Page 1

T H E S TAT E O F

University City 2018


PENNSYLVANIA Montgomery

Bucks

University City Philadelphia Chester

New Castle

Delaware

NEW JERSEY Burlington

Gloucester

Camden

Salem

DELAWARE

PHILADELPHIA

University City Center City


A Letter from UCD’s President

4

Spotlight on University City

6

Real Estate Development

10

Employment

26

Office

32

Retail and Hospitality

36

Colleges and Universities

42

Healthcare

46

Transportation

48

People

56

Life in the Neighborhood

60

Innovation

66

About University City District

74

Membership Program

82

Acknowledgements

84


THE STATE OF UNIVERSITY CITY 2018

A Letter from UCD’s President

A Letter from UCD’s President

It’s a special time for University City District as we celebrate our 20th anniversary and reflect on two decades of partnership with world class institutions, business leaders and community members to shape one of the country’s leading innovation neighborhoods. This collaboration has transformed our district through pioneering efforts to reclaim public space and re-imagine transit infrastructure, activation of dormant commercial corridors, a nationally-acclaimed initiative to connect local residents to career-changing jobs, and, always at our core, attention to the foundational community services that comprise our role as stewards of a wonderful place.

4

UCD’s founders came to this work with a bold vision for this neighborhood, but the trajectory of University City has surpassed even the biggest of aspirations. New discoveries over the past year by University City researchers and practitioners in the fields of immunotherapy, precision medicine and vaccine development promise to change the course of disease treatment and prevention for millions around the world. New accelerators and incubators are poised to help translate the discoveries emanating from our universities and health systems into job-generating commercial ventures. With nearly 80,000 jobs and $1 billion in aggregate annual R&D expenditures, University City’s real estate boom continues unabated, as it keeps pace with economic growth. Nearly 1.5 million square feet of development projects were completed in the last year, and construction activity shows no signs of slowing. The neighborhood has become a magnet for millennials, and an ongoing surge in multifamily housing has spurred an 11% increase in University City’s residential population


THE STATE OF UNIVERSITY CITY 2018

since 2010. Similarly, retail and hotel development push forward, drawn by University City’s growing workforce, student population and status as the regional hub for the knowledge economy. While the neighborhood has transformed over the past twenty years, the next twenty years will witness a University City that reshapes Greater Philadelphia’s economic foundation. Schuylkill Yards, Pennovation and uCity Square are three focal points of commercialization and discovery, all tightly bound within a walkable, bikeable, transit-oriented neighborhood of eclectic food options, gorgeous Victorian homes and gathering spaces that spur the kinds of serendipitous collisions among creators and dreamers that are necessary for breakthrough innovation.

Sincerely,

Matt Bergheiser President, University City District

A Letter from UCD’s President

As talented workers and visionary entrepreneurs make informed choices about where to live, work, play and grow, increasingly they are choosing University City. Here, the confluence of proximity, knowledge, diversity and rich amenities is reshaping the very notion of a great urban place. If past is prologue, there’ll be no better place to invent the future over the next twenty years than right here in University City.

5


Spotlight on University City University City is the region’s leader in education, science and innovation. The 2.4 square mile neighborhood boasts world-class institutions that have catalyzed nearly 80,000 jobs in fields including medicine, higher education, technology, professional services and hospitality. University City is a destination for culture seekers and food lovers, a transportation hub with some of the most bicycle- and pedestrian-friendly streets in the city, and is home to some of the most significant development projects in the region. With a diverse population, a blend of housing options, top notch schools and hospitals, and amenities galore, University City is a neighborhood where quality of life and quality of place spur growth

Spotlight on University City

and opportunity.

6


79,692 53,884 Jobs

93% Office Occupancy

147 Retailers

Residents

Residents Who Walk, Bicycle or Ride Public Transit to Work

20-24 22-24 minutes Median Age

Median Resident Commute Time

57%

4,328,718

Residents Aged 25 or Older with a Bachelor’s Degree or Higher

Colleges and Universities

Annual Amtrak Passengers at 30th St. Station

1,058 Hotel Rooms

148 Home Sales

$393,100 Median Home Sale Price

$1,500 Median Apartment Rent

4

Hospitals

87% 43,267 79% 85,048

Ground Floor Commercial Occupancy Rate

College and University Students

Hotel Room Occupancy

Hospital Inpatient Admissions

Spotlight on University City

266 5 Restaurants and Bars

69%

THE STATE OF UNIVERSITY CITY 2018

University City By The Numbers

7


University City is a leader in… • Job Growth University City remains one of the top employment hubs in the region, with more than 33,000 jobs per square mile. The number of jobs rose substantially in 2017 and is on pace to reach 80,000 for the first time.

• Development With nearly 1.5 million square feet of real estate projects completed in the last year and continued growth in the number of construction permits - rising more than 500% from pre-recession levels - the development boom in University City shows no signs of slowing.

• Attracting Millennials An ongoing boom in multi-family housing has contributed to an estimated 5,300 new residents since 2010 (up 11%). The people choosing to live here are getting younger, with the number of millennials (aged 20-34) up by 13% since 2000.

• Transportation How does living in paradise sound? University City earned three “paradise” distinctions from Walkscore.com, notching top marks for getting around on bicycle, public transportation or foot.

• Healthcare The neighborhood’s medical institutions are on track to admit over 85,000 patients in 2017 and are leading the way in new treatments, procedures and medical technologies. Two of University City’s hospitals - Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania-Penn Presbyterian and Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia - were ranked top ten in the nation, according to U.S. News and World Report. 8


• Dining Options University City is home to a whopping 266 places to eat and drink, and more are on the way. In 2017 the neighborhood welcomed new fine dining establishments Dim Sum House, CO-OP, and the Walnut Street Café to the roster of excellent options from around the globe.

• Innovation In 2016, R&D investment at University City's universities rose by $34 million, and 175 patents were issued to local businesses and institutions. The next wave of coworking spaces, laboratories and incubators - anchored by the arrival of Boston’s Cambridge Innovation Center to 3675 Market Street - will help further University City’s status as the region’s pacesetter for innovation.

• Retail Attractions Retailers love University City’s mix of college students, employees and residents, and shoppers love the 147 local retailers back, leading to 87% occupancy of ground floor commercial storefronts.

• Hotel Offerings Neighborhood hotel inventory exploded in 2016 with a 48% increase in rooms, split between the new AKA University City and The Study at University City. Existing inventory saw improvements, too, as the Sheraton University City completed a 20,500 square foot renovation.

• Housing The number of home sales increased 6% over last year - up to the highest level since the recession - and the median home price grew by an extraordinary 18%. At the same time, home and rental prices remain remarkably affordable compared to peer innovation hubs such as Cambridge and San Francisco. 9


THE STATE OF UNIVERSITY CITY 2018

Real Estate Development Rapid transformation and accelerated growth continue to define University City’s real estate sector, where progress moves at a breakneck pace. Highlights from the past year include the completion of the FMC Tower, University City’s tallest building; the opening of CHOP’s Roberts Center for Pediatric Research; the debut of Vue32, a 16-story mixed-use tower adjacent to Drexel; and the addition of The Study at University City, a combined hotel, restaurant, and banquet space. Three major projects - uCity Square, Schuylkill Yards, and the 30th Street Station District Plan make up a long-term vision that will further cement University City’s status as the region’s economic and technological powerhouse.

New Construction or Major Renovations (Square Feet) 3,000,000

2,500,000

2,000,000

Real Estate Development

1,500,000

10

1,000,000

500,000

0

2002

2003

2004

2005

Note: excluding parking sructures • Source: UCD

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016


THE STATE OF UNIVERSITY CITY 2018

Real Estate Development

11

UCity Square's 3675 Market


New Construction Permits

Square Footage by Primary Use (2002 - 2016)

Medical & Medical Research: 3,043,700

Academic: 2,660,110

Cultural: 46,500

Office: 3,308,250

University City

Hotel: 268,260

50

1,500

40

1,200

30

900

20

600

10

300

Residential: 4,387,675 0

0 2007

Education*: Retail: 253,000 352,513

* Primary / Secondary

Source: UCD

2008

2009

2010

2011

2012

University City

2013

2014

2015

2016

Philadelphia

Source: City of Philadelphia Department of Licenses & Inspections

Cumulative Units of New Multi-family Housing in University City 4,000 3,500 3,000 2,500

Real Estate Development

2,000

12

1,500 1,000 500 0 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 Source: UCD

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

Philadelphia

THE STATE OF UNIVERSITY CITY 2018

New Construction or Major Renovations


THE STATE OF UNIVERSITY CITY 2018

Approximate Value of New Real Estate Development Projects $1,400

Dollars (Millions)

$1,200 $1,000 $800 $600 $400 $200 $0 2009

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

Source: UCD

Real Estate Development

13


In the past year, 28 new development projects in University City opened their doors or made significant progress towards completion. Together, this represents approximately 4.5 million square feet of office, residential, academic, research, restaurant and medical space that will enhance the neighborhood’s already robust inventory. What follows is a summary of the current projects continuing to transform University City’s blocks and skyline.

Academic

Commercial

1. 2. 3. 4.

5. 6. 7. 8.

Evans Building Main Dental Clinic Korman Center Improvements The Perelman Center for Policial Science and Economics Richards Medical Research Laboratories

C H E ST N U 28

5

ST. 19

T ST.

17 21

WA L N U T ST.

20 4 2 ND ST .

ST.

.

E.

7 AV

N

26

D

KI

SS

ST .

N

49 TH ST .

E GS

.

LA

ST .

G IN

TH

E AV

D

TH

45

O

SP

N RI

D IEL

E AV

O

Real Estate Development

14

AVE.

GF

16 14

O O D AV E .

E BALTIMOR

50

1

18

W

LARCHW

ST.

24

8

4 5 TH

S P RU C E

POW ELTO N AV E.

T.

50 TH

MARKET

3.0 University Place 3675 Market 4614-18 Woodland Avenue Campus Commerce Center

4 0 TH S

ST.

THE STATE OF UNIVERSITY CITY 2018

CURRENT DEVELOPMENT

12


Public Space

9. 10. 11. 12.

13. Korman Quadrangle 14. 40th Street Trolley Portal Gardens

Center for Healthcare Technology The Pavilion at Penn Medicine Roberts Center for Pediatric Research Philadelphia Ronald McDonald House Expansion

THE STATE OF UNIVERSITY CITY 2018

Medical

Residential / Mixed Use 15. 3700 Lancaster 16. 400 South 40th Street 17. 4001-4003 Chestnut Street 18. 4045 Baltimore Avenue 19. 4215 Chestnut Street 20. 43rd & Sansom 21. Chestnut Street Apartments

LL KI YL U H SC

ARDEN S P R IN G G

22. Hamilton Court 23. Hill College House 24. The Simon 25. Summer Twelve 26. USciences Residence Hall 27. Vue32 28. West Lofts

ST.

.

25

27

uCity Square Expansion Site

12

3 8 TH ST .

6 2

13

Schuylkill Yards Site

MARKET

3 23

C H E ST N U

ST.

T ST.

WA L N U T ST. 4

S P RU C E

ST.

3 4 TH ST .

22

Philadelphia 30th Street District Site

R VE RI

15

10

L

KI

9

11

YL U H

SC

Real Estate Development

Pennovation Works

R

VE

I LR

15


THE STATE OF UNIVERSITY CITY 2018

ACADEMIC 1

EVANS BUILDING MAIN DENTAL CLINIC Penn’s School of Dental Medicine is undertaking a renovation of its flagship main clinic, featuring new energy-efficient windows and a new roof. Along with the construction of a two-story addition to the west of the Schattner Building entrance hall, this renovation will result in a new 2nd floor patient waiting room. Developer: Location: Size: Completion Date:

2

University of Pennsylvania 40th & Spruce Streets 16,500 square feet Summer 2018

KORMAN CENTER IMPROVEMENTS The project will give the 1958 Korman Center a new look and comfortable lounges that enhance the link between learning and high-tech connectivity. A cantilevered terra cotta screen will give the building a new, modern identity, creating a “front porch” that will act as an outdoor living room for students. Behind the screen, a new two-story glazed wall will brighten the façade. Developer: Drexel University Location: Between Market & Chestnut and between 32nd & 33rd Streets Size: 9,000 square feet Completion Date: Fall 2017

3

THE PERELMAN CENTER FOR POLITICAL SCIENCE AND ECONOMICS The Perelman Center will merge Penn’s academic departments of Political Science and Economics in one new facility. The project combines a rehabilitation of the Philadelphia Trust building with a significant new addition to the north.

