, in relevant subject.

Apply direct to the university

Professional Studies in Primary Education

2.5 years part-time

See website for detailed entry requirements.

P312 (campus code U)

Radio Production Foundation degree

2 years

UCAS tariff: 160 points.

LV33 (campus code U)

Sociology and Community History BA(Hons)

3 years

BBB

LQ33 (campus code U)

Sociology and English Literature BA(Hons)

3 years

ABB, including English at A-level.

P311 (campus code U)

Television Production Foundation degree

2 years

UCAS tariff: 160 points.

entry requirements | www.brighton.ac.uk/hastings 61


Do I have the right qualifications?

We are committed to helping as many people as possible benefit from higher education. We welcome applications from students over the age of 21 with qualifications and experience outside the traditional A-level route. Relevant work or other experience may also be regarded as equivalent to formal qualifications. This section provides an overview of the entry requirements system. Specific entry requirements for each course are listed within individual course descriptions. General minimum entry requirements For undergraduate degree courses (BA or BSc) • Two A-levels or National Certificate plus at least three GCSE subjects including English language and mathematics minimum grade C, or • a pass in a QAA-approved access course. For foundation degree and certificate courses (FdA, FdSc) • One A-level plus at least three GCSE subjects including English language and mathematics minimum grade C, or • a pass in a QAA-approved access course Offers will normally be higher than these minimum requirements. Conditional offers may be expressed in terms of grades, UCAS tariff points or a combination of UCAS tariff points and grades to be obtained. Postgraduate Certificate in Education (PGCE) Specific entry requirements on page 61. Primary Education Graduate Teacher Programme (GTP) Specific entry requirements on page 61.

62 www.brighton.ac.uk/hastings | do I have the right qualifications?

The UCAS tariff UCAS (Universities and Colleges Admissions Service) is the central organisation that processes applications for full-time undergraduate courses. The UCAS tariff is a points system that translates students’ achievements across different types of qualifications into one numerical format so that different types and volumes of achievement can be compared. It enables the university to make offers that take into account the breadth of qualifications. BTEC We welcome applicants offering a National Certificate or Diploma in a relevant subject area. Qualifications not on the UCAS tariff Admissions tutors accept many other qualifications which give access to higher education. Applicants offering work-based qualifications, such as NVQs, should be able to provide evidence of relevant background knowledge and ability to study at university level. While individual course requirements vary, all qualifications – UK and international – are considered. Access courses The university normally welcomes applicants with access courses approved by the Quality Assurance Agency (QAA) in an appropriate subject. Credits Relevant professional, commercial or Open University credits may be acknowledged as equivalent to sections of a course which would not need to be repeated. Applicants must be able to provide evidence of some A-level equivalent study and may still be advised to undertake a preparatory course. The relevant admissions tutor will be able to help you resolve the details.


Entry requirements – approximate equivalent qualifications Offer

UCAS tariff, AS and A-level

Scottish Highers

International Baccalaureate

European Baccalaureate

Irish Leaving Certificate

AAB

340 points including AA at A-level

AAABB

36 points

80 per cent

A1, A1, A1, A2, B1, B1

ABB

320 points including AB at A-level

AABBB

34 points

77 per cent

A1, A1, B1, B1, B2, B2

ABC/BBB

300 points including BB at A-level

ABBBB

32 points

75 per cent

A2, B1, B2, B2, B3, B3

BBC

280 points including BB at A-level

BBBBB

30 points

73 per cent

B1, B2, B3, C1, C2, C2

BCC

260 points including BC at A-level

BBBCC

28 points

71 per cent

B3, B2, C1, C1, C2, C2

CCC

240 points including CC at A-level

BCCCC

26 points

70 per cent

B3, C1, C2, C2, C3, C3

English language proficiency Our courses are delivered and assessed in English; to succeed in your studies you must have a good command of English and the ability to apply it in an academic environment. You can meet our English language proficiency requirement by providing us with certified proof that you have recently passed an English language qualification. You should check individual course descriptions to confirm the required grade for your chosen course on our website www.brighton.ac.uk/courses. If your qualifications and experience do not meet our entry requirements for English language proficiency, your offer of a place will be conditional on you achieving our required standard of English language proficiency before you start your studies here. In these circumstances we will recommend you complete an English language course. Please visit www.brighton.ac.uk/ learnenglish for more information.

