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[ 2015–2016 GRADUATE STUDENT CAREER GUIDE ]

EMBARK

FUTURE

YOUR

ON

EVERYTHING YOU NEED TO PREPARE FOR YOUR CAREER SEARCH.


FIND OUT

WHAT’S INSIDE GETTING STARTED 4

Welcome Letter

MAKING A POSITIVE IMPRESSION

5

Career Journey

18

R  esume and Curriculum Vitae (CV)

26

Cover Letter

28

Thank You

30

LinkedIn

34

Research Statement

12 Searching for Positions

35

Teaching Philosophy

13 Researching Employers

CLOSING THE DEAL

14 N  etworking and Informational Interviewing

37

I nterviewing

42

The Job Talk

44

Job Offer and Negotiating

THE JOB SEARCH 7

When and How to Start

10 I dentifying Transferable Skills

APPENDIX 47

List of Resources

49

Additional Resume Samples

58

Additional CV Samples


FOCUS ON

WHAT’S AHEAD YOUR DREAM JOB IS OUT THERE. The question is, how will you find and get it? This graduate student career guide is the key. Within the next few pages, you’ll find advice and resources aimed at preparing you for your first professional or academic position— and beyond. And that’s just the start. Need to polish your resume or CV? Looking for networking opportunities? Want to research prospective employers? It’s all possible at UB Career Services. Schedule your career counseling appointment today. (716) 645-2231 buffalo.edu/career

Career Services

259 Capen Hall, North Campus


WELCOME LETTER

Dear Professional and Graduate Student, Late nights at the library. Long days in the lab. Countless assignments. You’ve worked hard to obtain a quality education and an advanced degree that will position you for long-term success. Now, as your academic endeavors near an end, you hope to start your career on the right path. On behalf of both the Graduate School and Career Services, we are pleased to offer you this new resource. Through the Graduate Student Career Guide, you will be better prepared to seek your next professional opportunity. Of course, when additional or personalized guidance is needed, the experienced staff of the Career Services Office is always available. We wish you the very best in your job search. In addition, we envision that this resource will contribute to you landing that perfect opportunity that will enable you to utilize the skills and knowledge you’ve acquired through your studies at UB. Best wishes to you for your career and life success. Sincerely,

Graham Hammill, Ph.D. Vice Provost for Graduate Education and Dean of the Graduate School

Arlene Kaukus Director of Career Services

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THE

CAREER

JOURNEY

UTILIZE UB CAREER SERVICES

NETWORK AND NURTURE RELATIONSHIPS Did you know approximately 80% of jobs and internships are obtained through networking? You never know who might help you throughout your career development, whether it’s through mentoring, a recommendation or more. Meet, get to know, and stay in touch with your faculty, fellow students, colleagues and organization members—both in person and through social networking tools such as LinkedIn.

No matter where you are in your career development, the Career Services office is here to help you identify and develop the skills, experiences, and connections needed for a successful transition from a graduate student to a working professional. Take advantage of our services and resources, including workshops, events, career fair and the online portal BullsEye.

SEEK OUT EXPERIENCE

PREPARE, PRACTICE AND PERFECT

In today’s world, an advanced degree isn’t always enough. Employers like to know that your academic background can translate to “real-world” skills and leadership. Start by reviewing job postings to see what qualifications and skills are required. Then find opportunities that allow you to gain relevant experience, such as internships, research projects, community service initiatives or professional organizations.

You can’t predict when a career opportunity may arise, but you can be prepared for it. Make sure your resume, curriculum vitae (CV) and cover letter are polished and up to date. You should also hone your interviewing skills and develop an elevator speech to professionally articulate what you can offer to a company or organization.

5


THE

JOB

SEARCH


WHEN AND HOW TO START YOUR JOB SEARCH FOR PROFESSIONAL POSITIONS

It’s never too early to begin your job or internship search. While companies may look for talent at any time of the year, industries such as engineering and business recruit more heavily from September through December. As a UB student, you have the opportunity to connect with companies through on-campus job fairs, employer information sessions and job postings in BullsEye.

WHEN YOU WANT TO:

HOW | USE THESE RESOURCES:

Research prospective employers and job postings

BullsEye—a virtual tool to connect employers with UB students for jobs, internships and networking opportunities. Hoovers—an extensive database that provides directory listings and brief profiles for millions of public and private companies worldwide. GoinGlobal—The leading provider of career and employment resources for evaluating, selecting, and transitioning into a successful career in a foreign country to GoinGlobal’s 80,000-page database contains Country Career Guides, USA and Canadian City Career Guides, corporate profiles, worldwide job and internship openings, and a proprietary collection of H1B visa employer listings.

Create or update your resume, cover letter, and LinkedIn profile

Express appointments with Career Services are available Monday–Friday. Make a 20-minute appointment by calling 716-645-2231 or stopping by 259 Capen Hall.

Discuss your career goals and plans with faculty, a career counselor, advisor and mentors for feedback

One-hour counseling appointment can be scheduled with an expert career counselor to discuss job search strategies.

Attend conferences, join professional associations and engage with other professionals in industry

UB Career Advice Group on LinkedIn—we allow you to connect professionally with over 2,000 students, alumni and colleagues across the world.

Prepare for interviews

A practice interview session can be scheduled with a member of Career Services by calling 716-645-2231.

Attend alumni networking events, job fairs, employer site visits, employer information sessions

Check the Career Services Events page to see what’s up and coming up.

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ACADEMIC JOB SEARCH TIMELINE If you aspire to a career in academia, ideal planning should begin two years before completing your degree. The hiring cycle for academic positions is typically conducted between October and May, with slight variations by discipline. Be sure to utilize the experience and guidance of your faculty and mentors throughout the process.

C  onduct a professional and academic inventory of all your accomplishments, experiences, publications and presentations.

Utilize online resources to examine employment prospects, such as: > The Chronicle of Higher Education > Higher Ed Job > Academic 360 > Professional associations.

 xamine discipline E specific journal possibilities for publication.

Create or update your LinkedIn profile.

ONE YEAR

NOW

FROM DEGREE COMPLETION

Identify your preferred geographic locations.

Look for opportunities to present, network and assume leadership roles with national and regional organizations associated with your discipline.

Reach out to faculty and mentors for letters of recommendation.

8

 evelop or D update your CV and begin drafting cover letters.

Begin to think about your career contingency plan.


Prepare and practice your academic job talk.

 ollow up with faculty/ F mentors about letters of recommendation. Use Interfolio to store your recommendations.

 xamine E Post-Doctoral options, collect information, and applications.

Continue to attend professional conferences for networking and presentation possibilities.

Continue to network through professional associations, conferences and LinkedIn.

Continue to utilize job posting websites.

FINAL SEMESTER

BEFORE DEGREE COMPLETION

EVALUATE ANY OFFERS!

Determine if you need a portfolio and begin preparation. Discuss career options and job prospects with faculty and mentors.

Prepare for interviews.

