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UNIVERSITY JOURNAL SOUTHERN UTAH UNIVERSITY ACCENT EDITION | FEBRUARY 2018

highlights INTERVIEW WITH CONGRESSMAN STEWART - P2 NOTABLE SUU ALUMNI - P5 LEARN ABOUT THE NEW HSS DEAN - P9 AMBER MECHAM FEATURE - P13

COMMUNITY

WHAT IS NET NEUTRALITY - P18

SUU TO EVERYWHERE - P30

SHOE REPAIR - P22

COMMUNITY WORLD TRAVEL - P31

UTAH OLYMPIANS - P26

SUU COMMUNITY EDUCATION - P32


CONGRESSMAN CHRIS STEWART Q: I know there’s been some controversy regarding the repeal of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) policy. A: Oh, there hasn’t been controversy, come on. What are you talking about? Q: You are the cosponsor of two pieces of legislation that would work to protect those affected by the DACA repeal. Can you tell us a little about that? A: For those groups, those individuals who came here as children, as minors, we have to recognize that we have to accommodate them and make them feel as if they have a future … For example, I think if you’ve entered the country illegally, I don’t think you can just — with a stroke of the pen have one man, the president of the United States as President Obama wanted to do, make them citizens. I think becoming a citizen is something you have to earn, and you have to pay a price for. On the other hand, I would be willing to talk with them about legal status so as they come out of the shadows they can work, they can give their children a future, they don’t have to worry about being sent back home ... As you know this last weekend we had a government shutdown over this issue. Which is really unfortunate, because ironically Republicans and Democrats support — there is broad agreement on the subject. I think we’ll get there sometime in the next few weeks, in February. It might take a week or two longer, but if we don’t, by the way, shame on those people who aren’t helping us because this is a big issue for a lot of people. As I said, there is bipartisan support. Q: Moving on to Utah itself, we’ve seen some changes particularly to our national monuments. President Trump recently announced that he was greatly reducing the size of the Grand Staircase - Escalante and Bears Ears National Monuments. The Escalante monument is actually in your district? A: That was absolutely the right thing to do. You’d have to go back … President 2

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Q&A

Clinton didn’t come to Utah, he sat in Arizona and pointed into Utah and said, “I’m going to create a nearly 2 million acre national monument over there in Utah,” 1.88 million acres, which is a huge piece of land. Now, when I got out of the Air Force — you mentioned I was a writer — as a writer, I could live anywhere in the world, virtually anywhere. All I need is a laptop. But I chose to live in Utah … No one forced us to live here … I’ve opened up legislation to create a sixth national park in Utah. Some of that is gorgeous country — it’s as beautiful as Zion or Bryce or any of these other national parks. Let’s recognize this area as being an incredible piece of land ... Let’s open those up so that these families can stay together, and I think we can find a way to do both. Q: Last year you introduced the Victims’ Voice and Transparency Act. This would allow victims of sexual misconduct on Capitol Hill to release the names of those accused and the amount of settlement they received.

PHOTOS COURTESY OF CHRIS STEWART

Congressman Chris Stewart

“I have two beautiful daughters, young women. If someone treated them the way some of these other young women have been treated, I would rain hell down on these guys.” READ OR WATCH THE FULL INTERVIEW ONLINE AT SUUNEWS.NET

A: I have two beautiful daughters, young women. If someone treated them the way some of these other young women have been treated, I would rain hell down on these guys. And yet in Congress and in some government positions, those people are protected … The rules were set up that if someone had been harassed in Congress by a Congressperson, one of the first things they had to do was sign a non disclosure agreement which compelled them to be silent. I think that’s insane … I think it would be terribly ironic for some young woman, who had been abused or harassed by someone in Congress, forced to sign this non disclosure agreement so she couldn’t tell anyone … I think it would be extraordinarily difficult for her. Let’s just make it so they have the option if they choose to. Q: What is your opinion of Mitt Romney possibly running for Senate? A: We’ll just let Mitt make his own decision there.


INDEX

UNIVERSITY JOURNAL STAFF

GUIDE

ORDER TO WATCH

OPERATIONS MANAGER : Hayden Coombs EDITOR-IN-CHIEF (PRINT) : Megan Fairbanks EDITOR-IN-CHIEF (WEB) : Samantha Burfiend CAMPUS LIFE EDITOR : Andrew Leavitt OPINION EDITOR : Carlee Jo Blumenthal OUTSIDE & PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR : Mitchell Quartz SPORTS EDITOR : Haleigh Clemens CARTOONIST : Sam Sherrill ADVERTISING CHIEF & GRAPHIC DESIGNER : Laikin Barney ADVERTISING ASSISTANT : Danny Keetch SOCIAL MEDIA : Carlee Jo Blumenthal & Sam Burfiend REPORTERS : Cassidy Harmon & Larissa Beatty COPY EDITORS : Mikael Simpson, Nicole Smith SPECIAL CONTRIBUTORS : Savannah Palmer & Jenna Chapman

COMMUNITY STAFF SUU COMMUNITY EDITOR : Haven Scott COMMUNITY EXECUTIVE EDITOR : Melynda Thrope

GRAPHIC COURTESY OF MARVEL STUDIO

campus

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What notable SUU Alumni are doing now.

This infographic is just what you need to prepare for “Infinity War.” The best gyms in Cedar City and which one is the best fit for you.

news

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SUU welcomes first female HSS Dean.

Who we lost in 2017 and why they should be remembered.

SUU students prepare to study abroad in Fiji and Tonga this summer.

accent

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Amber Mecham talks about the importance of music in teaching. Daughter of SUU professor wins award at Carnegie Hall.

Stay cozy this winter with a book you love.

opinion

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Are streaming websites like Netflix killing television as we know it? What the protests in Iran say about our right to free speech. Net Neutrality: Why it matters & what it means.

Thunder 91.1 KSUU and the University Journal have collaborated to bring new SUU voices to the Morning Brew. Tune in Monday through Friday from 8-9 a.m. to get a taste of pop culture, sports and on-campus news.

outdoor

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Our Outside Editor reviews sandals from Xero shoes.

Learn what changes are being made to our National Parks. Annual St. George half marathon draws crowd.

Sports

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Brush up on the Utahns participating in this year’s Winter Olympics. Check out U.S.A. stats for the Winter Olympics in past years. SUU coach raises money for cancer research with Subway.