Entry requirements for healthcare professions, nursing, midwifery and medicine courses To study nursing, you must also complete a medical questionnaire, undergo a vaccination programme and provide a satisfactory Criminal Records Bureau (CRB) Enhanced Disclosure document. Entry requirements for initial teacher education courses To study on an initial teacher training course (ie a PGCE or degree with QTS), you need to meet entry requirements determined by the government. At the time of going to print, these include GCSE minimum grade C or equivalent in mathematics, English language and, for primary, a science. You must also be able to read effectively and communicate clearly in spoken and written standard English. The selection procedures for all initial teacher education courses include an interview and, before starting a course, you will need to complete an occupational health check and Criminal Records Bureau (CRD) Enhanced Disclosure check. Please note that the government may introduce new entry requirements for these courses for 2013 entry.

Education placements The university is not liable for failure of placement providers, or of placement providers to provide a suitable placement. In such circumstances the university will make every effort to make alternative arrangements. The university will seek placements with partners in the south-east region of England. It is the responsibility and obligation of the student to arrange travel to and from the placement. Living in Sussex? We are committed to making university as accessible as possible to people living and working in the Sussex. If you are studying, living or working here and you can meet the entry requirements of your chosen course you may be eligible for a guaranteed interview or offer of a place from us. Please contact our recruitment team on 01273 642601 for advice on which of our courses this guarantee applies to, and on how to complete your UCAS form. Please note the statutory entry requirements for nursing and some teaching courses mean that we cannot offer guaranteed interviews or offers of places for these courses.

Visit www.brighton.ac.uk/education for up-to-date information.

do I have the right qualifications? | www.brighton.ac.uk/hastings 63


Fees, funding and scholarships

What will it cost?

What funding is available?

Tuition fees In 2012 the tuition fee for UK students starting university for the first time is £9,000 per year. The fee for the industrial placement year is £750. Please note tuition fees are generally subject to small yearly increases in line with inflation.

Financial support is available from the government and the university. We’ve summarised what help is available below, using 2012 figures to illustrate how the system works.

Generally, if you are eligible to receive a student loan, tuition fees are not paid before or during your course. Tuition fees are paid like a tax, when you are in work and earning over a certain amount. What’s included? When costs such as health or criminal record checks, field trips or use of specialist materials are incurred as a mandatory requirement of the course they are included in your tuition fee. What else should I budget for? You may incur additional costs depending on the optional modules or activities you choose. The cost of optional activities is not included in your tuition fee and you will need to meet this cost in addition to your fees. Before you apply please check with the school that provides your course for advice about what is included and what optional costs you could face so you can budget accordingly. You should also budget for the cost of books, photocopying and printing for example. Where and how you live will play a big part in determining how much money you will need. You will also need to consider accommodation, travel, clothes, food, phone, insurance and your social life.

Government funding Full-time student from the UK For eligible students the government’s package includes student loans for tuition fees and living costs, and maintenance grants.

A range of funding is available from the government and the university to help you meet your costs whilst you are studying. Student loan for tuition fees Tuition fees do not have to be paid upfront before you start your course, or during your studies. Eligible students can get a loan to cover the cost of tuition, which you start to pay back from the April after you have graduated if you are earning over £21,000 a year. If your income falls your payments stop. Student loan for living costs This loan, also called the maintenance loan, can help with living costs such as food, accommodation and travel. The amount you can borrow is determined by your household income. In 2012–13 a loan of up to £5,500 a year is available to students living away from home and studying outside London. Students who live in their parents’ home can borrow up to £4,375 a year.