Complete and customize a version of your CV and cover letter for each position.

Depending on discipline, begin preparing your teaching philosophy, research statement and other materials needed for your application.

9


TRANSFERABLE SKILLS What skills do you bring to the table for employers? No matter your field of study, it’s important to speak their language and demonstrate how your academic experiences translate to workplace performance.

Good news—you’ve likely already started to develop important skills through your academic and extracurricular activities.

SKILL SETS EMPLOYERS LOOK FOR

HOW TO DEVELOP SKILLS

ANALYSIS & PROBLEM SOLVING

> Interpreting data through an experiment or survey > Identifying inconsistencies in presented arguments > Performing textual analysis > Learning a computer programming language

INTERPERSONAL & LEADERSHIP

> Teaching as a TA, instructor, tutor, trainer, or facilitator > Leading a research project team > Volunteering in student governance and professional associations > Collaborating with different groups

PROJECT MANAGEMENT & ORGANIZATION

> Managing the workload of several courses > Meeting deadlines > Designing and executing surveys > Leading and structuring research projects > Supervising undergraduate and first-year graduate students

RESEARCH & INFORMATION MANAGEMENT

> Conceptualizing models from open literature > Preparing a literature review > Conducting archival research > Organizing, interpreting, distributing, archiving, and publishing research findings

> Organizing and prioritizing study schedule > Balancing academic and personal responsibilities

SELF-MANAGEMENT & WORK HABITS

> Writing research papers, reports, grants, and proposals > Presenting at local, regional, and national venues (e.g. poster or conference sessions)

WRITTEN & ORAL COMMUNICATION

10


Prepare for interviews by planning out how you’ll discuss these experiences, and what they mean for your potential employer.

HOW TO DESCRIBE YOUR EXPERIENCE

LEARN HOW TO DEVELOP YOUR TRANSFERABLE SKILLS! Visit UB Career Services in Capen Hall to work with a career expert.

> Define a problem and identify possible causes > Design an experiment, plan or model that defines a problem, tests potential resolutions and implements a solution

> Synthesize large amounts of information

> Facilitate group discussions or conduct meetings

> Respond appropriately to positive or negative feedback

> Effectively mentor subordinates and/or peers

> Teach skills or concepts to others

> Motivate others to complete projects (group or individual)

> Navigate complex bureaucratic environments

> Form and defend independent conclusions

> Collaborate on projects

> Manage a project or projects from beginning to end

> Prioritize tasks while anticipating potential problems

> Identify goals/tasks and create a realistic timeline for completion

> Maintain flexibility in the face of changing circumstances

> Identify sources of information applicable to a given problem

> Design and analyze surveys > Develop organizing principles to effectively sort and evaluate data

> Understand and synthesize large quantities of data

> Work effectively under pressure and to meet deadlines

> Work effectively with limited supervision

> Learn or comprehend new material and subject matter quickly

> Explain complex or difficult concepts in basic terms and language

> Prepare concise and logically written materials

> Write effective grant proposals

> Organize and communicate ideas effectively in presentations to small and large groups

> Debate issues in a collegial manner and participate in group discussions

> Use logical argument to persuade others

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SEARCHING FOR THE RIGHT POSITION Before conducting your search, you need to have a strategy. Align your interests, values and skills with a career field. Then start researching potential employers. Be sure to prepare your 30-60 second elevator speech which describes who you are, what you’re looking for and what you can offer.

SIX WAYS TO MAKE YOUR SEARCH SMARTER:

1. RESEARCH THE INDUSTRY FIELD Make a list of preferred employers to target and research. Consider conducting informational interviews with alumni and professionals in the industry.

2. LOG INTO BULLSEYE BullsEye is a virtual tool to connect employers with UB students for jobs, internships and networking opportunities. Key features include job and internship postings, career fairs and the On-Campus Interviewing (OCI) e-Bulletin.

3. CHECK JOB POSTING WEBSITES Develop a list of relevant keywords that relate to your interest area and industry focus. View recommend websites

4. CONNECT WITH PROFESSIONALS Reaching out and building relationships with established professionals is a proven method in job searching. Tap into the UB alumni network by joining the UB Career Advice Group on LinkedIn.

5. TARGET EMPLOYERS Initiate an introduction to show determination and enthusiasm to potential employers. You may even create an opportunity to obtain a position before it’s officially posted and advertised to your peers.

6. JOIN PROFESSIONAL ASSOCIATIONS As a member of a professional association, you can stay informed on industry trends, build your professional network and obtain leads on potential job openings. View directories of professional organizations

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HOW TO RESEARCH EMPLOYERS It’s important to do your homework on prospective employers to help narrow down career options, find job opportunities and sound knowledgeable in a job interview.

INFORMATION TO LOOK FOR: > Size of organization

> Geographic locations

> Relocation policies

> Style of management

> Location of corporate headquarters

> Typical career path in your field

> Potential growth > Annual sales growth, long-term and short-term > Product lines or services, and potential new products or services > Relative age of top management and their career backgrounds

> Number of plants, stores, and outlets > Organizational structure > Type of training programs available > Promotional path > Recent developments reported in news stories

> History of organization > Funding (for non-profit organizations) > Customers and/or clients > Attitudes toward employees > Competition within industry > Stated values and mission of organization

WHERE TO DIG: Start by reviewing the organization’s website, annual reports and marketing literature related to recruitment. Keep in mind that any information prepared by the organization will include predominately positive information. As with any good research endeavor, rely on multiple sources to try to get an accurate picture of the employer. TOP RESOURCES:

Hoover’s

LexisNexis Academic

Provides directory listings and brief profiles for millions of public and private companies worldwide

Access to billions of searchable documents and records from more than 45,000 legal, news and business sources

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VIEW MORE RESOURCES >>


NETWORKING 101 Become an expert networker to get inside information and gain a competitive edge in your job search. Most people find jobs through contacts they build through internship experiences, family, friends and involvement in their field. > JOIN A PROFESSIONAL ASSOCIATION IN YOUR FIELD. See Weddle’s Association Directory, American Society of Association Executives and a list of international professional associations to explore associations aligned with your career and interests. > CREATE A LINKEDIN ACCOUNT. The social network allows you to see the profiles of current professionals and graduate students in your career field—perfect for networking. Also look to join LinkedIn groups that are tied to professional associations in your career field of interest. > JOIN THE UB MENTOR PROGRAM on LinkedIn to connect with career professionals in your field who can help you with the career exploration process. Our Career Mentors can also help you with:

>> Job/Internship search

>> Resumes/CV and cover letters

>> Interviewing tips and networking strategies

>> R  elocation tips as you prepare to relocate to a new city/state/company

>> Tour of their companies/organizations

> ASK FOR BUSINESS CARDS and look to connect with them through LinkedIn. > USE YOUR RESEARCH AND PROJECTS as a means to present at national/regional conferences affording you the opportunity to engage with members of professional organizations. > PERFECT YOUR 30-60 SECOND INTRODUCTION, and use it whenever you meet a potential new networking contact. > LEARN HOW TO MAKE SMALL TALK TO BROKER NEW CONNECTIONS. Visit Career Services or attend a workshop to get more information on the art of a networking conversation. > ASK IF YOUR CONTACTS CAN KEEP YOU POSTED regarding any professional openings.