FOLLOW US FEB 2018

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WHAT NOTABLE SUU ALUMNI ARE DOING NOW. THIS INFOGRAPHIC IS JUST WHAT YOU NEED TO PREPARE FOR “INFINITY WAR.” THE BEST GYMS IN CEDAR CITY AND WHICH ONE IS THE BEST FIT FOR YOU.

| FEB 2018

PHOTOS BY MITCHELL QUARTZ


CAMPUS

notable suu alumni This spring, as students think about which majors suit them best and what classes they have left to complete, thoughts turn toward the future. This can be an intimidating prospect. Here are some alumni that have been through the same thing, and are succeeding in life after college. Alumni are no different than you or I; they are people who, like us, have stressed about class and crammed for finals. Jill Stevens Shepherd was Miss Southern Utah University 2006, Miss Davis County and Miss Utah in 2007. A nursing major while at SUU, Shepherd went on to be awarded military badges and nationally recognized for her service. The NFL has no shortage of SUU alumni, just to name a few: James Cowser, linebacker and defensive end currently with the Oakland Raiders, Miles Killebrew, safety for the Detroit Lions,

LeShawn Sims, cornerback for the Tennessee Titans, Raysean Pringle, Green Bay Packers cornerback, and Josh Thornton, cornerback for the Houston Texans. Keala Settle, who graduated in 2015, recently played one of the leading roles in the 20th Century Fox production, “The Greatest Showman”. Cameron “Cam” Levans, by the time Levans had graduated, he was honored the Bowerman Award, given to the top collegiate track and field athlete. Levans then ran for Team Canada in the 2012 London Olympics, where he placed 11th in the 10K. After battling a slew of injuries, Levans is again competing at the highest level. For more information about SUU students and where they are now, visit www.suu.edu/everywhere.

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By Dewey Leavitt & Samantha Burfiend The Marvel Cinematic Universe (MCU) connects 18 different movies and several TV shows on top of that, but it can be difficult to know how to watch them in a chronological order. Often, the timeline within the actual movies is different from the order in which they were released. This infographic solves all of that (atleast for the movie adaptations).

1

2

4

3

5

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7

8

9 11 16 10 15

ORDER TO WATCH MARVEL MOVIES 12

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(1) Captain America: The First Avenger (2) Iron Man (3) Iron Man 2 (4) The Incredible Hulk (5) Thor (6) The Avengers (7) Iron Man 3 (8) Thor: The Dark World (9) Captain America: The Winter Soldier (10) Guardians of the Galaxy (11) Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 (12) Avengers: Age of Ultron (13) Ant-Man (14) Captain America: Civil War (15) Doctor Strange (16) Spider-Man: Homecoming (17) Thor: Ragnarok (18) Black Panther (19) Avengers: Infinity War Photos Courtesy of Marvel Studios

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Best gyms in cedar

VASA FITNESS As one of Cedar City’s most popular gyms, VASA Fitness memberships start at $9.99 a month for machines and weights. An upgraded membership is available for $19.99 a month for full-acess, which includes membership to other VASA location and guest privileges. The facility includes a total of 65 machines and the hours are 5 a.m. - 11 p.m. Monday - Thursday, 9 a.m. - 3 p.m. on Friday - Sunday and 7 a.m. - 5 p.m. on Saturday. The downside to this gym is that it can be overcrowded during peak hours. SPIRIT WELLNESS CLUB Offering a student discount of $30.72 a month with a one time start-up fee of $19.99, Spirit Wellness Club is one of the largest gyms in Cedar City. The facility on North Main Street offers two stories of work-out equipment. However, business hours are more restricted, open 5 a.m. - 10 p.m. Monday - Thursday, 7 a.m. - 4 p.m. on Saturdays and closed on Sundays.

SUU FITNESS CENTER Located on campus, the Fitness Center offers memberships for $20 a month or $60 a semester. The gym is open 6 a.m. to 10:30 p.m. Monday - Friday and 9 a.m. - 2 p.m. on Saturday. The Fitness Center will close for any university recognized holiday. RETRO FITNESS Open 5 a.m. - 11 p.m. Monday - Thursday, 5 a.m. - 10 p.m. Fridays, 7 a.m. - 7 p.m. Saturdays and 9 a.m. - 5 p.m. Sundays, this gym is an affordable gym option and offers more weekend hours than other gyms. Memberships start at $19.99 a month with no enrollment fee or contract. This includes access to all machines and a movie theater room with cardio machines. Retro is also the only gym in town that provides a smoothie bar for its members. FOR COMPLETE ARTICLE VISIT SUUNEWS.NET

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NEWS

news 09 10 11

SUU’S WELCOMES FIRST FEMALE HSS DEAN. WHO WE LOST IN 2017 AND WHY THEY SHOULD BE REMEMBERED. SUU STUDENTS PREPARE TO STUDY ABROAD IN FIJI AND TONGA THIS SUMMER. PHOTOS COURTESY OF SIERRA BONNER

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NEWS

making history FEMALE DEAN SUU HIRES HSS

SUU’s faculty and staff are set to welcome Dr. Jean Boreen to the university as the new dean of the Department of Humanities and Social Sciences. “Jean is the first female dean of the college of humanities and social sciences, which is a big deal,” Provost Brad Cook said. “(Jean) got the job because she was the most qualified. The fact that she is female is really great news, too, because when it comes to leadership on campus, we need to have more strong female leaders in these sort of positions. We will be a healthy university because of it.” Boreen said she feels honored to be the first female dean of SUU’s HSS department. “I hope that I can serve as a role model for other women who aspire to be leaders at the university level,” Boreen said. “Mentoring has been one of my passions during my professional life. I hope that I can serve as an example and a support to those who would like to undertake professional development in the area of leadership.”

“From the beginning, Jean really stood out as well-qualified,” Schulz said. “NAU is a very similar school to SUU, so she had worked in a rural western environment and a public arts institution. She is well-qualified and she is well-spoken. And I think it is fantastic that she is a woman.” Boreen said she ultimately is excited to come to SUU and further the HHS department. “I look forward to meeting the students, staff and faculty, without a doubt,” Boreen said. “The favorite parts of my day occur when I’m interacting with students or developing new programs or initiatives with faculty and staff that will offer a positive benefit for our students. I look forward to working with others to meet the opportunities and challenges that will inevitably face us in a positive and proactive manner.”

Boreen comes to SUU with a multitude of qualifications. Northern Arizona University’s College of Arts and Letters hosted Boreen as the school’s associate dean for the past 11 years. Last year, she served as interim dean for the same college. Boreen officially accepts her position as dean of the HSS department in July 2018. “Picking Boreen as HSS dean was not an easy task”, SUUSA HSS Senator Grace Schulz said. The process took a committee of 13 people several months to narrow down the search. The committee included: Provost Cook Shawn Christiansen, Chair of the Committee and Dean of the College of Education and Human Development Steve Barney, Professor of Psychology Jennifer Hunter, Senior Instructional Designer Jason Smith, Assistant Professor of Spanish Cameron Brooks, Executive Director of Development and Gift Planning Michelle Orihel, Assistant Professor of History Jacqueline Russell, HHS Business Manager Kevin Jacobson, Professor of Criminal Justice Art Challis, Department Chair of Communication Jessica Tvordi, Department Chair of English Department Katya Konkle, Curriculog Specialist/Catalog Editor Grace Schulz, HHS Senator FEB 2018 |

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NEWS

Who we lost

Thomas S. Monson

Roger Moore

Helmut Kohl

On Jan. 2, 2018, Monson, the sixteenth President of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, died at the age of 90.