Real Estate Development

Developer: University of Pennsylvania Location: 36th & Walnut Streets Size: 111,140 square feet (54,440 existing, 56,700 new) Completion Date: Spring 2018

16

4

RICHARDS MEDICAL RESEARCH LABORATORIES The Richards Medical Research Laboratory, along with the adjacent David Goddard Laboratories, was designated a National Historic Landmark in 2009. This project will repurpose obsolete wet labs for use by the Center for Cognitive Neuroscience for “dry” research, office and conference room space. Developer: University of Pennsylvania Location: 3700 Hamilton Walk Size: Towers C & D: 29,600 square feet Towers A & B: 30,300 square feet Completion Date: Towers C & D: Fall 2015; A & B: Spring 2019


3.0 UNIVERSITY PLACE A new five-story office building, 3.0 University Place is the world’s first commercial office building pre-certified LEED Platinum® V4 BD+C Core and Shell. Among other sustainable features, 3.0 University Place will capture and treat 95% of the rainwater that falls on the site and reuse the water for irrigation of the vegetated roof and in the cooling tower. Developer: Location: Size: Completion Date:

5

University Place Associates, LLC 41st and Market Streets 170,000+ square feet Fall 2019

3675 MARKET A 14-story office and laboratory building broke ground in Q4 2016. The building, which is designed by ZGF Architects to be LEED Silver or Gold, will feature 25,000 square foot floor plates and 12,000 square feet of retail. It will be the new home of the Science Center’s corporate offices and Quorum, its clubhouse for entrepreneurs, which will triple in size to 15,000 square feet. The anchor is Cambridge Innovation Center, which houses start-ups.

THE STATE OF UNIVERSITY CITY 2018

COMMERCIAL

6

Developer: A joint venture between the University City Science Center, Ventas and Wexford Science + Technology Location: 3675 Market Street Size: 345,000 square feet Completion Date: Summer 2018

4614-18 WOODLAND AVENUE This new three-story commercial building will feature both intensive and extensive green roofs where rainwater will be collected and stored as greywater to be reused in toilets to reduce water consumption.

7

Developer: 4614 Woodland Partners LP Location: 4614-18 Woodland Avenue Size: 15,000 square feet Completion Date: 2018

CAMPUS COMMERCE CENTER

Developer: Campus Apartments Location: 41st & Walnut Streets Size: 130,000 square feet Completion Date: Phase 1: 2012, Phase 2: 2020

8

Real Estate Development

Following the 2012 completion of the first phase of the Campus Commerce Center, a 136 room extended-stay hotel, phase two will be a Class-A office building partially occupied by the developer, Campus Apartments.

17


THE STATE OF UNIVERSITY CITY 2018

MEDICAL 9

CENTER FOR HEALTHCARE TECHNOLOGY Penn Medicine’s Center for Healthcare Technology will include an 8-story office building for Penn Medicine corporate functions, and a new childcare center. Construction began in early 2017. A second phase will support future needs and will increase the building to 18 stories, with a total of 540,000 square feet. Developer: Penn Medicine Location: Civic Center Boulevard Size: Phase 1: 250,000 square feet Phase 2: 290,000 square feet Completion Date: Early 2019 (Phase 1)

10

THE PAVILION AT PENN MEDICINE The University of Pennsylvania will build a new $1.5 billion hospital on Penn Medicine’s West Philadelphia campus. The facility will be the largest capital project in Penn’s history and Philadelphia’s most sophisticated and ambitious healthcare building project. The Pavilion will house 500 private patient rooms and 47 operating rooms in a 1.5 million square foot, 17-story facility across the street from the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. Developer: Penn Medicine Location: Civic Center Boulevard Size: 1.5 million square feet Completion Date: 2021

11

ROBERTS CENTER FOR PEDIATRIC RESEARCH A 21-story building that houses office-based clinical research sits on CHOP’s newest campus, a 9-acre site along the Schuylkill River. As one of the City’s largest redevelopment projects, this campus will revitalize the waterfront property, integrating CHOP spaces with the Schuylkill River Trail and landscaping the area to create pedestrian walkways and green spaces for public use that connect the neighborhood to the South Street Bridge and University City.

Real Estate Development

Developer: The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia Location: Schuylkill Avenue & South Street Size: 466,000 square feet Completion Date: 2017

18

12

PHILADELPHIA RONALD MCDONALD HOUSE EXPANSION Along with the renovation of existing structures, this expansion will enable PRMH to go from serving approximately 800 families annually over the past three years to an estimated 1,900 families, and will increase available room nights from roughly 16,000 to more than 40,000 per year. Developer: Location: Size: Completion Date:

Philadelphia Ronald McDonald House 3925 Chestnut Street 93,000 square feet Late 2018/Early 2019


KORMAN QUADRANGLE This green space adjacent to the improved Korman Center will feature new walkways, landscaping and seating that will make the area more userfriendly and appealing as a public gathering place. Renamed the Korman Quadrangle, it will unify this section of campus by strengthening its connections to Chestnut Street, Market Street and Drexel’s Perelman Plaza.

13

Developer: Drexel University Location: Between Market & Chestnut and between 32nd & 33rd Streets Size: 1 acre Completion Date: Fall 2017

40TH STREET TROLLEY PORTAL GARDENS Through a unique public-private partnership with SEPTA, the City of Philadelphia and neighborhood stakeholders, University City District will transform the 40th Street Trolley Portal from an expanse of concrete into a vibrant and social space featuring beautiful landscaping, movable seating, and a new restaurant called Trolley Car Station that will serve as a community asset for neighbors, commuters and local employees.

THE STATE OF UNIVERSITY CITY 2018

PUBLIC SPACE

14

Developer: University City District Location: 40th Street & Baltimore Avenue Size: 43,000 square feet Completion Date: Spring 2018

RESIDENTIAL / MIXED USE 3700 LANCASTER A six-story residential building at the corner of Powelton and Lancaster Avenues is expected to break ground in Q4 2018. The building is the second residential project at uCity Square, and will feature 300 market-rate apartments and 16,000 square feet of ground-floor retail.

15

Developer:

A joint venture between the University City Science Center, Ventas & Wexford Science + Technology Location: 3700 Lancaster Avenue Size: 300,000 square feet Completion Date: Spring 2020

Planning for a five-story apartment building with 119 individual units continues for this site. Designed for graduate and professional students, the building at 40th and Pine is close enough to campus that those with non-traditional work and study schedules can get to and from their laboratories, hospitals and research spaces sa fely and easily. Developer: University of Pennsylvania in partnership with Equinox Management & Construction, LLC, of Philadelphia Location: 40th and Pine Streets Size: 70,000 square feet Completion Date: Summer 2018

16

Real Estate Development

400 SOUTH 40TH STREET

19


THE STATE OF UNIVERSITY CITY 2018

RESIDENTIAL / MIXED USE 17

4001-4003 CHESTNUT STREET Plans are in the works to completely renovate the existing vacant buildings at 4001-4003 Chestnut Street to create retail and office spaces and three residential apartments. The project area includes a 2,200 square foot landscaped green space at the northern end of the site. Developer: Location: Size: Completion Date:

18

University of Pennsylvania in partnership with Stockton Real Estate Advisors and U3 Ventures, of Philadelphia 40th and Chestnut Streets 10,500 square feet Summer 2018

4045 BALTIMORE AVENUE Plans call for 49 one-bedroom apartment units to be built as an “addition� to the existing site located at 4045 Baltimore Avenue. The five-story project built over ongrade parking will include spaces for Zipcar vehicles. Developer: New Horizons Housing Location: 4045 Baltimore Avenue Size: 33,850 square feet Completion Date: February/March 2019

Real Estate Development

19

20

4215 CHESTNUT STREET A 28-unit condominium building, 4215 Chestnut includes one- and two-bedroom units with a common roof deck and enclosed parking. Developer: Location: Size: CompletionDate:

HOW Properties & Monte Resnick 4215 Chestnut Street 27,678 square feet July 2017


43RD & SANSOM This mixed-use space is a four-story building with two commercial spaces at grade.

20

Developer: Apartments at Penn Location: 43rd & Sansom Streets Size: 35,000 square feet Completion Date: April 2017

CHESTNUT STREET APARTMENTS Several multifamily buildings are rising on a short stretch of Chestnut Street, collectively adding a substantial new residential presence to this high traffic corridor.

THE STATE OF UNIVERSITY CITY 2018

RESIDENTIAL / MIXED USE

21

Developer: Multiple developers Location: Chestnut St. from 40th – 43rd Streets Size: Minimum 200 units in total Completion Date: Late 2017 – 2018

HAMILTON COURT

Developer: Post Brothers Location: 39th Street & Chestnut Street Size: 20,600 square feet commercial, 133,500 square feet renovated residential Completion Date: Spring 2018

22 Real Estate Development

Hamilton Court is an iconic off-campus student housing building at the University of Pennsylvania. The property is undergoing a comprehensive renovation and redevelopment, which includes the construction of a ground-up, modern amenity center in the building’s courtyard. Nearly 21,000 square feet of street level retail will be opened, which will further amenitize the building and enliven a previously underutilized street corner.

21


THE STATE OF UNIVERSITY CITY 2018

RESIDENTIAL / MIXED USE 23

HILL COLLEGE HOUSE Designed by Finnish-American architect and industrial designer Eero Saarinen in 1958, Hill College House is an internationally recognized architectural landmark that has undergone a complete building renovation. Originally a women’s dormitory, Hill is now a fully modern college house with upgraded bathrooms, common spaces, kitchen and dining areas, and mechanical systems including, for the first time, air conditioning. Developer: Location: Size: Completion Date:

24

University of Pennsylvania 33rd & Walnut Streets 195,000 square feet August 2017

THE SIMON This new apartment building will feature 23 luxury apartments. The design includes a state-of-the-art fitness center and limited parking. Developer: Campus Apartments Location: 121 South 41st Street Size: 45,000 square feet Completion Date: August 2018

Real Estate Development

25

22

SUMMER TWELVE Adjacent to the recently completed 16-story Vue32 apartment building, Radnor Property Group is also developing three low-rise residential buildings consisting of 12 for-sale condominiums. Each unit will have 2 bedrooms, 2.5 bathrooms, yard/roof deck amenity spaces and access to onsite parking. Developer: Radnor Property Group Location: 32nd & Summer Streets Size: Approximately 16,000 square feet Completion Date: Summer 2018


USCIENCES RESIDENCE HALL To better meet the needs of its students, University of the Sciences is planning to construct a new, mixeduse residence hall that will incorporate numerous sustainable features for Green Globe certification. The 426-bed building will also house ground floor multi-use classrooms, retail spaces and support offices. The building has a U-shaped courtyard that opens onto Woodland Ave., which will provide opportunities for interaction and collaboration - key facets of an overall campus master plan to activate Woodland Ave.

