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Contact: Centre for Adult Continuing Education University College Cork t. 021 4902301/4904739/4904717 e. shortcourses@ucc.ie w. http://study.ucc.ie/ace

Centre for Adult continuing Education

Short Courses 2011 - 2012 The Centre for Adult Continuing Education is pleased to present a newly augmented range of short courses for the academic year 2011/2012. Our selection was guided by the intention to appeal to a broad range of interests, concerns, and needs. To satisfy such a range, our courses cover a diverse spectrum from Medieval Irish Calligraphy to Spy Fiction, from Bond to Blunt; Understanding Music to Decorative Horticulture; Family and Child Law to Sustainability and Sustainable Development; Supervision in the Helping Professions to India: Past, Present and Future. We hope that from the courses on offer, you will find one, if not more, that either serve to strengthen your knowledge in an area of existing interest or perhaps introduce you to a new area of learning or perhaps facilitate your professional development.

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Commencing September/October 2011 January 2012


Short Courses 2011-2012

Maura O’Donoghue

Irish Art from Barry to Brocquy September See page 27

Liam made the lectures so interesting and informative. His skill in linking the art to the history and literature is very impressive. Liam’s enthusiasm spilled into all his lectures. Two hours passed by all too quickly.

UCC Campus Map

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Short Courses 2011-2012

Contents Foreword Course Fee Registration Contact Information Car Parking Short Courses September/October 2011

03 04 04 05 05

Short Courses January 2012

55

07

DISCLAIMER Every effort is made to ensure that the contents herein are accurate. This guide is intended only for the guidance of students. It is not in any way to be construed as granting legal rights to any person or as imposing any legal obligation on the National University of Ireland, Cork or the National University. No guarantee is given that courses, fees, regulations, rules or orders may not be altered, cancelled, replaced, augmented or otherwise amended at any time.

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Lorna Acton

Masterpieces from Irish Collections; Chester Beatty Library, National Gallery and Hugh Lane Gallery, Dublin- September See page 32

‘I like absolutely everything about this course! It was my first venture into art history and I didn’t know what to expect really- I thought it might be intimidating but it wasn’t at all so and it was a joy to discover that interest and enthusiasm are the only prerequisites. I found the content fascinating and James’ delivery was excellent- his knowledge, use of language and ability to place each work in its appropriate context was truly excellent ad informative. Any input or questions from the group were treated with courtesy and consideration while ensuring that the time allocated for the lecture was adhered to for the benefit of all present. This course, its content and delivery, need no improvement!’

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Short Courses 2011-2012

Foreword The Centre for Adult Continuing Education is pleased to present a newly augmented range of short courses for the academic year 2011/2012. Our selection was guided by the intention to appeal to a broad range of interests, concerns, and needs. To satisfy such a range, our courses cover a diverse spectrum from Medieval Irish Calligraphy to Spy Fiction, from Bond to Blunt; Understanding Music to Decorative Horticulture; Family and Child Law to Sustainability and Sustainable Development; Supervision in the Helping Professions to India: Past, Present and Future. We hope that from the courses on offer, you will find one, if not more, that either serve to strengthen your knowledge in an area of existing interest or perhaps introduce you to a new area of learning or perhaps facilitate your professional development. Furthermore, these courses showcase the work and interests of the University in a public forum. We would like to thank and acknowledge our many internal and external partners whose participation brings success and energy to our courses. We are by nature curious for the new, be it new information, new opinions or new viewpoints. We trust that participation in a course of study will enable you to think in new ways. More importantly, we wish that your choice of course brings you enjoyment and intellectual reward in an informal and sociable setting. While our courses are non-assessed we see them as a means of engaging you in the rewards of lifelong learning; your participation may be the first step towards committing yourself to a more dedicated programme of education and self discovery in the future. This year again we have broadened our availability in terms of time and location. Besides the usual evening programmes in UCC, courses are now located in many city libraries and the Crawford Art Gallery and the Cork Arts Theatre. We wish you very success and enjoyment on our programmes.

Regina Sexton, Short Course Co-ordinator, Centre for Adult Continuing Education, UCC

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Short Courses 2011-2012

Course Fee

Registration

This is payable when registering. Applicable fees are listed in each course description. For details of our Fee Concession Scheme see below. Payment can be made by cheque, postal order or bank draft, made payable to UCC. Students can also register and pay online quickly and securely in three easy steps (see http://study. ucc.ie/ace for detailed information). 

Registration will also be accepted by handing in applications with the fee to the Centre between 9.15am and 5.00pm each day or by returning them by mail, prior to the closing date.

Payment by credit/debit card can be made by calling to the Centre during normal office hours. Completed application forms for courses commencing in September/October must be submitted by the closing date: 19 September, 2011. Completed application forms for courses commencing in January 2012 must be submitted by the closing date: 16 January, 2012 to Regina Sexton, Short Course Co-ordinator, Centre for Adult Continuing Education, ‘The Laurels’, University College Cork.

Course commencement is subject to sufficient enrolment. In the event of a course not commencing applicants will be informed and their fees returned. Application forms are available on page 53 and page 99 of this booklet. A Fee Concession Scheme designed to provide support for adult learners on our courses is offered by the Centre. The scheme offers a 25% reduction of Short Course Fees. The Scheme applies to: • Applicants in receipt of unemployed benefit • Applicants in receipt of disability benefit • Applicants in receipt of retirement/old age/ widow/widower pension • Applicants in receipt of Lone Parents Allowance/Separation Allowance • Applicants in receipt of carer’s allowance Please deduct the concession from your fee when posting in your application and also enclose evidence of receipt of benefit.

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Short Courses 2011-2012

Contact Details

Car Parking

Centre for Adult Continuing Education, University College Cork t: 021 4904717 t: 021 4904739 t: 021 4902301 e: shortcourses@ucc.ie w:http://study.ucc.ie/ace

UCC’s buildings are located in suburban and city centre areas of Cork City. Site and planning restrictions mean that UCC cannot provide sufficient car parking for all those who would like to drive to work/study or to visit the College. As a result those wishing to access the University are strongly urged to use non-car modes of travel. UCC is well served by public transport and attempts are being made to improve cycle and pedestrian facilities.

Visitor Car Parking Visitor car parking is available at Perrott’s Inch and Perrott Avenue car parks (hourly charge) and at Brookfield Health Science Complex (pay & display). Visitors who are unable to obtain parking on the campus are requested to pay due regard to the access needs of the residents in the area surrounding the campus. Most of the on-street parking in this area is controlled by prepaid disc parking. Pay parking is available at Perrott Avenue, Perrott’s Inch and Brookfield car parks.

• • • • • • • • •

Those driving and parking on campus should always show consideration for pedestrians who have priority and to be aware that persons with disabilities use the campus. Anybody parking in the environs of UCC should park in legitimate spaces only and respect the needs of local residents. There is a maximum speed limit of 15 km/h (c 10 mph) on the campus and in the car parks. The College car parks are open as follows: 8.00am – 10.30pm. Overnight parking is not allowed. Access to the main campus car parks – rear of the Science building (left hand side, Physics car park), Áras na Laoi and Donovan’s Road (Geography), do not require a swipe key after 6.00pm. This facilitates night students and will help relieve congestion in the parking surrounding areas. Parking is only permitted in the marked spaces in all parking areas (between two white lines). In car parks with counting facilities when these spaces are full, no further vehicles will be permitted entry. This is essential for compliance with the Fire Regulations, to facilitate access to the buildings and allow free movement of pedestrians. The marked disabled parking spaces are strictly reserved for vehicles with disabled stickers. All vehicles are parked at the owner’s risk and the College does not accept liability for any loss, consequential loss, or damage. UCC reserves the right to remove or clamp any vehicles which obstruct access for emergency vehicles or if not parked in a marked space. A charge of a80 will apply for removal of wheel clamp (payable to clamping contractor). No liability is accepted for any damage resulting from the removal of any vehicle by UCC.

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Abbey Ho

Nutrition and Health September See page 36

6

‘The course was full of the information I was looking for and the lecturers, Eibhlís and Janette were extremely helpful and more than happy to explain when I didn’t understand. Some of the debates helped to show the pros and cons of different issues and it was interesting to hear other people views and opinions of the subject.’

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Short Courses 2011-2012

Short Courses September /October 2011 A Psychological Understanding of Childhood and Adolescence

09

Advanced Digital Photography

11

An Introduction to Educational Psychotherapy

12

An Introduction to Humanitarianism and Development

14

An Introduction to Psychology

15

Beginners Digital Photography

16

Communication Skills for the New Media Age- Intermediate

17

Communication Skills for the New Media Age- Introduction

18

Decorative Horticulture: A Basic Introduction

19

Employment Law

20

European Still Life Painting and the Fascination with Illusion and Deception

21

Family and Child Law

22

Finding Your Voice: A Course in Creative Writing

23

Genealogy: how to trace your family tree

24

Introduction to Medieval Irish Literature

25

Introduction to the Study of Folklore

26

Irish Art from Barry to le Brocquy

27

Leadership and Conflict Resolution in Community Groups

28

Life and Business Coaching

29

Literature I: The Country

30

Looking at Architecture: Ten Iconic Building Projects

31

Masterpieces from Irish Collections morning

32

Masterpieces from Irish Collections afternoon

32

Masters of the Renaissance

33

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Short Courses 2011-2012

Medieval Irish Calligraphy

34

Mentoring with Young People

35

Nutrition and Health

36

Parallel Worlds: How to Build Them with Words

8

A Course in Creative and Imaginative Writing

37

Photographic Lighting: Master Class

38

Photoshop for Beginners

40

Secrets and Lies: Spy Fiction from Bond to Blunt

41

The City of Rome: An Introduction

42

The Criminal Mind: An Introduction to Forensic and Criminal Psychology

44

The Story of Irish food

45

Understanding Music: An Introduction to Music Appreciation

46

Vienna: City of Dreams

47

Ways and Means with Words: a Course in Creative Writing

49

What Happened to the Parlour?

50

Women, Gender and War

51

Youth and Community Work through Physical Activity

52

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Short Courses 2011-2012

Fee: €230 for 10 weeks Time/Dates: Tuesday 7-9pm, 27th September to 29th November Venue: Brookfield Health Sciences Complex, Room 301, UCC Lecturer: Dr Elmarie Egan-Sage, Centre for Adult Continuing Education, UCC

A Psychological Understanding of Childhood and Adolescence The course is based on a parenting model that aims to promote the child’s self-esteem and confidence, thereby enhancing the parentchild relationship. The ten sessions will be intellectually stimulating, entertaining and emotionally nurturing. There will be time allocated each week for open discussion. Weeks One and Two: The Child’s History We will briefly explore how historical definitions of childhood continue to influence our child rearing practices. The child’s family is their personal history. We will examine how family patterns persist through the generations. Some transgenerational problems will be explored. Sibling rivalry and other areas of conflict will be addressed. The family is a System and we will examine how some family systems become dysfunctional. Weeks Three and Four: Child Development Theory We will glance at the development theories of Bowlby, Montessori, Erikson, Freud, Piaget and Social Learning Theory. We will use these theories to understand the meaningfulness of children’s behaviour such as tantrums, moodiness and phobias. We will look at gender roles, parenting styles, communication training and problem solving. Week Five: School This will include learning difficulties, special needs, giftedness, teasing, bullying, self-esteem, confidence and the healthy expression of anger.

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Short Courses 2011-2012

Week Six: Adolescence Whilst much of the course relates to adolescence, this session does so exclusively. Issues include stages of adolescence, eating distress (bulimia, anorexia, bingeing etc), alcohol and drug use, mental health problems, idealism. Weeks Seven, Eight and Nine: Some Childhood Problems This will include phobias, panic attacks, anxiety (separation and generalized), post traumatic stress, sleep problems, disruptive behaviour, oppositional defiant disorder, obsessive compulsive disorders, somatic complaints, depression, Asperger’s syndrome, autism, depression, abuse and neglect. Effects of bereavement, separation and divorce will also be examined. Week Ten: Closure We will discuss the Life Cycle. We will explore our own “inner child”. The course will be brought to a close.

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Short Courses 2011-2012

Fee: €230 for 10 weeks

Advanced Digital Photography

Time/Dates: Monday 7-9pm 3rd October to 12th December

Advanced Digital Photography is about understanding technology, effective implementation and achieving the results one envisions. Skills are necessary to overcome the barrier that machinery poses between you and great results. This short course allows you develop, in practical terms, the concepts of photography learnt in the Beginners Digital Photography course.

Venue: Western Gateway Building, Room G16, UCC Lecturer: Mr Stephen Bean, Centre for Adult Continuing Education, UCC

1.

Lighting overview

2.

Camera subject distance

3.

Keystone and perspective

4.

Lighting part 2

5.

Vectors

6.

Night photography

7.

Lighting part 3

8.

Time lapse and medium length exposures

9.

Chroma Key

Please note: class size is limited to 20 participants. Requirements: What you need to bring with you: • It is advisable that students have completed the Beginners Digital Photography short course or a course of similar standard. • A camera - a DSLR is recommended but an SLR or a compact that includes a manual mode can also be used. • If you have any extra lenses or an external flash bring them with you. • A note pad and pen to record notes, tips and camera settings etc. • Your camera instructions, you may need them. • Ensure you have sufficient charged batteries/spare batteries and memory cards. Own camera essential.

10. Lighting part 4

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Short Courses 2011-2012

Fee: €230 for 10 weeks Time/Dates: Tuesday 7-9pm, 27th September to 29th November Venue: Western Gateway Building, Room G15, UCC Lecturer: Ms Marie Delaney, Centre for Adult Continuing Education, UCC

1.

Introduction: what is Educational Psychotherapy? Its origins, theoretical influences and applications to learning

2.

Psychodynamic theories: understanding the theory of unconscious processes blocking learning and affecting behaviour; Anna Freud and Bion

3.

Attachment, behaviour and learning: Attachment theory and how it can help understand a child’s behaviour and approach to learning; the triangle of adult, task and relationship; Bowlby and Main

4.

Dealing with challenging behaviour and the ‘unteachable child’: practical strategies for the classroom; links with emotional literacy

5.

Therapeutic storywriting: how to use published stories and create stories with children to explore difficult feelings and facilitate change; Bettelheim and Sutherland

12

An Introduction to Educational Psychotherapy Educational Psychotherapy is a branch of child psychotherapy which focuses on improving a child’s educational achievement. This 10-week course will give an introduction to Educational Psychotherapy and the emotional factors affecting the learning processes and behaviour of children. Learning can be affected by trauma such as loss, separation, bereavement, domestic violence, parental mental illness, parental drug or alcohol addiction and displacement from the family home. Other children may experience none of these major traumas but have underlying and often unconscious concerns inhibiting their learning.

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Short Courses 2011-2012

The course will offer theoretical insight and practical strategies for helping children and young people overcome blocks to learning. It will be of interest to those working with young people in education, youth work and care settings as well as parents and carers. Please note this course does not qualify participants to practise as Educational Psychotherapists. It is a short taster course for participants to get an introductory overview of the field.

6.

The uses of play: Winnicott’s theories of play; the importance of recognising and developing stages of play to give ‘secondchance’ learning

7.

Effects of loss and trauma on learning: bereavement, domestic violence, parental mental illness

8.

Emotional blocks to reading: understanding the child who cannot bear to read and strategies which help

9.

Beginnings, transitions and endings: understanding the deep feelings aroused at times of change and how to help children deal with these

10. An Educational Psychotherapy approach to assessment: putting it all together and devising future work; participants will be asked to reflect on a young person they know

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Short Courses 2011-2012

Fee: â‚Ź190 for 8 weeks Time/Dates: Wednesday 7-9pm, 28th September to 16th November Venue: Brookfield Health Sciences Complex, Room 243, UCC Lecturer: Mr Damien McSweeney, Centre for Adult Continuing Education, UCC

1.

A brief history of development. What is meant by development? Why is development important?

2.

Humanitarianism, historical and contemporary

3.

Famines, food security and insecurity

4.

An examination of poverty, both from a developed world and a developing world context

5.

Development and gender

6.

Sustainable practices, development and the Environment

7.

Development and Human Rights

8.

The millennium development goals, what are they? Are they achievable?

14

An Introduction to Humanitarianism and Development Since the global recession of 2008 the gap between rich and poor nations is getting bigger. There has been a shameful lack of progress in reducing poverty over the last 50 years despite unparalleled growth. Half the 6 billion people on this planet are poor with 1.1 billion living on less than $1 a day. Widespread poverty and hunger, lack of health and education, lack of clean water and sanitation, as well as conflict disaster (natural and manmade) and disease are just some of the issues which affect the lives of millions in the developing world. This course will introduce these issues and help garnish a simple understanding of contemporary political, economic, environmental and cultural aspects of global issues and development. This course would benefit anyone with an interest in global issues, politics or the developing world as well as anyone thinking of working or volunteering abroad. It would also provide an insight and foundation to people who might be considering studying either the diploma in Development Studies or the honours degree in International Development and Food policy in University College Cork.