REMEMBER: Everyone you meet could potentially

become a networking contact. 14


TIPS FOR NETWORKING AT EVENTS At UB, on- and off-campus events are organized throughout the year to bring together current graduate students, alumni professionals and employer recruits. Take advantage of these great opportunities to build your network, learn about an organization and explore career fields. NETWORKING EVENTS WITH UB ALUMNI AND EMPLOYERS Career Conversations and Road Trip events are student-alumni career networking events designed for UB graduate level students and recent graduates who are interested in launching their careers, finding internships, or connecting with mentors in the Buffalo, Rochester, New York City and Washington DC areas. Visit Career Services Events to find out when Career Conversations and On the Road Experiences events are scheduled to take place. JOB FAIRS AND EMPLOYER SITE VISITS Meet with employers promoting their organizations and open positions. Job fairs come in all shapes and sizes, from small community sponsored events to large regional expositions held at major convention centers. Research the employers who are attending the fair. If it is a UB job fair on campus, a listing of employers can be on BullsEye.

JOB FAIR PREPARATION Before heading to a job fair, you should know: > WHAT TO EXPECT — Most job fairs feature booths or tables with organization representatives. Employers set up displays and offer brochures, business cards, and giveaways. At some fairs, initial screening interviews occur on the spot. Other times, the fair is used to pre-screen applicants for interviews to be conducted later. Some employers will not accept resumes at their tables. You may be referred to their website to formally apply. If so, use this opportunity to learn more about the organization, make contacts and get tips on how to make yourself stand out in an online application. > WHAT TO TAKE — Make multiple copies of your resume on high-quality resume paper. Take a professional folder to hold your resumes and a notepad and pen. Leave your backpack and coat at home if possible. If you must bring a cell phone, be sure it is not visible, and do not use it during the networking event. > HOW TO ACT—Try to get your resume into a person’s hands and say a few words. If the employer is too busy, make a note on your resume indicating your interest in the organization. Look around the display for the recruiter’s business card (or write down his or her name) and get some literature with the organization’s address. Afterward, send a follow-up note with another copy of your resume. > WHAT TO SAY—Create a brief “commercial” to sell yourself to an employer. In 60 seconds or less, introduce yourself, demonstrate your knowledge of the organization or career field, express enthusiasm and interest and relate your background to the organization’s needs.

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INFORMATIONAL INTERVIEWS WHAT’S AN INFORMATIONAL INTERVIEW? Different than a job interview, an informational interview is a conversation with a career professional to collect information about a job, career field, industry or company. It gives you the chance to build your network, expand your knowledge of the job market and learn about potential career paths. Make the most of this opportunity by asking your interviewer any of the following questions. PERSONAL CAREER STORY

WORK-LIFE BALANCE

> What is your educational background? How did you decide to go into this field?

> Is there travel involved with your job? > How much flexibility do you have in terms of dress, work hours, vacation, etc.?

> What do you wish you would have known prior to entering this field?

> What hours do individuals in this job usually work?

> What is a typical career path for individuals in your position?

> How would you describe your work environment? > What obligation does your work place upon you, outside of the ordinary workday/work week?

A DAY IN THE LIFE > What are your major duties and responsibilities? > What do you do during a typical workday and week?

TIPS AND ADVICE

> What do you find most rewarding about your job?

> What kinds of skills should a job seeker highlight in resumes and interviews?

> What were the positions that you had that led to this one? > What do you like most and least about your job?

> What advice do you have for me as I break into this field?

ABOUT THE EMPLOYER

> How do you see technology changing/ influencing this field? > What specific aspects of my background should I highlight or sell the most when applying for positions?

> What is the size of your company/organization? > Where do you have offices? > What are the challenges facing this industry today?

> Do I have to develop some skills or gain some experiences to make myself more competitive?

> What sets your company/organization apart from similar ones in this industry?

WHAT’S NEXT? > Do you know other people in the field with whom I can talk?

WORKPLACE CULTURE > What are your biggest challenges or problems?

> May I mention your name when I contact them?

> Do you work primarily alone or in collaboration with others?

> If I have any questions can I stay in contact with you?

> Who evaluates your performance? How is this done?

> What is a typical entry-level salary in this field? > Are there any professional groups in this field you recommend I join?

> What kind of on-the-job training is provided? > What is the on-boarding process like for a new employee?

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MAKING A

POSITIVE

IMPRESSION

17


MAKING YOUR RESUME STAND OUT A resume is a one- to two-page document that outlines your education, skills, accomplishments, and experience. Its purpose is to help you capture the attention of an employer so you can get an interview. Note: Longer resumes are more common for Master’s or Ph.D. students. Research your desired industry area resume standards. An employer spends an average of 15 to 20 seconds reviewing a resume. Create unique resume categories that highlight your relevant skills and experience. Typical sections include:

> Objective —Specifically states what type of job or internship you are looking for

> Education — Lists your degrees and other relevant training

> Experience —Any employment, internships, significant campus leadership offices, volunteer work, and class/research projects

Emphasize activities outside of academic and employment experience:

> Honors/Awards/Fellowships/Scholarships

> Volunteer Experience

> Study Abroad

> Campus Activities & Involvement

> Leadership

> Certifications & Licenses

> Language Proficiency

> Relevant Coursework

> Technical/Computer Skills

> Professional Affiliations

Write descriptive “action word” statements for each experience adding results or accomplishments. Use key words throughout your resume that show your skills to an employer. Pick a format and stick to it. Use consistent spacing, font, and format and convert to a PDF. Be error-free! That means no spelling or grammatical mistakes. INTERNATIONAL RESUMES Many countries use the words resume and CV interchangeably, so make sure you understand what documents you are required to submit. > Review International Resumes and CV Guides by Country > Login to BullsEye to access GoinGlobal where you can view resume and CV samples by country.

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RESUME EXAMPLE—HEALTHCARE FIELD

Judith C. Smith

(xxx) xxx-xxxx janetsm@buffalo.edu; www.linkedin.com/in/judithcsmith

EDUCATION University at Buffalo, The State University of New York Master of Science in Occupational Therapy, May 2015 Bachelor of Science in Occupational Science, May 2015 Minor in Health and Wellness GPA: 3.9/4.0 Dean’s List OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY RELATED CLINICAL EXPERIENCE Level II Fieldwork

University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, New York

May 2014-August 2014

• Conducted and documented detailed evaluations and administered assessments.

• Developed, implemented, and modified appropriate intervention plans.

• Educated patients and families on the use of adaptive equipment and home modifications.

•C  ollaborated with physicians, nurses, physical therapists, speech pathologists, and social workers to provide holistic and comprehensive patient care.