The English actor, most well-known for his portrayal of James Bond, died on May 23, 2017.

Prior to Kohl’s death on June 16,

Monson was born in Salt Lake City and graduated from the University of Utah. He was well-known for his involvement in humanitarian work, supporting the Boy Scouts of America and the work he did for the international growth of the LDS Church. Katherine Millett Millett died on Sept. 6, 2017. Well-known for her work as a feminist writer and activist, Millett earned her doctorate from Columbia University. Prior to that, she studied at St. Hilda’s College at Oxford University and was the first American woman to receive a degree with first class honors after studying there. Millett had a large influence on second-wave feminism and wrote openly about legal abortion, equality, mental health and civil rights. She taught at several universities, including the University of California at Berkeley, and Bryn Mawr College.

In addition to his film career, Moore also took part in humanitarian opportunities. In 1991, Moore became a UNICEF Goodwill Ambassador and in 2003 Queen Elizabeth II knighted Moore for the services that he took part in. Richard Gregory On Aug. 19, 2017, African-American civil rights activist Richard Gregory died. Gregory became well-known for his activism in the 60s. Initially using comedy to communicate to his audience, Gregory protested the Vietnam War and racism. Later in life, Gregory became an author, social critic and public speaker.

2017, he held several positions in the German government and the European Union (EU). As Chancellor of Germany from 1982-98, Helmut Kohl was a well-respected international political figure. Kohl is credited with spearheading the Maastricht Treaty, which helped to create the EU and introduced the Euro. He was posthumously awarded the first European Act of State in Strasbourg. During his life, Kohl was also the recipient of the Charlemagne Prize, and was the second person to be named Honorary Citizen of Europe.

Carmina Burana and Selected Works: An Original Choreographed Dance Concert in Collaboration with SUU Choirs and Orchestra

Randall L. Jones Theatre February 28th, March 1, 2, 3, 5 at 7:30 pm Matinee: March 3 at 2:00 pm

Opera Thorley Recital Hall March 21-24 at 7:30 pm

Wind Symphony Concert Heritage Center Theatre April 20 at 7:30 pm

Orchestra Concert Thorley Recital Hall April 25 at 7:30 pm

UPCOMING EVENTS

PHOTO CREDIT TO LDS.ORG, NEW YORK TIMES, THE HOLLYWOOD REPORTER, VARIETY, WIKIMEDIA COMMONS

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www.suu.edu/pva/music


NEWS

a study abroad in

fiji & tonga Seven islands, dance, food and a zipline: SUU’s upcoming study abroad to Fiji and Tonga will take place from July 15-30. Students may sign up in the International Affairs Office. The 15-day trip will include three classes: Intercultural Communication (COMM 2150), Nonverbal Communication (COMM 3150) and Intro to Biology (BIOL 1010).

PHOTOS COURTESY OF SIERRA BONNER

In addition, students will be able to work with native islanders and participate in a service project to collect school supplies for village schools. Outside the classroom, students have the opportunity to spend time on the beach, eat traditional foods, swim in a cave, swim with whales and zipline in Fiji. The cost of the trip is $2,560 plus the cost of airfare. Tevita Sekeni, an SUU alumnus, described the trip as an opportunity to explore a unique region. “The crazy thing about Pacific (Islanders) is they have cultural understanding,” Sekeni said. Sekeni said despite two different nations and cultures, the cultures have mutual values: family and giving. Sekeni gives the example of Moana, the first Polynesian Disney princess. Moana is a mix of several island cultures but still represents many different groups of people. Sekeni has attended the trip for the past two years but serves as an academic coordinator for the upcoming trip. Trip Coordinator Jonathan Holiman, a lecturer of communication, said students should attend the trip because the best way to learn intercultural communication is spending time in the culture. “You can only learn so much in a classroom,” he said. “This course will provide instruction and interaction with the history, land and cultural of Tonga and Fiji. Student’s will have the opportunity to enjoy the natural environment, while studying beliefs, behavior and the surroundings of the local culture and islands.” For more information on the trip, or to sign up, students should head to the International Affairs office located in the student center, visit their website, or contact Holiman at jonathanholiman@suu.edu.

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ACCENT

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AMBER MECHAM TALKS ABOUT THE IMPORTANCE OF MUSIC IN TEACHING.

DAUGHTER OF SUU PROFESSOR WINS AWARD AT CARNEGIE HALL.

STAY COZY THIS WINTER WITH A BOOK YOU LOVE.

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PHOTOS BY MITCHELL QUARTZ


ACCENT

student

spotlight amber mecham At age 5, Amber Mecham began piano and guitar lessons. Now, almost 15 years later the sophomore music education major from Syracuse, Utah plays 10 different instruments. She hopes to teach other the same art. “My mom started teaching me piano at the age of five,” Mecham said. “She was a piano teacher … she forced me. After piano and guitar my interests in instruments and learning them branched out from there. Now I can also play the organ, ukulele, mandolin, flute, violin, saxophone, clarinet and drums.” Mecham said her goal is to become a junior high school choir teacher. “My junior high choir teacher was my favorite teacher of all time and that is why I want to teach junior high,” she said. The next step in Mecham’s journey is passing her sophomore gateway. This is a comprehensive, board-reviewed look at what students have accomplished upon finishing up their sophomore years in their studies specific to their emphasis. Mecham is in secondary choral. “I have to perform several different songs including some in German and Italian. It’s in a personal recital format, performing in front of a panel of music professors who, afterwards, get to decide if I continue in the program or not.” Mecham is excited about her prospects. She hopes to pass her sophomore gateway and continue in her major.

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ACCENT

sarah sun award at

International

Carnegie Hall For some, success is winning a game. For

Including solo performances, Sarah has

Competitions 2017 Winners Recital by

some it’s career advancement and for others

performed with professional orchestras around

performing a piano piece entitled “La

success is defined by getting through the

the world from China to American Fork.

Campanella” by Liszt. The event was hosted at Carnegie Hall in New York City on Nov. 26, 2017. Sarah’s competitors at Carnegie Hall featured young artists (all under the age of 17) from around the world and included peers from Russia, Japan and Spain. Since November, Sarah hasn’t participated in any more competitions. As a high school senior, Sarah Sun is focusing on academics and hopes to attend Juilliard or BYU. Xun Sun said Sarah is very well rounded. When not focusing on her piano or school, Sarah is also a dancer. She participates in musicals, plays the trombone and flute, does speech and debate team, cross

day. Sarah Sun has found success through

Along her musical journey, Sarah has won

country, loves to read and volunteers at the

musical competitions in front of the world.

many awards, including: first place at UMTA’s

Salt Lake Children’s Hospital every Saturday,

Sarah is the daughter of the Director of

(Utah Music Teachers Association) Concerto

playing piano for the children there.