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Short Courses 2011-2012

Fee: â‚Ź190 for 8 weeks

An Introduction to Psychology

Time/Dates: Thursday 7-9pm, 29th September to 17th November

An introduction to Psychology course is specifically designed for those wishing to gain an introductory insight into the area of Psychology. A diverse number of topics shall be addressed over the eight weeks. All lectures will provide the opportunity to generate class discussion in a friendly and relaxed learning environment. All classes shall be complimented with the use of audio and visual materials to make learning more interesting.

Venue: Brookfield Health Sciences Complex, Room 301, UCC Lecturer: Ms Sinead Devine, School of Applied Psychology UCC

1.

The history of Psychology

2.

An introduction to Social Psychology

3.

An introduction to Developmental Psychology

4.

Memory and perception

5.

Personality

6.

Principles of behaviour analysis

7.

Research methods in Psychology

...the opportunity to generate class discussion in a friendly and relaxed learning environment.

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Short Courses 2011-2012

Fee: €230 for 10 weeks

Beginners Digital Photography

Time/Dates: Thursday 7-9pm, 6th October to 8th December

As research becomes more interdisciplinary, communicating and visualising research to a larger audience has become important. This short course introduces participants to the topic of Digital Photography, and will allow them to gain knowledge of the relevant tools used. Participants will receive practical hands-on lab-based tutorials with relevant image-editing software. There will also be a number of studio based lighting tutorials. The module also includes two assignments/exercises.

Venue: Western Gateway Building, Room G09, UCC Lecturer: Mr Stephen Bean, Centre for Adult Continuing Education, UCC

1.

History of photography

2.

Camera equipment and components

3.

Light

4.

Exposure. Assignment 1

5.

Depth of field/focus

6.

The camera/computer interface. Editing images

7.

Aspect ratio and the frame

8.

View point

9.

Assignment 2

Requirements: What you need to bring with you: • A camera - a DSLR is recommended but an SLR or a compact that includes a manual mode can also be used. • If you have any extra lenses or an external flash bring them with you. • A note pad and pen to record notes, tips and camera settings etc. • Your camera instructions, you may need them. • Ensure you have sufficient charged batteries/spare batteries and memory cards. Own camera essential.

Please note: Class size is limited to 18 participants for this course.

10. Three photographers

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Short Courses 2011-2012

Fee: ₏190 for 8 weeks Time/Dates: Thursday 7-9pm, 29th September to 17th November Venue: Brookfield Health Sciences Complex, Room 102, UCC Lecturers: Ms Imogen Bertin, Centre for Adult Continuing Education, UCC, Dr Siobhan O’Sullivan, CIT

1.

Theoretical underpinning: communication skills; privacy issues

2.

Identifying and engaging audience groups: emphasis on Facebook

3.

How should we measure effect for new media and social media?

4.

Disintermediation: publishing and education forced into change

5.

Encouraging engagement: community management skills

6.

Is it working? Analytics and engaging audiences

7.

Digital citizenship: from cyberbullying to teleworking

8.

Social media futurescoping: what to connect for what?

Communication Skills for the New Media Age - Intermediate Webinars | HTML5 | twitter backchannels | Google AdWords | Eventbrite | NFC | Tumblr | M-libraries | Augmented reality | QR Codes | RSS | Facebook Ads | LinkedIn | ePortfolios | Audioboo | Wordpress | LiveStreaming | Google Places | This course provides a structured opportunity to explore social media and new media tools for a wide variety of communication uses. The emphasis of this course is on practical application, and it is tailored to the participants through an enrolment questionnaire as well as by agreement on topics of importance to the group during the course. Participants are encouraged to develop a small project. At the end of this course, you should be able to scope, plan, cost, design, create and customise social media for your needs. This course is suitable for people who already use social media. It builds on, but does not require, the introductory course. Some aspects of learning technology are also covered.

Please note: Class size is limited to 18 participants for this course.

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Short Courses 2011-2012

Fee: €190 for 8 weeks Time/Dates: Wednesday 7-9pm, 28th September to 16th November Venue: Brookfield Health Sciences Complex, Room 102, UCC Lecturers: Ms Imogen Bertin, Centre for Adult Continuing Education, UCC, Dr Siobhan O’Sullivan, CIT

1.

Theoretical underpinning: communication skills; privacy issues

2.

Productivity and Facebook: not such opposites

3.

New media overview: practical sessions twitter/skype/geolocation

4.

Finding and using new media resources: smartphone videos

5.

Creating new content: podcasting and microblogging, website usability

6.

Presentation skills: PowerPoint revisited

7.

Is it working? Analytics and engaging audiences

8.

Linking social media: what to connect for what?

18

Communication Skills for the New Media Age - Introduction Facebook | twitter | YouTube | Dropbox | iPhone | blogs | mindmaps | IM | Skype | Surveymonkey | Google analytics | LinkedIn | Delicious | synching | Jing |podcasts | webtext | Audioboo | Forums | VLEs | Google maps | iCanAnimate Learn new ways of relaying information to customers, students, colleagues or friends using new media and social media. The emphasis of this course is on practical application and online interactive work, with content tailored to the participants through an enrolment questionnaire, and a focus on jargon-busting. At the end of this course, you should be able to customise your use of new media for your individual goals, and feel confident using the skills acquired for your work and personal communications. Learners are encouraged to reflect on their own “digital identity” and its consequences in the real world, both positive and negative. This course is suitable for those who currently use the Internet for basic searching, booking travel, email, information browsing etc. Please note: Class size is limited to 18 participants for this course.

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Short Courses 2011-2012

Fee: €150 for 6 weeks Time/Dates: Wednesday 7-9pm, 5th October to 9th November Venue: Western Gateway Building, Room G17, UCC Lecturer: Dr Ted Hickey, Centre for Adult Continuing Education, UCC

1.

Plants: main functions, nursery categories, selection, and sourcing tips

2.

Plant names explained

3.

Plant design: basic principles and practices. Recommended plants for different situations

4.

Routine maintenance operations

5.

Understanding soil and growing media

6.

DIY plant propagation

Decorative Horticulture: A Basic Introduction This short course, designed for beginners, will cover the importance of plants in the environment and their many uses in different situations in the garden. It will explain in simple terms, how plants are named and categorised and will advise on how to get value for money when purchasing plant material from a nursery. An introduction to easy propagation techniques and to making composts will also enable course participants to grow their own at minimal cost. Plant aftercare will be dealt with and course participants will be given easy-to-follow instructions on how to assess garden soils in terms of suitability for growing plants. To illustrate course content, emphasis will be placed on the use of slides, overhead projection and PowerPoint presentations with handouts.

easy propagation techniques and… making composts will… enable course participants to grow their own at minimal cost.

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Short Courses 2011-2012

Fee: €230 for 10 weeks

Employment Law

Time/Dates: Wednesday 7-9pm, 28th September to 30th November

This ten-week course will familiarise students with the contents, sources and relevant procedures in Employment Law and will enable them to access and evaluate new legislation or case law. In turn, participants can advise management on the relevant issues, assist in development of new policies and procedures for their organisations in an evolving legal environment.

Venue: O’Rahilly Building, Room 101, UCC Lecturer: Dr Ryan Morgan, Centre for Adult Continuing Education, UCC

1.

The law in context

2.

Court structure

3.

The contract of employment

4.

Termination of the contract of employment

5.

Unlawful Dismissals Legislation 1977 – 1993

6.

Redundancy

7.

Employment Equality Act, 1988. Equal Status Act, 2000

8.

Other protective legislation

9.

The employer’s duty to care for their employees

10. Detailed study of a statute and a case report

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Short Courses 2011-2012

Fee: €150 for 6 weeks Time/Dates: Thursday 7-9pm, 20th October to 24th November Venue: Western Gateway Building, Room G15, UCC Lecturer: Dr Joachim Beug, Centre for Adult Continuing Education, UCC

1.

Introduction and illustration of terms and concepts such as ‘Still Life’, ‘Nature Morte’, ‘Mimesis’, ‘Trompe l’Oeil’ etc. The main sub-categories of still life painting: flower pieces, ‘vanitas’ pictures, hunting, fruit and vegetable paintings, breakfast still lives etc.

2.

A journey through 2000 years of realist Still Life painting; 400 BC – 1600 AD

3.

The journey continued: 1600 – present

4.

Famous cases of illusionist art work in the Dutch ‘Golden Age’: The criminal prosecution of Johannes Torrentius; the optical cabinet of Cornelis Norbertus Gijsbrechts, et al

5.

Visual perception and its limits; ‘anamorphosis’, ‘curiopticals’, hidden and ambiguous pictures and other playful illusionary tricks

6.

Artistic deception in modern and contemporary art forms; ‘pictures of nothing’ and the end of Still Life?

European Still Life Painting and the Fascination with Illusion and Deception Still Life painting from its beginnings in Greek and Roman antiquity to its modern and contemporary manifestations has been associated with the challenge to create deceptively true imitations of real objects. Many art lovers have heard of the story of the ancient Greek artist Zeuxis, who painted a bunch of grapes so perfectly that birds were fooled into picking at the painted fruit. Recent major exhibitions and publications have established renewed interest and fascination with trompe l’oeil painting and the interplay between illusion and reality in works of art. This course will look at the history of still life painting with a special focus on the artistic skill and cunning employed to seduce the viewer into taking art for reality. By appealing to the sense of touch, by seemingly reaching out from the picture plane into the space of the viewer a sense of tangible reality is created… if only for the brief moment until the disillusionment sets in and the spectator realizes with a sense of amusement and amazement that this was ‘art’ after all. Thus, some fundamental conditions and limits of our visual perception will be explored in this course and different ‘ways of seeing’ discussed.

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Short Courses 2011-2012

Fee: €190 for 8 weeks

Family and Child Law

Time/Dates: Tuesday 7-9pm, 27th September to 15th November

This course will provide a comprehensive overview of Family Law and Child Law in Ireland today. Legislative developments over the past two decades will be examined such as the Family Law Act 1995, the Family Law (Divorce) Act 1996, the Domestic Violence Acts 1996 and 2002 and the Children Act 2001.The proposed Constitutional Referendum on Children’s Rights will be discussed as well as recent high profile cases which have appeared before the courts. The extent to which these cases have acted as catalysts for change will be explored.

Venue: Western Gateway Building, Room G14, UCC Lecturer: Dr Aisling Parkes, Department of Law, UCC

1.

Family Law

2.

The engagement

3.

The requirements for a valid marriage

4.

Separation agreements and judicial separation

5.

Divorce

6.

Nullity

7.

Domestic violence

8.

Child Law

9.

Guardianship, custody and access

The proposed Constitutional Referendum on Children’s Rights will be discussed as well as recent high profile cases which have appeared before the courts

10. United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child 1989 (Article 12)

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Short Courses 2011-2012

Fee: €150 for 10 weeks Time/Dates: Wednesday morning, 10.15am to 12.15pm, 28th September to 30th November Venue: Douglas Library, Douglas Village Shopping Centre, Cork Lecturer: Dr Kathy D’Arcy, Centre for Adult Continuing Education, UCC

Finding Your Voice: A Course in Creative Writing This short course is a fun, gentle introduction to creative writing for people of all levels of experience. We’ll take a look at the techniques often used by actors and writers to enhance their creativity, and put them into practice so that the process of having an idea, picking up a pen and beginning to write becomes enjoyable and effortless.

1.

What does ‘creative writing’ mean to you?

In the ‘Work in Progress’ sections of the course, participants will have the opportunity to bring their work to the group to be discussed in a friendly, open environment. In this way you can improve and develop your work throughout the course. We will conclude the course with a reading of work for friends and family.

2.

Idea machines! How to generate ideas

Please note: Class size is limited to 15 participants.

3.

Telling a story

4.

Work in progress

5.

Portraits: descriptive and biographical writing

6.

Work in progress

7.

Beautiful words: writing poetry

8.

Work in progress

9.

Creating the universe of the imagination

10. Work in progress and reading

http://study.ucc.ie/ace

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Short Courses 2011-2012

Fee: €230 for 10 weeks Time/Dates: Tuesday 7-9pm, 27th September to 29th November Venue: Western Gateway Building, Room 303, UCC Lecturer: Mr Tony McCarthy, Centre for Adult Continuing Education, UCC

1.

General Introduction: Source: Census Returns; Project Plan; History: First People in Ireland

2.

Source: State Registration of Births, Deaths and Marriages; Start research with the live ones; History: The Bronze Age to the Celts

3.

Sources: Catholic and Church of Ireland Parish Records; Administrative Divisions; History: St Patrick to the Vikings

Genealogy: How to Trace your Family Tree This course aims to equip attendees with the skills and information necessary to set out confidently on the ancestor trail. There are three strands to the course. Firstly, twelve important genealogical sources will be described in detail, with a focus on how to locate and use them to get information on your own ancestry. Secondly, a methodical approach to family history research will be outlined, advising how to tackle a mass of documentary material, and also suggesting how to produce a finished family tree document. Thirdly, the historical and social context necessary for a deeper understanding of our ancestors and our genealogical records will form a continuous backdrop to the course. The three strands will be intertwined to form a practical, informative and entertaining experience.

7.

Source: The Registry of Deeds; Intensive Investigations; History: The Ascendancy

4.

Source: Valuation and Poor Law Records; The Easy Options; History: The Norman/ British Conquest of Ireland

8.

Sources: Tithe Applotment Books and the Land Commission; Finishing the Job; History: O’Connell’s Ireland

5.

Sources: Wills and Administrations, Records of the Graveyard; The Matheson Report; History: The Plantations

9.

Sources: Hearth Money Rolls and the Religious Census; Assessment of Material; History: Parnell’s Ireland

6.

Source: Estate Records; Parliamentary Papers; History: The 1641 Rebellion to the Battle of the Boyne

10. Source: Miscellaneous other sources; The Final Document; History: de Valera’s Ireland

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Short Courses 2011-2011

Fee: €230 for 10 weeks Time/Dates: Thursday 7-9pm, 29th September to 1st December Venue: Western Gateway Building, Room G17, UCC Lecturer: Dr Gavin Dillon, Roinn na Sean agus Meán Ghaeilge/Dept. of Early and Medieval Irish, UCC

1.

Stories in stone: Ireland’s first literacy – Ogham

2.

Poetry and the development of the manuscript tradition

3.

The Ulster Cycle – overview, themes and key texts

4.

Táin Bó Cuailnge – “A window on the Iron Age?”

5.

The Mythological Cycle – overview, themes and key texts

6.

Cath Maige Tuired – development of Irish ‘pseudo-history’

7.

Women in Medieval Irish literature and society

8.

Religious Literature – Hagiography (the lives of the Saints)

9.

Legal Literature – introduction to Early Irish Law

Introduction to Medieval Irish Literature The Irish were the first in Western Europe to begin writing in their own language at a time when Latin was the standard language of the written word. A rich oral culture had been preserved in Ireland and was eventually written down in the medieval period, leading to a wealth of literature concerning gods, goddesses, kings, druids, poets and heroes, poetry and religious material. Despite their Christian faith, the Irish never lost a keen and consuming interest in the traditions of their ancestors. This course seeks to investigate some of this literature with a view to discussing its genesis and how it compares to European literature of the same period. A wide range of texts will be studied to provide an introduction to the rich field of Early Irish literature and culture. All material will be studied in translation. The course is primarily designed to be enjoyable and an interesting learning experience. A wide range of images will illustrate the lectures including Ogham stones, Celtic inscriptions and the illuminated manuscripts which survive to us today. These images will help to develop an appreciation for Medieval Irish literature as something that is more than mere words printed in modern books, but a vibrant art form in its own right. It is hoped that a field trip can be organised to view some stunning reproductions of the manuscripts mentioned throughout the course held in the Special Collections section of UCC’s Boole Library. It is also hoped that a short excursion will be made to view the largest collection of Ogham stones in the world, held in UCC’s ‘Stone Corridor’ in the main quadrangle.

10. End of an Era – cultural change and the arrival of the Normans http://study.ucc.ie/ace

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Short Courses 2011-2012

Fee: €190 for 8 weeks

Introduction to the Study of Folklore

Time/Dates: Tuesday 7-9pm, 27th September to 15th November

This course provides an introduction to folklore, including the history of folklore collection in Ireland and elsewhere. The classes cover Irish folklore as well as aspects of the folklore of other countries, particularly in relation to some supernatural beliefs, which can be compared to other cultural contexts. The focus is on belief, custom and narrative traditions in the Irish context. Both traditional and contemporary culture is addressed.

Venue: Western Gateway Building, Room G16, UCC Lecturer: Ms Jenny Butler, Roinn an Bhéaloidis, Department of Folklore and Ethnology, UCC

1.

Introduction – defining “Folklore” and methods of folklore collection

2.

The intellectual history of the folklore discipline

3.

Supernatural belief and legends

4.

The otherworld and fairy folklore

5.

Death and dying in traditional worldview

6.

Festivals - the Irish ritual year

7.

Ireland’s sacred landscape

8.