Check our website for the latest advice about tuition fees and other costs. www.brighton.ac.uk/money

64 www.brighton.ac.uk/hastings | fees, funding and scholarships

Non-repayable maintenance grant The amount you receive as a grant is based on your household income. Grants can help with living costs. Grants do NOT need to be paid back. Students with a household income of up to £25,000 are entitled to a full grant of £3,250 a year. Students with a household income of between £25,000 and £42,600 are entitled to a grant of between £3,250 and £50. Targeted support Additional government help is available for students with disabilities, for students with children or other dependants and for care leavers. Depending on family circumstances you could also be eligible for certain state benefits and child tax credits. Disabled students’ allowances Disabled students’ allowances (DSAs) are extra financial help available to disabled students studying full and part-time. DSAs do not depend on income, and are paid to you in addition to the standard student finance package of student loans and maintenance grant. DSAs do not need to be repaid. Part-time students from the UK If you are an eligible part-time student studying for at least 25 per cent of the time of a full-time undergraduate course you can apply for a student loan to cover the cost of your tuition whilst you are studying. Part-time students are eligible for disabled students’ allowances but are generally not eligible for government grants or loans to help cover living costs. Part-time students from England are eligible to be considered for financial support from the University of Brighton. See www.brighton.ac.uk/money for details.


How do I apply for student funding? You should not wait until you have been offered a place at university to apply for your student funding. You can apply online at www.direct.gov.uk/studentfinance.

The fund seeks to provide non-repayable grants of up to £250 for eligible students to assist in the following ways: • to contribute towards travel and subsistence costs for students attending job interviews or undertaking unpaid work experience or volunteer experience • to help in the purchase of appropriate clothing and footwear for interviews • to enable students to access specialist equipment or facilities related to professional practice.

Money help online On our website you can find practical information and advice to help you maximise your income and minimise your expenditure. The site has useful information on: • funding and fees • welfare benefits • advice on debt • how to live on a budget • student discounts • part-time work.

University of Brighton funding

Help and advice

Find out more, visit www.brighton.ac.uk/ money.

University of Brighton bursaries A bursary is money and other support that does not have to be paid back. Our bursaries can help eligible students cover the cost of fees, books, equipment and other study-related costs. During a three year course you could receive additional financial support from us.

Our Student Advice Service can provide financial advice relating to your specific circumstances as well as information on money management.

Nursing student Nursing courses have separate tuition fee and funding arrangements. The funding package can include full payment of tuition fees, an NHS bursary linked to household income and a student loan for living costs.

University of Brighton bursaries are available to students from lower income families, students from neighbourhoods where fewer people than average go to university and to young people leaving local authority care. We also provide a range of scholarships which recognise and reward academic and sporting merit. Hastings Aspiration Awards A number of Hastings Aspiration Awards are available for students from the Hastings and Rother area. The awards provide financial and additional study support. For further information contact our widening participation coordinator. The University of Brighton in Hastings Student Employability Fund A new fund has been established through the generosity of Diana and Rodney Buse to support second and third year students based at the university’s Hastings campus in enhancing their employability.

We can guide you through the eligibility criteria and application processes for grants, student loans and other funds. There are a number of additional funds to help students in certain circumstances and we can help you access these if you are eligible.

We can provide you with expert and confidential advice on student finance before and throughout your time here. We can also help you minimise financial stress by coaching you on money management techniques. We offer regular one-to-one sessions and group workshops.

Check our website, www.brighton.ac.uk/money regularly. You can also sign up to receive email updates from us.