Orchestral Activities Xun Sun and Ling Yu Sun,

Competition; Alternate at UMTA’s Performance

an adjunct professor of viola.

Competition; Honorable Mention in the Utah

“Sarah was so thrilled to represent the state

Symphony Salute to Youth Competition;

of Utah during the competition (American

At the age of four, under the tutelage of JoAnn

first place two different times at the Encore

Protege International Competitions 2017

Jones, Sarah began playing the piano. This

Keyboard Competition and another first place

Winners Recital) and performance,” Xun

continued until 2010 when Jones encouraged

at the Salt Lake Piano Competition.

Sun said.“Sarah loves all of her teachers

Sarah and her parents to start training with

and feels that the education she is receiving

Brigham Young University’s Irene Peery-Fox,

These awards eventually led Sarah to take

who still teaches Sarah today.

second at the American Protege International

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in Utah is valuable and exciting.”


ACCENT

stepping into the

Unknown

Any avid book reader will tell you about their teetering tower of books yet to be read on their shelves. Most of them reel over the fact that they’ve read “The Hunger Games” 12 times but still haven’t touched their “I’ve been meaning to” books that they’ve had for years. The new year brings an opportunity for all of us out there with a daunting stack of books to dust them off and give them the read they deserve. While I’m sure reading “Lord of the Rings” for the eighth time would be satisfactory, reaching carefully into the unknown for something new sounds like more fun. This week, I recommend reading “And Then There Were None” by Agatha Christie. I confess Christie is not new to me–and she is also not new to hardly anyone on the planet, as she is regarded as the most famous and most successful mystery author of all time. One of her books, “Murder on the Orient Express”, was recently adapted into a successful movie that has brought her fans out of their reading holes and into the theaters.

The fact that Christie is well known makes it easy to pick up any of her books at all, but I chose “And Then There Were None” because I’ve had it for so long that it simply demanded to be read. As one of her most renowned novels, I almost couldn’t believe I hadn’t read it yet! Besides, the unknown is scary; it’s better to start somewhere familiar before jumping into brand new territory. A thrilling tale of entrapment and murder, the novel is creepy enough to keep readers at the edge of their seats, and clever enough to keep readers guessing until the very end–and what an end! This novel is short enough to read over the weekend for those that read quickly, and for the rest of us, it can be read within a week or so, making it the perfect book to read during study breaks. Start the year off right: grab something new, and enjoy stepping into the unknown!

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DANCING WITH YOUR COMMUNITY STARS

COLLEGE OF PERFORMING ARTS

SUU’S HIP HOP CLUB

MEDIUM DESK CONCERT

SUU ART AND DESIGN SUU NEWS

ACCENT

SUU BALLROOM DANCE COMPANY 16

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The University Journal strives to highlight various fine arts on campus. These performing and visual arts include: theatre, painting and printmaking, graphic design, dance, music, literature and illustrations. PHOTOS BY MITCHELL QUARTZ & LAIKIN BARNEY


OPINION

OPINION 18

19

20 PHOTO BY MITCHELL QUARTZ

ARE STREAMING WEBSITES LIKE NETFLIX KILLING TELEVISION AS WE KNOW IT? WHAT THE PROTESTS IN IRAN SAY ABOUT OUR RIGHT TO FREE SPEECH.

NET NEUTRALITY : WHY IT MATTERS AND WHAT IT MEANS.

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OPINION

television as we know it And now it’s their turn on the chopping block as online streaming services

is Is dying

simply prefer watching their shows via the use of a digital streaming service.

come after television. Television as we know it is dying and we as viewers are helping to kill it. And the television

These digital streaming services also know their viewers better than broadcast television networks.

networks know it. A video streaming platform such as YouTube or Netflix Before the creation and growth of digital streaming services, if a

can take the information about the shows that a user has

person wanted to watch a television show, they actually had to sit

previously watched or added to a playlist. This gives the

down in the living or entertainment room in front of the television

user recommendations of other shows to check out on the

and watch it from there.

platform based on this watch history as opposed to just checking TV Guide for something that sounds interesting.

Now most major networks such as The CW, Fox Broadcasting

This results in users more likely to return to that platform and

Company (FOX), American Broadcasting Channel (ABC) and

continue using it, as opposed to just checking TV Guide for

Turner Network Television (TNT) all have apps that users can

something that sounds interesting.

download onto a smart device in order to watch shows created and produced in their studios. Netflix, Hulu, Amazon, Crunchyroll

Television is dying, but not the way we think it is. The medium

and even YouTube offer the ability to sign up for television now.

itself does not seem to be going anywhere as a form of

However, television and streaming don’t have to be mutually

entertainment. However, the image of a family gathering

exclusive.

around on the couch to enjoy a show together has given way to the mobile and more individually tailored

Let’s rephrase that earlier comment. The medium of television

viewing experience.

isn’t dying: the way people tune in and watch is. More people are utilizing mobile devices such as smartphones and tablets for streaming content as a matter of personal convenience. Accordng to a 2017 Accenture survey, only 23 percent of people globally preferred watching television on a television set, which is a 55% decrease from just the year before. More people would rather watch a show on their computer, phone or tablet than a larger screen mounted on the wall. These people have become known to the industry as “cord-cutters,” meaning they are people who have canceled their cable television or satellite subscriptions, or “cord-nevers,” meaning people who never had a subscription in the first place. This doesn’t mean that they never want to watch television, they

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CARLEE JO BLUMENTHAL PHOTOS COURTESY OF UNSPLASH


OPINION

Iran & free speech Since protests began on Dec. 28, 2017, Iran has seen what CNN

The protests attracted attention from countries all over the world,

is calling “the largest public display of discontent in Iran since

in part because of the restrictions that Iranian officials placed on

the 2009 Green Movement.”

public Internet access. Reports state that sites like Instagram and Twitter were blocked, along with messaging apps like Telegram.

Reasons for these protests vary, but multiple news sources

CNN estimates that affected an estimated 40 million people--nearly

such as CNN, Wired and Forbes agreed that Iran’s economic

half of Iran’s population.

state was a contributor. After coming to an agreement with Iran about its nuclear program in 2015, the U.N.

This

lifted sanctions on the country. However,

conversations about what human rights - in

many businesses in the U.S., U.K., Russia,

particular, free speech - that governments

China, France and Germany still refused to

should not be able to take away from their

work with Iranian companies.

people.