Urban ethnology

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Short Courses 2011-2012

Fee: €90 for 6 weeks

Irish Art from Barry to le Brocquy

Time/Dates: Thursday morning, 10.15am to 12.15pm, 29th September to 3rd November

This course explores Irish art from the eighteenth to the twenty-first century through the fascinating and distinguished careers of six Irish artists: James Barry, Daniel Maclise, John Hogan, John Lavery, Jack B Yeats and Louis le Brocquy. Not only will participants get a chance to survey Irish painting and sculpture, they will see significant events in Irish history – from the 1798 Rebellion to the Easter Rising – through the lens of Irish artists and their representation of major historical events. Fusing art and politics, this course will stimulate and inform both the viewer of Irish art and the reader of Irish history.

Venue: Crawford Art Gallery, Emmet Place, Cork Lecturer: Dr Liam Lenihan, NUI Fellow, School of English, UCC

1.

James Barry

2.

Daniel Maclise

3.

John Hogan

4.

John Lavery

5.

Jack B. Yeats

6.

Louis le Brocquy

will see significant events in Irish history – from the 1798 Rebellion to the Easter Rising – through the lens of Irish artists

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Short Courses 2011-2012

Fee: €260 for 10 weeks Time/Dates: Thursday 7-10pm, 6th October to 8th December Venue: Brookfield Health Sciences Complex, Room 104, UCC Lecturer: Mr. Thomas Riedmuller, Centre for Adult Continuing Education, UCC

1.

Active listening; basic agreements; effective feedback; ‘I’ statements; rank awareness; non-violent communication; roles in groups

2.

Leadership and facilitation

3.

Exploring motivations to lead; finding balance

4.

Consensus and other decision making techniques

5.

Proposals; agendas and other tricky details

6.

Facilitating open discussions; alternatives to open discussion; how to deal with ‘difficult individuals’

7.

Mediation; negotiation; arbitration; integrating diverse points of view

8.

Building shared frameworks of understanding

9.

Processing ‘emotional allergies’

Leadership and Conflict Resolution in Community Groups This course is designed for people who are involved in community groups and organisations wanting to improve leadership skills. It will teach you how to make meetings more efficient and enjoyable, to increase participation, inclusion and enthusiasm in your group; to reduce frictions and build teamwork, to gain confidence in your leadership ability and to avoid burnout. Each session will follow an experiential and interactive format which the participants can use in their own groups. The way the course is taught models all the skills which are part of the course contents. Participants have opportunities for presenting case studies to maximize the practical relevance of this course.

make meetings more efficient and enjoyable, increase participation, inclusion and enthusiasm in your group; reduce frictions and build teamwork, gain confidence

10. Evaluation and Implementation 28

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Short Courses 2011-2012

Fee: â‚Ź230 for 10 weeks

Life and Business Coaching

Time/Dates: Tuesday 7-9pm, 27th September to 29th November

Planning or adapting to change in life or in business is a challenge that is very prevalent in today’s society. Many face the prospect of career change, retirement, business challenges or significant life adjustments. How we handle such events in life often defines what the years ahead will be like as it challenges us to look at life in order to assess our priorities, values and goals.

Venue: Western Gateway Building, Room G09, UCC Lecturer: Mr Pat O’Leary, Centre for Adult Continuing Education, UCC

1.

Defining coaching

2.

Coaching qualities, skills and competencies

3.

Coaching and communication

4.

Values, beliefs and goal setting

5.

Cognitive-Behavioural coaching

6.

Emotional intelligence

7.

Change and leadership

8.

Business coaching

9.

Coaching psychology

Coaching, in both life and business, provides us with a structure to address change in an effective and clear manner. It empowers us to set new goals, clarify options and provide solutions to complex issues. While these skills can be put to good effect in the workplace or in assisting others to look at change in their own personal lives, selfcoaching is also a very effective tool that people use in their own lives in order to address change. In addition to learning a number of coaching skills, individuals will also be provided with an opportunity to see the benefits of coaching at a practical level by experiencing the coaching process in a structured and objective way.

10. Solution focused coaching 11. Personal / interpersonal awareness 12. Coaching ethics and best practice

http://study.ucc.ie/ace

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Short Courses 2011-2012

Fee: €230 for 10 weeks

Literature I: The Country

Time/Dates: Wednesday 7-9pm, 28th September to 30th November

Ever since Raymond Williams’ study The Country and the City, readers have become increasingly conscious of the way rural landscape and lives are represented. This course will explore different ways of thinking about and presenting aspects of the countryside, nature, landscape and rural life.

Venue: O’Rahilly Building, Room 244, UCC Lecturer: Mr Frank West, Centre for Adult Continuing Education, UCC

1.

Pastoral poetry: selections from the poetry of Hesiod, Theocritus, Virgil

2.

Walden Henry David Thoreau

3.

The Robinson films of Patrick Keiller

4.

Selections from Richard Mabey’s Unofficial Countryside and Farley and Roberts’ Edgelands

5.

The Country House poem: selections from the poetry of Ben Jonson, John Denham, Andrew Marvell

6.

That They may Face The Rising Sun John McGahern

7.

Landscape in art: the Barbizon School

8.

The Cherry Orchard Anton Chekhov

9.

Villages: selections from the poetry of Oliver Goldsmith, George Crabbe, Patrick Kavanagh

The course attempts to effect a balance between contemporary and historical works. While the emphasis is predominantly literary, it will draw on works from other media. Each class will begin with an introductory lecture. This will be followed by group discussion and debate. Supplementary material (added in response to lines of enquiry arising from class discussions) or material that is difficult to obtain will be provided either as photocopies or as online downloads. This will allow everybody to familiarise themselves with material in advance of the classes taking place. As usual, I would recommend www.abebooks.com, www. bookdepository.com and www.ebay.co.uk should you have any difficulty in sourcing material.

10. Selection of musical works chosen with reference to Rob Young’s Electronic Eden

30

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Short Courses 2011-2012

Fee: €230 for 10 weeks Time/Dates: Wednesday 7-9pm, 28th September to 30th November Venue: West Wing 6, UCC Lecturer: Mr James G.R. Cronin, Centre for Adult Continuing Education and School of History, UCC

1.

Ancient Greece: the Acropolis, Athens

2.

Ancient Rome and Byzantium: the Colosseum, Basilica of Maxentius and Hagia Sophia, Istanbul

3.

South East Asia: Angkor Wat, the Khmer style of Cambodia

4.

China: The Forbidden City

5.

Japan: Katsura Palace, Kyoto

6.

Medieval France: cathedrals of Notre Dame and Chatres

7.

Renaissance Italy: Florence Cathedral and St. Peter’s Basilica in the Vatican

8.

Nineteenth Century Britain: Royal Pavilion, Brighton, inspired by the arts of India

9.

Modernism: Le Corbusier’s Villa Savoye and Frank Lloyd Wright’s Fallingwater, Pennsylvania

Looking At Architecture: Ten Iconic Building Projects Why are buildings important? What do they reveal about our culture? What can they reveal about ourselves? This series will introduce you to the history, style and language of architecture by closely looking at ten significant building projects.

Ancient Greece…Rome and Byzantium… China…Japan…Medieval France… Renaissance…Modernism… Contemporary…

10. Contemporary: Palm and World islands, Dubai, recently described as the eighth wonder of the world http://study.ucc.ie/ace

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Short Courses 2011-2012

Fee: €150 for 10 weeks

Masterpieces from Irish Collections

Time/Dates: Wednesday, 10.30am to 12.30pm or 2.30pm to 4.30pm 28th September to 30th November

Behind every picture is a story. What makes an artwork a masterpiece? What secrets do artworks reveal about the acts of their making? This ten-part series explores the stories of masterpieces from Irish collections including Trinity College Dublin; Chester Beatty Library; National Gallery; Hugh Lane Gallery, Dublin; Hunt Museum, Limerick; University College Cork; Crawford Gallery, Cork.

Venue: Central Library, Grand Parade, Cork Lecturer: Mr James G.R. Cronin, Centre for Adult Continuing Education and School of History, UCC

1.

The Chi-Rho Page from The Book of Kells, Trinity College Dublin

2.

Rearing Horse attributed to the workshop of Leonardo da Vinci, Hunt Museum, Limerick

3.

Caravaggio The Taking of Christ, National Gallery

4.

Diego Velázquez Kitchen Maid with the Supper of Emmaus, National Gallery

5.

Muraqqa’: Imperial Albums of the Chester Beatty Library

6.

James Barry Portraits of Barry and Burke in the Characters of Ulysses and his Companion fleeing from the Cave of Polyphemus, Crawford Gallery

32

Please note: class size is limited to 25 participants.

7.

Daniel Maclise The Marriage of Aoife and Strongbow, National Gallery

8.

Zodiac from the floor mosaic, Honan Chapel, Cork

9.

John Lavery The Artist’s Studio, National Gallery

10. Sean Keating Men of the South, Crawford Gallery

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Short Courses 2011-2012

Fee: €230 for 10 weeks

Masters of the Renaissance

Time/Dates: Wednesday 7-9pm, 28th September to 30th November

What is the Renaissance and how should we characterise this period of art? Who were the masters of the Italian Renaissance and why? What makes a work a masterpiece? This course aims to explore these issues in detail through the examination of the works of a number of key artists, sculptors and architects of the period. The selected works represent the seminal pieces created in the various artistic centres in Renaissance Italy including Florence, Rome and Venice. Through the analysis of these works, it will be possible to map out the evolution of the artistic developments in this highly productive period of art history.

Venue: Brookfield Health Sciences Complex, Room 104, UCC Lecturer: Ms Elaine Hoysted, History of Art and Centre for Adult Continuing Education, UCC

1.

Introduction. The roots of the Renaissance

2.

Sacred Images - Masaccio’s Brancacci Chapel and da Fabriano’s Strozzi Altarpiece. Renaissance Architecture- the works of Alberti, Brunelleschi and Bramante

3.

Ghiberti’s Gates of Paradise. The DavidsDonatello and Andrea del Verrocchio

4.

Donatello: Orsanmichele, the Duomo and San Lorenzo

5.

Botticelli’s Birth of Venus and La Primavera. The Court Artists- Della Francesca, Mantegna and Pisanello

6.

Leonardo da Vinci-Artist, sculptor, architect and inventor

7.

Raphael and Rome

8.

Michelangelo and the Sistine Chapel

9.

The Venetian Masters- Bellini, Giorgione and Titian

key artists, sculptors and architects of the period…map out the evolution of artistic developments…

10. Conclusion. The impact of the Renaissance http://study.ucc.ie/ace

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Short Courses 2011-2012

Fee: €190 for 8 weeks Time/Dates: Wednesday 7-9pm, 28th September to 16th November Venue: Western Gateway Building, Room G13, UCC Lecturer: Ms Jane O’Sullivan, Centre for Adult Continuing Education, UCC

1.

Introduction to Irish Minuscule calligraphy MS Rawlinson B 502

2.

Other Irish Minuscule mss and continued practical calligraphy workshop on scripts

3.

Interlace and decorated initials from the “minuscule” manuscripts

4.

Irish Majuscule - introduction to the Book of Kells and its script

5.

Knotwork and Zoömorphics from Kells and Lindisfarne

6.

Personalised projects in the “majuscule” style

7.

Related hands - Anglo-Saxon and continental manuscripts

8.

Modern scribes in the Celtic Tradition, and our own interpretations

34

Medieval Irish Calligraphy These series of classes are designed to offer a blend of an “academic” and palaeographical introduction to manuscript art and calligraphy, and a “practical” workshop in learning to reproduce the styles of script studied. No previous training in either field is needed. We will be discovering and delighting in the exquisite work of medieval Irish scribes, and then - according to individual tastes and abilities - taking plume, pencil or brush in hand to enjoy creating certain letters and forms of illumination. Most basic materials are supplied (with advice on the purchase of further specialised items if desired), and NO artistic ability is required!

taking plume, pencil or brush in hand to enjoy creating certain letters and forms of illumination

http://study.ucc.ie/ace


Short Courses 2011-2012

Fee: €190 for 8 weeks

Mentoring with Young People

Time/Dates: Thursday 7-9pm, 29th September to 17th November

There is increasing interest in the development of mentoring relationships in youth and justice organisations as a model of support and development for young people. Traditionally mentoring programmes have tended to work on rather than with young people. The aim of this course is to provide a model through which Youth and Community workers can both become a mentor and introduce mentoring programmes to their agencies. Youth policy has changed recently and mentoring is now seen as a necessary part of the toolkit for anyone working with young people. Time will be given to working on the appropriateness and risks of mentoring and the relationships of friendship and kinship. Drawing from the American experience, time will also be given to the concept of resiliency and young people’s ability to manage the transition from adolescence to adulthood. ‘Mentoring with Young People’ aims to match organic and informal mentoring processes with one created by a Youth and Community agency.

Venue: Western Gateway Building, Room G16, UCC Lecturer: Mr Rory Doody, Department of Applied Social Studies and Centre for Adult Continuing Education, UCC

1.

An introduction to mentoring

2.

Promoting mentor rich environments

3.

Goals and expectations of the mentor/ mentee

4.

Skills for the mentoring relationship

5.

Mentoring and the parent/youth relationship

6.

Considerations for the application of a programme

7.

Young people and mentoring

8.

Mutual learning, reflection and supervision

http://study.ucc.ie/ace

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Short Courses 2011-2012

Fee: €230 for 10 weeks Time/Dates: Tuesday 7-9pm, 27th September to 29th November Venue: Western Gateway Building, Room G13, UCC Lecturers: Dr Alice Lucey, Dr Eibhlís O’Connor and Dr Elaine Walsh, School of Food and Nutritional Sciences, UCC

Nutrition and Health This course will provide an introduction to the basic principles of nutrition and cover different aspects of how to achieve a healthy overall balanced diet. Nutrients of concern in the Irish diet will be discussed including saturated fats, fibre, salt, omega 3 fats, calcium and vitamin D. Other areas which will be focused on include how to read and understand nutrition labels, the importance of physical activity and the risks associated with overweight and obesity and a look at some popular bio-active food components and their function.

1.

Introduction and course overview: Macronutrients – protein, carbohydrate, fat and dietary fibre, beverages

2.

Micronutrients 1: Vitamins – role, food and supplement sources, deficiency, toxicity

3.

Micronutrients 2: Minerals – role, food and supplement sources, deficiency, toxicity

4.

Food records-a look at your own diet/ eating habits discussion on Fad diets

5.

Understanding nutrition labels-how to interpret them and what are the recommendations

8.

Diet and physical activity – including calculating caloric requirements

6.

Overweight and obesity – including body measurements and health risks

9.

Dietary bio-actives – what they are and what they do

7.

Nutrition throughout the life-cycle – nutritional requirements at different life stages

10. Impact of diet on health and disease – including measurement of blood pressure

36

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Short Courses 2011-2012

Fee: €230 for 10 weeks Time/Dates: Tuesday 7-9pm, 27th September to 29th November Venue: Brookfield Health Sciences Complex, Room 304, UCC Lecturer: Mr Trevor Joyce, Centre for Adult Continuing Education, UCC

Parallel Worlds: How to Build them with Words. A Course in Creative and Imaginative Writing This course will present an unorthodox and unsentimental approach to creative writing. Literary writing is distinguished from other sorts in that it’s not what is said that matters, but how it’s said. The language is there not simply to communicate some message, but to intrigue, affect, provoke, surprise and satisfy the reader. This course will present many examples from a wide range of writing, focusing mainly but not exclusively on poetry and short prose. The examples discussed will be from many languages and cultures, generally unfamiliar, and always selected both for instruction and for pleasure, and many will be presented by way of recorded performances. The aim is to get the aspiring writer to unlearn the routines of standard communicative writing, and to play instead with the textures and colours of language. The emphasis will be on learning literary techniques, but always justified by enjoyment of the pleasures of the text. Participants will be encouraged to try out new ideas between sessions, and a limited time will be given over each week to discussion of this work.

1.

Words tamed and in the wild: investigating the many varieties of words, how to identify and use their similarities and differences

2.

Making strange: abandoning routine and envisioning the world anew

3.

The same again (or is it?): repetition and the beginnings of form

4.

The virtues of uncertainty: questions, too much information, the wrong information, no information at all

5.

Making form do the work: parallels and divergences in words, characters, plots

6.

Not just short works writ large: how longer works are constructed

7.

Crime reports and histories, travelogues and recipes: the literary use of non-literary forms

9.

8.

“I load myself with chains and try to get out of them”: the freedom of constraint

10. Originality and tradition: strange bedfellows

Translation, found poetry, assemblage: how to incorporate the sea of language that surrounds you

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Short Courses 2011-2012

Fee: €290 for 12 weeks Time/Dates: Tuesday 7-10pm, 4th October to 13th December Venue: Western Gateway Building, Room G04, UCC Lecturer: Mr Stephen Bean, Centre for Adult Continuing Education, UCC

1.

Technical overview

2.

Dark objects

3.

Silver

4.

Glass

5.

Product lighting

6.

Day for night

7.

Daylight and Tungsten/mixed lighting

8.

Jewellery

9.