26

THE STATE OF UNIVERSITY CITY 2018

RESIDENTIAL / MIXED USE

Developer: University of the Sciences Location: 4514-22 Woodland Avenue Size: 126,000 square feet Completion Date: Winter 2018-19

VUE32 This $56 million, mixed-use project developed in partnership with Drexel University provides residences and a preschool to a mix of Drexel graduate students, faculty, professional staff and non-Drexel professionals working in the area. The 16-story residential tower features 164 luxury one- and two-bedroom units and top flight amenities. Developer: Location: Size: Completion Date:

Radnor Property Group 3201 Race Street 176,000+ square feet July 2017

WEST LOFTS

WPHS Venture Partners LLC 47th & Locust Streets 268 units Beginning Summer 2017

28 Real Estate Development

The historic West Philadelphia High School building is being converted to loft style apartments with soaring ceilings and oversized windows. Features of the original building that are being preserved include the restored 1911 gym with suspended running track. Developer: Location: Size: Completion date:

27

23


THE STATE OF UNIVERSITY CITY 2018

uCity Square University City Science Center and Wexford Science + Technology announced a strategic development partnership in 2015 to create uCity Square, a mixed-use, transit-oriented community in the heart of University City. In total, the project combines 2.5 million square feet of existing mixed-use development along Market Street with an additional 4 million square feet of planned office, laboratory, clinical, residential, retail and green space on 14 acres of land. Construction is underway on the first new building in uCity Square, 3675 Market Street, which is scheduled to deliver in summer 2018. Building on the success of Innovation Plaza, additional placemaking activities are in progress in uCity Square. The Pennsylvania Horticultural Society opened a pop-up beer garden at 36th and Filbert in spring 2017. University City District, Wexford, TinyWPA and the Science Center are collaborating on The Meadow, a one-acre wildflower meadow and urban tree farm at uCity Square inspired by recommendations from a local community design process. In partnership with Drexel University, Wexford has begun construction on a new street and utility grid on land Drexel and Wexford acquired from the School District of Philadelphia in 2014. The project will include three new streets - Cuthbert, Warren and 37th - which will further integrate uCity Square into the surrounding neighborhoods. The new streets are expected to take 10-12 months to complete. The growth of uCity Square will continue to elevate University City as one of the nation’s leading innovation districts.

Real Estate Development

Pennovation Works

24

Innovators in fields from robotics to health sciences have found offices, labs, production space and a collaborative community at Pennovation Works, a 23-acre site development by the University of Pennsylvania. The site’s centerpiece, the Pennovation Center, opened in September 2016 and today hosts more than 20 companies housed in labs, offices, startup garages and co-working desks. The site’s capacity is expanding, with the fit-out of 8,000 square feet in the Pennovation Center and the availability of 24,000 square feet in the recently renovated office building. Penn is also studying future use in a 69,000 square foot lab building. Programming in the past year has included a hackathon, launch events, industry speaker panels, collaborative art activity and a music concert open to the community. By grouping facilities for innovation, technological development and artistic production/exhibition, Penn’s Master Plan envisions a multifaceted workshop for harnessing and commercializing the tremendous creative potential in the region.


THE STATE OF UNIVERSITY CITY 2018

Schuylkill Yards Drexel University and Brandywine Realty Trust have partnered to create Schuylkill Yards, a 14-acre master planned community. Schuylkill Yards will be an integrated urban environment, offering a collaborative and connected knowledge community comprised of educational and medical institutions, businesses, residents and visitors bound together by the pursuit of innovation. Situated adjacent to Amtrak’s 30th Street Station, the third-busiest passenger rail station in the country, Schuylkill Yards will be connected to the Philadelphia International Airport and the major cities along the Northeast corridor, making it a key innovation hub on the East Coast. Brandywine has secured zoning approval for the first phases of Schuylkill Yards, allowing for 1.3 million square feet of new vertical development, the re-imagining of the Bulletin Building and the development of Drexel Square – a 1.3-acre park at the corner of 30th and Market Streets. This initial development will further connect Drexel University’s main campus, Amtrak’s 30th Street Station and Brandywine’s Cira Centre and Cira Centre South to solidify the gateway to University City. Construction of Drexel Square is projected to commence by the end of 2017.

Philadelphia 30th Street District

In addition, Amtrak is advancing planning and design for Station Plaza, the grand civic place surrounding all four sides of 30th Street Station. During the year, Amtrak engaged a widerange of stakeholders - including the public - on ways to enhance the public space around the station. A preferred alternative will be selected by the end of 2017.

Real Estate Development

In 2017, Amtrak took the next big step toward a comprehensive redevelopment of Philadelphia 30th Street Station and adjacent properties with the release of a Request for Qualifications (RFQ) seeking a Master Developer partnership. This multiphase solicitation follows the successful completion of the Philadelphia 30th Street District Plan in 2016, which envisioned the district around 30th Street Station as Philadelphia’s next great neighborhood: a place to live, work, learn and play near one of the nation’s busiest and most important transportation hubs, and accessible to one-of-a-kind urban and natural amenities.

25


THE STATE OF UNIVERSITY CITY 2018

Employment In recent years, University City’s employment growth has been on par with that of peer innovation neighborhoods in Seattle, Austin and Atlanta, and shows no signs of slowing. With more than 33,000 jobs per square mile, University City remains one of the top employment hubs in the region, and plays a significant role on the national level as well: for the first time in 25 years, Philadelphia outpaced New York in terms of job growth. Buoyed by the neighborhood’s largest employers and the opening of several new offices, the number of jobs in University City continues to rise, and is expected to reach 80,000 for the first time in 2017. The continued development of uCity Square, Schuylkill Yards and University City's health systems will continue spurring employment for years to come.

Employment in University City 90,000 80,000 70,000

Percentage of Jobs Paying at Least $40,000 per Year

12%

70%

10%

60%

60,000 8% 50,000

50%

40% 6%

40,000

30% 30,000

4% 20%

20,000

26

Jobs in University City % of Philadelphia Jobs in University City Source: U.S. Census Bureau. 2015. OnTheMap Application. Longitudinal-Employer Household Dynamics Program. Excludes federal civilian employees (prior to 2010), uniformed military, self-employed workers, and informally employed workers. * UCD Estimate

2015

2014

2013

2012

2011

2010

2009

2008

2007

2006

2005

2004

0% 2003

2017*

2015

2016*

2013

2014

2011

2012

2010

2009

2007

2008

2005

2006

2003

2004

0% 2002

Employment

0

10%

2002

2% 10,000

University City Remainder of Philadelphia Note: Percentages reflect jobs paying at least $40,000 per year in nominal (currrent) dollars, and are not adjusted for inflation. Source: U.S. Census Bureau. 2015. OnTheMap Application. Longitudinal-Employer Household Dynamics Program. Excludes federal civilian employees (prior to 2010), uniformed military, self-employed workers, and informally employed workers.


THE STATE OF UNIVERSITY CITY 2018

Employment

27


THE STATE OF UNIVERSITY CITY 2018

University City’s Largest Employers 60,000

50,000 IRS: 3,855 VA Hospital: 2,544 Drexel University: 3,441 40,000 Children's Hospital of Philadelphia: 12,161 30,000 Penn Medicine: 15,311 20,000

10,000

University of Pennsylvania: 17,655

0 2008

2009

2010

2011

Source: Individual Employers

Jobs By Industry Education and Health Care: 79.5% Office: 5.2% Entertainment, Hospitality & Retail: 8% Public Services: 4.4% Transportation, Warehousing & Wholesale Trade: 0.3%

Employment

Manufacturing: 0.1%

28

Other Services: 1.1% Real Estate & Construction: 1.4% Source: U.S. Census Bureau. 2015. OnTheMap Application. Longitudinal-Employer Household Dynamics Program.

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2017


BY ZIP CODE 19116

283

Philadelphia

19154

19115

336

305

19150

352

19152

19111

297

740

19126

256

510

901

1,039

252

19138

19119

19128

19114

417

19118

THE STATE OF UNIVERSITY CITY 2018

Residents Commuting to University City Jobs

19136

419

19149 19141

19144

406

721

19127

145

619

19120

717

19135

302

19124

University City

19129

607

19140

366

451

19132

480

19133

1,014

19121

463

19151

912

1,069

19139

19104

1,988

19122

224

19130

1,163

19143

425

19137

137

19125

573

19102 19123

19103

1,798

334

419

19107 19106

525 531

19146

2,813

19134

145

19131

2,220

BY COUNTY

19147

1,529

19142

643

19145

19148

1,041

1,050

Pennsylvania

19153

389

Montgomery 8,790

19112

4

Bucks 2,441

Philadelphia 32,331

Chester 2,872

University City Delaware 10,697

New Jersey

Camden 4,104 Gloucester 2,255

New Castle 1,146

Burlington 1,960

Salem 150

LOW

HIGH

Source: U.S. Census Bureau. 2014. OnTheMap Application. Longitudinal-Employer Household Dynamics Program.

Employment

Delaware

29


30

Employment THE STATE OF UNIVERSITY CITY 2018


Employment

Percentage of Jobs Paying at Least $40,000 per Year

275,000

100%

250,000

90%

225,000

80%

200,000

THE STATE OF UNIVERSITY CITY 2018

University City and Peer Employment Centers

70%

175,000

60% 150,000

50% 125,000

40%

100,000

30%

75,000

25,000

10%

0

0% 20

20

02 20 03 20 04 20 05 20 06 20 07 20 08 20 09 20 10 20 11 20 12 20 13 20 14 20 15

20%

02 20 03 20 04 20 05 20 06 20 07 20 08 20 09 20 10 20 11 20 12 20 13 20 14 20 15

50,000

Atlanta (Midtown)

Research Triangle Park

Seattle (South Lake Union)

Austin (Downtown)

San Francisco (Mission Bay)

Washington DC (Downtown)

Boston (Innovation District)

San Jose (Downtown)

University City

Cambridge (Kendall Square)

Percentage of Employees with Bachelor's or Advanced Degrees 45% 40% 35% 38.3%

37.8%

39.5%

42.3% 33.8%

30% 25%

34.6%

35.0%

34.1%

35.4%

26.8%

20% 15% 10%

0% Atlanta (Midtown)

Austin (Downtown)

Boston (Innovation District)

Cambridge (Kendall Square)

Research Triangle Park

San Francisco (Mission Bay)

San Jose (Downtown)

Seattle (South Lake Union)

Washington DC (Downtown)

University City

Notes: Comparisons are between University City and equally sized areas (2.4 square miles) encompassing the peer employment center. Percentages reflect jobs paying at least $40,000 per year in nominal(current) dollars, and are not adjusted for inflation. • Source: U.S. Census Bureau. 2015. OnTheMap Application. Longitudinal-Employer Household Dynamics Program

Employment

5%

31


THE STATE OF UNIVERSITY CITY 2018

Office At 93% occupancy in Q3 2017, University City’s office market remains among the tightest in the Philadelphia region. In the past year, three major companies - FMC Corporation, NASDAQ, and Brandywine Realty Trust relocated to University City. The anticipated completion of the Science Center’s and Wexford Science + Technology’s 3675 Market Street will add nearly 350,000 square feet of new innovation space and has already attracted the Boston-based Cambridge Innovation Center (CIC) as an anchor tenant. The 1.5 million square feet of new development occurring across the neighborhood was among the highest in the last 15 years, and growth in construction permits drastically outpaces Philadelphia overall.