• Created and presented three, 60 minute in-service presentations to 12+ staff members.

• Utilized evidence based practice to design and construct a mirror box for treatment with patients post-stroke. School of the Holy Childhood, Rochester, New York

January 2014-March 2014

• Developed, implemented, and modified appropriate intervention plans for students.

• Administered standardized assessments and completed re-evaluation and annual review documentation.

• Utilized evidence based practice to design a Response to Intervention program based on student sensory needs.

• Collaborated with special education teachers, speech pathologists, and occupational therapy assistants to create interventions that catered to each students specific needs. Level I Fieldwork Physical Disabilities: Mercy Hospital of Buffalo, Buffalo, New York Adult Developmental Disabilities: Suburban Adult Services Inc. (SASI), Elma, New York Pediatrics: Mary Cariola Children’s Center, Rochester New York

LEADERSHIP AND VOLUNTEER EXPERIENCE University at Buffalo Student Occupational Therapy Association, Social Convener, 2012–2015

• Organized more than 10 events, demonstrating good organizational and time management skills. Occupational Therapy Student Mentor, 2014–2015 Annual Step Up for Down Syndrome Walk, Volunteer, 2012–2013

PROFESSIONAL AFFILIATIONS Active member of Pi Theta Epsilon Occupational Therapy National Honor Society- Tau Chapter University at Buffalo Student Occupational Therapy Association (SOTA) American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA) New York State Occupational Therapy Association (NYSOTA)

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CURRICULUM VITAE A Curriculum Vitae (CV) is a brief biography of your educational and work background used to obtain an interview in the higher education job search, usually consisting of three or more pages.

A CV WILL HELP YOU: > Establish your professional image. > Apply for postdoctoral fellowships in the academic or related fields. > Promote yourself for employment opportunities, particularly in academic settings. > Inform employers about your achievements and activities for annual or tenure review. > Describe your areas of expertise when applying for independent consulting. > Support your applications for fellowships, grants or other contract funding proposals. > Provide information related to professional activities. (e.g. application for professional memberships, leadership roles/awards) > Introduce yourself when making presentations at professional conferences. > Establish credibility when submitting a manuscript proposal to an academic journal or press.

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STRUCTURE AND CONTENT Your CV should include the following categories and information: > IDENTIFICATION INFORMATION: Name, address (campus/temporary and permanent/home), email, phone numbers > CAREER OBJECTIVE (optional) > EDUCATION: Title of academic degree, name of college/university, location (city/state), date of completion, GPA (optional), areas of specialization, title of thesis/dissertation > RELEVANT WORK EXPERIENCE: Title/position, department, institution/organization/company, location (city/state), description of duties > PUBLICATIONS: Authors’ names, date of publication, title of article, journal name > SPECIAL AWARDS AND HONORS > PRESENTATIONS: Presenters’ names, title of presentation, name of conference, date and location > RECENT AND CURRENT RESEARCH: Short description of research including type and purpose of research > GRANTS RECEIVED: Name of grant, granting agency, date received, title/purpose of project > PROFESSIONAL ASSOCIATION MEMBERSHIPS: Current memberships only, in alphabetical order > OTHER RELEVANT INFORMATION > PROFESSIONAL SERVICE: Title of leadership positions held, names of association, dates held, responsibilities > COMMUNITY INVOLVEMENT: Brief description of responsibilities, name of organization, dates > OTHER COMPETENCIES: Language competencies, computer skills, international experiences, etc. > CURRENT INTERESTS: Teaching/research interests, service to profession/department/college/community, etc. > REFERENCES: Include names, title/department, organization/institution, contact information

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CV SAMPLE—BASIC SCIENCES CURRICULUM VITAE

Name

Department • University at Buffalo, SUNY • Address • City, ST 12345 Email: name@domain.com • Phone: (555)-555-1234

EDUCATION University at Buffalo, SUNY (Buffalo, New York)

May 20XX (Expected)

(Expected) Doctor of Philosophy in XXX Thesis: “Insert Title of Thesis Here” North Carolina State University (Raleigh, North Carolina)

May 20XX

Bachelor of Science in XXX Bachelor of Science in XXX Minor in XXX RESEARCH EXPERIENCE Dec. 20XX–Present UB SUNY, Name and location of research lab

(Buffalo, NY)

• Provide description of your job function and responsibilities, as well as the focus area of research. • Elaborate on your achievements and what you contributed to your role in conducting this research. • Use qualitative examples where possible. May 20XX–August 20XX Name of Organization, Position

(Morrisville, NC)

• Provide description of your job function and responsibilities, as well as the focus area of research. • Elaborate on your achievements and what you contributed to your role in conducting this research. • Use qualitative examples where possible. PUBLICATIONS 1st Author Publications: # of publications Citations: # of citations H-index: # of H-indexes I10-index: # of 110-indexes Research papers: 1st Author Publications: In preparation/Submitted: 1. Your Name, Chen.T, Gollakota A, Kamal-Ahmadi M, Reddinger R. Hakansson AP, Pfeifar BA. Improved Escherichia coli bactofection and cytotoxicity by expression of lysis gene E. (In preparation) Published: Your Name, Chen M, Ravikrishnan A, Reddinger R, Zhang G, Hakansson AP, Pfeifer BA. Mannosylated poly(beta amino esters) for targeted antigen presenting cell immune modulation. Biomaterials-(Accepted) Abstracts: 7. Your Name, Ravikrishnan A Cf-Jen C-K, Patt E, Pfeifer- BA. Synthesis of Hybrid Biomaterial-Bacterial Gene Delivery Vectors. University at Buffalo SUNY, 16th Annual CBE Graduate Research Symposium. October 2013

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Secondary Author Publications: In preparation/Submitted: Chen C-K, Wang, Your Name, Law W-C, Yu Y, Prasad PN, Pfeifer BA, Cheng C. Degradable and pH-responsive chitosan nanocapsules as drug carriers for doxorubicin delivery in MCF-7 cells. Langmuir. 2013; 30(14). 4111-4119 (In preparation) Abstracts: Chen M, Ravikrishnan A, Reddinger R, Your Name, Zhang G, Hakansson AP, Pfeifer BA. Mannosylated poly (beta amino esters) for targeted antigen presenting cell immune modulation. Biomaterials-(Accepted) PRESENTATIONS 1. Your Name, McCarty G. On-Chip Electrophoresis using Fast Scan Cyclic Voltammetry End-Point Detection for Complex Biological Samples. North Carolina State University Undergraduate Symposium. May 2011 TALKS/SPEECHES 1. Student Keynote Speaker, University at Buffalo SUNY, 17’h Annual CBE Graduate Research Symposium. October 2014 AWARDS & HONORS

• Graduate School Ambassador Award

March 20XX, 20XX

• List all other awards and honors awarded during Graduate school

TECHNICAL LEADERSHIP & TEACHING Lecturer/Adjunct Professor Name of University/College SMBS Post-Baccalaureate Program-Medical Microbiology-Summer 20XX Teaching Assistantships Name of University/College

• MA131-Business Calculus- Fall 20XX

• MA141-Engineering Calculus 1- Fall 2008, Spring 20XX, Fall 20XX

• MA241-Engineering Calculus 2- Spring 20XX

Guest Lectures University at Buffalo SUNY CE327-Chemical Engineering Lab I-Spring 2012 (Instructor Name)

• Bi-weekly lab sessions

• Two class lectures

Volunteer Work July 20XX–Present People Inc.