Concerned about money? If you are concerned about your financial situation at any time when you are a student here, please contact the Student Advice Service. Our service is confidential and non-judgemental. 01273 642888 Advice for students with existing qualifications Government policy means that if you already have a degree or other higher education qualification and you choose to study for another qualification at the same or lower level (ELQ) you will not normally be eligible for government funding such as grants, and living cost and tuition fee loans. You will need to meet the cost of your tuition fees and your living costs yourself. Some courses and qualifications are exempt from this policy, including social work and some NHS courses. If you have concerns about whether this issue could affect you please contact fees@brighton.ac.uk where our helpful team will be happy to help. Changing course Changing courses or leaving your course early could have financial consequences. Please contact the student advice team or refer to www.brighton.ac.uk/ ontherightpath.

fees, funding and scholarships | www.brighton.ac.uk/hastings 65


Living here

Hastings offers a variety of good quality, value for money accommodation to rent, from our own halls of residence to privately-owned apartments and shared houses. Our friendly accommodation team can offer advice and guidance on your accommodation options. Living at home If you are local to the area, you may prefer to continue living at home. You can still join in all the activities and will have plenty of chances to make new friends. Halls of residence Our current hall of residence is a Victorian building full of character and set in a beautiful seafront square, which has been transformed into modern student accommodation. It offers self-catering facilities with good-sized en suite rooms. There are big modern kitchens, washing machines and ethernet internet access. It is located in Warrior Square in nearby St Leonards, 15 minutes’ seaside walk from the university campus in Hastings, close to St Leonards Warrior Square railway station and buses. Private accommodation The Hastings area offers some of the most affordable rented accommodation in the south-east. Our accommodation staff can provide information and advice on the typical prices you can expect to pay. We hold a database of local registered flats and houses available to rent. All registered properties are in easy reach of the university campus and have been visited by our accommodation staff to ensure our standards are being met.

66 www.brighton.ac.uk/hastings | living here

Yourstudentpad provides a searchable database of all kinds of property available to our students, as well as comprehensive advice about housing matters. You need to register with the accommodation office before you can use this service. Visit www.yourstudentpad.co.uk for more information. Planning ahead Once you have been offered a place to study here, you will need to consider accommodation options. Start by contacting the university’s Hastings accommodation office. We will help you to select the type of accommodation that will best suit you and provide information on the properties available. There are a range of properties to choose from – halls, single-person lodgings or house and flat shares if you want to live with a group. When you find somewhere you like, we can give you advice about tenancies and answer any other questions you may have. House-sharing If you would like to share with other students, we can help you to contact other first-year students who are looking for rented accommodation. You can meet each other, get into groups and find houses together.

Applying for university accommodation First-year students are given priority for accommodation in halls of residence. EU/ UK students will need to have accepted an academic offer, met advertised criteria and applied for a room in halls by the dates advertised to be eligible for a place in halls. Meeting criteria and applying by the advertised deadlines does not guarantee a place as demand can be greater than the numbers of rooms available. Students from outside the UK/EU who have accepted an academic offer and applied for a place in halls by the dates advertised are guaranteed a place in halls. The finding a home guide is online at www.brighton.ac.uk/accommodation and has more information on the application process and options available, including the rents for living in halls. If you come through clearing, contact us at hastingsinfo@brighton.ac.uk to discuss availability.

Ask the accommodation office for more information: hastingsaccommodation @brighton.ac.uk


George Rankin is a first year Digital Post Production student who lives in halls

Hayley Coleman is the accommodation coordinator for the Hastings campus

I chose to move to Hastings rather than commute from my home town, Brighton, because I was keen to have some more independence and experience living away from home.

I’m the first point of contact for any accommodation queries and can help you find a home or match you with people who are also looking for a home.

Living in halls is a great way to see what living without your parents is like, but as bills are included in the rent this means it isn’t too full on straight away. You get to meet a lot of people through living in halls, people you probably wouldn’t otherwise socialise with, it’s a great way to make some new friends. Being closer to the university itself is also a benefit for using the facilities and also saves a lot of money on travel.