Office Occupancy Rates Among 25 Regional Submarkets Submarket

Occupancy Rate*

University City Main Line

90.7%

Conshohocken

89.3%

Market West

88.7%

Market East

88.7%

Bala Cynwyd

88.7%

Delaware County

88.1%

Lehigh Valley West

87.5%

King Of Prussia/Valley Forge

87.0%

Exton/West Chester

86.2%

Independence Hall

84.9%

Jenkintown

84.6%

New Castle County Suburbs

84.4%

Burlington County

84.3%

Central Bucks County

84.1%

Plymouth Meeting

84.0%

Horsham/Willow Grove

83.4%

Upper Main Line

82.8%

Gloucester County Camden County

Office

Blue Bell

32

90%

85%

80%

81.5%

75%

80.8% 80.6%

Fort Washington

80.0%

Lehigh Valley East

79.3%

Lower Bucks County

78.8%

Source: CBRE

95%

81.7%

Wilmington CBD

*2017 (Q3)

100%

92.6%

70% 2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2017


THE STATE OF UNIVERSITY CITY 2018

Office

33


THE STATE OF UNIVERSITY CITY 2018

Asking Gross Rent (per sq ft)

Total Vacancy Rate

$45

20%

$40 $35

15%

$30 $25

10%

$20 $15

5%

$10 $5

0%

Office

34

University City

Downtown Philadelphia

Region

2017

2016

2015

2014

2013

2012

2011

2010

2009

2008

2007

2017

2016

2015

2014

2013

2012

2011

2010

2009

2008

2007

$0

Note: Downtown Philadelphia includes University City and Center City Source: CBRE


THE STATE OF UNIVERSITY CITY 2018

Net Absorption

Under Construction

(sq ft)

1,500,000

(sq ft)

3,000,000

1,000,000

2,500,000

500,000 2,000,000

0 1,500,000

-500,000

Remainder of Region (excluding Downtown Philadelphia)

2017

2016

2015

2014

2013

2012

2011

2010

2009

2008

2017

2016

2015

2014

2013

2012

2011

Center City

Source: CBRE

Office

University City

2010

0

2009

-2,000,000

2008

500,000

2007

-1,500,000

2007

1,000,000

-1,000,000

35


THE STATE OF UNIVERSITY CITY 2018

Retail and Hospitality Local and national retailers, restaurants, and hotels view University City - with its diverse mix of employees, commuters, college students and residents - as a prime location. Hotel options abound due to the openings of AKA University City and The Study at University City, plus renovations at the Sheraton. Need food options? The neighborhood contains a whopping 266 places to eat and drink, including new fine dining establishments Dim Sum House, CO-OP, and the Walnut Street CafÊ and casual eateries Fuel, Schmear It, and Beiler’s Donuts. These new amenities draw customers and employees, leading to a 3% average annual increase of pedestrian activity on University City streets.

Busy Sidewalks and Thriving Businesses Hourly Pedestrian Counts

Ground Floor Commercial Storefronts

100

1 Spring

Powelto 184 249

Larchwoo

e

d Ave

1,155

361 236

994

579 507

282

552

159

133 Baltmore Ave

103

682

273

276

233

ve nA d

43

e Av Ch

es

r te

e Av

Ki

ng

se

ss

in

rd

n te

rB

ut

hS t

l vd

St

143

ve gA

104

dA ve

el

Civ

e ic c

So

lan

S

i pr

f ng

Wo od

o gt

1,163

155

Ave

Retail and Hospitality

973 885

254

University

36

1,030

1,224 1,157

133 226

90

Cedar Ave

rin

898

279 209

964

427 515

159

Ha zel Ave

ar W

688

40th St

Pine St

865

Arch St

34th St

Spruce St

438 426 436

Arch St

368

788

286

36th St

37th St

38th St

744

39th St

43rd St

41st St

547

120

728

Locust St

Osage Av

Race St 370 542

42nd St

Walnut St

84

44th St

47th St

Sansom St

45th St

St

46th St

48th St

Chestnut

n Ave

Ave

Av e

ylkill

te r

Schu

as

30th St

nc

Market St 49th St

50th St

La

St

37th St

39th St

1,000

Garden

32nd St

10

31st St

5

6PM - 8PM

33rd St

500

11AM - 1PM

Source: UCD


THE STATE OF UNIVERSITY CITY 2018

Retail and Hospitality

37

CO-OP


THE STATE OF UNIVERSITY CITY 2018

All Storefronts

Food & Beverage

Retail:

147

Casual Dining:

131

Food and Beverage:

266

Full Service Dining:

67

237

Bakery and Cafe:

44

Bar and Night Club:

17

Ice Cream:

7

Services:

Retail and Hospitality

Retail

38

Food: Apparel: Books and Music: Pharmacy: General Merchandise: Home and Garden: Cell Phones and Electronics: Gas Station: Art Galleries and Supplies: Gifts and Flowers: Beauty Supplies: Bicycles: All Other: Source: UCD

Services

43 11 11 11 10 8 10 7 5 6 5 3 17

Beauty: Laundromat and Dry Cleaning: Real Estate: Childcare: Health Care: Auto Service: Bank and Financial Institutions: Copy and Print: Tax Preparation and Accounting: Fitness: Arts and Music Instruction: Hotels: Car Rental: Social Services: Religious: Tutoring: All Other:

52 21 20 15 14 15 11 11 7 8 10 7 7 7 5 4 23


THE STATE OF UNIVERSITY CITY 2018

Retail and Hospitality

39

The Nesting House


THE STATE OF UNIVERSITY CITY 2018

Ice Cream & Other

Bar/Nightclub

Full Service Dining

Bakery/Café

Casual Dining Source: UCD

40

2017 (Q2)

2015

2016

0 2014

0

2013

0

2011

50

2012

50

2010

50

2009

100

2016

100

2017 (Q2)

100

2015

150

2014

150

2012

150

2013

200

2011

200

2010

200

2009

250

2017 (Q2)

250

2015

250

2016

300

2014

300

2012

300

2013

Services

2011

Retail

2010

Food & Beverage

2009

Retail and Hospitality

Clarkville


THE STATE OF UNIVERSITY CITY 2018 AKA University City

Two New Hotels Boost University City’s Appeal

Hotel Occupancy and Average Room Rate 90%

$250

80% $200

70% 60%

$150

50% 40%

$100

30% 20%

$50

10% 0%

2008

2009

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

$0

University City Occupancy

Center City Ocupancy

UC Average Rate

CC Average Rate

Average Daily Hotel Room Supply and Demand in University City 1,200

800 600 400 200 0

2008

2009

Room Supply

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

Room Demand

Source: CBRE Hotels - Provided by the Philadelphia Convention and Visitors Bureau

2016

2017

Retail and Hospitality

1,000

Visiting University City has never been easier, or more comfortable. In 2016, hotel room inventory surged 48% with the addition of 345 combined units at the newly opened AKA University City and The Study at University City. The Study features 212 rooms, approximately 7,000 square feet of banquet and meeting space, and CO-OP, a new restaurant and lounge offering urban dining with an emphasis on seasonal and local ingredients. AKA University City - located on the top 18 floors of the new FMC Tower - features luxury hotel, extended stay and apartment options. It also offers proximity to the ground-level Walnut Street CafĂŠ from the owners of the Michelin star winning Rebelle in New York City, plus some of the most breathtaking views in the entire city.

41


THE STATE OF UNIVERSITY CITY 2018

Colleges and Universities True to its name, University City provides top options in the region and nation for undergraduate and graduate/professional studies. Over 43,000 students are enrolled in the neighborhood’s institutions of higher education. Students from around the country and world are drawn to the dynamism of University City’s global dining scene, proximity to employment opportunities and excellent transit system. Nearly 25,000 undergraduate and graduate students live in apartments and houses spread throughout the neighborhood. According to a Campus Philly poll of undergraduates, 67% of respondents want to stay in Philadelphia after graduation and approximately 88% believe there are many job opportunities in Greater Philadelphia. In 2010, only 55% of respondents in a similar poll indicated they’d recommend Philadelphia as a place to live.

Student Population in University City and Peer Employment Centers 25,000

20,000

15,000

42

5,000

Graduate

Washington DC (Downtown)

Seattle (South Lake Union)

San Jose (Downtown)

San Francisco (Mission Bay)

Cambridge (Kendall Square)

Boston (Innovation District)

Austin (Downtown)

Atlanta (Midtown)

Undergraduate

Research Triangle Park

N/A*

0 University City

Colleges and Universities

10,000

Note: Comparisons are between University City and equally sized areas (2.4 square miles) encompassing the peer employment center. *No date due to limited residential population • Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 2011-2015 American Community Survey


THE STATE OF UNIVERSITY CITY 2018

Colleges and Universities

43


THE STATE OF UNIVERSITY CITY 2018

Degrees Awarded at University City's Colleges and Universities Architecture and Related Services Biological and Biomedical Sciences Business, Management, Marketing, and Related Support Services Communication, Journalism, and Related Programs Computer and Information Sciences and Support Services Education Engineering Engineering Technologies and Engineering-related Fields English Language and Literature/Letters Foreign Languages, Literatures, and Linguistics Health Professions and Related Programs History Legal Professions and Studies Liberal Arts and Sciences, General Studies, and Humanities Library Science Mathematics and Statistics Multi/Interdisciplinary Studies Philosophy and Religious Studies Physical Sciences Psychology Public Administration and Social Service Professions Social Sciences Visual and Performing Arts

0

Bachelor's

Master's

500

1,000

1,500

Doctor's research/ scholarship

2,000

2,500

3,000

Colleges and Universities

4,000

Doctor's professional practice

Source: National Center for Education Statistics, IPEDS, Degrees Awarded July 1, 2015 - June 30, 2016 (fields with 50 or more degrees awarded)

44

3,500


University Enrollment

25,000

45,000 40,000

5,325 20,000

THE STATE OF UNIVERSITY CITY 2018

Student Population Living in University City

4,020

35,000 30,000

15,000 25,000 20,000

10,000

19,221

17,719

15,000 10,000

5,000

5,000

0

0

2000

2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016

2015

Graduate

USciences Grad

Drexel Grad

Penn Grad

Undergraduate

USciences Undergrad

Drexel Undergrad

Penn Undergrad

Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 2000 Census, 2011-2015 American Community Survey

Source: Individual institutions

2017 Enrollment University of Pennsylvania

Drexel University*

University of the Sciences in Philadelphia

The Restaurant School at Walnut Hill College

Community College of Philadelphia West Campus

11,716 13,244 24,960

15,499 8,733 24,232*

2,094 442 2,536

326 0 326

1,455†

5,723 424 5,569 4,602

3,018 178 12,481 n/a

457 n/a 1,700 n/a

121 0 205 26

0 0 1,455† n/a

670 12,574 5,098

134 8,599 n/a

34 380 n/a

0 0 0

0 0 0

Students Undergraduate Graduate Total Students

0 1,455†

Student Housing Undergraduate

Graduate on campus off campus (total) in University City

*Includes 2,166 students on co-op and 4,868 distance learning students. Total students on University City campus is 15,445. †Includes credit and non-credit students who took classes at the West Regional Center including summer terms

Colleges and Universities

in campus residences in fraternity/sorority off campus (total) in University City

45


THE STATE OF UNIVERSITY CITY 2018

Healthcare Nearly 40% of all people employed in University City work in the healthcare sector, making it an essential component of University City’s economy. The neighborhood’s medical institutions - Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania (HUP), Penn Presbyterian Medical Center, Children’s Hospital of Pennsylvania (CHOP) and Philadelphia Veteran Affairs Medical Center - are on pace to treat nearly 4 million patients in 2017, and are leading the way in new treatments, procedures and medical technologies. Two of University City’s health systems are ranked within the top ten in the nation according to U.S. News and World Report, with the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania-Penn Presbyterian ranked #9 overall and Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia coming in at #2 for best children’s hospital.

Admissions

Beds 800

40,000

Births 5,000

788

34,691 30,000

4,000

600

29,065

520 20,000

3,000

400

354

15,388 10,000

2,000

280

200

1,000

5,904 0

0

Outpatient Visits

0

Employees

1,500,000

15,000

Healthcare

1,000,000

46

51 NORTH 39TH STREET

10,043

Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia

714,773

3401 CIVIC CENTER BOULEVARD

5,000

216,352

Philadelphia Veterans Affairs Medical Center 2,133

0

0

Penn Presbyterian Medical Center

10,000

500,000

410

3400 SPRUCE STREET

13,326

1,259,581

0

Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania

1,690,429

0

4,078

2,322

3900 WOODLAND AVENUE

Source: American Hospital Association


THE STATE OF UNIVERSITY CITY 2018

Healthcare

47


THE STATE OF UNIVERSITY CITY 2018

Transportation Need to get around the neighborhood? You’re in luck. University City boasts excellent options for bicyclists, pedestrians or commuters using public transit, earning Walkscore.com's “paradise” status for all three modes of transportation. Transit ridership at neighborhood rail stations has increased by 16% since 2010, bike traffic to Center City is up 11% annually and pedestrian counts are up at an annualized rate of 3%. Overall, University City rates as more accessible by transit than any of its peer innovation hubs, including San Francisco, Seattle and Cambridge. Bike sharing has proven to be a smash success: 2016 saw a 27% increase in the inventory of local stations, and four of the top six most frequent trips in the city were to University City stations.