• Provide description of your responsibilities

• Elaborate on your achievements and what you contributed to your role in conducting this research.

• Use qualitative examples where possible.

CLICK TO VIEW ADDITIONAL CV SAMPLES IN APPENDIX 23


CONVERTING YOUR CV TO A RESUME If you already have a CV, you may need to consolidate the information to fit a resume format for a job search outside of academia.

TRANSFORM YOUR CV TO A RESUME IN A FEW SIMPLE STEPS:

1. Identify  a resume format by looking through resume books in the Brent D. Arcangel Career Resource Library (259 Capen Hall) or online through the “Library Thingy” and the resume tip sheet.

1. 2. 3.

5. Use action-oriented verbs that describe your skills and experiences in a way that will make sense to a prospective employer.

2. R  esearch and identify skills and qualifications sought by prospective employers and particular job postings.

6. Streamline your document by removing extraneous information and by using clear and concise formatting.

3. G  enerate a list of your transferable skills and relevant experience.

7. M  eet with a Career Services counselor to receive feedback and suggestions for revisions.

4. O  rganize your information to highlight experience and skills that are relevant to the job you are seeking.

8. R  evise your resume, proofread carefully and print the final copy on good quality resume paper.

RESUME TIPS

TRY

AVOID

> Be concise—ideally a resume should be one page; two pages only if you have extensive experience.

> Including references—names and contact information should be provided separately, if requested.

> Focus on work experience and transferable skills rather than coursework and research.

> Listing all your course work—only include classes relevant to the job you’re seeking.

> Follow a traditional format including headings such as Objective Education, Experience, Activities, and Skills.

> Including publications unless on a separate page or under their own section called “Selected Publications”.

Source: Columbia University Center for Career Education

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WO R D S TH AT A D D

IMPACT

TO YOUR RESUME AND CV Abstracted Achieved Acquired Acted Adapted Addressed Administered Advertised Advocated Aided Allocated Analyzed Answered Anticipated Applied Appraised Approved Arranged Ascertained Assembled Assessed Assisted Attained Audited Augmented Authored Bolstered Briefed Brought Budgeted Built Calculated Cared Charged Chartered Checked Clarified Classified Coached Collaborated Collected Comforted Communicated Compared Compiled Completed Composed

Computed Conceived Conducted Conserved Constructed Consulted Contracted Contributed Controlled Converted Cooperated Coordinated Copied Correlated Counseled Created Critiques Cultivated Debated Decided Defined Delegated Delivered Designed Detected Determined Developed Devised Diagnosed Directed Discovered Discriminated Dispatched Displayed Dissected Distributed Documented Drafted Drove Edited Eliminated Emphasized Enabled Enforced Enlightened Enlisted Ensured

Interviewed Introduced Invented Inventoried Investigated Judged Launched Learned Lectured Led Lifted Listed Listened Located Logged Made Maintained Managed Manipulated Mapped Mastered Maximized Meditated Memorized Mentored Met Minimized Modeled Modified Monitored Motivated Narrated Negotiated Observed Obtained Offered Operated Ordered Organized Originated Overcame Oversaw Participated Perceived Perfected Performed Persuaded

Established Estimated Evaluated Examined Exceeded Excelled Expanded Expedited Experimented Explained Explored Expressed Extracted Facilitated Fashioned Financed Fixed Followed Formulated Fostered Founded Gained Gathered Generated Governed Guided Handled Headed Helped Identified Illustrated Imagined Implemented Improved Improvised Inaugurated Increased Indexed Indicated Influenced Informed Initiated Inspected Instituted Instructed Integrated Interpreted 25

Planned Practiced Predicted Prepared Presented Prioritized Produced Programmed Projected Promoted Proposed Protected Proved Provided Publicized Published Purchased Queried Questioned Raised Ran Ranked Rationalized Read Reasoned Received Recommended Reconciled Recorded Reduced Referred Related Relied Repaired Reported Represented Researched Resolved Responded Restored Revamped Reviewed Scanned Scheduled Screened Selected Served

Set goals Shaped Sketched Sold Solicited Solved Spearheaded Specialized Spoke Stimulated Strategized Streamlined Strengthened Stressed Studied Substantiated Succeeded Suggested Summarized Supervised Supported Surveyed Sustained Symbolized Synthesized Tabulated Talked Taught Tended Tested Theorized Trained Translated Tutored Undertook United Updated Upgraded Utilized Validated Verified Visualized Weighed Won Wrote


COVER LETTER In a one-page letter that that accompanies your resume or CV, make a good first impression that piques the interest of a potential employer.

COVER LETTER TIPS

1

CUSTOMIZE your cover letter for each organization and for each position.

2

3

HIGHLIGHT SPECIFIC EXAMPLES from your experience that demonstrate why you are a match for the position and the employer.

BE CLEAR AND GET TO THE POINT.

4

26

PROOFREAD! No spelling or grammatical mistakes.


COVER LETTER SAMPLE Your Present Address City, State Zip Code Date of Writing Mr. / Ms. / Dr. Last Name of Person Title of Person Organization Name Street Address City, State Zip Code

Dear Mr. / Ms. / Dr. Last Name: Why are you writing this letter? If you are responding to a job posting, include the position, field, or area to which you’re applying and tell how you learned of the opening. If you are “prospecting” to determine if the organization has unpublished opportunities, or acting on a referral from one of your contacts, indicate how you learned about the organization. Who, if anyone, referred you? Include a brief statement about what is unique about your skills or experiences that would make you a good fit in the organization and the field. Also, offer a brief statement demonstrating specific knowledge of the company to which you are applying. Tailor this to each employer to demonstrate your interest and that you’ve done your homework. Use this paragraph to demonstrate to the employer how your interests, education, and experience fit the requirements described in the position postings. Use specific examples that illustrate your related skills and experience. If you are prospecting, how do you see yourself fitting with this organization? Describe the qualifications that you think are most relevant. If you have related experience or specialized training, briefly mention it here. Think about all the transferable skills you have gained in various jobs, volunteer experiences, campus activities, projects, and research. Briefly summarize how those experiences are relevant to the position or the organization. Refer the employer to your resume for further details about your experiences and qualifications. Reiterate why you want to work at that specific organization. Offer your contact information and thank the employer for time and consideration. If you are addressing your letter to a specific person, indicate when and how you plan on following up on the submission of your cover letter.

Sincerely,

Your Signature Name Enc. (Include this notation only if you send the letter by mail and your resume is enclosed.)