The polarize

10. Time of day and mixed lighting and how to balance daylight with flash

Photographic Lighting: Master Class Photographic Lighting Master Class is a hands-on, practical workshop that teaches students professional-level lighting skills. This series of highly practical workshops will provide hands-on experience for any photographer wanting to learn the basics of how to use photographic lighting. Numbers are limited to allow close personal attention. Through practical demonstrations, hands-on exercises, assignments and inclass activities, students master the art and science of photographic lighting, shadow, contrast, diffusion and colour. Students will be guided to a new level of competence in creative lighting under a variety of real world circumstances, including commercial, pack shots, specialized lighting effects, etc. The course is entirely hands-on. Skills learnt during this course will be gained during the weekly work-shops. Work-shop content will include: • The differences between tungsten and strobe lighting • Softboxes, umbrellas, spots and French flags • Why automatic exposure does not always work and why use manual mode using a light meter to determine the exposure and using the histogram • Taking strobe light pictures • How to control shadows with various lighting options • Practical approaches to product lighting • Tips on how to get started on a budget will be provided during the course • General studio design and safety • Questions and answers

11. Shadow 12. Experimental lighting

38

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Short Courses 2011-2012

Requirements: What you need to bring with you: • A camera - a DSLR is recommended but an SLR or a compact that includes a manual mode can also be used. • If you have any extra lenses or an external flash bring them with you. • A note pad and pen to record notes, tips and camera settings etc. • Your camera instructions, you may need them. • Ensure you have sufficient charged batteries/spare batteries and memory cards. • Own camera essential. Please note: Participants must have previously taken a Centre for Adult Continuing Education Digital Photography course. Class size is limited to 20 participants.

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Short Courses 2011-2012

Fee: €290 for 12 weeks Time/Dates: Wednesday 7-10pm, 5th October to 14th December Venue: Western Gateway Building, Room G15, UCC Lecturer: Mr Stephen Bean, Centre for Adult Continuing Education, UCC

1.

Explore the Photoshop interface so you understand navigation of the program and how to access its powerful features

2.

Learn about type of images, using file formats correctly, storing images, and working with color management

3.

Simplify your approach to editing by using the Essential Tool Box

4.

Practice applying the easy techniques you learn on your own images, and gets results every time

5.

Each lesson has been designed to cover key features and shortcuts of Photoshop

6.

The course covers all the basic concepts and tools you need to edit and enhance your own images

40

Photoshop for Beginners Photoshop for beginners is a hands on practical course designed for people who have little or no experience in using this software application. Photoshop is used for editing, enhancing and manipulating digital images or even for creating new images from scratch. At a very basic level photoshop allows you to adjust or repair any aspect of your image. If an image is too light or too dark, or has a scratch, you can use the photoshop controls to improve the picture. Over the years Photoshop has developed as one of the world’s most powerful digital tools and is a very versatile program. Photoshop may be used by people from many different professions: photography, print industry, web and graphic designers, forensic investigation, medicine, and a lot more! Students will become confident and proficient working with basic elements of Photoshop.   Course requirements: Basic computer competency and familiarity with computers is required. This means using a computer for 6 months or more. For example, you must be able to use a mouse, and have a basic understanding of file management (understand how to transfer images from your camera, delete files, copy and move to different folders). Please note: Class size is limited to 20 participants.

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Short Courses 2011-2012

Fee: €190 for 8 weeks Time/Dates: Tuesday 7-9pm, 27th September to 15th November Venue: Western Gateway Building, Room G02, UCC Lecturer: Dr Liam Lenihan, NUI Fellow, School of English, UCC

Secrets and Lies: Spy Fiction from Bond to Blunt This course looks at four famous examples of spy fiction to examine modern fiction’s exploration of the relationship between politics and art. The course begins with the layering and complication of the spy-as-hero in Cold War fiction, namely Ian Fleming’s James Bond in From Russia With Love (1957) and John Le Carré’s George Smiley in Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy (1974). It then moves to the postmodern paranoia of Don DeLillo’s novel about code breaking and cults in The Names (1982). It concludes with John Banville’s representation of the real spy, Anthony Blunt, in the shape of his fictional creation, Victor Maskell in The Untouchable (1997). Here Banville portrays the spy as an artist and deception as an art that is not merely political, but artistic, cultural, emotional and sexual. Throughout the course the spy will be examined as a liminal figure who is continually re-created and adapted for the anxieties of the era. Reading • Ian Fleming, From Russia With Love (1957), London: Penguin, 2004. • John Le Carré, Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy (1974), London: Penguin, 2010. • Don DeLillo, The Names (1982), London: Vintage, 1989. • John Banville, The Untouchable (1997), London: Picador, 2010.

the spy will be examined as a liminal figure

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41


Short Courses 2011-2012

Fee: €135 for 9 weeks Time/Dates: Tuesday morning, 10.00am to 12.15pm, 4th October to 29th November Venue: Central Library, Grand Parade, Cork Lecturer: Professor Emeritus Éamonn Ó Carragáin, School of English, UCC

1.

Beginnings of Rome: from Republic to Empire

2.

Religions in Ancient Rome: Roman state religion, mystery religions, early Christianity. The tomb of St Peter and the art of the catacombs

3.

Constantine and the fall of the Roman Empire: St Peter’s and the other Christian basilicas

4.

Papal Rome and its relations with Constantinople and with Northern Europe. Rome and the Atlantic Islands of Britain and Ireland. The Carolingian Renaissance. The Holy Roman Empire and the Papacy during the Middle Ages

5.

The early Renaissance: architecture, sculpture and painting: the ideals of Renaissance Humanism

6.

The High Renaissance: Raphael and his contemporaries; sixteenth century perspective views of Rome

42

The City of Rome: An Introduction This short course provides a practical introduction to the history and layout of the City of Rome. Rome has existed for three thousand years, and for over two thousand years it has been central to the ways in which Europeans imagined what a city was, and what their civilisation was about. To get to know this city is to become familiar with architecture, painting and sculpture from every major period, and with some of the central political and religious ideas which have created, and troubled, European civilisation. The course will be illustrated by some 3,000 PowerPoint images of the city and its monuments. Depending on demand, it is hoped to organise a Study Tour of the city at the time of the Befana (Epiphany) holiday in early January 2012. The course is designed for those who have been to Rome and want to make sense of what they saw; for those who have never been to Rome and want to prepare for a visit; and for armchair travellers who simply want to imagine what the major monuments of the city look like, and the ideas (political and religious) which inspired them. The morning lectures will be supplemented by two evening lectures (dates to be announced) on Michelangelo and Rome, concentrating on the Sistine Chapel. The two evening lectures will be open to members of the course, and also to a wider public. Please note: Class size is limited to 25 participants.

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Short Courses 2011-2012

PUBLIC LECTURES, Open Not Only To The Class, But Also To A Wider Public [each lecture two hours]: 1. The Sistine Chapel I, from Botticelli to Michelangelo. 2. The Sistine Chapel II: Michelangelo and Rome.

7.

From Caravaggio to Bernini: architecture, sculpture and painting in CounterReformation Rome

8.

Rome and the Grand Tour: Piranesi and Canova; Napoleon and Rome; Irish artists, the Romantic poets, and the city. Special study: the Canova casts in the Crawford art gallery. Rome as an inspiration for the work of James Barry (1741-1806) and John Hogan (1800-1858)

9.

From Papal City to Capital of Italy: Rome in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Descriptions of Rome by Stendhal, Dickens, Henry James, Elizabeth Bowen, Seรกn ร“ Faolรกin

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Short Courses 2011-2012

Fee: â‚Ź230 for 10 weeks Time/Dates: Tuesday 7-9pm, 27th September to 29th November Venue: Brookfield Health Sciences Complex, Room 243, UCC Lecturers: Dr Maureen Griffin, Dr Sharon Lambert and Dr Ciara Staunton, Department of Applied Psychology, UCC

1.

An introduction to theories of criminal behaviour

2.

Understanding mentally disordered and personality disordered offenders

3.

Paedophiles, hebephiles and internet sex offenders

4.

Assessment and treatment of serious sexual and violent offenders

5.

Police psychology and eyewitness testimony

6.

A special look at female sexual abusers

7.

The psychology of stalking and harassment

8.

The psychology of serial killers and mass murderers

9.

Investigating crime using behavioural investigative advice

The Criminal Mind: An Introduction to Forensic and Criminal Psychology This course will be of interest to anyone from novices to professionals within the legal system who have an interest in violent and criminal behaviour. Over 10 weeks the course will consider the criminal mind from a psychological perspective by addressing the various theories presented by criminology and forensic psychology. Participants will gain an understanding and insight into the relationship between psychology and crime by considering the deviant behaviours of child molesters, paedophiles, rapists and murderers.

10. Interviewing offenders and detecting deception 44

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Short Courses 2011-2012

The Story of Irish food

Fee: €230 for 10 weeks Time/Dates: Tuesday 7-9pm, 27th September to 29th November

Ireland produces some of the world’s best food and high quality ingredients. The Irish food industry has remained buoyant despite recession. Yet the history of food in Ireland holds a low and frail profile and tends to be dominated by the malign influence of the potato and the persistent notion that Ireland’s traditional food is simple and borne of poverty. As a result attitudes to Ireland’s food heritage and history remain ambiguous making any foundation for the development of an Irish food identify unstable. (Ireland, for example, has but 4 European labels of provenance and protection (PDOs/PGIs/TSG) making us near bottom of the class in comparison to other European countries) This short course therefore sets out to tell the story of Irish food from the prehistoric period to contemporary times. It will question why we tend to be confused about our food identity and culture. It is hoped that in understanding the history and development of Irish food patterns that we might revise our view and instead see Ireland’s food story as one of the most interesting in Europe.

Venue: O’Rahilly Building, Room 255, UCC Lecturer: Ms Regina Sexton, Centre for Adult Continuing Education, UCC

1.

All wild things- food before farming: mesolithic food patterns

2.

An element of food security?: the arrival of farming

3.

Coarse, salty, milky- breads, porridge, cheese and milk: the food staples of Early Medieval Ireland and their socioeconomic importance

The course will also include a field trip to Cork’s Old English Market.

4.

Spice and sauce, pies and swans- exotic new introductions and innovations: the Anglo Normans and their dietary influences

5.

Elizabethan tastes and Ireland. Case study: the potato

8.

6.

The grandeur of the Estate-food, dining and recipes in the country house. The first recipe books - case study the Birr manuscript receipt (recipe) book and the Clonbrock manuscript receipt book

Feasting and fasting in Ireland. The Irish food year

9.

Food in twentieth century Ireland and the emergence of the Irish cookery bookFlorence Irwin, Maura Laverty, Monica Sheridan and Myrtle Allen

Nineteenth century Ireland: the poor, the privileged and the secure in-between

10. Food issues in contemporary Ireland

7.

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Short Courses 2011-2012

Fee: â‚Ź230 for 10 weeks Time/Dates: Thursday 7-9pm, 29th September to 1st December Venue: Western Gateway Building, Room G13, UCC Lecturer: Dr Eva McMullan, School of Music, UCC

1.

Introducing Medieval music

2.

Rituals and Royalty: music, power and ceremony in the Baroque Period

3.

The reign of Bach and Handel

4.

Introducing the symphony

5.

Mozart: the man and the artist

6.

An invitation to opera

7.

The last romantic: the piano music of Rachmaninoff

8.

Classical music in the Twentieth Century: tradition and innovation

9.

Understanding contemporary society through popular music

Understanding Music: An Introduction to Music Appreciation This course is designed to introduce contrasting musical styles and genres that have existed throughout the history of Western Classical Music. The aim of the course is to create an awareness of the particular musical styles themselves, and to identify the contrasting cultural contexts in which the selected works were composed. Each lecture will comprise of two parts. The first part will be dedicated to learning about a particular period in musical history, while the second part will include listening and responding to some of the most popular works from the genre being studied.

10. Music and other arts (visual art, architecture, literature)

46

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Short Courses 2011-2012

Fee: €170 for 7 weeks Time/Dates: Tuesday 7-9pm, 27th September to 1st November

Vienna: City of Dreams •

The Danube and the beginnings of Vienna: the Danube, one of the most important rivers and trade and pilgrim routes in Europe, has shaped Vienna’s fate. The city evolved from Celtic oppidum to a Roman town and, eventually, to a medieval capital. During the Middle Ages it became a stop-over to Constantinople and the Holy Land and saw Crusaders and pilgrims alike. The Irish saint Colman suffered martyrdom there and he is now buried at the Benedictine abbey of Melk overlooking the Danube. The 1000th anniversary of his death will be commemorated in 2012.

The Middle Ages in Vienna: patronage and piety: the elevation of Austria to a duchy in the 12th century saw the beginnings of the Irish monastery at Vienna. The lecture will discuss the connections between the monastery and Ireland and look at the written documents still surviving in the archives. The medieval treasures of the Imperial museums are one of the world’s most important ensemble of artifacts.

The Irish ‘Wild Geese’ in Baroque Austria: following the Battle of Kinsale and the Treaty of Limerick, many Irish nobles had to leave Ireland in order to look for career options in the Roman Catholic Imperial armies in Europe. Over the course of the 17th and 18th centuries, the Austro-Hungarian Empire became the home of many Irishmen who advanced to high positions. Many of the castles and great houses of these Irishmen, who often married into the Austrian aristocracy, are still accessible today.

Venue: Brookfield Health Sciences Complex, Room 242, UCC Lecturers: Dr Dagmar Ó Riain-Raedel, Centre for Adult Continuing Education, UCC, Dr Eva McMullan, School of Music, UCC, Mr James G.R. Cronin, Centre for Adult Continuing Education and School of History, UCC

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Short Courses 2011-2012

48

Beethoven and the Construction of a Musical Genius: musical Politics in Vienna. Inspired by a publication by Tia DeNora, this lecture will include an exploration of the important role Viennese Classicism had in helping to both formulize and shape European music. Focusing specifically on selected instrumental and vocal compositions of Haydn, Mozart, and Beethoven, the significance of their compositional approaches and how they resounded throughout European countries will be fore-grounded. In addition, the special position Beethoven held within this HaydnMozart-Beethoven trinity will help to depict the musical politics which dominated society during what has become widely known as the First Viennese School.

Vienna, centre of the Austria-Hungarian Empire and a Place of Power: politics and architecture. The 19th century saw an architectural revival of Vienna and many of the official buildings now gracing the city come from this time. The style chosen expressed the ambitions of the empire and these can be compared with other such Places of Power as Rome, Paris, Berlin.

Tales from the Vienna Woods Op. 325 (Geschichten aus dem Wienerwald) entitles one of the most famous waltzes composed by Johann Strauss II. The waltz was an exciting new dance that emerged and flourished with the musical talent of Johann Strauss and his son during the nineteenth century. Evolving from the traditional Ländler which was played by small groups in the inns near the Vienna Woods, it became one of the most fashionable dance tunes throughout Europe. The popularity of the waltz led to the establishment of the famous Viennese Balls which reflected unique cultural and social cohesion. This lecture will include a focused study on the waltz music of the Strauss Family, Josef Lanner and Johann Hummel.

Art nouveau/Jugendstil/ Art Déco, Secession.

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Short Courses 2011-2012

Fee: €150 for 10 weeks Time/Dates: Thursday morning, 10.30am to 12.30pm, 29th September to 1st December Venue: Tory Top Road Library, Ballyphehane, Cork Lecturer: Ms Colette Olney, Centre for Adult Continuing Education, UCC

Ways and Means with Words: A Course in Creative Writing This creative writing course aims to persuade potential writers to attempt the craft, while also offering encouragement, new impetus and direction to already practicing writers. Over a period of ten, weekly two-hour sessions, participants will investigate writers and writing using a variety of texts. The course will cover factual and fiction writing, taking in several genres and will consider the specific demands of writing a story, a poem, memoir and scripts for media. It will encourage and equip writers with technique, and tackle issues such as what to write and “writers’ block”. It will probe options, assist with invention, character portrayal, plot making, and the writing of dialogue. The course will also examine poetry’s power and debunk some unhelpful myths. Exercises and assignments to “grease the wheels” will be proposed and course participants will be given regular opportunities to experiment, share and discuss their work. The course will also suggest reading material and issue handouts.

1.

The world of words. What writers say about writing. Ways to start. The writer’s tools. Sampling of genres

2.

The habit of writing. The use of notebooks. The notion of inspiration

3.

What to write. Planning and plotting. Triggering exercises

4.

Unblocking the “block”. Attending to place, memory, details, feelings. Creating credible characters. Play-acting to imagine. Scene-setting

5.

The nuts and bolts of good writing; a close look at technique. Points of view – who is telling the story? Trusting your narrator

6.

Minding your language. Finding the right words. Writing to be read. First lines

7.

Syntax, grammar. The rules and reasons to break them. Ambiguity and context. Striking registers

9.

8.

Listening to yourself. Style and tone. Emotional accuracy

10. Clarity, accuracy, and honesty. Using fact in fiction. Ways into print. Publishing

Please note: Class size is limited to 15 participants.

Your voice. Your genre/s of choice. Staying on track

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Short Courses 2011-2012

Fee: €190 for 8 weeks

What Happened to the Parlour?