Commute Mode of Residents

Travel Time to Work (Minutes)

100%

45%

1.2%

1.2%

9.5%

8.6%

1.3% 2.6%

41%

40% 35%

90%

40% 32%

30%

21.7%

25% 20%

80%

15%

26%

24% 15%

10%

10%

5.1%

70%

8.2%

50.4%

5%

5% 0%

<15

15-29

30-59

60-89 90+ Philadelphia Residents

University City Residents

60%

4% 4%

Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 2011-2015 American Community Survey

50%

76.4% 30.5%

40%

3.1% 2.1%

Long Term Change in Pedestrian Counts (2010-2016) Market St: 36th - 37th 34th St: Spruce - Convention

30%

30th St: Schuylkill - 30th Lancaster Ave: 36th - 37th

26.2%

20%

40th St: Chestnut - Ludow Lancaster Ave: 34th - 35th

4.4% 0.6% 5.1%

10%

Baltimore Ave: 45th - 46th Market St: 34th - 36th 40th St: Locust - Walnut

8.5%

Woodland Ave: 46th - 47th

2.8%

0%

United States

Baltimore Ave: 47th - 48th

Philadelphia

University City

Market St: 33th - 34th

Note: Average annual change for weekday evening counts (6PM - 8PM) from 2010 to 2016 Source: UCD

14%

12%

10%

8%

4%

6%

Bicycle Walked Public Transportation

2%

Drove Alone Worked at Home

0%

Other Car Pooled

-2%

Baltimore Ave: 49th - 50th

Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 2011-2015 American Community Survey

48

34th St: Walnut - Chestnut

-4%

Transportation

30.7%


THE STATE OF UNIVERSITY CITY 2018

Transportation

49


THE STATE OF UNIVERSITY CITY 2018

Average Daily Transit Boardings and Bike Share Trips by Station Transit Stations/Boardings

1,000

10 50

Pine St

d Ave

42nd St

Larchwoo

Cedar Ave

Fl

or

e

nc

ve eA

gt

on

Sp

el

d

e Av C

s he

te

ve rA

30

40 Street Portal

ng

30th Street Station

315

1,045

71

University City Station

37th Street Station

6

Civ

ic c

en

B te r

l vd

12,119

890

33 rd Street Station

1,745

2,386

s

s es

in

13,434

79

104

91

3,125

So

53 25

ve gA

la n Wo od

Source: SEPTA, New Jersey Transit, Amtrak, City of Philadelphia, Bicycle Transit Systems Note: Bike Share counts are for Q2 2017

ut

hS t

5,670

ill A ve

6,318

uylk

34 th Street Station

30th St

55 th

n Ave

rA ve

36th St

36 Street Station

25

dA ve

Ki

te

th

35

e Av

fi rin

Powelto

as

St

Ave

ar W

rin

Ave

nc

36th Street Portal

University

Transportation

ore Baltim

La

38th St

Spruce St

39th St

Locust St

25

25

St 40th St

Walnut St

5,792 28 41st St

44th St

31

43rd St

45th St

46th St

47th St

48th St

49th St

50th St

Market St Chestnut

25

40th Street Station

4,366 15

35th St

39th St

46th Street Station

37th St

10,000

Garden

33rd St

Amtrak

Spring

29

31st St

100

Sch

5,000

SEPTA Regional Rail/New Jersey Transit

32nd St

Subway-Surface Trolley Lines

50

Bike Share Stations/Trips

34th St

Market-Frankford Line

37


THE STATE OF UNIVERSITY CITY 2018

Average Daily Boardings at University City Stations

Annual LUCY Riders 1,000,000 900,000 800,000

25,000

700,000 600,000 500,000 400,000

20,000

300,000 200,000 100,000 0 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016

15,000

Source: SEPTA

Total Amtrak Riders to/from Philadelphia (30th Street Station)

10,000

4,500,000 4,000,000 3,500,000 5,000

3,000,000 2,500,000

1,500,000

0

1,000,000

MarketFrankford Line

500,000 0 2010 Source: Amtrak

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

Subway Surface (Trolley)

Regional Rail

2016

2010

2016

Source: SEPTA

Transportation

2,000,000

51


THE STATE OF UNIVERSITY CITY 2018

100 90 80

92

Walk, Transit and Bike Scores

98

90

Walk Score measures walkability based on the distance to nearby places and pedestrian friendliness on a scale of 0 to 100.

79

70 60

68

67

Transit Score measures how well a location is served by public transit based on the distance and type of nearby transit lines.

50 40 30

Bike Score measures whether an area is good for biking based on bike lanes and trails, hills, road connectivity, and destinations.

20 10 0 Walk Score

Transit Score

University City

Bike Score

Philadelphia

Source: walkscore.com

Most Frequent One-Way Trips on Indego Bike Share University City Station / 23rd & South Rodin Museum / 26th & Pennsylvania 36th & Sansom / Rittenhouse Square 21st & Catharine / Rittenhouse Square Dornsife Center / 33rd & Market University City Station / 21st & Catharine Rodin Museum / 18th & JFK 4th & Bainbridge / 15th & Spruce 15th & Spruce / 21st & Catharine 11th & South / 15th & Spruce 23rd & South / Amtrak 30th Street Station Rodin Museum / Rittenhouse Square University City Station / 19th & Lombard 23rd & South / The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia 18th & JFK / 21st & Catharine 26th & Pennsylvania / 18th & JFK 23rd & South / 15th & Spruce University City Station / 15th & South 18th & JFK / 11th & Pine, Kahn Park Darien & Catharine / 15th & Spruce

0 Trips to/from University City

2

4

6

8

10

12

Average Daily Trips

Other trips

Source: City of Philadelphia, Bicycle Transit Systems, 2017 (Q2)

52

Percentage of Residents Commuting to Work by Bicycle 9%

800

8%

700

8.2%

7%

600

6%

500

5%

400

4%

300

3.9%

3% 2.1%

0.4%

2000 Note: Includes Schuylkill River bridges excluding Spring Garden Street Source: Bicycle Coalition of Greater Philadelphia

0.9%

0.6%

U.S.

2016

2015

2014

2013

2012

2011

0% 2010

0 2009

1%

2008

100

2007

2%

2006

200

2005

Average hourly bicyclists at rush hour

Transportation

Bicycle Traffic Between University City & Center City

Philadelphia

University City

2015

Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 2011-2015 American Community Survey


THE STATE OF UNIVERSITY CITY 2018

Transportation

53


VIA TRANSIT

University City

University City

Transportation

VIA DRIVING

THE STATE OF UNIVERSITY CITY 2018

Travel Time from University City

MINUTES <5

54

University City

5-10

10-15

0 2.5 5

10

15

20 Miles

15-20 20-25 25-30 30-35 35-40 40-45 45-50 50-55 55-60 60-65 65-70 70-75 75-80 80-85 85-90 >90


Median Travel Time from Employment Center

60%

120

50%

100

40%

80

San Francisco (Mission Bay)

San Jose (Downtown)

Seattle (South Lake Union)

Washington DC (Downtown)

San Jose (Downtown)

Seattle (South Lake Union)

Washington DC (Downtown)

100%

San Francisco (Mission Bay)

0

60

Research Triangle Park

50

Research Triangle Park

20 30 40 Travel Time (Minutes)

Cambridge (Kendall Square)

10

Cambridge (Kendall Square)

0

Boston (Innovation District)

0%

Boston (Innovation District)

20

Austin (Downtown)

10%

Austin (Downtown)

40

Atlanta (Midtown)

20%

Atlanta (Midtown)

60

University City

30%

University City

Minutes

Percentage of Regional Population

Share of regional population with access from employment center within the specified travel time

THE STATE OF UNIVERSITY CITY 2018

Travel Time from Employment Center

60

50

80% 70%

40 60% Minutes

Percentage of Regional Population

90%

50% 40%

30

20

30% 20%

10 10% 0% 0

10

20

30

40

50

60

0

University City Atlanta (Midtown)

Cambridge (Kendall Square)

San Jose (Downtown)

Austin (Downtown

Research Triangle Park

Seattle (South Lake Union)

Boston (Innovation District)

San Francisco (Mission Bay)

Washington DC (Downtown)

Transportation

Travel Time (Minutes)

Notes: Travel times are estimated at 5PM local time on a weekday; travel times are estimated to all zip codes within a 25 mile radius of employment Center â&#x20AC;˘ Source: Google, ESRI

55


THE STATE OF UNIVERSITY CITY 2018

People University City is home to a diverse cross-section of residents. Over 53,000 people live in the neighborhood, ranging from students studying at local colleges and universities, to young professionals working in the major educational and medical centers, to families who have called the area home for decades. The neighborhoodâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s cultural and socioeconomic diversity continues to grow due to the high quality of life in University City. A continuing boom in multi-family housing has contributed to an estimated 5,300 new residents since 2010 and the people choosing to live here are getting younger, with the number of millennials (aged 20-34) up by 13% since 2000.

University City Population

Population in University City and Peer Employment Centers

55,000

60,000

30,000

53,884

50,000 40,000 30,000

25,000

20,000

20,000

10,000

15,000

N/A*

0 At to lant w a n)

10,000 5,000 2010

2017

st

2000

Bo

1990

(M

id

0

(D ow A nt us o t on wn in (In ) n Di ova st tio ric n t) (K en C da am ll S b qu rid ar ge e) Tr R ia es ng e le arc Pa h rk Sa (M n F iss ra io nci n sc Ba o y) (D S ow a nt n Jo ow se n) Se at La tle ke (S Un ou io th W n) as (D hin g ow to nt n D ow C n Un ive ) rs ity Ci ty

35,000

48,589

40,000

47,357

45,000

46,364

50,000

*No date due to limited residential population â&#x20AC;˘ Note: Comparisons are between University City and equally sized areas (2.4 square miles) encompassing the peer employment center. Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 2011-2015 American Community Survey

Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Decennial Census; UCD estimate for 2017

Age Distribution 30%

2000

25%

2015

20% 15%

People

10%

56

5% 0% 0-4

5-9

10 - 14

15 - 19

20 - 24 25 - 29 30 - 34 35 - 39 40 - 44 45 - 49 50 - 54 55 - 59 60 - 64 65 - 69 70 - 74 75 - 79

Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 2000 Decennial Census, 2011-2015 American Community Survey

80 - 84

85+


THE STATE OF UNIVERSITY CITY 2018

People

57


THE STATE OF UNIVERSITY CITY 2018

Diversity This measure reflects the probability that any two residents are of different races. 0% 0 - 5% 5 - 10% 10 - 15% 15 - 20% 20 - 25% 25 - 30% 30 - 35% 35 - 40% 40 - 45% 45 - 50% 50 - 55% 55 - 60% 60 - 65% 65 - 70 %

People

70 - 75%

58

>75% Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 2011-2015 American Community Survey


THE STATE OF UNIVERSITY CITY 2018

Educational Attainment Population 25 Years and Over 100%

82% 57%

65%

50%

50%

19% 52%

38%

40%

40%

30% 20%

Bachelor's Degree

University City

Washington DC (Downtown)

Master's/Professional/Doctorate Degree

Cambridge (Kendall Square)

University City

Boston (Innovation District)

Philadelphia

Seattle (South Lake Union)

N/A*

0%

San Jose (Downtown)

0%

10%

San Francisco (Mission Bay)

24%

10%

Research Triangle Park

20%

Austin (Downtown)

30%

60%

70%

28%

71%

23%

66%

70%

70% 60%

80%

73%

15%

90%

29%

66%

80%

10%

Atlanta (Midtown)

90%

Residents With Bachelor's Degree or Above in University City and Peer Employment Centers

High School or Below Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 2011-2015 American Community Survey

*No date due to limited residential population â&#x20AC;˘ Note: Comparisons are between University City and equally sized areas (2.4 square miles) encompassing the peer employment center. Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 2011-2015 American Community Survey

People

Some College/Associate's Degree

59


THE STATE OF UNIVERSITY CITY 2018

Life in the Neighborhood Options for housing in University City are as varied as the residents, with high-rises, historic homes, walk-up apartments, dormitories and more. Those who live in the neighborhood are never far from the 94 acres of public space, which includes parks, plazas, dog runs and athletic fields. Getting around is a breeze thanks to the excellent transportation options, and 69% of residents elect to walk, bicycle or ride public transit to work while enjoying typical commute times of 20-24 minutes. Raising a family? Local schools like Penn Alexander and the Samuel Powel School earn annual accolades. An excellent and eclectic dining scene caters to every appetite and retail options range from national chains to one-of-a-kind storefronts that keep people supplied with essentials. Finally, University City boasts a robust arts and culture scene, including theaters, art galleries and local dance and performance groups that call the neighborhood home. University Cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s fantastic amenities make it a neighborhood of choice for the entire region.