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THANK YOU LETTER Sending a thank you letter after an interview isn’t just polite, it shows professionalism. In your letter, express sincere appreciation for the opportunity, and remind the prospective employer that you are interested in the position. This small gesture can help you stand out among applicants and possibly increase your chances of landing the job. For assistance writing your thank you letter, visit UB Career Services.

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THANK YOU LETTER SAMPLE Your Present Address City, State Zip Code Date of Writing Name of Interviewer Title of Interviewer Name of Organization Street Address City, State, ZIP Code

Dear Name of Interviewer: Paragraph 1: Thank the interviewer and express your appreciation for the courtesy and consideration extended to you. Mention the position for which you interviewed, the date and the place of the interview and include some reference to your conversation which will help the employer remember you. Paragraph 2: Reaffirm your interest in the position. Mention anything you have done since the interview that shows your interest in the position. You could also comment on something specific about the position which came up during the interview. Paragraph 3: Express your willingness to provide additional information. Include here, or enclose with the letter, any information requested at the interview. Paragraph 4: End with a simple, positive closing.

Sincerely yours,

Your Signature Type your name here Enc. (If you enclose a resume or other materials)

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GET

LINKED

INTRODUCTION TO LINKEDIN LinkedIn is the world’s largest professional networking site, with more than 300 million members. It’s a virtual “resume” of sorts that includes details of your education, professional interests, skills, and previous experiences.

WHY USE LINKEDIN? It allows you to manage your professional online identity and build your professional network. By allowing you to see the profiles of current professionals and students, you can explore career options and find job/ internship opportunities.

ULTIMATE LINKEDIN CHECKLIST 1. CREATE A PROFILE C  reate an exciting headline such as “Econometrics and Financial Analyst.” U  pload a picture. It doesn’t have to be too fancy but should be crisp and appropriate. Customize your LinkedIn URL like this: www.linkedin.com/in/(your first and last name, no spaces). Write your summary focusing on what you’re good at, what’s happening in your career and what’s next for you. Build your profile to look like your resume with sections such as education, experience and skills. 2. JOIN LINKEDIN GROUPS University at Buffalo Career Advice: join this group to network with UB alumni and employers. C  lick “Members.” S  earch for Mentors using keywords such as major, field, company and position title. Click “Send Message” link to send an email about connecting and/or setting up an informational interview. U  niversity at Buffalo Alumni Association: beginning in January of the year of your degree completion, you can join the official UB Alumni Association LinkedIn group to network with UB alumni and search for jobs.  ther LinkedIn Groups: search by keyword and join groups related to your career, field of interest and skills. O TIP: The best way to contact a LinkedIn Group member you don’t already know is to send a LinkedIn email message through LinkedIn. Remember—you don’t have to be “connected” with them to send a LinkedIn email message.

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3. MAKE CONNECTIONS Search for people on LinkedIn who have job titles, skills, industries, majors, belong to groups and work at companies that interest you. View their profiles to learn about their career path. Find professionals in your field who also went to UB by clicking the “Network” tab and then “Find Alumni.” Research Graduate/Professional schools by viewing the profiles of alumni of any school by clicking “Switch Schools.” Once your profile is finished, start “connecting” with people that you know:

> Friends

> Family members

> Current or previous work colleagues

> Supervisors

> Classmates

TIP: Change the years attended to “1980–2014” and click “include people with no dates.” You’ll see “Where they live”, “Where they work”, and “What do they do”. To see, “What they Studied”, “Skills and Expertise,” click on the >.

TIP: You should only connect with people you know. When sending an invitation to connect, always personalize your invitation. Indicate why you want to connect with this person or refer to the last conversation you had with him/her.

4. SEARCH FOR A JOB AND INTERNSHIP Type the company name in the “company search” field. You can see people in your network who work at that company, job postings and “insights” about people who work there.  ind out where others are doing internships related to your field by doing an “Advanced” search F using related keywords and the job title “intern”.  earch for jobs and internships posted on LinkedIn using the “Advanced” search to sort job openings S by keyword, function, industry, location or level of experience. To get ready for an interview, use LinkedIn to research the company and even the professionals who will be interviewing.

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EXAMPLE PROFILE

PHOTO: Appropriate and crisp

HEADLINE: Exciting and descriptive

SUMMARY: Motivations, skills and intentions

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EXPERIENCE: All experience, even if part-time, with supporting accomplishments and visual examples

ORGANIZATIONS: professional associations, in-school or outside, and your involvement

Add Steven N. Gineer as a connection on your LinkedIn account!

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CRAFTING YOUR RESEARCH STATEMENT When applying for an academic position, you may be asked to summarize your research achievements and create a proposal for upcoming research. Your research statement should include current focus, interests and future plans. Aim for one to three pages in length, although longer statements are sometimes applicable.

TIPS FOR WRITING

QUESTIONS TO ANSWER

> Discuss your long-term research goals.

> Why are you interested in this research?

> If you have done several projects, convey the connection among them.

> What was the burning question that you set out to answer?

> Discuss your interest in the relevant academic field.

> What challenges did you encounter along the way, and how did you overcome these challenges?

> Outline contributions you plan to make to the field.

> How can your research be applied? And why is your research important within your field?

> Describe your contributions as a member of a research team.

> What direction will your research take you in next, and what new questions do you have?

> Explain a few research concepts on a focus area of interest.

> What is your potential to secure grant funding?

> Discuss how a recent piece of work paved a pathway for the research you plan to do.

> What is the compatibility with the university and the department?

> Consider detailing how you will involve students in your research and how your research relates to your teaching. > Discuss funding history and potential. > Indicate how your research goals align with departmental goals. > Strive to convince a committee you will succeed.

TOP THREE

REASONS A RESEARCH PROPOSAL IS TURNED DOWN BY THE RESEARCH COMMITTEE

ONE “Lacks clarity and focus as it only relates to a limited area and does not address the mainstream issues of its field.”

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TWO

THREE

“The research statement is overly ambitious.”

“Does not fully grasp the complexity of the research.”


WHAT’S YOUR TEACHING PHILOSOPHY? A teaching philosophy is a self-reflective statement of your beliefs about teaching and learning. It is a way to discuss how you put your beliefs into practice by including concrete examples of what you do or anticipate doing in the classroom. Typically, the philosophies are between one and four pages double-spaced.

ANSWER THESE FOUR QUESTIONS 1. WHAT ARE YOUR OBJECTIVES? > Your role in orienting students to a discipline. > Specific ways you want to improve the education of students in your field. > Area you will you focus on developing most in your students (e.g. critical thinking, life-long learning skills, problem-solving strategies). > Define the boundaries between your responsibilities and the students’ responsibilities.

2. HOW WILL YOU ACCOMPLISH YOUR OBJECTIVES? > Readings to use in your curriculum. > Whether you will use collaborative or individual projects. > Whether you will use active learning or student-centered learning principles and why.