In July of 2017, Iran facilitated a rocket

In the United States, this right is protected

launch that officials said had breached the

action

in

particular

has

started

by the first amendment to the Constitution,

agreement with the U.N. Security Council, prompting the U.S.

which states that “Congress shall make no law respecting an

Treasury Department to institute new sanctions on six Iranian

establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof;

satellite companies. This fresh controversy, coupled with Iran’s

or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of

unemployment rate (over 24 percent for men ages 15-29, and

the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government

even higher for women, according to CNN), has resulted in

for a redress

widespread unrest within Iranian borders.

of grievances.” In the U.S., it’s generally understood that the government gains its power from the people rather than vice versa. In 2017, we saw the power of organized protests in action following the election of President Donald Trump. Some protested the man himself, creating the popular phrase “Not my president.” Others participated in protests for the Black Lives Matter movement, the March for Science, or the Women’s March on Washington--a movement that took place the day after Trump’s inauguration and became the largest protest in U.S. history, with over half a million people participating. For each of those protests, the Internet played an essential part in organizing participants. The use of hashtags on Twitter, the creation of Facebook groups, and Instagram Live feeds saw heavy use during the early weeks of the year. However, unlike what was seen in Iran, the U.S. government did not take steps to shut down these groups or hide evidence of their existence online. FOR COMPLETE ARTICLE VISIT SUUNEWS.NET FEB 2018 |

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OPINION

net neutrality Net Neutrality: those words have buzzed around the internet and on the news since November of 2017. But what is it? Net Neutrality is the principle that Internet service providers (ISP), such a Comcast, Time Warner and Century Link, must treat all data on the internet the same. They must not discriminate or charge differently based on the user, content, website, platform, application, type of attached equipment or method of communication. In 2015, after a decade of discussion, the U.S. Federal Communications Commission (FCC) adopted Net Neutrality rules based on Title II of the Communications Act which gave Internet users the strongest protection possible. However, it would seem the FCC just won’t let us be.

On Dec. 14, 2017 the government approved FCC Chairman Ajit Pai’s plan to reverse the rules of Net Neutrality. As chairman, Pai oversees the entire entity of the FCC. This means promoting competition between broadband services, supporting the economy of the United States by ensuring competitive framework for communications, encouraging the best use of communication services domestically and internationally and revising media regulations. However, it doesn’t seem like Pai is taking the situation and vote seriously. In his speech about the vote in 2017, he tells us what he has done online over the days leading up to that moment. “I’ve downloaded interesting podcasts about blockchain technology, ordered a burrito, managed my playoff-bound fantasy football team, and—as you may have seen—tweeted,” Pai said. Seriously. This is a 45-year-old government official, telling the nation in his speech regarding the fate of the free Internet that he uses it to order Mexican food, plays fantasy football and go on Twitter. What exactly does that have to do with net neutrality? It sounds like Pai is just trying to take the opportunity to relate to Millenials and Gen Xers. They are the ones listening and are arguably the group most concerned about the fate of the Internet in America. Throughout his speech, Pai also makes statements about the vote bringing Internet regulation and Net Neutrality back to the way it was during the Clinton administration in the 1990s.

儀唀䄀䰀䤀吀夀 䈀䔀䰀吀匀

䄀䘀䘀伀刀䐀䄀䈀䰀䔀 倀刀䤀䌀䔀

Bill Clinton was the first United States president to use email in the White House. The same version and style of regulations for Internet that existed from 1996 and the days of dial-up Internet up to 2015 with the invention of the term “Netflix and Chill,” are not the best tools to govern a more advanced Internet. Free and open Internet is one of the greatest things ever created by humans. We should be doing everything we can to keep it that way.

伀吀 䠀 䔀 刀   䌀 伀 䰀伀 刀 匀  䄀嘀䄀 䤀 䰀 䄀 䈀 䰀 䔀  䄀吀  一 䈀 ㌀ ⸀ 䌀 伀

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The Internet has become one of the few places where the voice of the people is still heard. Though we may not want to hear what all of those voices have to say, we shouldn’t be denying them in favor of making it easier for the one percent and ISP lobbyists to discriminate against content, traffic and users based on what they think is best.


OUTDOOR

OUTDOOR 22

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24 PHOTO BY MITCHELL QUARTZ

OUR OUTSIDE EDITOR REVIEWS SHOES FROM XERO.

LEARN WHAT CHANGES ARE BEING MADE TO OUR NATIONAL PARKS. ANNUAL ST. GEORGE HALF MARATHON DRAWS CROWD.

FEB 2018 |

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OUTDOOR

SUU News

OUTSIDE SHOE REVIEW

SCAN HERE 22

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OUTDOOR

st george

half marathon On Jan. 13, nearly 2,500 runners gathered in St. George to participate in the St. George Half Marathon.

The St. George Half Marathon takes participants on various trails along the Virgin river and across the St. George landscape. It has been held every year for 36 years, making it Southern Utah’s longest running half marathon. The event held races in various lengths for runners of all ages. The first race, the half marathon itself, began at 9 a.m. The 13.1 mile course took first place finisher, Nathan Peters of Salt Lake City, just 1 hour, 7 minutes and 47 seconds to finish. The second race, the 5k, began at 9:15 a.m. This 3.1 mile course led participants along the beginning and end of the half marathon course. The first place finisher, Amber Andrews of Orem, finished in 18 minutes and 51 seconds. The three final races—the kids 1 mile, 1/2 mile and 200m—all began at 11 a.m. The first place finisher of the 1 mile run, Sawyer Dunn of Cedar City, finished the course in 4 minutes and 55 seconds. The first place finisher of the 1/2 mile kids race, Kyler Lefevour of Salt Lake City, finished in 3 minutes and 51 seconds. The first place finisher in the final 200m kids run, Karli Baldwin, finished in 2 minutes and 29 seconds. A complete list of times and finishes can be found at results. chronotrack.com/event/results/event/event-36556. For more information on this year’s race or to find information on next year’s race visit sgcity.org.

PHOTO BY MITCHELL QUARTZ

PHOTO BY MITCHELL QUARTZ

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OUTDOOR

CHANGES PARKS to THE

There’s change brewing in the U.S. and it’s coming to a national park or monument near you (or not so near). Being surrounded by national parks and monuments means a lot of people in Southern Utah are going to be affected by the changes coming to them. Number one: If you planned on taking a photography workshop at Zion National Park, you may want to change your plans depending on the subject of the course. If it involves hand shooting, you’re fine. However, if it has something to do with long exposures or other shots that require a tripod, you may want to take a workshop elsewhere. According to fstoppers. com, “for 2018 there are no tripods to be used on any trail within Zion and tripods are only allowed on paved parking areas and pullouts.” Keep in mind, this is only for photography workshops and photographers working in Zion in a professional manner. If you’re just going there to relax, take some nice shots. You’re still welcome to use a tripod.

Number four: Yosemite Valley Lodge in Yosemite National Park is reportedly getting a Starbucks. Reports of the coffee chain moving into the Lodge began to surface after a job posting for the store managers position surfaced online. The decision has since drawn sharp criticism from some and resulted in a petition on change.org. Number five: Earlier this year, President Donald Trump signed the “Martin Luther King, Jr. National Historic Park Act” into law. The move made King’s birth home, Ebenezer Baptist Church and King’s burial site a National Historic Park. Trump said signing the law was an honor. The daughter of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., Bernice King, said she was thankful to President Donald Trump for the designation. Number six: There will only be four National Park fee-free days this year compared to last year’s ten. The fee-free entry days are on Jan. 15 – Martin Luther King, Jr. Day, April 21 – First Day of National Park Week, Sept. 22 – National Public Lands Day and Nov. 11 – Veterans Day.