University City and Peer Employment Centers Average Rent + Utilities

Median Home Asking Price

$559,500

Washington DC (Downtown)

Seattle (South Lake Union)

San Jose (Downtown)

San Francisco (Mission Bay)

Research Triangle Park

Cambridge (Kendall Square)

N/A* Boston (Innovation District)

University City

$0 Washington DC (Downtown)

Seattle (South Lake Union)

San Jose (Downtown)

San Francisco (Mission Bay)

Research Triangle Park

Cambridge (Kendall Square)

Boston (Innovation District)

Austin (Downtown)

$0

Austin (Downtown)

$200,000

N/A*

Atlanta (Midtown)

$400,000

$500

$422,000

$600,000

Source: Local multiple listings services (via Redfin); snapshot of listings June, 2017. Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 2011-2015 American Community Survey *No date due to limited residential population â&#x20AC;˘ Note: Comparisons are between University City and equally sized areas (2.4 square miles) encompassing the peer employment center.

University City $331,500

$670,000

$800,000

$1,000

Atlanta (Midtown)

Life in the Neighborhood

60

$1,000,000

$649,000

$1,200,000 $1,500

$944,975

$1,400,000

$1,224,500

$1,600,000 $2,000

$1,350,000

$1,692,000

$1,800,000

$2,500


THE STATE OF UNIVERSITY CITY 2018

Life in the Neighborhood

61


THE STATE OF UNIVERSITY CITY 2018

Spruce Hill Named Hottest Philadelphia Neighborhood of 2017 Early in 2017, the real estate website Redfin.com used data from thousands of customer visits and the local expertise of their real estate agents to predict the hottest markets for home sales in neighborhoods across the country. University City’s Spruce Hill topped the list in the Philadelphia market. The ranking was based on the neighborhood’s quick access to public transit, larger move-in ready homes, access to trendy shopping and dining options as well as “price tags that are a little easier to bear.” 96% of the houses listed in Spruce Hill sold after spending an average of only 29 days on the market.

Life in the Neighborhood

University City Arts League Celebrates Golden Anniversary

62

University City boasts many excellent arts and cultures options - including the renowned PHILADANCO, the Annenberg Center, and World Cafe Live - yet few have had the longevity of the University City Arts League. In 2017, the Arts League celebrated its 50th Anniversary with special events and exhibitions over the course of the year. On May 13th, they hosted a Heart of Gold Gala that honored Powelton Village “junk” artist Leo Sowell, whose work created from Philadelphia refuse has earned him national acclaim. Throughout the year, the Arts League partnered with different organizations, including University City District, on a Clothesline Art Show Initiative. At various community events, the Arts League invited neighbors to create original works of art to be displayed at an Open Hearts event in December as a way to showcase the community’s passion and creativity.


Median Home Price in University City

160

$400,000

140

$350,000

120

$300,000

100

$250,000

80

$200,000

60

$150,000

40

$100,000

20

$50,000

Powelton West Powelton

Walnut Hill Cedar Park

2015

2016

Garden Court Spruce Hill

$0 2014 2015 2016

2014

2013

2013

2011 2012

2012

2008 2009 2010

2011

2003

2010

2004 2005 2006 2007

2009

2000 2001 2002

0

THE STATE OF UNIVERSITY CITY 2018

Number of Home Sales in University City

Source: Source: Realist, 2000-2002; TREND, 2003-2016

Source: TREND

Life in the Neighborhood

63


or

en

ce

gfi

el

d

e

vd

uylk Sch 30 th St

34 th St

36 th St

37th St

38 th St

39 th St

40 th St

41 st St

42 nd St

43 rd St

44 th St

45 th St

46 th St

e Av s he

te

ve rA i

ut

h

HMS School for Children with Cerebral Palsy

43

e Av

St

SCHOOLS

rd

St

Primary Middle Secondary

Wo o

dla

nd

in

ss

So

Jubilee School

e

K

e gs

ng

ore Ave

Av

C

Central University City

Spruce St

nnedy Bl

ity

S

in pr

Baltm

St. Franics de Sales School

e Av

Spruce Hill

John F Ke

e rs

ar W

ri n

n

rA ve

The City School at Spruce Hill

Cedar Park o gt

te

Univ

Fl

ve A

as

Av e

e

Cedar Av e Walton Ave Catharin e St

Penn Alexander School

47th St

Ha zel Av

e

nc

ill Av

La

St

Henry C. Lea School

Garden Court d Av e

Osa ge Av Larchwoo

Ches tnut

cust St

48 th St

49 th St

50 th St

Pine St

Samuel Powel School

33 rd St

THE STATE OF UNIVERSITY CITY 2018

Ave

West Philadelphia Catholic High School Paul Robeson High School Sansom St The City School at for Human Services Walnut Walnut Street St The Workshop School Islamic Education School Lo

Walnut Hill

Powelton Village

West Powelton

West Philadelphia High School

31st St

St

nd 32 St

Baring

Powelton

St

on St

th 37 St

39th St

Market

Hamilt

rd 3 3 St

Spri

Science Leadership Academy Middle School

St

en ng Gard

35th St

Neighborhoods and Schools

Average Home Sale Price

Average Home Sale Price Per Square Foot

$500,000

$250

$450,000

$225

$400,000

$200

$350,000

$175

$300,000

$150 $250,000

$125

$200,000

$100

$150,000

$75

$100,000 2009

2010

Cedar Park

2011

2012

Garden Court

2013

2014

2015

Powelton Village

2016

Spruce Hill

2009

2010

Walnut Hill

2011

2012

West Powelton

2013

2014

2015

University City

2016

Source: TREND

(includes all neighborhoods)

Life in the Neighborhood

Median Rent $3,000

$3.0

$2,500

$2.5

$2,000

$2.0

$1,500

$1.5

$1,000

$1.0

$500

$0.5

$0

$0.0 Cedar Park

Source: RentHub

64

Median Rent per Square Foot

Central University City

Garden Court

Powelton

Spruce Hill

University City

includes all neighborhoods

Walnut Hill

West Powelton

Cedar Park

Central University City

Garden Court

Powelton

Spruce Hill

University City

includes all neighborhoods

Walnut Hill

West Powelton


SCHOOL

ADDRESS

GRADES

TYPE

Henry C. Lea School

4700 Locust St.

pre K-8

Public

HMS School for Children with Cerebral Palsy

4400 Baltimore Ave.

pre K-12

Private

The Islamic Education School

4431 Walnut St.

K-8

Private

Jubilee School

4211 Chester Ave.

pre K-6

Private

Paul Robeson High School for Human Services

4125 Ludlow St.

9-12

Public

Penn Alexander School

4209 Spruce St.

K-8

Public

Samuel Powel School

301 N. 36th St.

K-4

Public

Science Leadership Academy Middle School

3509 Spring Garden St.

5-8

Public

St. Francis de Sales School

917 S. 47 St.

K-8

Private

The City School at Spruce Hill

4115 Baltimore Ave.

K-5

Private

The City School at Walnut Street

4501 Walnut St.

6-8

Private

The Workshop School

221 S. Hanson St.

9-12

Public

West Philadelphia Catholic High School

4501 Chestnut St.

9-12

Private

West Philadelphia High School

4901 Chestnut St.

9-12

Public

th

THE STATE OF UNIVERSITY CITY 2018

Schools in University City

Annual Neighborhood Attendance at Arts & Cultural Organizations ORGANIZATION TYPE

ANNUAL ATTENDANCE

Broadcast, Media and Literary Arts

<10,000

Performing Arts

10,000-24,999

Museums, Visual Arts, Historic and Scientific

as

Saunders Park

te r

Drexel Park

Av e

John F Kenn

30th St

Cira Green

Penn Park

Cedar Ave Walton Av e

nc

Kaskey Park

ri

on

e Av rin

gfi

ve rA

Ki

ng

s

es

sin

ve gA

43

rd

St

ve yA

C

te

hS t

Woodlands Cemetery

e Av

s he

ut

rsi t

Sp

d el

So

U n i ve

ar W

t ng

Av e

re

ve eA

nd

Fl o

Clark Park

e Ave

d la

Cedar Park

Baltmor

St

W oo

Catharine

Source: Greater Philadelphia Cultural Alliance & DataArts

Life in the Neighborhood

Ha zel Ave

33rd St

34th St

38th St

36th St

Spruce St

edy Blvd

The Porch

Innovation Plaza

37th St

42nd St

Os age Av e Larchwoo d Ave

41st St

44th St

43rd St

Pine St

45th St

Barkan Park

46th St

47th St

48th St

49th St

50th St

Locust St

39th St

40th St

Walnut St

ylkill

Ave

St

Sansom St

Schu

Ches tnut

n Ave

nc

32nd St

Powelto

Market St

La

33rd St

Baring St

35th St

arden St

St Hamilton

37th St

Spring G

>50,000

31st St

25,000-49,999

Community Arts and Education

65


THE STATE OF UNIVERSITY CITY 2018

Innovation University City is nationally recognized as a hub for advances in science, research and medicine. In a recent report, The Brookings Institute described the neighborhood as a “globally relevant innovation district a dense, dynamic engine of economic activity where research-oriented anchor institutions, high-growth firms, and tech and creative startups are embedded within a growing, amenity-rich residential and commercial environment.” Local discoveries bring billions of dollars to the regional economy, a number that keeps accelerating as new incubators, start-ups and projects like Pennovation Center and uCity Square hit the scene. In 2016, R&D investment rose by $34 million and 175 patents were issued to local businesses and institutions. The next wave of coworking spaces, laboratories and incubators - anchored by the arrival of Boston’s CIC to 3675 Market Street - will help further University City’s status as the region’s pacesetter for innovation.

Research and Development Expenditures at University City's Universities $1,000

Expenditures (in millions)

$900 $800 $700 $600 $500 $400 $300

$100 $0 1972 1973 1974 1975 1976 1977 1978 1979 1980 1981 1982 1983 1984 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015

Innovation

$200

Note: R&D expenditures in science and engineering only Source: National Science Foundation

66


THE STATE OF UNIVERSITY CITY 2018

Innovation

67


THE STATE OF UNIVERSITY CITY 2018

University City Institutions and Businesses Patents Issued 180 160 140 120 100 80 60 40 20 0

2006

2007

2008

University City Institutions

2009

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

Science Center Port Incubator Businesses

Note: Includes The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, University of Pennsylvania, Penn Medicine, Drexel University, Wistar Institute, and Science Center Port Incubator residents (2010 -2016 only) Source: Individual Institutions

Total NIH Funding $700

Dollars in Millions

$600 $500 $400 $300 $200 $100 $0 2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

Percentage of Statewide NIH Funding 50% 40% 30%

Innovation

20% 10% 0% 2005

2006

Source: National Institutes of Health

68

2007

2008

2009

2010

2011


New for 2017-18, University of the Sciences has launched a Bachelor of Science degree in neuroscience. Students in the program study the nervous system across a variety of contexts, and complete courses that emphasize the biological, behavioral, theoretical and clinical aspects of neuroscience. Capitalizing on the breadth of faculty expertise at USciences in behavioral and biological sciences; math, physics, and statistics; pharmaceutical sciences; and professional clinical programs makes

this a truly unique program. Early and frequent research experience and the diversity of program electives give students an edge in this competitive and growing field. The BS in neuroscience ultimately prepares students for graduate, medical or health professional schools that put them on career paths to be physicians, healthcare providers, doctoral degree students, biomedical engineers or researchers in areas such as theoretical modeling of the nervous system, neurobiology or neuropsychology.