3. HOW WILL YOU BE EFFECTIVE? > Measures of success. > Method of feedback. > Be creative.

4. WHY TEACHING? > Your greatest rewards of teaching. > Why teaching is important to you. > How you want to make the world better. > How you will inspire students. > How you will make a difference in your students’ lives.

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CLOSING THE

DEAL


INTERVIEWING TIPS PREPPING FOR THE BIG DAY

Practice makes perfect. Schedule a practice interview appointment with Career Services. We will record your responses on video and review your performance together to make improvements. Or, you can record and upload a practice interview video through InterviewStream, our online virtual interview preparation tool on BullsEye. Research the organization again. Look through websites and written materials, or talk with customers/ clients to familiarize yourself with the organization. Be sure to incorporate your new learning into your interview responses and questions. Read about how to research employers. Create your talking points. Think of the reasons why you are the best candidate for the position, and work them into your responses. If you are struggling to talk about your strengths, consider taking StrengthsQuest™.

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AT THE INTERVIEW

LISTEN TO THE INTERVIEWER. Adjust to the interviewer’s style and think about why particular questions are being asked. Respond completely to all aspects of a question.

DON’T MONOPOLIZE THE CONVERSATION. While interviewers usually want more than a simple “Yes” or “No” answer, avoid long responses. Make your answers accurate, brief and as interesting as possible.

BE POSITIVE. This is not the place to criticize your school, past employers or professors. An optimist is more useful in an organization than a pessimist. If you can be enthusiastic about past experiences, you are likely to be positive about future employers.

PEOPLE HIRE, NOT ORGANIZATIONS. Remember, people make the hiring decisions. Your goal is to make effective contact with the interviewer.

ASK QUESTIONS. Reflect your interest and enthusiasm by asking questions about the organization and the job. This is another place to demonstrate that you have researched the organization.

EXPRESS INTEREST. Take time near the end of the interview to reiterate excitement about the employer and the position.

LEARN WHAT HAPPENS NEXT. It is always acceptable to ask about the next stages in the employment process and when they might occur.

EXPRESS THANKS. Thank the interviewer for his or her time and interest in you. Thank the receptionist and anyone else who helped you.

Source: Career Opportunities News, Garrett Park Press, Garrett Park, MD

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COMMON INTERVIEW QUESTIONS Stay one step ahead of the interviewer by preparing answers for these popular questions.

PERSONAL

EDUCATION

• Tell me about yourself.

• Why are you interested in this position?

• What are your greatest strengths?

• Why did you choose to your academic program/discipline?

• What is one of your weaknesses? • Define success. Define failure. • Have you ever had any failures? What did you learn from them? • What motivates you most about this position? • What can you offer us? • Describe your ideal position. • Why did you choose to interview with our company/organization?

• How has your advanced degree prepared you for a position with our organization? • Tell me about your leadership/campus involvement? • Do your grades accurately reflect your ability? Why or why not? • How do you think a professor who knows you well would describe you? • Why are you interested in this position?

• Why should we hire you?

CAREER GOALS EXPERIENCE • What skills relevant to this position have you developed? • In what type of work environment do you thrive? • Tell me about how your experiences would help you in this position. • Describe a major problem you encountered and how you dealt with it. • Give an example of a time when you worked under a deadline. • Give an example of a time when you worked on a team to accomplish something.

• Do you prefer to work under supervision or independently? • What kind of supervisor/chair/leadership do you prefer? • Do you prefer large or small organizations? Why? • How do you feel about working in a structured environment? • Can you work on several assignments at once? • How do you feel about the possibility of relocating?

• What did you enjoy most about your last employment? Least? • How do you think a former supervisor would describe your work?

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QUESTIONS YOU MAY ASK Employers will typically ask if you have any questions about the position or the organization. Don’t pass up this opportunity to gather more information to show your interest and help decide if you want the job.

TO A PROSPECTIVE COWORKER: • What do you like best about working for this department/organization? •W  hat do you find most challenging about working for this department/organization? • Can you describe a typical workday in the department? • What are the possibilities for professional growth and promotion? •D  o you have much of an opportunity to work independently, or with supervisors, colleagues or customers? • How did you get to where you are in this organization and in your career?

TO YOUR PROSPECTIVE SUPERVISOR: • What would be my primary responsibilities? •W  hat would I be expected to accomplish in the first six months on the job? In the first year? •W  hat are some of the department’s ongoing and anticipated special projects? • Can you describe a typical day in the life of this position?

TO THE HUMAN RESOURCES REPRESENTATIVE: •A  re employees encouraged and given the opportunity to express their ideas and concerns? • What do employees seem to like best and least about the company? • What is the rate of employee turnover? Why is this position open? • How large is the department where the opening exists? • What type of orientation or training do new employees receive? • How often are performance reviews conducted?

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BEHAVIORAL INTERVIEWING In a behavioral interview, a potential employer will ask you focus on a past situation as a way to predict your future performance. Interviewers will be looking for you to describe what happened, what you did in the situation and the outcome.

TOP 10 BEHAVIORAL INTERVIEWING QUESTIONS 1. Describe a situation when you were able to have a positive influence on the actions of others. 2. Describe how you developed a project team’s goals and the project plan? 3. What have you done in order to be effective with your organization and planning? 4. Describe a team experience you found rewarding. 5. P  lease give your best example of working cooperatively as a team member to accomplish an important goal. 6. Tell us about a time that you successfully adapted to a culturally different environment. 7.  Tell us about a situation in which you had to adjust to changes over which you had no control. How did you handle it? 8. Give a specific example of a time when you used good judgment and logic in solving a problem. 9. Describe a situation where you felt you had not communicated well. How did you correct the situation? 10. Describe a time when you were faced with a stressful situation that demonstrated your coping skills.

BE A STAR

ST

S  ITUATION OR TASK

Briefly outline the parameters of the situation/problem: > Who were the key players? > What was the objective or assignment?

A

ACTION

Focus on your role/part in the situation and specifically what action steps you took: > Logically recount what you did and why.

> Why did the problem exist?

R

RESULT

Results of the situation are arguably the most important though most commonly omitted part of the response. Discuss what your actions led to: > Did you accomplish goals/objectives? > Were you successful or not? > Were you efficient and productive? > What did you learn?

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THE JOB TALK During the interview process, potential employers may request an on-campus job talk. The purpose of this presentation is for them to learn more about you and your research. It’s also an opportunity to demonstrate your enthusiasm, problem-solving skills and communication style.

TIP: One talk does not fit all—tailor your presentation to the organization and the position.

JOB TALK CHECKLIST  sk your faculty mentors and others in your field about their job talks A and interviewing processes.  atch job talks on your campus. W  pend time and effort preparing—they are spending time and effort S bringing you to them.  ut some thought into possible contradictions in your research. P

I dentify themes in your research that best display your qualifications.  hink of keywords from your profession. T  upport your information with facts, authoritative sources, quotes, S narratives and even humor.  ake a final determination on what part of your research you want to discuss. M  resent your talk in front of diverse groups of people—record the talk on video P and have friends ask challenging questions.  emember the FIVE P’s (Proper Preparation Prevents Poor Performance) R  o not go over the time allotted for the talk. If you are told you have an hour D for your talk, prepare the talk for 50 minutes.