Time/Dates: Wednesday 7-9pm, 28th September to 16th November

We take houses and the idea of home for granted, as indeed we should, and to a large degree, we assume that both are unchanging, which they are not.

Venue: Brookfield Health Sciences Complex, Room 242, UCC Lecturer: Ms Mary Colette Sheehan, Centre for Adult Continuing Education, UCC

1.

Developments in the history of house building. Why don’t Irish houses have basements?

2.

The emergence of rooms; tracking changes in the use of private and public space

3.

An historical survey of decoration and style. What are the influential factors that cause them to change?

4.

A survey of movements: Classical, Baroque, Empire, Belle Époque

5.

A survey of movements: Art Nouveau, Art Deco, Modernism and Post Modernism

6.

The meaning of Home

7.

Home movies – the reel deal. A view of home as depicted in some select movies

8.

The Irish House and Home: our Great Houses, the Big House, the Georgian Terrace, the cottage and the new-builds

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The house, in construction and configuration, has greatly evolved over time according to needs and opportunities, as has, in less obvious ways, the idea and function of the house as home. By looking at developments in architecture and changes in style and decoration since the 17th century, this series of lectures investigates the changes in the composition of the house and in tandem, explores our changing understanding of the concept of home. The lectures will be richly visual and insightful in investigating a hitherto underexplored aspect of social and material culture.

We take houses and the idea of home for granted,…we assume that both are unchanging, which they are not

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Short Courses 2011-2012

Fee: €230 for 10 weeks

Women, Gender and War

Time/Dates: Thursday 7-9pm, 29th September to 1st December

This course will look at women in wars and conflict today. It will discuss the impact of war and conflict on women’s lives by examining torture, mass rape, genocide, and experiences of refugees.

Venue: Western Gateway Building, Room G04, UCC Lecturer: Ms Rola (Hamed) Abu Zeid-O’Neill, Department of Sociology and Centre for Adult Continuing Education, UCC

1.

General introduction and overview of course

2.

Women and the military

3.

Femininity, motherhood and war

4.

Women and nationalism - where are the women?

5.

Armed conflict impacts on women – women refugees

6.

Class, gender, race and sexuality in the military

7.

Sexual violence, sexual politics and the militarized state

8.

War, conflicts and international law

9.

Women’s resistance in times of war and conflict

This course will analyse the strategies used by women in opposing war and conflict, and the impact of war prevention, peacekeeping, and post-war reconstruction. Each class will discuss examples and cases from Africa, Asia, Europe, and the Middle East.

Women in wars and conflict today… strategies used by women in opposing war and conflict,

10. Concluding remarks and evaluation

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Short Courses 2011-2012

Fee: On application for 10 weeks Time/Dates: Thursday 6.30-9.30pm, 6th October to 15th December Venue: The Glen Resource and Activity Centre, The Glen, Cork Lecturers: Ms Fiona O’Sullivan and Ms Imelda Kelly, Centre for Adult Continuing Education, UCC

1.

Introduction to youth and community work and physical activity

2.

Lifespan development (an exploration of development from the stages of birth to old age)

3.

Models of youth and community work

4.

Approaches to physical activation

5.

Group work skills

6.

Working with diversity

7.

Presentation skills and reflective work

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Youth and Community Work through Physical Activity The course focuses on the interplay between physical activity and youth and community work skills and the interaction between the two skills sets in working with young people and communities. Youth and Community Work and Sports Coaching/Facilitation are traditionally seen as distinct areas of expertise but each discipline draws on skills sets used commonly in the other area. This course is designed for those currently working or interested in working with a wide range of groups based in the community who use physical activities for developmental and/or activation purposes with groups and who are interested in developing their own skills and knowledge to work more effectively with groups. This is an experiential programme which combines theory with practical sessions.

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September/October 2011 Short Courses Application Form Tear out and Return to: Short Course Co-ordinator, Centre for Adult Continuing Education, UCC Application for Courses Commencing September/October 2011 must be received before Monday 19 September 2011 Name: Address:

Telephone/Mobile No. Email Address: Course Title: Second Course Choice (if first is full or not proceeding) Payment Accepted by Cheque/Postal Order/ Bank Draft (made payable to University College Cork). Payment by Credit/debit card can be made by calling to the centre during normal office hours. Amount: â‚Ź Office Use Only Amount: Date: Receipt notes:


Short Course 2011-2012

Claire O’Flynn

Introducing Opera January See page 90

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‘The lecture sessions were stimulating, enlightening and interesting. I liked the atmosphere created by the lecturer in his humorous delivery of the historical, cultural and musical background pertaining to the chosen opera and composer for each week. Nyle Wolfe’s approach was outreaching and inclusive and interspersing the lecture with operatic arias made it all the more enjoyable. The course offered a very broad outline in/to? The field of opera. The course appealed both to those who were new to the world of opera and those who were already familiar with the art form. Nyle Wolfe had the gift of imparting his knowledge and his lectures were impassioned and refreshing.’

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Short Courses 2011-2012

Short Courses January 2012 A City of Steps and Steeples: Cork’s Architectural Heritage

57

A Lasting Peace – The Struggle to Reconcile A Conflicted World

58

A Psychological Understanding of Childhood and Adolescence

59

Advanced Digital Photography

61

An Introduction to Educational Psychotherapy

62

An Introduction to Growing for the Home Garden

64

Are you Ready?: Building your own Portfolio

65

Beginners Digital Photography

66

Berlin City: Historical, Political and Cultural Perspectives

67

Communication Skills for the New Media Age - Intermediate

68

Communication Skills for the New Media Age - Introduction

69

Conflict and Controversy: An Introduction to Irish Theatre

70

Decorative Horticulture: A Basic Introduction

71

Employment Law

72

Finding Your Voice: A Course in Creative Writing

73

Genealogy: How to Trace your Family Tree

74

India: Past, Present and Future

75

Introduction to the Study of Folklore

76

Life and Business Coaching

77

Literature II: The City

78

Masterpieces from the National Galleries of Scotland morning

79

Masterpieces from the National Galleries of Scotland afternoon

79

Mediation - Help Others to Resolve Conflict

80

Medieval Continental Calligraphy

81

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Short Courses 2011-2012

Memoir, Autobiography and the Literature of Witness

82

Nutrition and Health

83

Palestinian Citizens of Israel: Between ‘Democratic’ and ‘Jewish’ State

84

Parallel Worlds: How to Build Them with Words A Course in Creative and Imaginative Writing

85

Photoshop for Beginners

86

Supervision in the Helping Professions

87

Sustainability and Sustainable Development: Principles, Concepts, Values and Techniques for Transformation

88

The Changing Face of Opera; 1860s to 1960s

90

The City of Venice

91

The Criminal Mind: An Introduction to Forensic and Criminal Psychology

92

The Culture of the “Big House”: Art and Culture of the Anglo-Irish

93

The Media World: Friend or Foe: Children’s Experiences of Media

94

and the Opportunities and Threats posed

56

The Renaissance Woman: Myth or Reality?

95

Ulysses

96

Understanding Music: An Introduction to Music Appreciation

97

Working with Challenging Behaviour in Young People

98

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Short Courses 2011-2012

Fee: €230 for 10 weeks Time/Dates: Wednesday 10.15am to 12.15pm, 25th January to 28th March Venue: West Wing 6, UCC Lecturer: Mr James G.R. Cronin, Centre for Adult Continuing Education and School of History, UCC

A City Of Steps And Steeples: Cork’s Architectural Heritage Cork has long been a place of commercial importance, largely due to the excellence of its harbour. The city’s narrow alleys, waterways and Georgian architecture give it a distinctly Continental Feel. Many of the city’s leading families became known as the ‘merchant princes’ of Cork due to their power, prestige and money. The city is dominated by the river Lee which separates into two channels creating an island in the centre where most of the city centre is built. This short course offers a survey of Cork’s architectural and cultural heritage with an emphasis on acquiring the skills used in local history studies. Topics will include: a survey of Cork’s built environment from the Middle Ages to the present; Cork during the Tudor and Elizabethan Reformations; the development of Cork during eighteenth century Georgian period; High Victorian Cork; the contemporary city. Buildings surveyed include: Royal Yacht Club, Cobh; St. Colman’s Cathedral, Cobh; St. Finbarr’s Cathedral, Cork; St. Peter and Paul’s, Paul St., Cork; Honan Chapel, University College Cork; Butter Exchange; English Market; Shandon and Christ the King, Turner’s Cross. Regina Sexton, food historian, will present a lecture on the food traditions of Cork. The lecture series ends with a walking tour of Cork.

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Short Courses 2011-2012

Fee: €230 for 10 weeks Time/Dates: Tuesday 7-9pm, 24th January to 27th March Venue: Western Gateway Building, Room G15 Lecturer: Mr Anthony Angelini, Centre for Adult Continuing Education, UCC

1.

Introduction, the development of Human Rights Theory

2.

The United Nations: from inception to present day

3.

The roots of conflict in society

4.

Genocide and the Genocide Convention

5.

Humanitarian intervention – a contradiction in terms?

6.

Blackhawk down – Somalia and Africa’s world war

7.

Iraq, Afghanistan and the Theory of Just War

8.

From slavery to presidency: the struggle against racism

9.

Gandhi and the history of nonviolent action

A Lasting Peace – The Struggle to Reconcile A Conflicted World This course will examine the processes that drive conflict and human rights abuses and the methods used to resolve them. Specific case studies and current events will be investigated and contrasted to detect any underlying patterns. The development of a global human rights consciousness and its ongoing role in reducing conflict will also be discussed.

development of a global human rights consciousness and its ongoing role in reducing conflict

10. The road to forgiveness: post conflict reconciliation and development

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Short Courses 2011-2012

Fee: €230 for 10 weeks Time/Dates: Tuesday 7-9pm, 24th January to 27th March Venue: Brookfield Health Sciences Complex, Room 301, UCC Lecturer: Dr Elmarie Egan-Sage, Centre for Adult Continuing Education, UCC

A Psychological Understanding of Childhood and Adolescence The course is based on a parenting model that aims to promote the child’s self-esteem and confidence, thereby enhancing the parentchild relationship.  The ten sessions will be intellectually stimulating, entertaining and emotionally nurturing.  There will be time allocated each week for open discussion.  Weeks One and Two: The Child’s History We will briefly explore how historical definitions of childhood continue to influence our child rearing practices.  The child’s family is their personal history.  We will examine how family patterns persist through the generations.  Some transgenerational problems will be explored.  Sibling rivalry and other areas of conflict will be addressed. The family is a System and we will examine how some family systems become dysfunctional. Weeks Three and Four: Child Development Theory We will glance at the development theories of Bowlby, Montessori, Erikson, Freud, Piaget and Social Learning Theory.  We will use these theories to understand the meaningfulness of children’s behaviour such as tantrums, moodiness and phobias.  We will look at gender roles, parenting styles, communication training and problem solving. Week Five: School This will include learning difficulties, special needs, giftedness, teasing, bullying, self-esteem, confidence and the healthy expression of anger.

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Short Courses 2011-2012

Week Six: Adolescence Whilst much of the course relates to adolescence, this session does so exclusively.  Issues include stages of adolescence, eating distress (bulimia, anorexia, bingeing etc), alcohol and drug use, mental health problems, idealism. Weeks Seven, Eight and Nine: Some Childhood Problems This will include phobias, panic attacks, anxiety (separation and generalized), post traumatic stress, sleep problems, disruptive behaviour, oppositional defiant disorder, obsessive compulsive disorders, somatic complaints, depression, Asperger’s syndrome, autism, depression, abuse and neglect.  Effects of bereavement, separation and divorce will also be examined. Week Ten: Closure We will discuss the Life Cycle. We will explore our own “inner child”.  The course will be brought to a close.     

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http://study.ucc.ie/ace


Short Courses 2011-2012

Fee: €230 for 10 weeks

Advanced Digital Photography

Time/Dates: Monday 7-9pm, 23rd January to 26th March

Advanced Digital Photography is about understanding technology, effective implementation and achieving the results one envisions. Skills are necessary to overcome the barrier that machinery poses between you and great results. This short course allows you develop, in practical terms, the concepts of photography learnt in the Beginners Digital Photography course.

Venue: Western Gateway Building, Room G16, UCC Lecturer: Mr. Stephen Bean, Centre for Adult Continuing Education, UCC

1.

Lighting overview

2.

Camera subject distance

3.

Keystone and perspective

4.

Lighting part 2

5.

Vectors

6.

Night photography

7.

Lighting part 3

8.

Time lapse and medium length exposures

9.

Chroma Key

Please note: class size is limited to 20 participants. Requirements: What you need to bring with you: • It is advisable that students have completed the Beginners Digital Photography short course or a course of similar standard. • A camera - a DSLR is recommended but an SLR or a compact that includes a manual mode can also be used. • If you have any extra lenses or an external flash bring them with you. • A note pad and pen to record notes, tips and camera settings etc. • Your camera instructions, you may need them. • Ensure you have sufficient charged batteries/spare batteries and memory cards. • Own camera essential.

10. Lighting part 4

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Short Courses 2011-2012

Fee: €230 for 10 weeks Time/Dates: Tuesday 7-9pm, 24th January to 27th March Venue: Brookfield Health Sciences Complex, Room G18, UCC Lecturer: Ms Marie Delaney, Centre for Adult Continuing Education, UCC

1.

Introduction: what is Educational Psychotherapy? Its origins, theoretical influences and applications to learning

2.

Psychodynamic theories: understanding the theory of unconscious processes blocking learning and affecting behaviour; Anna Freud and Bion

3.

Attachment, behaviour and learning: attachment theory and how it can help understand a child’s behaviour and approach to learning; the triangle of adult, task and relationship; Bowlby and Main

4.

Dealing with challenging behaviour and the ‘unteachable child’: practical strategies for the classroom; links with emotional literacy

5.

Therapeutic storywriting: how to use published stories and create stories with children to explore difficult feelings and facilitate change; Bettelheim and Sutherland

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An Introduction to Educational Psychotherapy Educational Psychotherapy is a branch of child psychotherapy which focuses on improving a child’s educational achievement. This 10-week course will give an introduction to Educational Psychotherapy and the emotional factors affecting the learning processes and behaviour of children. Learning can be affected by trauma such as loss, separation, bereavement, domestic violence, parental mental illness, parental drug or alcohol addiction and displacement from the family home. Other children may experience none of these major traumas but have underlying and often unconscious concerns inhibiting their learning.

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Short Courses 2011-2012

The course will offer theoretical insight and practical strategies for helping children and young people overcome blocks to learning. It will be of interest to those working with young people in education, youth work and care settings as well as parents and carers. Please note this course does not qualify participants to practise as Educational Psychotherapists. It is a short taster course for participants to get an introductory overview of the field. 6.

The uses of play: Winnicott’s theories of play; the importance of recognising and developing stages of play to give ‘second-chance’ learning

7.

Effects of loss and trauma on learning: bereavement, domestic violence, parental mental illness

8.

Emotional blocks to reading: understanding the child who cannot bear to read and strategies which help

9.

Beginnings, transitions and endings: understanding the deep feelings aroused at times of change and how to help children deal with these

10. An Educational Psychotherapy approach to assessment: putting it all together and devising future work; participants will be asked to reflect on a young person they know

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Short Courses 2011-2012

Fee: â‚Ź190 for 8 weeks Time/Dates: Tuesday 7-9pm, 24th January to 13th March Venue: Brookfield Health Sciences Complex, Room 104, UCC Lecturer: Dr Linda Foley, Centre for Adult Continuing Education, UCC

1.

The garden site

2.

Identifying your soil

3.

Improving and maintaining your soil (composting etc)

4.

Container gardening

5.

Crop rotation including plant families

6.

Companion planting, biological control of pests

7.

The basics of organic fruit growing

8.

Garden troubles

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An Introduction To Growing For The Home Garden This edible garden course will introduce you to the basics of growing fruit and vegetables. It will cover the siting of your plants, the tools you need to get started and the best crops to start with. It will introduce you to the principles of organic gardening such as soil health, crop rotation and biological control. This course will include container gardening, under-cover (polytunnel) gardening and raised bed gardening so that whether you have an acre or a patio you will be able to grow some food for your table. The aim of this course is to provide you with the knowledge and the confidence to grow food for your own table – food that will not have chemicals sprayed on it, food that will not have travelled thousands of miles to get to you and food that will be the freshest and tastiest that you have ever experienced.

whether you have an acre or a patio you will be able to grow some food for your table.

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Short Courses 2011-2012

Fee: €190 for 8 weeks Time/Dates: Tuesday 7-9pm, 24th January to 13th March Venue: Brookfield Health Sciences Complex, Room 242, UCC Lecturers: Dr Mary Wilson and Ms Deirdre Quirke, School of Applied Social Studies, UCC

1.

Introducing the context: transition and reflection. Introduction and orientation to the programme. Aims, objectives and methodology. Building the learning community

2.

Biography and universal themes in the life cycle. Introduction to core texts; experiential and portfolio learning

3.

Transition and identity: storying the life cycle. The role of literature and narrative in mapping life stages and turning points

4.

Managing uncertainty and risk. Experiential aspects of transition

5.