THE STATE OF UNIVERSITY CITY 2018

University of the Sciences Launches Neuroscience Degree

Innovation

The new bachelor of science degree in neuroscience from University of the Sciences prepares students for graduate, medical or health professional schools.

69


THE STATE OF UNIVERSITY CITY 2018

Vice President Joe Biden to Lead the Penn Biden Center for Diplomacy and Global Engagement Vice President Joseph R. Biden, Jr. has been named the Benjamin Franklin Presidential Practice Professor at the University of Pennsylvania, where he will lead the Penn Biden Center for Diplomacy and Global Engagement, a new center focused on diplomacy, foreign policy and national security. The Center will be located in Washington, D.C., and Biden will also have an office on Penn's campus. The Center promises significant impact for Pennâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s teaching and research missions. As the Presidential Practice Professor, Biden will hold joint appointments in the Annenberg School for Communication and the School of Arts and Sciences, with a secondary affiliation in the Wharton School. The Penn Biden Center for Diplomacy and Global Engagement will open its D.C. office in late 2017.

Innovation

New Penn Medicine Treatment Could Lead to Lifesaving Organ Transplants

70

Ten Penn Medicine patients have been cured of the Hepatitis C virus (HCV) following lifesaving kidney transplants from deceased donors who were infected with the disease as part of a Penn Medicine clinical trial. The findings point to new strategies for increasing the supply of organs for the nationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s more than 97,000 patients who are awaiting kidney transplants, often for as many as five or more years. This progress comes as a result of a 2016 study led by David S. Goldberg, MD, MSCE, an assistant professor of Medicine and Epidemiology

and Peter Reese, MD, MSCE, an associate professor of Medicine and Epidemiology. The research team has also recently launched a new clinical trial that will study this same approach in patients awaiting a heart transplant, and in the future they hope to examine the efficacy of this approach in liver and lung transplants. Researchers believe that if larger trials continue with these positive outcomes, an entirely new pool of donor organs may become available, effectively affording hundreds - if not thousands - more patients a lifesaving organ transplant.


Innovation

The University City Science Center - along with development partners Wexford Science + Technology and Ventas - reached a deal to bring Boston-based Cambridge Innovation Center (CIC) to join the Science Center as an anchor tenant in uCity Square’s newest building, 3675 Market Street. CIC will occupy 127,000 square feet in 3675 Market as it brings its successful model of supporting innovation and entrepreneurship to Philadelphia. The Science Center will relocate and expand its headquarters in 3675, serving as the new home to its nationally-recognized tech commercialization and business incubation programs. The Science Center’s programs will continue to provide access to critical funding, expertise and business tools. These early-stage companies will now be able to take advantage of CIC’s space, and grow and mature in a cohesive community that supports and accelerates success. Quorum, the Science Center’s entrepreneur clubhouse, will triple in size and feature street-level access as it offers more meetings, events and programming for uCity Square residents and the wider community. This expansion of Science Center programs and its partnership with CIC will strengthen Philadelphia’s collective ability to serve startups and serial entrepreneurs, catalyzing and accelerating innovation and entrepreneurship in Greater Philadelphia.

THE STATE OF UNIVERSITY CITY 2018

University City Science Center Partners with Boston-based CIC to Ignite Innovation at 3675 Market Street

71


THE STATE OF UNIVERSITY CITY 2018

The Wistar Institute Celebrates 125 Years of Research Discoveries

2017 marked the 125th anniversary of The Wistar Institute. Founded in 1892, The Wistar Institute is the nationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s first independent nonprofit biomedical research institute in the United States and has held the prestigious Cancer Center designation from the National Cancer Institute since 1972. Today, the Institute is home to more than 275 scientists from more than thirty countries working in thirty-four laboratories. Wistar scientists

focus on cancer research and vaccine development for infectious disease. This year, in collaboration with Inovio Pharmaceuticals and GeneOne Life Science, Wistar created a synthetic DNA Zika vaccine that was proven safe and effective at inducing an immune response in the first human trial conducted by the University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine. The Wistar Institute is committed to remaining an engine of transformative biomedical discovery and carrying forward its pioneering scientific legacy in the life sciences. Wistar scientists pursue novel and courageous research paths and train new generations of scientists with the ultimate goal of translating basic discoveries into new therapies and producing groundbreaking advances in world health.

Innovation

Drexel Researchers Pushing Charging Rate Limits in Energy Storage

72

Researchers in Drexel Universityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s College of Engineering have taken a big step forward in battery charging. The team, led by Yury Gogotsi, PhD, has created new electrode designs from a highly conductive, two-dimensional material called MXene. Their design could make energy storage devices like batteries, viewed as the plodding tanker truck of energy storage technology, just as fast as the speedy supercapacitors that are used to provide energy in a pinch - often as a battery back-up or to provide quick bursts of energy for things like camera flashes. Conductivity is the overarching benefit of using MXene as the material for the electrode design. Materials that allow for rapid flow of an electrical current, like aluminum and copper, are often used in electric cables. MXenes are conductive, just like metals, so not only do ions have a wide-open path to a number of storage ports, but they can also move very quickly to meet electrons there. This latest development is particularly significant because it addresses one of the primary problems that has been hindering the expansion of the electric vehicle market and lurking on the horizon for mobile devices.


A unique womb-like environment designed by pediatric researchers from Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Hospital of Pennsylvania (CHOP) could transform care for extremely premature babies by mimicking the prenatal fluidfilled environment to give the tiniest newborns a few more precious weeks to develop their lungs and other organs. CHOP researchers tested and monitored effects on fetal lambs, in which prenatal lung development is very similar to that occurring in humans. The innovative system uses a unique fluid-filled container attached to custom-designed machines that provide physiologic support. The fetal lambs grow in a temperature-controlled,

near-sterile environment, breathing amniotic fluid as they normally do in the womb, their hearts pumping blood through their umbilical cord into a gas exchange machine outside the bag. If their animal results translate into clinical care, the researchers envision that a decade from now, extremely premature infants would continue to develop in chambers filled with amniotic fluid rather than lying in incubators, attached to ventilators. Added to the desired health benefits, there could be a large economic impact as well, reducing the estimated $43 billion annual medical costs of prematurity in the U.S.

THE STATE OF UNIVERSITY CITY 2018

Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Hospital of Philadelphia Artificial Womb Could Transform Care for Extremely Premature Babies

Innovation

73


THE STATE OF UNIVERSITY CITY 2018

About University City District University City District (UCD) is a partnership of world-renowned anchor institutions, small businesses and residents that for twenty years has created opportunity and improved economic vitality and quality of life in the University City area of West Philadelphia. UCD works within a placebased, data-driven framework to invest in world-class public spaces, address crime and public safety, bring life to commercial corridors, connect low-income residents to careers and promote job growth and innovation.

About University City District

TRANSFORMING PUBLIC SPACE

74

UCD creates lively public venues that reactivate underutilized space, enhance community-building efforts and spur innovation. We are a nationally recognized leader in data-driven placemaking, and have extensive experience creating allseason temporary spaces that attract visitors, generate economic activity and foster community. From conceptualization and design to construction and operations, UCDâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s team has spearheaded successful projects including The Porch at 30th Street Station, the Market Street Bridge streetscape enhancements, Philadelphiaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s first Parklet program, and the forthcoming Trolley Portal Gardens. Our streetscape improvements make the environment appealing to pedestrians, transit-users, bikers and drivers. We partner with local companies, designers, and partner organizations to create dynamic public spaces, and maintain these spaces through our Public Space Maintenance staff and in-house landscaping crew, Green City Works. From seating experiments that encourage social interactions to landscaping projects that break up stretches of concrete with lush plants, UCD is helping create a more vibrant neighborhood.


THE STATE OF UNIVERSITY CITY 2018

About University City District

BalletX at The Porch 75


THE STATE OF UNIVERSITY CITY 2018

The Porch at 30th Street Station Since its introduction in late 2011, The Porch at 30th Street Station has been UCD’s flagship public space, a vibrant meeting place stitching together commuters, nearby employees and the surrounding community. Today, after ongoing iterations and increasing investment, The Porch features a variety of comfortable and intimate spaces for people to lounge, linger and enjoy pop-up performances, festive lighting,and rotating food and drink options. From May through September of 2017 we partnered with PECO to program weekly dance, music and arts performances at The Porch. In August, UCD collaborated with Bridgewater’s Pub and SHIFTSPACE Design to create the Pub at The Porch, a new outdoor drinking destination. An estimated 204,000 visitors used the Porch in 2016.

40th Street Trolley Portal

About University City District

Through a unique public-private partnership with SEPTA, the City of Philadelphia and neighborhood stakeholders, UCD has raised $2.1 million to transform the 40th Street Trolley Portal, the busiest at-grade rail station in the city. By combining great urban design, infrastructure investments and community engagement, UCD will transform the space from an unappealing expanse of concrete into a vibrant and social space. Trolley Portal Gardens will feature beautiful landscaping, movable seating and a new restaurant called Trolley Car Station. The future site will emphasize safety and comfort for the estimated 5,000 riders who board or exit trolleys at the Portal each day. Trolley Portal Gardens will improve pedestrian circulation while using cutting-edge storm water management techniques that replace impervious surfaces with lush wildflower mounds planted with native species. Green City Works, UCD’s landscaping social venture, will maintain the space, ensuring that the neighborhood’s beautification is tied to growth and opportunity for local residents.

76


THE STATE OF UNIVERSITY CITY 2018

Parklets

Pedestrian Plazas UCD works closely with the City and community residents to enhance the safety of the streets for the benefit of pedestrians, bikers, transit riders and drivers. We have developed a number of pedestrian plazas that use greening and design principles to make dangerous intersections safer, greener, more beautiful open spaces.

About University City District

In 2011, UCD introduced its first Parklet - small, flexible mini-parks created in parking spaces - to Philadelphia. Today, UCD installs and maintains six Parklets during warm weather months. Parklets are landscaped with planters and a decorative railing, furnished with movable cafĂŠ tables and chairs, and add a distinct vibrancy to the neighborhood. Parklets are a coordinated effort between our Planning and Economic Development department, our Public Space Maintenance crew and our Green City Works landscaping social venture. UCDâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s process has informed how the City has implemented Parklets in neighborhoods throughout Philadelphia.

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THE STATE OF UNIVERSITY CITY 2018

UNIVERSITY CITY DISTRICT EVENTS UCD executes community events throughout the year designed to help bring neighbors, visitors and businesses together. To celebrate our 20th Anniversary, we bolstered our already robust event season through weekly performances at The Porch at 30th Street Station; giveaways and promotions; a new networking series called University City MIX; and a renewed investment in signature events like Movies in Clark Park, the Baltimore Avenue Dollar Stroll, the 40th Street Summer Series and our popular restaurant promotion University City Dining Days.

University City Dining Days This popular restaurant promotion - designed to bring additional business and exposure to area eateries during the typically slower summer season - allows diners to enjoy three course meals for $15, $25 or $35 from many of University Cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s top restaurants. The ten-day promotion routinely draws tens of thousands of visitors to the neighborhood to sample the diverse food offerings from around the world.

Baltimore Avenue Dollar Stroll The Baltimore Avenue Dollar Stroll is one of UCDâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s most popular and successful events. Operated with help from the Baltimore Avenue Business Association, the event draws thousands of neighbors and visitors to Baltimore Avenue to enjoy $1 specials from local businesses as well as family-friendly entertainment.