Number two: The National Parks Service is currently considering increasing fees at 17 national parks. The parks that are likely to see the increase include Arches, Bryce Canyon, Canyonlands, Number seven: Apparently a place doesn’t need to be stationary Denali, Glacier, Grand Canyon, Grand Teton, Olympic, Sequoia to be added to the National Register of Historic Places. Three & Kings Canyon, Yellowstone, Yosemite, Zion, Acadia, Mount of the boats in Glacier National Park have been added to the Rainier, Rocky Mountain, Shenandoah and Joshua Tree. National Register of Historic Places. According to the NPS, the fee increase would be used “to improve the visitor experience and make sure America’s This is by no means a complete list of changes coming to national parks are protected in perpetuity.” The new fee of $70 the national parks and monuments. For more information on per vehicle would begin during peak visiting months in 2018. changes coming to parks near you, visit nps.gov. Visit nps.gov for more information on when fees are likely to increase. Eurydice Number three: President Donald Trump has signed an executive order changing the size of two national monuments (Bears Ears and Grand StaircaseEscalante) created under his predecessors, President Barack Obama and President Bill Clinton. The move will reduce Bears Ears from 1.35 million acres to 228,784 acres. The second national monument affected by the executive order, Grand Staircase-Escalante, will be reduced from 1.9 million to 1 million acres and split into three units: Kaiparowits, Grand Staircase and Escalante Canyons.

Eileen and Allen Anes Studio Theatre February 2, 3, 5, 9 at 7:30 pm Matinee: February 3, 10 at 2:00 pm

Carmina Burana and Selected Works: An Original Choreographed Dance Concert in Collaboration with SUU Choirs and Orchestra

Randall L. Jones Theatre February 28th, March 1, 2, 3, 5 at 7:30 pm Matinee: March 3 at 2:00 pm

Urinetown: The Musical Randall L. Jones Theatre April 13, 14, 16, 20 at 7:30 pm Matinee: April 14th, 21 at 2:00 pm

UPCOMING EVENTS

www.suu.edu/pva/ta

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OUTDOOR

SPORTS 26

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BRUSH UP ON THE UTAHNS PARTICIPATING IN THIS YEAR’S WINTER OLYMPICS. CHECK OUT U.S.A. STATS FOR THE WINTER OLYMPICS IN PAST YEARS. SUU COACH RAISES MONEY FOR CANCER RESEARCH WITH SUBWAY.

PHOTO BY MITCHELL QUARTZ

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SPORTS

utahns in the olympics Team U.S.A. is expected to send 240 athletes to the 2018 Winter Olympic Games in PyeongChang, South Korea this month. As of January 26, nine athletes from Utah had been selected to represent the United States at the Olympics.

Ted Ligety

Rosie Brennan

Taylor Morris

Park City

Park City

Salt Lake City

Alpine Skiing

Cross-Country Skiing

Luge

At the age of 21, Ligety was the youngest

After her first attempt to ski at 14,

A sergeant in the U.S. Army, Morris is

American male to earn an Olympic gold

Brennan won a race at a community

headed to his first Olympic Games after

medal in Alpine Skiing. His career has

event. This win excited her competitive

missing the qualification for the 2014

only progressed from there. In 2015,

nature and lead her to competitions in

Olympics by four one-thousandths

he became the first skier to earn three

Canada. During the summer months, she

of a second. In 2017, Morris finished

consecutive World Championship titles in

trains in Alaska where she has grown to

fifth in men’s sprint during the world

giant slalom.

love the community. She volunteers with

championships.

Skiku, a program to teach young children Megan McJames

to ski, and Fast and Female, a group that

Sarah Hendrickson

Park City

empowers young women through sports.

Park City

Alpine Skiing

Ski Jumping

A North American Cup champion of

Nathan Chen

During her first World Cup competition

giant slalom, McJames competed in the

Salt Lake City

in 2012, Hendrickson dominated

2010 and 2014 Winter Olympics. She

Figure Skating

her competitors by winning nine

placed 30th in the Sochi 2014 Olympics.

At the age of 18, Chen is heading to his

competitions. In 2014, she was the first

In her spare time, McJames runs a cake

first Olympics this year. He originally tried

woman to compete in ski jumping at the

decorating business called Sister’s Sweet

ice skating to become a hockey goalie,

Olympics after women were permitted to

Tooth.

but found his place in figure skating

start competing in the event.

instead. In December, he was named Jerica Tandiman

champion of the 2017-18 Grand Prix Final

Faye Gulini

Kearns

in Japan.

Salt Lake City

Long Track Speedskating

26

Snowboarding

Tandiman began skating after the 2002

Chris Fogt

At the age of 14, Gulini left her home

Olympics because the Utah Olympic

Alpine

and family in Salt Lake City to attend

Oval was built next to her house. She

Bobsled

the Vail Ski and Snowboard Academy in

still practices there today. In 2014, she

A captain in the U. S. Army, Fogt

Colorado. During the 2014 Olympics, she

was the all-around champion at the U.S.

competes in the Olympics in between

earned fourth place in snowboarding. Off

Junior Nationals. She recently took time

his tours of active duty. As a member of

of the slopes, Gulini is working toward

off of skating to earn her associate’s

Team Night Train, he took home a bronze

a degree in accounting, enjoys riding

degree, but is now dedicated to skating

medal from the 2014 Olympics in Sochi,

her motorcycle and completed her first

full-time to achieve her olympic dream.

Russia.

marathon in 2016.

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America

SPORTS

at the

Winter Olympics The Winter Olympic Games were created in 1924, 28 years after the founding of the modern Olympic Games. America has competed in every iteration of the Winter Olympic Games. This year Team USA is expected to send approximately 240 athletes to the Winter Olympic Games. This number is dependent on illness, injury, personal circumstances for athletes and the technical aspects of the Games. INFORMATION COURTESY OF TEAMUSA.ORG

Leading In

Figure Skating

282 329

Skeleton

218

Overall Winter Medal Leaders Snowboarding

96

102

Freestyle Skiing

84

Winter Medals Won FEB 2018 |

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SPORTS

coaches SUU men’s basketball head coach Todd Simon swapped his clipboard for an apron for the afternoon on Jan. 16 to make sandwiches at Subway in support of support Coaches vs. Cancer and raise money for cancer research. Coaches vs. Cancer is a 25-year-old program run by the American Cancer Society with the National Association of Basketball coaches. The program hosts events such as three point challenges, suits and sneakers weeks and more creative events like the one Simon participated in. “The opportunity arose to do something unique like this and I’m certainly all-in on doing things like this,” Simon said. This is the second year that Simon has made sandwiches at