Reflective enquiry and lifelong learning. Finding creative solutions: identifying participant’s own significant texts

6.

Portfolio presentation. Participants select and present an example of life transition

7.

Portfolio presentation. Participants select and present an example of life transition

8.

Summarative analysis. Process and context and implications for future learning

Are you Ready?: Building your Own Portfolio Are you in transition? If you can answer yes to that question you may wish to join us in discovering better ways of using this experience to your advantage. If you are at a turning point in your life or considering a major life change we are offering an opportunity to develop creative responses to your challenges. We believe that the best way to prepare for uncertain times is to transition to something new. The format of sessions will incorporate a theoretical orientation to life stages and biography; portfolio making, reflective enquiry and creativity as the principal tools for enhanced management of transition and change. Participants will be provided with the necessary skills to construct a portfolio documenting past experiences, current challenges and future possibilities, while learning and applying skills in self presentation, peer mentoring and peer support. Reading List • MYSELF and other more important matters, Charles Handy • Expecting Adam, Martha Beck • The life of Pi, Yann Martel • The Year of Magical Thinking, Joan Didion • Unsung Hero, Michael Smith • Texts chosen by course participants

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Short Courses 2011-2012

Fee: €230 for 10 weeks

Beginners Digital Photography

Time/Dates: Thursday 7-9pm, 26th January to 29th March

As research becomes more interdisciplinary, communicating and visualising research to a larger audience has become important. This short course introduces participants to the topic of Digital Photography, and will allow them to gain knowledge of the relevant tools used. Participants will receive practical hands-on lab-based tutorials with relevant image-editing software. There will also be a number of studio based lighting tutorials. The module also includes two assignments/exercises.

Venue: Western Gateway Building, Room G09, UCC Lecturer: Mr Stephen Bean, Centre for Adult Continuing Education, UCC

Please note: class size is limited to 20 participants. 1.

History of photography

2.

Camera equipment and components

3.

Light

4.

Exposure. Assignment 1

5.

Depth of field/focus

6.

The camera/computer interface. Editing images

7.

Aspect ratio and the frame

8.

View point

9.

Assignment 2

Requirements: What you need to bring with you: • A camera - a DSLR is recommended but an SLR or a compact that includes a manual mode can also be used. • If you have any extra lenses or an external flash bring them with you. • A note pad and pen to record notes, tips and camera settings etc. • Your camera instructions, you may need them. • Ensure you have sufficient charged batteries/spare batteries and memory cards. • Own camera essential.

10. Three photographers

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Short Courses 2011-2012

Fee: €150 for 6 weeks Time/Dates: Wednesday 7-9pm, 25th January to 29th February Venue: Western Gateway Building, Room G17, UCC Lecturers: Staff, Department of German, UCC

1.

General introduction

2.

Berlin and the Weimar Republic

3.

Nazi-Berlin

4.

Post-War Berlin

5.

The Divided City

6.

Berlin reunited

Berlin City: Historical, Political and Cultural Perspectives Germany’s capital city is a major centre of culture, politics, media, and science in Europe.  Especially since the fall of the Wall in 1989 this artistically and intellectually vibrant city has become increasingly attractive for visitors.  In this series of six 2 hour seminars, aspects of Berlin, past and present, will be explored - through the eyes of historians, politicians, writers, visual artists, architects, film and theatre makers.  It is envisaged that this course will be complemented by a study trip to Berlin, including visits to special exhibitions (e.g. ‘The Story of Berlin’), places of historical interest (e.g. the remains of the Berlin Wall), art galleries (‘Neue Nationalgalerie’) and museums (e.g. Wall Museum). A study tour of Berlin will be organised depending on demand.

through the eyes of historians, politicians, writers, visual artists, architects, film and theatre makers

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Short Courses 2011-2012

Fee: ₏190 for 8 weeks Time/Dates: Thursday 7-9pm, 26th January to 15th March Venue: Brookfield Health Sciences Complex, Room 301, UCC Lecturers: Ms Imogen Bertin, Centre for Adult Continuing Education, UCC, Dr Siobhan O’Sullivan, CIT

1.

Theoretical underpinning: communication skills; privacy issues

2.

Identifying and engaging audience groups: emphasis on Facebook

3.

How should we measure effect for new media and social media?

4.

Disintermediation: publishing and education forced into change

5.

Encouraging engagement: community management skills

6.

Is it working? Analytics and engaging audiences

7.

Digital citizenship: from cyberbullying to teleworking

8.

Social media futurescoping: what to connect for what?

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Communication Skills for the New Media Age - Intermediate Webinars | HTML5 | twitter backchannels | Google AdWords | Eventbrite | NFC | Tumblr | M-libraries | Augmented reality | QR Codes | RSS | Facebook Ads | LinkedIn | ePortfolios | Audioboo | Wordpress | LiveStreaming | Google Places | This course provides a structured opportunity to explore social media and new media tools for a wide variety of communication uses. The emphasis of this course is on practical application, and it is tailored to the participants through an enrolment questionnaire as well as by agreement on topics of importance to the group during the course. Participants are encouraged to develop a small project. At the end of this course, you should be able to scope, plan, cost, design, create and customise social media for your needs. This course is suitable for people who already use social media. It builds on, but does not require, the introductory course. Some aspects of learning technology are also covered. Please note: Class size is limited to 18 participants for this course.

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Short Courses 2011-2012

Fee: €190 for 8 weeks Time/Dates: Wednesday 7-9pm, 25th January to 28th March Venue: Brookfield Health Sciences Complex, Room 102, UCC Lecturers: Ms Imogen Bertin, Centre for Adult Continuing Education, UCC, Dr Siobhan O’Sullivan, CIT

Communication Skills for the New Media Age - Introduction Facebook | twitter | YouTube | Dropbox | iPhone | blogs | mindmaps | IM | Skype | Surveymonkey | Google analytics | LinkedIn | Delicious | synching | Jing |podcasts | webtext | Audioboo | Forums | VLEs | Google maps | iCanAnimate

1.

Theoretical underpinning: communication skills; privacy issues

2.

Productivity and Facebook: not such opposites

3.

New media overview: practical sessions twitter/skype/geolocation

Learn new ways of relaying information to customers, students, colleagues or friends using new media and social media. The emphasis of this course is on practical application and online interactive work, with content tailored to the participants through an enrolment questionnaire, and a focus on jargon-busting. At the end of this course, you should be able to customise your use of new media for your individual goals, and feel confident using the skills acquired for your work and personal communications. Learners are encouraged to reflect on their own “digital identity” and its consequences in the real world, both positive and negative. This course is suitable for those who currently use the Internet for basic searching, booking travel, email, information browsing etc.

4.

Finding and using new media resources: smartphone videos

Please note: Class size is limited to 18 participants for this course.

5.

Creating new content: podcasting and microblogging, website usability

6.

Presentation skills: PowerPoint revisited

7.

Is it working? Analytics and engaging audiences

8.

Linking social media: what to connect for what?

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Short Courses 2011-2012

Fee: €190 for 8 weeks Time/Dates: Wednesday, 7-9pm 25th January to 14th March, Venue: Brookfield Health Sciences Complex, Room 104, UCC Lecturer: Dr Fiona Brennan, Centre for Adult Continuing Education, UCC

1.

Week one: popular theatre of the 1800s and the work of Dion Boucicault

2.

Week two: the founding of the Irish dramatic movement

3.

Week three: the drama of John Millington Synge

4.

Week four: controversial themes and dramatic action of lesser known playwrights including George Fitzmaurice and Lord Dunsany

5.

Week five: the drama of Sean O’Casey

6.

Week six: the drama of John B. Keane

7.

Week seven: the drama of Brian Friel

8.

Week eight: contemporary Irish theatre: the controversial themes of Martin McDonagh, Enda Walsh and Marina Carr

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Conflict and Controversy: An Introduction to Irish Theatre The Irish theatrical canon abounds with themes of controversy and spectacle to which audiences and critics alike have traditionally responded with great gusto. During the nineteenth century, plays like Dion Bouciault’s The Colleen Bawn popularised spectacular on-stage feats. Infamously, the violent reactions to plays such as JM Synge’s The Playboy of the Western World (1907) and Sean O’Casey’s The Plough and the Stars (1926) made newspaper headlines. Conflict is equally central to the parochial drama of John B. Keane which identified Irish societal problems of the 1950s and 1960s. Brian Friel introduced themes of psychological conflict and loss in plays such as Philadelphia Here I Come! Most recently, the work of Martin McDonagh has caused much discussion regarding the violent scenes in plays like The Beauty Queen of Leenane. This eight-week course will explore spectacle, controversy and conflict in the Irish theatrical canon from the mid 1800s to the present day.

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Short Courses 2011-2012

Fee: â‚Ź150 for 6 weeks Time/Dates: Wednesday 7-9pm, 25th January to 29th February Venue: Western Gateway Building, Room G09, UCC Lecturer: Dr Ted Hickey, Centre for Adult Continuing Education, UCC

1.

Plants: main functions, nursery categories, selection, and sourcing tips

2.

Plant names explained

3.

Plant design: basic principles and practices. Recommended plants for different situations

4.

Routine maintenance operations

5.

Understanding soil and growing media

6.

DIY plant propagation

Decorative Horticulture: A Basic Introduction This short course, designed for beginners, will cover the importance of plants in the environment and their many uses in different situations in the garden. It will explain in simple terms, how plants are named and categorised and will advise on how to get value for money when purchasing plant material from a nursery. An introduction to easy propagation techniques and to making composts will also enable course participants to grow their own at minimal cost. Plant aftercare will be dealt with and course participants will be given easy-to-follow instructions on how to assess garden soils in terms of suitability for growing plants. To illustrate course content, emphasis will be placed on the use of slides, overhead projection and PowerPoint presentations with handouts.

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Short Courses 2011-2012

Fee: €230 for 10 weeks

Employment Law

Time/Dates: Wednesday 7-9pm, 25th January to 28th March

This ten-week course will familiarise students with the contents, sources and relevant procedures in Employment Law and will enable them to access and evaluate new legislation or case law. In turn, participants can advise management on the relevant issues, assist in development of new policies and procedures for their organisations in an evolving legal environment.

Venue: O’Rahilly Building, Room 101, UCC Lecturer: Dr Ryan Morgan, Centre for Adult Continuing Education, UCC

1.

The law in context

2.

Court structure

3.

The contract of employment

4.

Termination of the contract of employment

5.

Unlawful Dismissals Legislation 1977 – 1993

6.

Redundancy

7.

Employment Equality Act, 1988. Equal Status Act, 2000

8.

Other protective legislation

9.

The employer’s duty to care for their employees

advise management on the relevant issues, assist in development of new policies and procedures

10. Detailed study of a statute and a case report

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Short Courses 2011-2012

Fee: €150 for 10 weeks Time/Dates: Wednesday 10.15am to 12.15pm, 25th January to 28th March Venue: Douglas Library, Douglas Village Shopping Centre, Cork Lecturer: Dr. Kathy D’Arcy, Centre for Adult Continuing Education, UCC

1.

What does ‘creative writing’ mean to you?

2.

Idea machines! How to generate ideas

3.

Telling a story

4.

Work in progress

5.

Portraits: descriptive and biographical writing

6.

Work in progress

7.

Beautiful words: writing poetry

8.

Work in progress

9.

Creating the universe of the imagination

Finding Your Voice: A Course in Creative Writing This short course is a fun, gentle introduction to creative writing for people of all levels of experience. We’ll take a look at the techniques often used by actors and writers to enhance their creativity, and put them into practice so that the process of having an idea, picking up a pen and beginning to write becomes enjoyable and effortless. In the ‘Work in Progress’ sections of the course, participants will have the opportunity to bring their work to the group to be discussed in a friendly, open environment. In this way you can improve and develop your work throughout the course. We will conclude the course with a reading of work for friends and family. Please note: class size is limited to 15 participants.

a fun, gentle introduction to creative writing for people of all levels of experience.

10. Work in progress and reading

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Short Courses 2011-2012

Fee: €230 for 10 weeks Time/Dates: Tuesday 7-9pm, 24th January to 27th March Venue: Western Gateway Building, Room 303, UCC Lecturer: Mr Tony McCarthy, Centre for Adult Continuing Education, UCC

1.

General Introduction: Source: Census Returns; Project Plan; History: First People in Ireland

2.

Source: State Registration of Births, Deaths and Marriages; Start research with the live ones; History: The Bronze Age to the Celts

3.

Sources: Catholic and Church of Ireland Parish Records; Administrative Divisions; History: St Patrick to the Vikings

4.

Source: Valuation and Poor Law Records; The Easy Options; History: The Norman/ British Conquest of Ireland

5.

Sources: Wills and Administrations, Records of the Graveyard; The Matheson Report; History: The Plantations

6.

Source: Estate Records; Parliamentary Papers; History: The 1641 Rebellion to the Battle of the Boyne

7.

Source: The Registry of Deeds; Intensive Investigations; History: The Ascendancy

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Genealogy: How To Trace Your Family Tree This course aims to equip attendees with the skills and information necessary to set out confidently on the ancestor trail. There are three strands to the course. Firstly, twelve important genealogical sources will be described in detail, with a focus on how to locate and use them to get information on your own ancestry. Secondly, a methodical approach to family history research will be outlined, advising how to tackle a mass of documentary material, and also suggesting how to produce a finished family tree document. Thirdly, the historical and social context necessary for a deeper understanding of our ancestors and our genealogical records will form a continuous backdrop to the course. The three strands will be intertwined to form a practical, informative and entertaining experience.

8.

Sources: Tithe Applotment Books and the Land Commission; Finishing the Job; History: O’Connell’s Ireland

9.

Sources: Hearth Money Rolls and the Religious Census; Assessment of Material; History: Parnell’s Ireland

10. Source: Miscellaneous other sources; The Final Document; History: de Valera’s Ireland

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Short Courses 2011-2012

Fee: €150 for 6 weeks

India: Past, Present and Future

Time/Dates: Wednesday 7-9pm, 25th January to 29th February

This lecture series has been designed to give participants a good understanding of the dynamics that are poised to make India one of the world’s leading super-powers by the middle of this century. In order to contemplate India’s future, we will begin by examining India’s history, to see how it emerged as the political entity that it is today. We will also focus on the very unique aspects of Indian culture that make this country such a fascinating place to visit, but also, sometimes, a frustrating place to do business. This course would be relevant to anybody with an interest in global political and economic affairs. It should be of particular interest to those who might be considering doing business in India, or to those who are planning to visit India for leisure or for health / educational purposes.

Venue: Western Gateway Building, Room G02, UCC Lecturer: Mr Michael Murphy, Department of Management and Marketing, UCC

1.

2.

3.

4.

What is ‘India’? How did the India we know today emerge from the social and geographical boundaries that previously delineated one of the world’s most significant economic and cultural powers? Indian culture and identity: how has Hinduism influenced the culture of India? What have been the influences of the other minority religions in India? What are the other factors shaping Indian culture and Indian identity today? ‘Modern’ India: we will examine life in India today, and look at the lives of ordinary Indians living in different castes and social strata. How do hundreds of millions of people live on a salary of one euro a day, or less? Why has India more billionaires than Japan and the UK combined? India and politics: how is the world’s largest democracy governed? Is there a free press? What has been Gandhi’s legacy? How are India’s relations with other nations (including Ireland)?

The course will conclude with a discussion on visiting India, highlighting some important factors to be considered by those who might be planning a visit to India in the future.

5.

India and business: why have global marketing giants like Coke, McDonald’s and Kellogg’s made costly mistakes in India? Why have other international companies failed to gain any foothold in the Indian market? What Indian companies are doing well internationally?

6.

India and the future: will India soon become one of the world’s most powerful nations? Will India survive as a single democratic nation, given its significant internal cultural diversity and social inequality? How will India fare against China in the future? What is India’s global strategy?

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Short Courses 2011-2012

Fee: €190 for 8 weeks

Introduction to the Study of Folklore

Time/Dates: Tuesday 7-9pm, 24th January to 13th March

This course provides an introduction to folklore, including the history of folklore collection in Ireland and elsewhere. The classes cover Irish folklore as well as aspects of the folklore of other countries, particularly in relation to some supernatural beliefs, which can be compared to other cultural contexts. The focus is on belief, custom and narrative traditions in the Irish context. Both traditional and contemporary culture is addressed.

Venue: Brookfield Health Sciences Complex, Room 121, UCC Lecturer: Ms Jenny Butler, Roinn an Bhéaloidis, Department of Folklore and Ethnology, UCC,

1.

Introduction – defining “Folklore” and methods of folklore collection

2.

The intellectual history of the folklore discipline

3.

Supernatural belief and legends

4.

The otherworld and fairy folklore

5.

Death and dying in traditional worldview

6.

Festivals - the Irish ritual year

7.

Ireland’s sacred landscape

8.

Urban ethnology

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Folklore collection, supernatural beliefs, custom and narrative traditions…

http://study.ucc.ie/ace


Short Courses 2011-2012

Fee: â‚Ź230 for 10 weeks

Life and Business Coaching

Time/Dates: Tuesday 7-9pm, 24th January to 27th March

Planning or adapting to change in life or in business is a challenge that is very prevalent in today’s society. Many face the prospect of career change, retirement, business challenges or significant life adjustments. How we handle such events in life often defines what the years ahead will be like as it challenges us to look at life in order to assess our priorities, values and goals.