I attend open days and meet prospective students and parents and I’m on hand to help with issues including utility bills, tenancy and maintenance. If you need more specialist help, I can find which other departments or agencies you need to contact. Hastings is a great place to live. It has a large range of affordable property, good transport links to London and being part of a small friendly campus where it’s easy to get to know everyone is a huge benefit.

living here | www.brighton.ac.uk/hastings 67


Support for students

We realise that getting to grips with an unfamiliar place, a new lifestyle, and meeting lots of new people all at once can be daunting. There’s help at hand every step of the way, from before you’ve started your course to after you’ve completed your studies. New students on studentcentral When you accept our offer, you will be able to access your university email account and a special new student area on studentcentral, our online learning environment and community. From there you will be able to view personalised information including important dates, checklists and FAQs. You’ll also find the new student discussion board and blogs here, and meet other new students online before you arrive. Transition day Students who have accepted a firm place here can attend an informal support session in early September. You can ask for advice on finance, learning skills, and disability support, speak to student ambassadors and meet others who are starting at the same time. It’s a good chance to address your worries and helps make university feel more familiar before you start your course. Student advice We know that university life can sometimes be challenging. If you have concerns about money, exams, health, housing or any other problem, help is at hand from our student support tutor. The Student Advice Service offers confidential and non-judgemental advice and support on academic and non-academic issues. The Students’ Union advice centre also offers information, support and representation to students on all kinds of issues, big and small.

Counselling We have our own safe, confidential service for you to discuss aspects of university life or personal issues that worry you with a qualified and experienced counsellor.

Chaplain Our chaplain is available for students and staff of all faiths and those with none, to support them in whatever way is most needed.

Health Before you arrive, visit www.brighton. ac.uk/studentlife/health for the latest advice about immunisations and measles, mumps and meningitis. We can recommend GPs and health centres in Hastings when you begin studying.

The Students’ Union Advice Centre As a student here, you will be able to join the University of Brighton Students’ Union and gain access to a broad range of services. Our friendly staff can provide information about events and social activities on offer, as well as advice on issues that may affect you as a student.

Support for care leavers We are proud to have received the Frank Buttle Trust Quality Mark for our commitment to helping care leavers through university. Care leavers are offered a student support and guidance tutor throughout their period of study, are guaranteed accommodation for the whole of their first year, including vacations, and are eligible for a £1,000 study grant. To be eligible for these benefits, you usually need to be under the age of 25 and have been in local authority care for three months or more since the age of 14. Childcare Many students here balance their studies with caring for their families. We do our best to support our students who have children and can recommend local nurseries that have been registered by Ofsted. We have developed a new guide for the parents of young children which can be found here: www.brighton.ac.uk/ childcare. If you are a full-time student with dependent children, you may be entitled to help from the Childcare Grant and Parents’ Learning Allowance. This extra finance can help pay for childcare and other costs related to your course. Eligibility is dependent on individual circumstances. Visit www.direct.gov.uk to find out more.

68 www.brighton.ac.uk/hastings | support for students

Careers Service The Careers Service can help you develop your career plan and find employment while you are here and give you further advice and guidance to make an effective transition to employment or further study after you graduate. We provide help with CVs, applications and job interviewing and we have access to practice psychometric tests. The careers website provides up-to-date information on occupations, employers, further study and training opportunities at www.brighton.ac.uk/ careers. Our online vacancy database has details of graduate-level jobs, careers events, work experience and study opportunities. We also help students find part-time, temporary and vacation work. Careers counsellors Careers counsellors can help you develop your career plans from the day you start your course. They also work with your tutors to offer sessions on career planning and job search strategies, tailored to your subject.