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CANCER Subway in support of Coaches vs. Cancer. When comparing the different experiences Simon said he was able to apply the things he learned last year. Got a real appreciation for how hard they work, especially at that lunch hour,” Simon said. “It was really good for a great cause and it’s fun to serve.” The whole men’s basketball team stopped by to get a sandwich from Simon. Ivan Madunic, a sophomore forward and center from Split, Croatia, said the sandwiches Simon made this year were way better than the sandwiches he made last year. “I guess you just have to trust the process,” Madunic said. In total Simon raised $75 for the American Cancer Society. To stay up to date on all SUU men’s basketball teams, follow them on Instagram and Twitter @suubasketballand on Facebook. FOR COMPLETE ARTICLE VISIT SUUNEWS.NET


COMMUNITY EXPERIENCE

Community PHOTO COURTESY OF SOUTHERN UTAH UNIVERSITY

30 COMMUNITY ON THE GO TAKES FLIGHT.

31 WORLD TRAVEL IN 2018.

32 COMMUNITY EDUCATION.

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COMMUNITY EXPERIENCE

SUU TO EVERYWHERE COMMUNITY ON THE GO TAKE FLIGHT A Study Abroad for Adults

the lights in Covent Garden and on Regents Street, to the many markets dotting the city, Southern Utah University’s new Community on to the Christmas concerts and sing-a-longs at the Go program has been taking community Royal Albert Hall — there really is a feeling of members on some memorable vacations Christmas in the air.” recently, and those returning participants have been bringing back praises for the program. On Veterans Day, 28 Community on the Go

Overlord: The D-Day Experience,” brought

One group of travelers just returned from England on a trip themed, “Christmas in London,” where they took in holiday plays, music and toured Oxford University, Westminster Abbey, St. Paul’s Cathedral and more.

former Utah House Rep. Kay McIff, to retrace

travelers toured sites where more than 160,000 Allied troops came by boat, parachuted from the sky, and more than 9,000 lost their lives in a battle memorialized as D-Day. The trip to France in November, themed “Operation

community members together in a group environment for an unforgettable vacation experience. SUU Director of Ethics and Compliance Ann Marie Allen made the journey with her father, the steps of her grandfather, Eldon McIff, who crossed the English Channel at the same place on the beaches of Normandy during WWII, but not on D-Day, Allen said. the steps of her grandfather, Eldon McIff, who

Launched in 2017, Community on the Go offers travel experiences to adult members of the community in groups of 20-30. Trip leaders are SUU experts that have previously traveled to host destinations and share their expertise with participants during their journey, although there is also plenty of free time scheduled, said Melynda Thorpe, Director of the Office of Community and Academic Enrichment at SUU.

crossed the English Channel at the same place on the beaches of Normandy during WWII, but not on D-Day, Allen said. From the Churchill War Rooms where WWII missions were planned, to the beaches where Allied troops came by sea, and the shops offering French pastries that cannot be found in the U.S., Allen said the best part of the trip

“We are educators, and our expertise in leading excursions lies in the fact that our trip leaders also direct short-term study abroad trips for SUU students, and many have completed research in foreign countries” she said. “We’re finding that our Community on the Go participants enjoy our trips because of our educational focus.”

was the quality time spent with her father. “The staff at Community on the Go did an excellent job planning,” Allen said. “In terms of travel arrangements, transportation, the sites that were selected — it was so seamless that it allowed us to really enjoy each other’s company

Jeb Branin, Executive Director of Experiential Learning at SUU, and a trip leader to London, said faculty members propose trips throughout the year, and successful voyages are chosen based on educational component, broad appeal and cultural relevance.

without the burden

of

those

logistical details.” SUU graduate Katie Groves went to Normandy because she found a love for traveling while attending several SUU study abroad trips for students. After graduating in 2016, Groves

“... Community on the Go participants enjoy our trips because of our educational focus.”

resolved to see as much of the world as she could while young. “I was a history major so this trip was a dream come true — it’s like study abroad for adults,” she said. “There are places in the

“In England, we selected sites that are quintessentially British,” Branin said. “London is especially magical at Christmastime. From 30

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world that you can read about and fall in love PHOTOS COURTESY OF SOUTHERN UTAH UNIVERSITY

with, but nothing can compare to actually visiting that place.”


COMMUNITY EXPERIENCE

SUU Bringing Community World Travel in 2018

immersive culture with faculty experts With stops in China, France and England, Southern Utah University’s new Community on the Go program took groups of adult community members from all walks of life to places around the world in 2017. In 2018, Community on the Go trips are slated to be equally as intriguing — if not a bit frightening. From touring ancient ruins in South America, to off the beaten paths and mountain valleys of Hungary and Romania, to the villages and castles in the Alps of Germany and Austria, Community on the Go aims to make memories that will last a lifetime. This year, SUU’s community travel lineup begins in May to the ancient Incan Empire in Peru. Once considered the largest empire in preColumbian America, the Incas ruled the highlands of Peru from the early 13th century until succumbing to Spanish armies in 1572. Architecture highlights the Peru trip, with sites such as Ollantaytambo, located in the Sacred Valley of the Incas, or the temple of Qorikancha, selected. Traditional cooking lessons, textile weaving demonstrations and dancing lessons are also included in the itinerary.

And in December, Community on the Go will voyage to Germany and Austria for Christmas in the Alps. The journey begins in Munich before traveling to the historic castles of Füessen and a tour of The Sound of Music movie site in Salzburg. In Austria, travelers will visit art museums with the option to attend an opera if desired. “Both Germany and Austria have rich Christmas traditions that appeal to community members,” said Kurt Harris, SUU’s Director of Learning Abroad. “I am personally excited that we will be visiting one of the most famous and popular destinations in the world, Neuschwanstein castle.” Housed in the SUU Office of Community and Academic Enrichment (CAE), Community on the Go is a program designed to offer community members immersive, educational experiences while traveling the globe with SUU specialists, said CAE Executive Director Melynda Thorpe.

“Community on the Go seeks to provide those who travel with an academically rich, affordable and fun vacation ...”

SUU experts leading the trip are Dr. Emily Dean, associate professor of anthropology, and Dr. Iliana Portaro, assistant professor of Spanish. An archaeologist specializing in prehistory of the Andean region of South America, Dean has conducted both archaeological and anthropological fieldwork in Peru. Portaro, a native of Lima, Peru, received her Ph.D. in Latin American literature and cultures, and specializes in Peruvian literature and women’s studies. In October, Community on the Go takes flight to Transylvania during Halloween season. From the banks of the immortal Danube River, to the lush farm valleys and mesmerizing mountain peaks of western Romania, to the birthplace of Vlad the Impaler, this voyage is sure to excite those who love history and science fiction. In Romania, Bran Castle, more commonly known as Dracula’s castle due to similarities of the setting in Bram Stoker’s famous novel Dracula, is a favorite stop among tourists.