About University City District

University City MIX

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Responding to a need for local networking opportunities, UCD has launched University City MIX, a happy hour networking event aimed at bringing together professionals from multiple sectors. Over the past year, UCD has partnered with local restaurants and organizations to host MIX, providing an opportunity for people to mingle, make professional connections and enjoy bites and drinks from neighborhood hot spots.

Outdoor Performances and Movie Nights UCD works with partners such as the University of Pennsylvania, the Friends of Clark Park and local artists to bring life to public spaces through free events including Movies in Clark Park, the 40th Street Summer Series, and pop-up music and theater performances at our own spaces, including The Porch at 30th Street Station.


THE STATE OF UNIVERSITY CITY 2018

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT

The West Philadelphia Skills Initiative UCD’s nationally recognized West Philadelphia Skills Initiative (WPSI) connects unemployed West Philadelphians seeking opportunity with West Philadelphia employers seeking talent. The Skills Initiative is an employer-driven job training program that has redefined how effective workforce development programming can transform people’s lives. 2017 was a banner year for the Skills Initiative, featuring a visit from Mayor Jim Kenney, WPSI’s largest grant to-date from the Pew Charitable Trusts and our first cohort in the building trades. Last year, 93% of our graduates connected to jobs with family-sustaining wages and benefits and we are proud that our employer partners have paid over $15 million in wages to our participants. We look forward to continued growth, which will allow us to support increasing numbers of employers and jobseekers.

Green City Works

About University City District

Fueled by the expanding footprint of our partners, UCD launched our landscaping social venture, Green City Works, in 2016 in order to create local economic opportunity for underserved residents. Green City Works connects our work to beautify the district with our workforce experience honed through the West Philadelphia Skills Initiative. Green City Works cares for UCD’s own public space projects and executes fee-for-service landscaping contracts for local institutions and businesses, while connecting local residents to quality jobs. In its second year of operations, Green City flourished with 25 clients, 14 full-time staff and nearly $1 million in revenue. It also serves as a template for UCD’s deeper exploration of social enterprise models.

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THE STATE OF UNIVERSITY CITY 2018

NEIGHBORHOOD ASSISTANCE Clean and Safe Our Public Space Maintenance employees work seven days a week to clean and enhance more than 160 commercial and residential blocks through street cleanings, graffiti removal, trash collection, and more. Our Public Safety Ambassadors patrol the streets and serve as highly visible deterrents to crime while offering assistance to those in need. We also assist in community safety fairs and demonstrations and offer literature and guidelines for new students and residents.

Project Rehab Project Rehab is UCDâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s free community-based initiative that identifies property owners and guides them through the process of restoring their distressed real estate. Project Rehab responds to the unique needs of each owner by developing strategies that bring the property back to life. UCD provides a range of free supports and services that help owners realize their vision for the property, helping them untangle issues related to property records, financing, rehabilitation, sale, zoning or conservatorship.

About University City District

Small Business Services

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Neighborhoods need healthy, flourishing commercial corridors in order to thrive, and UCD works hard to create an inviting business atmosphere throughout the district. The organization has undertaken a variety of activities to support recruitment, retention and growth to ensure that University City is one of the best places in Philadelphia to start, run and grow a business. Through our Small Business Services program, we have helped large and small enterprises looking to open, expand, improve their business and/or relocate here in University City. We help businesses access funding, find new real estate in West Philadelphia, navigate regulatory challenges and develop the business plans that are critical in helping them to access capital. We also support landlords looking to make building improvements in order to attract new tenants.


THE STATE OF UNIVERSITY CITY 2018

TRANSPORTATION PLANNING

About University City District

UCD works to make traveling in our neighborhood safer and more convenient, whether people are getting around on foot, public transit, car or bike. Since 1999, UCD has partnered with SEPTA to create, operate and manage the Loop Through University City (LUCY) Shuttle. With two routes that run through the heart of University City, LUCY has provided more than seven million rides in the last ten years to students and employees of the University of Pennsylvania, University of Pennsylvania Health System, University City Science Center, uCity Square, the Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Hospital of Philadelphia and the general public. Over the course of the past year, UCD worked closely with the City of Philadelphia, SEPTA and the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation to make safety improvements to the I-76 on/off ramps at University Avenue, replace the LUCY shuttle fleet, and introduce a protected bike lane on Chestnut Street. Looking to the future, UCD is harnessing the power of big data to create new tools and libraries of information that can inform decisions about transit issues including motor vehicle traffic and travel times, pedestrian counts, bicycle counts and regional accessibility.

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THE STATE OF UNIVERSITY CITY 2018

Membership Program University City District’s Membership Program connects leading businesses in and around University City with exclusive networking opportunities, custom research and other members-only benefits while fueling UCD’s collective economic impact.

NETWORKING AND INFORMATION •

Priority invitations to annual tours of University City development projects

Priority access to custom market research, data runs and GIS analysis for project-planning purposes

The opportunity to guide original research and analysis and shape ideas to improve the business climate and quality of life in University City Quarterly newsletter on University City development trends and market data, emailed exclusively to members.

• •

100 copies of State of University City annual report for distribution to partners, stakeholders and tenants

University City District’s Membership Program connects leading businesses in and around University City with exclusive networking opportunities, custom research and other members-only benefits while fueling UCD’s collective economic impact

MARKETING AND PROMOTION •

Table/tent presence at one consumer-oriented UCD event each year (for example, Baltimore Avenue Stroll, 40th Street Summer Series, and Movies in Clark Park)

Ads in up to three UCD e-newsletters per year; each is sent to a distribution list of 5,500 residents, students, partners and civic leaders

BUSINESS SERVICES •

One day of free special event ambassador and/or public safety coverage at your University City property(ies)

Priority access to graffiti removal services, special UCD trash pickups and move-in/move-out services

COLLECTIVE ECONOMIC GROWTH

Innovation

Your membership also supports core UCD services, including:

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120,000 public safety patrol hours/year

More than 4,600 nighttime walking escorts of University City students and residents to their homes

160 blocks of University City maintained, including 149,724 bags of trash removed and 785 graffiti tags erased

Major investments in University City public spaces and gateways, including The Porch at 30th Street Station, Market Street Bridge, the 40th Street Trolley Portal, pedestrian plazas and parklets

Special events that attract more than 50,000 annual attendees from across the city and region

Advertising and press partnerships that result in more than 1.3 million dollars of annual media value in selling University City

Intensive, ongoing efforts to recruit retail prospects and support commercial corridors

For more information about UCD’s Membership Program, contact the development office at 215.243.0555.


Average Daily Vehicle Traffic in University City

Predicted Daytime Pedestrian Volume in University City

A T A D E L P M SA

THE STATE OF UNIVERSITY CITY 2018

EXCLUSIVE ACCESS TO CUSTOM MARKET RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT TRENDS

NETWORKING OPPORTUNITIES

MARKETING AND PROMOTION

PRIORITY BUSINESS SERVICES Membership Program

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THE STATE OF UNIVERSITY CITY 2018

Thank you to our sponsors:

PHILADELPHIA UNIVERSITY CITY HOTEL

ABM JANITORIAL SERVICES ARCHER & GREINER, P.C. FRIEDMAN LLP HOMEWOOD SUITES BY HILTON UNIVERSITY CITY

Acknowledgments

THE INN AT PENN, A HILTON HOTEL

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SWIRLING SILKS VISIT PHILADELPHIA


Craig Carnaroli, Chair

David Forde, Jr.

Keith Kasper

Executive Vice President University of Pennsylvania

Director of Community and Government Relations, University of the Sciences

Senior Vice President and Chief Financial Officer, Penn Medicine

President and CEO, Campus Apartments

Michael Froehlich

Keith Orris, Vice Chair

Community Representative, Cedar Park Neighbors Association

President, The Restaurant School at Walnut Hill College

Senior Vice President of Corporate Relations and Economic Development, Drexel University

Jamie Gauthier

Owner, Metropolis Group / 40th Street Live

Community Representative Garden Court Community Association

Phil Moses

David Adelman, Vice Chair

Joseph Trainor, Treasurer Chief Financial Officer, Wistar Institute

Ken Gedaka

Maureen Rush, Secretary

Vice President, Communications and Public Affairs, FMC Corporation

Vice President for Public Safety University of Pennsylvania

Tony Acevedo Senior Vice President, Asset Management HCP Medical Office Properties

Elizabeth Azari Senior Vice President of Operations, National Board of Medical Examiners

Mark Celoni Vice President and Office Director, Pennoni Associates, Inc.

Della Clark President, The Enterprise Center

Julian Goresko Community Representative Walnut Hill Community Association

Peter Grollman Senior Vice President, Public Affairs The Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Hospital of Philadelphia

Barry Grossbach Community Representative Spruce Hill Community Association

Curt Hess Senior Vice President of Real Estate University City Science Center

Daniel Liberatoscioli

Mark Mills

THE STATE OF UNIVERSITY CITY 2018

UCD BOARD

Principal, Vice President, INTECH Construction, Inc.

Brad Paul Co-Owner and General Manager Central City & Ardmore Toyota

George Poulin Community Representative, Powelton Village Civic Association

Joe Reagan, Jr. Vice President, Development Wexford Science + Technology

Joe Ritchie Vice President of Development Brandywine Realty Trust

Douglas Smith Vice President, External Affairs, Verizon Pennsylvania

UCD STAFF Matt Bergheiser

Rachel Feigenbutz

President

Urban Design Associate

Joyce Bacon

Caitlin Garozzo

Program Manager, West Philadelphia Skills Initiative

Seth Budick Senior Manager, Policy and Research

Morgan Rogers Burns Develpment Associate

James Carter Public Safety Account Manager

Director, Workforce Development

Sarah Davis Director of Development

Nick Edelman Finance Director

Brian English

Alan Garry

Operations Manager, Public Space Maintenance Program

Chris Richman Communications Manager

Shawn Ryan

Director, Public Safety and Community Services

Graphic Design and Web Development Manager

Lt. Derek Hawkins

Ryan Spak

Commanding Officer, UCD Philadelphia Police Substation

Nate Hommel Director of Planning and Design

Maggie Langdon

Manager, Project Rehab

Margaret Leidy Starke Event Planner

Andrew Stober

Office and Administrative Manager

Vice President of Planning and Economic Development

Chris Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Keeffe

Alissa Weiss

Production Supervisor, Green City Works

Joshua Park

Program Manager, West Philadelphia Skills Initiative

Director of Strategic Initiatives and Communications

Acknowledgments

LeTonya Clark

Program Manager, West Philadelphia Skills Initiative

Tom Patterson

Director, Green City Works

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Acknowledgments THE STATE OF UNIVERSITY CITY 2018


Seth Budick Research and Analysis

Chris Richman Writing and Editing

Shawn Ryan Graphic Design

THE STATE OF UNIVERSITY CITY 2018

PUBLICATION CREDITS

Alissa Weiss Writing and Editing

PHOTOGRAPHY CREDITS AKA University City: Page 9, 41

CO-OP: Page 9, 37

Ryan Collerd: Pages 8, 9, 50, 58, 74, 77, 78, 79, 86

Conrad Erb: Page 81

James Gathany: Page 72

Oak Leaf Media: Cover, Pages 4,5, 44, 61

Lora Reehling: Pages 8, 11, 30, 40, 51, 53, 57, 62, 63, 78, 81

Science Center: Page 67

Ben Tran: Pages 39, 59, 62, 75, 78, 79, 80, 83

uCity Square: Pages 6, 34

USciences: whyilovephilly.com: Cory Popp: Pages 1, 9, 13, 43, 47, 49, 87 Michael Smith: Page 33

Wistar: Page 27

Acknowledgments

Page 69

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University City District 3940 Chestnut Street Philadelphia, PA 19104 215.243.0555

To make a secure, online donation to UCD, please visit: www.universitycity.org/donate

universitycity.org universitycity

Acknowledgments

@ucdphl

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@universitycity

The State of University City 2018