Careers fair Our well-established annual careers fair provides a chance for students to meet and impress potential employers, who may look to recruit from those they meet on the day. Award-winning volunteering and mentoring schemes Voluntary work can play a key role in your personal and professional development. The university’s award-winning Active Student volunteering service offers you the chance to contribute to the local community while boosting your own career development. To find out more about the support and opportunities available from the careers team, visit www.brighton.ac.uk/careers. After you finish You can keep in touch via the University of Brighton Alumni Association, which has access to 100,000 graduates worldwide. Through our Alumni Advice Network, graduates can stay in touch with, and support, the university through networking, volunteering, mentoring, offering placements or professional advice. Our aim is to support alumni throughout their careers, alert them to opportunities, and help with reunions and events. www.brighton.ac.uk/alumni Beepurple Beepurple helps students and graduates get their business ideas off to the best possible start. Over 2,000 staff, students and alumni have signed up to the Beepurple entrepreneurship programme. Beepurple offers free workshops to develop members’ enterprise skills as well as one-to-one business support for anyone looking to develop an entrepreneurial idea, start a company or social enterprise or for those who are already trading. www.beepurple.co.uk

Lorraine Roberts Student support and guidance adviser offering financial guidance to students throughout their university experience. The change in tuition fees is a concern for many prospective students but I would reassure anyone who’s worried that they will not have to use their savings or ask their family for support because they can apply for a full tuition fee loan which they will not have to pay back until they are earning £21,000+. There are also a range of non-repayable grants available too. People can visit me in my office but many grab me for an informal chat when they see me around the building which is a benefit of having a relatively small campus. I can assist students with their funding needs in a number of ways including supporting them through the application process, advising them with on any finance queries they have, helping them to determine their benefit eligibility and with the students’ permission I can speak to Student finance on their behalf.

Latest research shows that volunteering experience enhances your employability. In fact, 75 per cent of employers state a preference for applicants with voluntary work experience. Source: Tearfund Support is available in a range of areas, from the day you ask us about applying until after you graduate. More information about the support available can be found at www.brighton.ac.uk/studentlife. You can also get regular student life news and info from us on Twitter: @brightonstudent.

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70 www.brighton.ac.uk/hastings | maps

By train Hastings railway station is just two minutes on foot from the Hastings campus. London to Hastings takes approximately one and a half hours; Ashford International and Tunbridge Wells to Hastings takes around 45 minutes; Brighton to Hastings one hour; and Eastbourne to Hastings takes around 30 minutes.

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By bus Hastings railway station is just two minutes on foot from the Hastings campus. London to Hastings takes approximately one and a half hours; Ashford International and Tunbridge Wells to Hastings takes around 45 minutes; Brighton to Hastings one hour; and Eastbourne to Hastings takes around 30 minutes.

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Our other campuses

Surrey Kent

West Sussex

Falmer campus

Hastings campus

East Sussex Eastbourne campus

Grand Parade campus

Moulsecoomb campus

Central London

Gatwick international airport

Heathrow international airport

Transport Brighton

80 mins

Eastbourne Hastings

50 mins

45 mins

30 mins

75 mins

120 mins

100 mins

90 mins

75 mins

60 mins

105 mins

150 mins

100 mins

100 mins

85 mins

90 mins

110 mins

170 mins

maps | www.brighton.ac.uk/hastings 71


Course finder index

A Applied Social Science Applied social science introduction

35 34

B Biology 50 Biology joint honours pathway see environmental biology and human biology pathways Broadcast Journalism 22 Broadcast media introduction 20–21 Broadcast Media 22 Broadcast Media top–up 23 Business and computing introduction 26–27 Business joint honours pathway 42 Business Management BA(Hons) top up 28 Business with Enterprise 28 C Community history joint honours pathway 46 Computing and Business 51 Computing and Education 51 Computing introduction see Business and computing introduction Computing joint honours pathway 43 D Digital Games Production Digital Film Production Digital Post Production

72 www.brighton.ac.uk/hastings | index

29 25 23

E Early Years Care and Education 32 Education and English Literature 52 Education introduction 30–31 Education joint honours pathway 44 Education and Sociology 55 English Literature and Community History 52 English Literature and Media Studies 52 English literature joint honours pathway 45 Environmental Biology and Education 50 Environmental biology joint honours pathway 40 G Graduate Teaching Programme (GTP) in Primary Education