Venue: Western Gateway Building, Room G09, UCC Lecturer: Mr Pat O’Leary, Centre for Adult Continuing Education, UCC

1.

Defining coaching

2.

Coaching qualities, skills and competencies

3.

Coaching and communication

4.

Values, beliefs and goal setting

5.

Cognitive-Behavioural coaching

6.

Emotional intelligence

7.

Change and leadership

8.

Business coaching

9.

Coaching psychology

Coaching, in both life and business, provides us with a structure to address change in an effective and clear manner. It empowers us to set new goals, clarify options and provide solutions to complex issues. While these skills can be put to good effect in the workplace or in assisting others to look at change in their own personal lives, selfcoaching is also a very effective tool that people use in their own lives in order to address change. In addition to learning a number of coaching skills, individuals will also be provided with an opportunity to see the benefits of coaching at a practical level by experiencing the coaching process in a structured and objective way.

10. Solution focused coaching 11. Personal / interpersonal awareness 12. Coaching ethics and best practice

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Short Courses 2011-2012

Fee: €230 for 10 weeks

Literature II: The City

Time/Dates: Wednesday 7-9pm, 25th January to 4th April

This course focuses on different representations of the city and city life. I have made the selection of works bearing in mind recent courses which have involved material drawn from different media. This approach has proved popular and productive, allowing for an interdisciplinary approach that facilitates contrast and comparison. Hopefully, the course will do justice to the wide range of depictions of the city in different media, different cultures and different historical eras.

Venue: O’Rahilly Buillding, Room 244, UCC Lecturer: Mr Frank West, Centre for Adult Continuing Education, UCC

1.

Journal of the Plague Year  Daniel Defoe

2.

William Hogarth’s London paintings

3.

The Tower of London Natsume Soseki

4.

St Petersburg: 7th and 8th Symphonies Shostakovich, selection of poems by Anna Akhmatova 

5.

American Pastoral Philip Roth

6.

City Symphony films: Man with a Movie Camera and Berlin: Symphony of a Metropolis

7.

Walter Benjamin: A selection of excerpts from The Arcades Project

8.

Samuel Selvon The Lonely Londoners

9.

City Poetry: selections from the poetry of William Blake, Arthur Rimbaud, T S Eliot

The course incorporates a variety of works that, I hope, will provide a stimulating mix of the familiar and the new. At the end of the course, participants will be invited to a screening of Los Angeles Plays Itself. This film presents Los Angeles through an imaginative and wide ranging collage of film and television material that has contributed to our sense of that city. Each class will begin with an introductory lecture. This will be followed by group discussion and debate. Supplementary material (added in response to lines of enquiry arising from class discussions) or material that is difficult to obtain will be provided either as photocopies or as online downloads. This will allow everybody to familiarise themselves with material in advance of the classes taking place. As usual, I would recommend www.abebooks.com, www. bookdepository.com and www.ebay.co.uk should you have any difficulty in sourcing material.

10. The House in Paris Elizabeth Bowen

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Short Courses 2011-2012

Fee: â‚Ź150 for 10 weeks Time/Dates: Wednesday, 10.30am to 12.30pm or 2.30pm to 4.30pm 25th January to 28th March Venue: Central Library, Grand Parade, Cork Lecturer: Mr James G.R. Cronin, Centre for Adult Continuing Education and School of History, UCC

Masterpieces from the National Galleries of Scotland Behind every picture is a story. What makes a painting a masterpiece? What secrets do paintings reveal about the acts of their making? This ten-part series explores the stories of masterpieces from gallery collections in Scotland. Featured works include: Raphael, Bridgewater Madonna (Edinburgh) Diego VelĂĄzquez An Old Woman Cooking Eggs (Edinburgh) Johannes Vermeer, Christ in the House of Martha and Mary (Edinburgh) Thomas Gainsborough The Hon. Mrs Graham (Edinburgh) John Constable Dedham Vale (Edinburgh) Sir Henry Raeburn Reverend Robert Walker (1755 - 1808) Skating on Duddingston Loch (Edinburgh) J.M.W. Turner The Vaughan Bequest Watercolours (Edinburgh) Paul Gauguin Vision after the Sermon (Edinburgh) Charles Rennie Mackintosh architectural sketches (Hunterian, Glasgow) Salvador Dali Christ of Saint John of the Cross (Kelvingrove, Glasgow) Please note: class size is limited to 25 participants.

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Short Courses 2011-2012

Fee: â‚Ź260 for 10 weeks

Mediation - Help Others To Resolve Conflict

Time/Dates: Thursday 7-10pm, 26th January to 29th March

During this course participants will be trained to mediate conflicts and help their family members, neighbours, colleagues and people in their care to resolve their conflicts. The teaching style is practical and experiential. Lecturing and theory will be kept to a minimum. Role play will be used to practice skills.

Venue: Brookfield Health Sciences Complex, Room 102, UCC Lecturer: Mr Thomas Riedmuller, Centre for Adult Continuing Education, UCC

1.

Conflict awareness, escalation, deescalation, overview of different dispute resolution approaches

2.

Creating safe space, ground rules, managing issues such as confidentiality, impartiality, trust

3.

Mediation demonstration, stages of the mediation process

4.

Practicing techniques for active listening, paraphrasing, summarising, reframing and moving from positions to underlying needs

5.

Mediation role play

6.

Introduction to community mediation as a service that engages volunteers trained to mediate conflicts in their community

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7.

Introduction to peer mediation in schools - approaches and activities designed to train children and teenagers to be peacemakers

8.

More mediation practice and role play

9.

Limits of the mediation process and other methods for conflict management and reconciliation

10. Mediation role play, course evaluation and outlook for further learning and training opportunities

http://study.ucc.ie/ace


Short Courses 2011-2012

Fee: €190 for 8 weeks

Medieval Continental Calligraphy

Time/Dates: Wednesday 7-9pm, 25th January to 14th March

These series of classes are actually designed to offer a blend of an “academic” and palaeographical introduction to manuscript art and calligraphy, and a “practical” workshop in learning to reproduce the styles of script studied.  No previous training in either field is needed. We will be discovering and delighting in the exquisite work of medieval Continental scribes, and then - according to individual tastes and abilities - taking plume, pencil or brush in hand to enjoy creating certain letters and forms of illumination. Most basic materials are supplied (with advice on the purchase of further specialised items if desired), and NO artistic ability is required!

Venue: Western Gateway Building, Room G13, UCC Lecturer: Ms Jane O’Sullivan, Centre for Adult Continuing Education, UCC

1.

Carolingian calligraphy and its sources

2.

Uncial alphabets and the legacy of their Illuminated Initials

3.

Gothic hands of the Early and High Middle Ages

4.

Noble Gothic meets Medieval Cursive: the French Bâtarde

5.

Illumination and initials in the Gothic and Bâtarde traditions

6.

The Enlightened hands – part I: Humanistic calligraphy

7.

The Enlightened hands – part II: elegant Italic

8.

Personal interpretation and projects workshop

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Short Courses 2011-2012

Fee: €230 for 10 weeks Time/Dates: Tuesday 7-9pm, 24th January to 27th March Venue: Western Gateway Building, Room G16, UCC Lecturer: Ms Rachel Andrews, Centre for Adult Continuing Education, UCC

1.

The Year of Magical Thinking Joan Didion

2.

A Heartbreaking Work of Staggering Genius Dave Eggers

3.

And when did you last see your father? Blake Morrison

4.

Fierce Attachments Vivian Gornick

5.

Are you somebody? Nuala O’Faolain

6. 7. 8.

Memoir John McGahern

9.

Angela’s Ashes Frank McCourt

Reading in the Dark Seamus Deane

10. The Speckled People Hugo Hamilton 11. An Only Child Frank O’Connor

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Memoir, Autobiography And The Literature Of Witness Memoir is an increasingly popular genre among readers and writers. The non-fiction sections of our bookshops teem with first person narratives. Some of the writers are famous, but many are not, and there are prominent examples of authors who have become renowned through the writing of work that is about little but the personal. However, memoir has also become a controversial arena, particularly in the US, with writers being accused of making up facts and not telling the ‘truth’. What is ‘truth’ in relation to memoir? Should memorists who make things up publish as fiction writers? Or is the ‘truth’ a subjective notion that varies from person to person? And why do writers, such as John McGahern, who have already published their story under the guise of fiction, rewrite it as a non-fiction tract? In addition, the notion of memoir as literature will also be explored. For example, Joan Didion, who won the National Book Award for her recent autobiographical book The Year of Magical Thinking, is also a novelist, but has received far more acknowledgement for her nonfiction work. Can she still be described as a writer of literature? Over a ten-week period, the above issues will be explored by focusing on the specific texts listed below. The sessions will incorporate a lecture, followed by a discussion, of the texts. Where appropriate, I will introduce further material by that week’s writer, or other relevant writers, to the sessions will also be explored. This will be supplied in class. The course will also incorporate a voluntary, practical element, where participants will be encouraged to write their own first-person narratives and submit them for critiquing and feedback.

http://study.ucc.ie/ace


Short Courses 2011-2012

Fee: €230 for 10 weeks

Nutrition and Health

Time/Dates: Tuesday 7-9pm, 24th January to 27th March

This course will provide an introduction to the basic principles of nutrition and cover different aspects of how to achieve a healthy overall balanced diet. Nutrients of concern in the Irish diet will be discussed including saturated fats, fibre, salt, omega 3 fats, calcium and vitamin D. Other areas which will be focused on include how to read and understand nutrition labels, the importance of physical activity and the risks associated with overweight and obesity and a look at some popular bio-active food components and their function.

Venue: Western Gateway Building, Room G13, UCC Lecturers: Dr Alice Lucey, Dr Eibhlís O’Connor and Dr Elaine Walsh, School of Food and Nutritional Sciences, UCC

1.

Introduction and course overview: Macronutrients – protein, carbohydrate, fat and dietary fibre, beverages

2.

Micronutrients 1: Vitamins – role, food and supplement sources, deficiency, toxicity

3.

Micronutrients 2: Minerals – role, food and supplement sources, deficiency, toxicity

4.

Food records-a look at your own diet/ eating habits discussion on Fad diets

5.

Understanding nutrition labels-how to interpret them and what are the recommendations

6.

Overweight and obesity – including body measurements and health risks

7.

Nutrition throughout the life-cycle – nutritional requirements at different life stages

the importance of physical activity and the risks associated with overweight and obesity

8.

Diet and physical activity – including calculating caloric requirements

9.

Dietary bio-actives – what they are and what they do

10. Impact of diet on health and disease – including measurement of blood pressure

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Short Courses 2011-2012

Fee: €230 for 10 weeks Time/Dates: Thursday 7-9pm, 26th January to 29th March Venue: Brookfield Health Sciences Complex, Room 104, UCC Lecturer: Ms Rola (Hamed) Abu Zeid-O’Neill, Department of Sociology and Centre for Adult Continuing Education, UCC

1.

General introduction, and overview of course

2.

Historical background

3.

Racial and political incitement

4.

Discriminatory legislation of Israeli policies

5.

Palestinian unrecognized villages in Israel

6.

House demolitions

7.

Status of Palestinian women in Israel

8.

“Black October” – slaying of Palestinian citizens by Israeli security forces (Palestinian ‘Bloody Sunday’)

9.

Palestinian citizens and the equality index

Palestinian Citizens of Israel: Between ‘Democratic’ and ‘Jewish’ State Palestinian citizens of Israel are part of the Palestinian people who remained in their homeland which become the state of Israel after the war of 1948, and become a national minority. Today, they are nearly a fifth of Israel’s population, and cannot so easily to be ignored. They can be viewed as a group characterized by: National (Palestinian), Ethnic (Arab), Religious (Muslim, Christians and Druze); and Linguistic (Arabic). This course will aim to examine and explore the political, social, and economic development of the Palestinian citizens in Israel since 1948, and their current situation today.

they are nearly a fifth of Israel’s population, and cannot so easily to be ignored.

10. Concluding remarks and evaluation

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Short Courses 2011-2012

Fee: €230 for 10 weeks Time/Dates: Tuesday 7-9pm, 24th January – 27th March Venue: Brookfield Health Sciences Complex, Room 304, UCC Lecturer: Mr Trevor Joyce, Centre for Adult Continuing Education, UCC

Parallel Worlds: How to Build Them with Words. A Course in Creative and Imaginative Writing This course will present an unorthodox and unsentimental approach to creative writing. Literary writing is distinguished from other sorts in that it’s not what is said that matters, but how it’s said. The language is there not simply to communicate some message, but to intrigue, affect, provoke, surprise and satisfy the reader. This course will present many examples from a wide range of writing, focusing mainly but not exclusively on poetry and short prose. The examples discussed will be from many languages and cultures, generally unfamiliar, and always selected both for instruction and for pleasure, and many will be presented by way of recorded performances. The aim is to get the aspiring writer to unlearn the routines of standard communicative writing, and to play instead with the textures and colours of language. The emphasis will be on learning literary techniques, but always justified by enjoyment of the pleasures of the text. Participants will be encouraged to try out new ideas between sessions, and a limited time will be given over each week to discussion of this work.

1.

Words tamed and in the wild: investigating the many varieties of words, how to identify and use their similarities and differences

2.

Making strange: abandoning routine and envisioning the world anew

3.

The same again (or is it?): repetition and the beginnings of form

4.

The virtues of uncertainty: questions, too much information, the wrong information, no information at all

5.

Making form do the work: parallels and divergences in words, characters, plots

6.

Not just short works writ large: how longer works are constructed

7.

Crime reports and histories, travelogues and recipes: the literary use of non-literary forms

9.

8.

“I load myself with chains and try to get out of them”: the freedom of constraint

10. Originality and tradition: strange bedfellows

Translation, found poetry, assemblage: how to incorporate the sea of language that surrounds you

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Short Courses 2011-2012

Fee: €290 for 12 weeks Time/Dates: Wednesday 7-9pm, 25th January to 11th April Venue: Western Gateway Building, Room G15, UCC Lecturer: Mr Stephen Bean, Centre for Adult Continuing Education, UCC

1.

Explore the Photoshop interface so you understand navigation of the program and how to access its powerful features

2.

Learn about type of images, using file formats correctly, storing images, and working with color management

3.

Simplify your approach to editing by using the Essential Tool Box

4.

Practice applying the easy techniques you learn on your own images, and gets results every time

5.

Each lesson has been designed to cover key features and shortcuts of Photoshop

6.

The course covers all the basic concepts and tools you need to edit and enhance your own images

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Photoshop for Beginners Photoshop for beginners is a hands on practical course designed for people who have little or no experience in using this software application. Photoshop is used for editing, enhancing and manipulating digital images or even for creating new images from scratch. At a very basic level photoshop allows you to adjust or repair any aspect of your image. If an image is too light or too dark, or has a scratch, you can use the photoshop controls to improve the picture. Over the years Photoshop has developed as one of the world’s most powerful digital tools and is a very versatile program. Photoshop may be used by people from many different professions: photography, print industry, web and graphic designers, forensic investigation, medicine, and a lot more! Students will become confident and proficient working with basic elements of Photoshop.   Course requirements: Basic computer competency and familiarity with computers is required. This means using a computer for 6 months or more. For example, you must be able to use a mouse, and have a basic understanding of file management (understand how to transfer images from your camera, delete files, copy and move to different folders). Please note: Class size is limited to 20 participants.

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Short Courses 2011-2012

Fee: €190 for 8 weeks Time/Dates: Tuesday 7-9pm, 24th January to 13th March Venue: Western Gateway Building, Room 301, UCC Lecturers: Mr Dave O’Donovan, School of Applied Social Studies and Ms Cindy O’Shea, School of Applied Social Studies and Centre for Adult Continuing Education, UCC

1.

An introduction to supervision in youth and community work

2.

The benefits of supervision and reflection

3.

Skills for supervisory practice

4.

Tasks of supervision

5.

Models of supervision

6.

Group supervision

7.

Mapping the supervisory experience

8.

The reflective practitioner

Supervision in the Helping Professions Many youth and community work staff are required to provide supervision to their staff and volunteers as a model of good professional practice. However some find themselves inadequately trained and informed about the requirements of supervision. This timely course is designed with the supervision of staff in youth and community work agencies in mind and is ideally suited to staff in supervisory roles or those interested in getting more from the supervisory relationship. Sessions will be experiential and interactive with use of real examples and opportunities for peer learning.

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Short Courses 2011-2012

Fee: €270 for 11 weeks Time/Dates: Wednesday 7-10pm, 18th January to 28th March Venue: Western Gateway Building, Room G14, UCC Lecturers: Dr Edmond Byrne, Department of Process and Chemical Engineering, Dr Ger Mullally, Department of Sociology, Dr John Fitzpatrick, Department of Process and Chemical Engineering, University College Cork

1.

Sustainability and sustainable development: an unsustainable societal construct?