“SUU expert-led trips allow for groups of 20-30 to explore various parts of the world in a fun, affordable and educational setting,” Thorpe said. “Community on the Go seeks to provide those who travel with an academically rich, affordable and fun vacation. Our employees handle the logistics, such as transportation schedules, attraction tickets and hotel reservations.”

Much like a study abroad program for adult members of the community interested in educational travel, Community on the Go trips are designed to offer fun, affordable, educational travel experiences and to build community relationships with SUU faculty experts leading the trips. Activities are flexible and designed using community feedback. For more information on 2018 SUU Community on the Go trips, or to reserve your spot with a deposit, visit suu.edu/onthego, call (435) 865-8259 or stop by the office at 136 W. University Blvd, Suite 003, Cedar City, Utah.

Explore the World

SUU Professors Kyle Bishop, a nationally recognized expert on the horror genre, and Dr. Grant Corser, knowledgeable traveler of the Transylvania region and expert on the psychology of fear and its connections to things that go bump in the night, will lead the expedition.

Fun, Affordable, Educational Travel Travel for adults Fun, Affordable, Educational FEB 2018 |

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COMMUNITY EXPERIENCE

SUU Community Education Offers Something For All new community classes for those who love to learn

of the world,” she said. “By helping the community to explore their interests, develop a new hobby or skill, and enhance their quality of life — everybody wins.” The first classes being offered by CAE are now open for enrollment. They include:

Resolve to learn something new this year, advance your career, prepare an intriguing meal, or to be more social in the community with educational classes for all at Southern Utah University. Beginning in March, the Office of Community and Academic Enrichment (CAE) is launching community classes designed for those who love to learn. Community Education classes now open for enrollment will give community members a chance to learn something fun, or begin a new hobby in a short term, affordable class setting.

From Blog to Book: In this 12 week course, applicants will learn about the blogging and book industries. By course completion, each participant will have competed a first draft of a book and have established some expertise on their chosen topic. helping the

“By community to explore their interests, develop a new hobby or skill, and enhance their quality of life — everybody wins.”

For those interested in increasing their marketability, upgrading their current resume or polishing their professional skills, Professional Development courses will also be offered. Upon successful completion, an SUU Institutional Certificate will be issued to participants giving area business owners a credible venue for offering employee training.

CAE Executive Director Melynda Thorpe was put in charge of giving back to the community that in 1897 struggled to build the original building, Old Main, that led to the present day SUU campus. By offering programs that lead to personal enrichment, professional advantage and cultural engagement, the community as a whole will benefit, Thorpe said. “The culture of the region is rich, and adding a variety of academic offerings will only enhance the experience of living in this beautiful part

Travel Spanish: In this 11 week course, participants will learn the basics of the Spanish language for travel situations. This is not a grammar class, rather an instructional Spanish class to become comfortable using the Spanish language in travel situations.

Raising Preschoolers in a Technology Driven World: Learn how to teach young children self-control through games and communication, effective ways to use technology and how and why to limit tech use in this 12 week course. Energy and Water Efficiency: With some moderate changes, participants will learn how to decrease their water and electricity usage, decrease their monthly bills and help to conserve for future generations in this 11 week course. Southern Utah Chef Series: This nine-part course beginning in March features favorite local culinary personalities teaching audience members to prepare and serve up delectable dishes from familiar restaurant menus.

PHOTO COURTESY OF SOUTHERN UTAH UNIVERSITY

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COMMUNITY EXPERIENCE Classes will be taught in the amiable setting of the IG Winery with a different chef, baker or locally-owned restaurant being featured every month. Classes can be taken as a course for a discount, or as a single class.

Social Dancing: Participants will learn the basics of dancing, including footwork, frame and hold, movement, count and line of dance. Dances originate from all over the world

art students in a fun, experiential, educational setting. General issues and techniques of both contemporary and historical uses of photography will be addressed with a focus on visual literacy. Students will also gain insight in the photographs

Media Boot Camp Academy: The Public Relations and Marketing boot camp is designed to introduce both students and professionals to topical best practices in the field of communication, public relations, marketing, advertising, branding, and to encourage dialogue on ideas which best exemplify ethical practices in the profession in a sixsession workshop. Adobe Creative Suite: Course participants will learn the basics of Adobe Creative Cloud software, such as basic photo touch-up, correction, cropping, and resolution. InDesign, Adobe Illustrator, Acrobat Pro, and other Adobe Suite products, will be taught depending on the needs and interests of class members in this four week course. Math Made Easy (High School Students): In six weeks, high school students will learn how better take notes, prepare for tests and work through the subjects they are struggling with in a stress-free group setting with guidance from professional tutors.

and will include a brief history, including the foxtrot, waltz, tango, rhumba, the Cha Cha and swing techniques. Photography: This course is designed to introduce participants to the fine art of photography, and is open for both art and non-

CLASSES

STARTING MARCH 2018

For more information on community education classes, visit www.suu.edu/siel/cae, email communityeducation@suu.edu, call SUU CAE at (435) 865-8259, or stop by the office at 136 W. University Boulevard, Office 003, Cedar City, Utah.

FROM BLOG TO BOOK TRAVEL SPANISH RAISING PRESCHOOLERS IN A TECHNOLOGY DRIVEN WORLD ENERGY AND WATER EFFICIENCY SOUTHERN UTAH CHEF SERIES MEDIA BOOT CAMP ACADEMY ADOBE CREATIVE SUITE MATH MADE EASY FOR HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS SOCIAL DANCING PHOTOGRAPHY

Register Today At www.suu.edu/siel/cae

Call to register today, (435) 865-8259

Community Education and Professional Development

used in popular culture, and the techniques used by professionals that make them effective.

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COMMUNITY EXPERIENCE

Tourists from SUU’s Community on the Go

stand on Utah Beach in Normandy, where key battles were fought when Allied forces stormed France by air, land and sea to free the country from German rule in WWII.

Community on the Go voyagers visited St. Paul’s Cathedral during their “Christmas in London 2017” trip.

A tr i b u te to WWII A soldier

Travelers pause at St. Pancras International Railway Station in London to see what the statue of John Betjeman finds so interesting.

who had his parachute caught on the Church of SaintMere-Eglise in Normandy is photographed by Community on the Go travelers.

Community

on the Go Katie Groves, an SUU alumna from Cedar City, visits the Churchill War Rooms of the Imperial War Museum, where the British government planned and carried out missions during World War II.

Community on the Go travelers pose for a photo in front of an old-fashioned phone booth in London. 34

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PHOTOS COURTESY OF SOUTHERN UTAH UNIVERSITY


Profile for University Journal

February 2018  

Fourth issue of the University Journal for the 2017-2018 academic school year.

February 2018  

Fourth issue of the University Journal for the 2017-2018 academic school year.

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