P PGCE (Primary Education) Primary Graduate Teaching Programme (GTP) Primary Education PGCE Professional Studies in Primary Education

53 53 54 47 54 54 48 33 33 33 32

33

H Human Biology and Education 50 Human biology joint honours pathway 41 I Internet Computing

M Mathematics and Business Mathematics and Computing Mathematics and Education Mathematics joint honours pathway Media Studies and Education Media Studies and Sociology Media studies joint honours pathway

29

J Joint honours 39–55 Joint honours introductions: Environmental biology 40 Human biology 41 Business 42 Computing 43 Education 44 English literature 45 Community history 46 Mathematics 47 Media studies 48 Sociology 49

R Radio Production

24

S Single honours 19–37 Sociology and Community History 55 Sociology and English Literature 55 Sociology joint honours pathways 49 T Television Production

24


General index

A day in the life… 14 Academies 13 Access courses 62 Accommodation 66–67 Active Student, see also volunteering 69 Applications 58

Joint honours

Beepurple 69 BTEC 62

Maps 70–71 Mature students 12 Mentoring 69

Café 09 Care leavers 10, 12, 68 Careers Service 07, 11, 68 Chaplain 68 Childcare 11, 68 Clearing 58 Computer rooms 09 Costs 64 Counselling 68 Credits 62

16, 39–55

Library 09 Living at home 66 Living in Hastings 66–67 Living in Sussex? 63

Open days

01, 59

Part-time study 59, 64 Placements 06 Postgraduate courses 17 Private accommodation 66 Professional accreditation 05 Qualifications 60–63

Directions 70

Research Centre

Employability fund English language Enquiries team Entry requirements

Scholarships 65 Single honours 16, 19–37 Student adviser 69 Student ambassadors 15 Student support 65, 68–69 Studentcentral 68 Students’ Union 11, 68

65 63 59 60–61, 63

Facebook 15 Facilities 08–09 Fees 64 Fees – nursing 65 Foundation degrees 17 Frank Buttle Trust Quality Mark 10, 68 Funding 64 Halls of residence 66 Hastings and Rother 12 Hastings Aspiration Awards 12, 65 Hastings campus 70 Health 68 Honours degrees 16 House-sharing 66 How to apply 58 How to find us 70

13

Tuition fees 64 Twitter 15 Types of course 16–17 UCAS 58 UCAS tariff 62 University of Brighton Alumni Association 69 Volunteering Widening participation Work experience

07, 69 13 06

Produced by Marketing and Communications Photography by Andrew Weekes Printed by L&S Printing Company Limited registered to environmental standard, ISO 14001 May 2012

This prospectus is available in alternative formats on request. This prospectus was printed in May 2012. The University of Brighton makes every effort to ensure the accuracy of this guide and will take all reasonable steps to provide the courses and services described in it and in supplementary documentation. It cannot, however, guarantee their provision in the event of circumstances beyond its control (such as lack of demand, changes in government policy or industrial action) but in such an event, will make reasonable effort to provide a suitable alternative. In accepting any offer of a place, you consent to incorporation of this notice as a term of contract between you and the university. All students are required to abide by the university’s regulations which are available on request. ®

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index | www.brighton.ac.uk/hastings 73


University of Brighton

Contact details

University of Brighton in Hastings Havelock Road Hastings East Sussex TN34 1BE telephone 08456 020607

UCAS institutional code University of Brighton Hastings campus (BRITN) B72 campus code U

www.brighton.ac.uk/hastings

Hastings prospectus 2013

Central contact details University of Brighton Mithras House Lewes Road Brighton BN2 4AT telephone 01273 644644 fax 01273 642607

Priory Square, the newest addition to the University of Brighton in Hastings, is enabling us to help many more students in Hastings, and is home to specialist facilities for our biology students.


University of Brighton in Hastings Prospectus 2013