2.

Historical context: the scientific method

3.

Models of sustainability. Perceptions and values

4.

Flourishing within limits

5.

Considerations of business as usual approaches to reducing unsustainability

6.

Environmental sustainability I

7.

Environmental sustainability II

8.

Certainty and uncertainty and complexity

9.

Open, non-equilibrium systems

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Sustainability and Sustainable Development: Principles, Concepts, Values and Techniques for Transformation The concepts of sustainability and sustainable development strike a particular resonance at the current time as we are increasingly being forced to reflect on both the complexity and the fragility of our society as well as on the finite resources in the world that we inhabit. Enormous strides for the betterment of humankind have been realised over the past couple of centuries. Scientist and engineers have been at the forefront of this, designing transport and energy systems, electronics, communications, medicines and spearheading improved provision of food and water for an ever expanding global population. The result is a highly complex and interconnected global 21st Century society which social scientists have tried to contextualise in terms of humanity’s relationship with such a society. More recently, we have been presented with ever increasing evidence of the fragile nature of the economic, societal and ecological systems that we are part of. These are symptoms of unsustainable patterns of behaviour that can ultimately tip the meta-systems that make up our broader environment from one set of seemingly predictable conditions to another altogether different and more erratic set. The 21st Century must be one of societal transformation towards a world which can maintain and improve the quality of life of the greatest number of people within the earth’s carrying capacity, while at the same time nurturing ecological diversity and building resilience. It is a big ask, probably the biggest we’ve faced to date. It is also one which requires trans-disciplinary engagement across a range of disciplines, professions and expert peer groups as we collectively strive to better understand and hence govern (as opposed to ‘control’) the complex manmade and natural systems that we are intrinsically http://study.ucc.ie/ace


Short Courses 2011-2012

part of. Such problems clearly demand a more nuanced and smarter approach than that adopted in the past. This course takes a trans-disciplinary approach to examining the topography of sustainability and sustainable development from several perspectives. The course is facilitated by engineers and sociologists who come together to engage in a pedagogical dialogue and invite participants of all backgrounds and experiences to examine the principles and values behind these terms and concepts. The course will provide historical context while demonstrating the necessity of understanding uncertainty and complexity in facing the substantial and existential problems that present. Recognising that many of our proposed ‘solutions’ and indeed knowledge and understandings around this complex meta-discipline can always only be provisional and lacking certainty, the course looks at some potential future options while exploring how we might attempt to go about leading transformation from the current unsustainable trajectory.

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Short Courses 2011-2012

Fee: €90 for 6 weeks Time/Dates: Tuesday 10.30am – 12.30pm, 24th January to 28th March Venue: Cork Arts Theatre, Camden Court, Carroll’s Quay, Cork Lecturer: Mr Nyle Wolfe Dip R.A.M., Centre for Adult Continuing Education, UCC

1.

Béatrice et Bénédict  - Hector Berlioz

2.

Eugene Onegin - Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky

3.

The Pirates of Penzance - Gilbert and Sullivan

4.

The Threepenny Opera - Kurt Weill and The Beggar’s Opera -  Pepusch and Gay

5.   6.

Candide – Bernstein

The Changing Face of Opera; 1860s to 1960s   The Changing Face of Opera will introduce students to popular but less known operas and the colourful lives of their composers. The lectures will introduce 7 operas and the progression of musical styles from 1861-1969.   It will include some of the more notable opera composers and the challenges they set the performer and stage director. The discussion will include the musical content, stories and characters of the operas. The challenges of staging the works will be highlighted and the developments of the art form over time. Audio extracts will be used to enhance the enjoyment of the presentation. The course will also introduce techniques used by working singers including vocal production, basic musicianship and acting skills. Each session will comprise two halves, one discussing the opera and composer of each work and the other introducing the skills and techniques of the vocal performer.

The Bear - Walton

the musical content, stories and characters of the operas… the challenges of staging the works will be highlighted and the developments of the art form over time.

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Short Courses 2011-2012

Fee: €135 for 9 weeks Time/Dates: Tuesday 10.00am – 12.15pm, 24th January to 20th March Venue: Central Library, Grand Parade, Cork Lecturer: Professor Emeritus Éamonn Ó Carragáin, School of English, UCC

The City of Venice This short course provides a practical introduction to the history and layout of the City of Venice. Venice, one of the most beautiful cities in the world, has some fourteen hundred years of history behind it. Because Venice has always had a close relationship with Greece, Byzantium and Constantinople, the course will begin with the great buildings and mosaics of Constantinople and Ravenna. We then cover all the major buildings and works of art in Venice itself, placing them in their historical and political settings. We will look at the accounts of Venice by major writers such as Dickens, Ruskin, Henry James, Seán Ó Faoláin. The course will be illustrated by some 3,000 PowerPoint images of the city and its monuments. Depending on demand, it is hoped to organise a week-long Study Tour of the city in May 2012. The course is designed for those who have been to Venice and want to make sense of what they saw; for those who have never been to Venice and want to prepare for a visit; and for armchair travellers who simply want to imagine what the major monuments of the city look like, and the ideas (political and religious) which inspired them. The morning lectures will be supplemented by two evening lectures (dates to announced) on St Marks, and on the buildings of the Grand Canal. The two evening lectures will be open to members of the course, and also to a wider public. Please note: class size is limited to 25 participants.

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Short Courses 2011-2012

Fee: â‚Ź230 for 10 weeks Time/Dates: Tuesday 7-10pm, 24th January to 27th March Venue: Brookfield Health Sciences Complex, Room 243, UCC Lecturers: Dr Maureen Griffin, Dr Sharon Lambert and Dr Ciara Staunton, Department of Applied Psychology, UCC

The Criminal Mind: An Introduction to Forensic and Criminal Psychology This course will be of interest to anyone from novices to professionals within the legal system who have an interest in violent and criminal behaviour. Over 10 weeks the course will consider the criminal mind from a psychological perspective by addressing the various theories presented by criminology and forensic psychology. Participants will gain an understanding and insight into the relationship between psychology and crime by considering the deviant behaviours of child molesters, paedophiles, rapists and murderers. 1. Introduction to violent, criminal and deviant behaviour 2. Understanding mental disorders and criminal behaviour 3. Understanding personality and disorders of personality 4. Psychopathy and psychopaths 5. The crime of rape, rapists and the Irish legal system 6. Paedophiles and child molesters 7. A special look at female sexual abusers 8. The psychology of stalking and harassment 9. The psychology of serial killers and mass murderers 10. Investigating crime using behavioural investigative advice

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Short Courses 2011-2012

Fee: € 190 for 8 weeks Time/Dates: Monday 7-9pm, 23rd January to 12th March Venue: West Wing 9, UCC Lecturers: Mr James G.R. Cronin, Centre for Adult Continuing Education and School of History, UCC, Dr Dagmar Ó Riain-Raedel, Centre for Adult Continuing Education, UCC, Ms Regina Sexton, Centre for Adult Continuing Education, UCC and Dr Eibhear Walshe, School of English, UCC

1.

Irish “Big House” in historical context

2.

The Anglo-Irish class

3.

Irish Grand Tourists

4.

The art of collecting

5.

House, kitchen, and garden

6.

Diet, dining and the food economy

7.

“Big House” literature: from Maria Edgeworth to Sommerville and Ross

8.

“Big House” literature: Elizabeth Bowen and Molly Keane

9.

The re-emergence of the “Big House”

The Culture of the “Big House”: Art and Culture of the Anglo-Irish The Irish “Big House” has a long-established history, made familiar by the fiction of Sommerville and Ross, Elizabeth Bowen, and others. The Big House was a tribute to the Anglo-Irish ascendancy, and many of these homes were destroyed during the Irish Civil War. The earliest of the great houses were built during the early eighteenth century. A half century later, Ireland’s golden age of Palladianism saw the construction of magnificent homes such as Castletown in Co. Kildare and Strokestown Park, Co. Roscommon, later followed by a return to the gothic style such as Castle Ward, Co. Down and Glin Castle, Co. Limerick. The Adam style of interior design found in many of the homes is associated with Scottish architect Robert Adam (17281792) and became popular in Ireland from the 1770s. One of the best-known proponents of this style was James Gandon (1743-1823), designer of Dublin’s Custom House and the Four Courts. Abbey Leix in Co. Laois (1773) is a fine example of the Adam style. The beginning of the nineteenth century ushered in the Regency style of architecture and dignified homes such as Mount Stewart, Co. Down. By mid-century, the Victorian Age ruled, and we find the grand style epitomised by Kylemore Abbey.

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Short Courses 2011-2012

Fee: €230 for 10 weeks Time/Dates: Wednesday 7-9pm, 25th January to 28th March Venue: Brookfield Health Sciences Complex, Room 242, UCC Lecturers: Ms Patricia Radley and Dr Anna Ridgway, School of Education, UCC

1.

Media matters: introduction to the kinds of media experiences children have today?

2.

Introduction to Child Development theories – what do we know of how children think and learn: the influence of Maria Montessori and others

3.

How are our children smart! Multiple Intelligences Theory

4.

Advertising: how it works and why children are targeted specifically

5.

Television: does it unify or divide families? The nature of interactive television and the role of advertising

6.

The Internet: friend or foe – it is a key resource for learning today

7.

Websites popular with young children – what are they experiencing online?

8.

Video games: the violent content and the impact of this on children and their behaviour – the Rating Scale to help parents choose appropriate games

The Media World: Friend or Foe: Children’s Experiences of Media and the Opportunities and Threats posed Children inhabit a media saturated age. They are subjected to thousands of advertisements each year for toys, fast foods and designer clothing amongst others. They are now targeted by advertisers as a distinct and very lucrative market. It can be difficult for parents and teachers to support children’s learning when the rate of change is so fast. The level of peer pressure on children is very high with respect to using media. As adults we are not always comfortable with new technology and the array of digital media available. This course provides an outline of current theories of child development – what do children need to learn well in an appropriate environment? How is this information used by media developers and advertisers to ensure children will be attracted to the programmes, websites and games? It will look at how the marketing and advertising process works. It will also look at children’s experiences of television, the internet and video games, particularly how we can help to ensure this experience is positive, safe and enjoyable.

9.

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The importance of play and the effects of prolonged media usage on children’s play

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Short Courses 2011-2012

Fee: €230 for 10 weeks Time/Dates: Wednesday 7-9pm, 25th January to 28th March Venue: Brookfield Health Sciences Complex, Room 301, UCC Lecturer: Ms Elaine Hoysted, History of Art and Centre for Adult Continuing Education, UCC

1.

Renaissance man vs Renaissance woman

2.

The life of a girl in Italian society

3.

The portraiture of newly-married Florentine women

4.

Eleonora di Toledo of Florence and the “Ideal Mother” complex

5.

The working woman

6.

Isabella d’Este- court lady, consort and collector extraordinaire

7.

Cecilia and Lucrezia- two influential female scholars

8.

Religion and the Renaissance woman

9.

Lavinia Fontana: The woman and the artist. Petrarch and his “Laura”- the ideal female beauty

The Renaissance Woman: Myth or Reality? The Renaissance man has been examined in great detail by scholars over the years but what about his counterpart, the Renaissance woman? Who was the Renaissance woman? Is it possible to argue that the women of this period also went through this process of “rebirth”? This short course aims to explore these questions in depth through the examination of art works which depict Renaissance Italian women and moments in their life cycle captured by contemporary artists of the period to determine the impact of the Renaissance on their lives. The course concludes by briefly exploring how the experiences of the Renaissance woman shaped the lives of those who followed. A comprehensive slide list and bibliography of further reading will be handed out at the beginning of each of the lectures.

Who was the Renaissance woman? Is it possible to argue that the women of this period also went through this process of “rebirth”?

10. Widowhood: independence for women? Conclusion

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Short Courses 2011-2012

Fee: €150 for 10 weeks Time/Dates: Thursday morning 10.30am to 12.30pm, 28th January to 8th April Venue: Bishopstown Library, Wilton, Cork Lecturer: Mr Frank West, Centre for Adult Continuing Education, UCC

1.

Telemachus, Nestor

2.

Proteus, Calypso

3.

The Lotus Eaters, Hades

4.

Aeolus, Lestrygonians

5.

Scylla and Charybdis, Wandering Rocks

6.

Sirens, Cyclops

7.

Nausicaa, Oxen of the Sun

8.

Circe

9.

Eumaeus

10. Ithaca, Penelope

Ulysses This course will provide an introduction to Joyce’s Ulysses aimed primarily at those who have never read the novel before. It should also be of interest to anyone who has attempted to read Ulysses but has encountered difficulty through unfamiliarity with the novel’s array of classical and contemporary references. Each of the ten sessions will deal with the episodes as indicated below and will focus on several short excerpts from each episode. Each class will also attempt to place that week’s excerpts into the context of the novel’s overall structure, themes and characters. The classes will begin with a lecture in which information on Joyce’s sources, classical and contemporary, will be presented. The intention here is to provide the basis for a good understanding and appreciation of that week’s excerpts. This will then be followed by class discussion. We will use the Vintage Books/Random House ‘Corrected Text’ edition of Ulysses (edited by Hans Walter Gabler). If you use any other edition, the pagination will be different and will make participation in the classes very difficult. Past experience has shown that the course works best when all of us use the same edition. Although it is probably best to begin by reading Ulysses on its own, you may find Ulysses Unbound by Terence Killeen (published by Wordwell) helpful. This can be ordered through any bookshop or online from booksellers at www.abebooks.com or www.amazon.co.uk I would also recommend that readers check http://ulyssesseen.com/. This is a site which aims to present the whole of the novel in cartoon form. As of now, it is ongoing and incomplete but you should find it useful and entertaining. The blogs and reader’s notes are well worth reading.

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Short Courses 2011-2012

Fee: â‚Ź230 for 10 weeks Time/Dates: Thursday 7-9pm, 26th January to 29th March Venue: Brookfield Health Sciences Complex, Room 304, UCC Lecturer: Dr Eva McMullan, School of Music, UCC

1.

Introducing Medieval music

2.

Rituals and Royalty: music, power and ceremony in the Baroque Period

3.

The reign of Bach and Handel

4.

Introducing the symphony

5.

Mozart: the man and the artist

6.

An invitation to opera

7.

The last romantic: the piano music of Rachmaninoff

8.

Classical music in the Twentieth Century: tradition and innovation

9.

Understanding contemporary society through popular music

Understanding Music: An Introduction to Music Appreciation This course is designed to introduce contrasting musical styles and genres that have existed throughout the history of Western Classical Music. The aim of the course is to create an awareness of the particular musical styles themselves, and to identify the contrasting cultural contexts in which the selected works were composed. Each lecture will comprise of two parts. The first part will be dedicated to learning about a particular period in musical history, while the second part will include listening and responding to some of the most popular works from the genre being studied.

listening and responding to some of the most popular works from the genre

10. Music and other arts (visual art, architecture, literature)

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Short Courses 2011-2012

Fee: €190 for 8 weeks Time/Dates: Wednesday 7-9pm, 25th January to 14th March Venue: Brookfield Health Sciences Complex, Room 243, UCC Lecturer: Ms Mary Hickey-Griffin, Centre for Adult Continuing Education, UCC

1.

What is challenging behaviour?

2.

Learning difficulties

3.

Emotional problems and family issues

4.

Anger and frustration

5.

Self esteem

6.

Approaches to addressing behavioural problems

7.

Problem solving and conflict resolution

8.

Strategies for positive outcomes

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Working with Challenging Behaviour in Young People Increasingly in both formal and non-formal learning environments staff and volunteers are dealing with a myriad of behaviours that make it difficult to work with young people. This course is for those struggling to work positively with these behaviours, beginning with the exploration of ‘Challenging Behaviour’ and looking specifically at issues contributing to and affecting behaviour in the lives of contemporary youth. It is geared towards those working directly with young people in youth and community work or educational settings. The course is designed to help us to explore and understand difficult behaviour and where it comes from and looks at strategies to deal with it. The course will consist of 8 two-hour lectures and will follow an experiential format. It is focussed on skill development so that participants will feel more confident in their work in the future.

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Short Courses 2011-2012

January 2012 Short Courses Application Form Tear out and Return to: Short Course Co-ordinator, Centre for Adult Continuing Education, UCC Application for Courses Commencing January 2012 must be received before Monday 16 January 2012 Name: Address:

Telephone/Mobile No. Email Address: Course Title: Second Course Choice (if first is full or not proceeding) Payment Accepted by Cheque/Postal Order/ Bank Draft (made payable to University College Cork). Payment by Credit/debit card can be made by calling to the centre during normal office hours. Amount: â‚Ź Office Use Only Amount: Date: Receipt notes:

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Short Courses 2011-2012

John Morgan

Are you Ready? Building your own Portfolio January See page 65

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‘ The lecturers Mary and Deirdre are indeed fine examples of formal meets informal educating bodies. The classes were delivered with a happy, amiable flourish and they were most informative. I’ve enjoyed the experience and the company of the class over the last 6 weeks. I would certainly recommend the time I’ve spent to any person who wants to learn more about themselves.’

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Short Courses 2011-2012