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HOW TO STRUCTURE YOUR PRESENTATION

SECTION

PURPOSE AND EXAMPLE

1.

INTRODUCTION

Grab attention! “The number of Americans living in poverty jumped to 35.9 million last year.”

2.

ESTABLISH CREDIBILITY

“My name is Grady Student, and I have been researching this issue for the past two years.”

3.

NEED/IMPORTANCE

“My Research affects everyone in the room today because…. e.g. poverty infiltrates all areas….”

4.

INITIAL SUMMARY

Tell them what’s coming: “Today I will discuss the part of my research which revolves around the economic impact of poverty in the rural United States….”

5.

BODY/CATEGORIES

a). Rationale b). Methods

6.

FINAL SUMMARY

7.

QUESTIONS

c). Results d). Implications

e). Future Directions

“To summarize, the results of my work show that the economic impact of poverty…”

Answer succinctly and thank interviewer for the question.

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JOB OFFERS AND NEGOTIATING Congratulations—you received a job offer! Now what? Make sure you thoroughly understand the offer, and don’t hesitate to politely ask the following questions for clarification.

TOPIC

QUESTIONS TO ASK

TITLE

WHAT IS MY EXACT TITLE?

SUPERVISOR

TO WHOM WILL I REPORT?

START DATE

CAN WE MAKE MY START DATE EARLIER OR LATER?

SALARY

WHAT IS THE BASE RATE? IS IT PAYABLE MONTHLY OR BI-WEEKLY?

BENEFITS

WHAT BENEFITS WILL I HAVE? HEALTH INSURANCE, DENTAL, OR VISION? IF SO, WHAT WILL BE MY CONTRIBUTION?

VACATION

HOW MANY VACATION DAYS WILL I RECEIVE? ANY FLEXIBILITY IN PROVIDING MORE? DOES IT INCREASE? IF YES, WHEN?

HOLIDAYS

HOW MANY? WHAT HOLIDAYS? CAN ANY BE FLEXED?

SICK/PERSONAL DAYS

DO I GET ANY SICK OR PERSONAL TIME? IF SO, HOW MUCH? ANY RESTRICTIONS?

OVERTIME

IS THERE PAID OVERTIME?

PROMISED INCREASES

WHAT INCREASES SHOULD I EXPECT FOR THE FIRST 2–3 YEARS?

RELOCATION

WHAT EXPENSES ARE COVERED? IS THERE A CAP?

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GO

BEYOND This isn’t the end of your journey— it’s just the beginning. As you prepare for your career, it’s important to remember that you don’t have to do it alone. In addition to this guide, UB Career Services is ready to provide guidance and resources every step of the way. You bring the ambition. We’ll help make it possible. (716) 645-2231 buffalo.edu/career

Career Services

259 Capen Hall, North Campus


APPENDIX: LIST OF RESOURCES


RESEARCHING EMPLOYERS

PROFESSIONAL ASSOCIATIONS

Hoover’s >

Weddle’s Association Directory >

LexisNexis Academic >

American Society of Association Executives >

Going Global > Worldwide industry profiles, located in the Resource Library in BullsEye

Wikipedia list of international professional associations >

RESUMES AND CVS

H-1b Databases > Located in the Resource Library in BullsEye

Basalla, Susan and Maggie Debelius. So What Are You Going To Do With That?: A Guide for M.A.’s and Ph.D.’s Seeking Careers Outside the Academy. Farrar, Straus and Giroux: 2001 (rev. ed 2007) >

Brent D. Arcangel Career Resource Library Visit 259 Capen Hall to look through hundreds of books, including business directories, magazines and newspapers.

Furlong, Jennifer S. and Julia Miller Vick. The Academic Job Search Handbook. University of Pennsylvania Press, 1992 (rev. ed. 2008). >

Employer Info Sessions on Campus View Career Services Events page

EMPLOYMENT PROSPECTS

JOB TALK

The Chronicle of Higher Education >

Acing the Academic Job Talk: Marincovich Gives Pointers > Diane Manuel, Stanford Report Online

Higher Ed Jobs > Academic 360 >

Academic Scientists at Work: The Job Talk > Jeremy M. Boss, Susan H. Eckert, Science Careers Forum

JOB POSTING WEBSITES Beyond Academe: >

Giving a Job Talk in the Sciences > Richard M. Reis, The Chronicle of Higher Education Chronicle Careers

Columbia University’s Non-Academic Career Options >

Perfecting the Job Talk > Notes from Professor John Eadie, University of California - Davies

myIDP > primarily careers Postdocjobs > sciencecareers.org >

INTERVIEWING

www.cvtips.com >

Preparing for Interviews >

Vitae > America’s Job bank > Vault Reports Job Board >

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APPENDIX: RESUME & CV SAMPLES


SAMPLE STUDENT RESUME 1

SAMPLE STUDENT  

E: sstudent@buffalo.edu  |  M:  (123)-­‐456-­‐7891  |  LinkedIn:  www.linkedin.com/in/sstudent  

PRODUCTIVITY ANALYSIS  &  OPERATIONS  IMPROVEMENT  

A meticulous   Industrial   Engineer   who   undertakes   complex   productivity   analysis   assignments,   meets   tight   deadlines,   and   delivers   optimal   performance.   Possesses   practical   knowledge   in   manufacturing,   warehousing   and   business   operations.   Applies   strong   industrial   engineering   skills   to   make   recommendations   to   senior   management   on   key   trends   &   metrics   that   affect   business   and   achieves  productivity  improvement  by  application  of  production  planning,  lean  and  six  sigma  methodologies.  Operates  with  a  strong   sense  of  attention  to  detail,  and  thrives  in  a  fast  paced  setting.  Fluent  in  English  &  French.     Core  competencies  include  –   Production  Planning  &  Control  ●  Six  Sigma  ●  Lean  Manufacturing  ●  Quality  Assurance  ●  Continuous  Improvement  ●  Facilities  Design   ● Supply  Chain  Management  ●  Logistics  &  Global  Distribution  Management  ●  Purchasing  &  Supply  Management

PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE  

INGRAM MICRO  ●  Williamsville,  NY  ●  Oct  20xx  to  Present    Delivering   global   technology   and   supply   chain   services   to   support   cloud   aggregation,   data   center   management   logistics,   technology   distribution.  Helping  businesses  realize  the  promise  of  technology.   Data  Specialist   Perform  analysis  of  business  trends  for  Ingram  Micro’s  Global  Shared  Services  Department.  Support  the  development  of  productivity   &  utilization  reports  for  executives  and  ad-­‐hoc  teams.  Formulate  quarterly  productivity  goals  and  track  actual  trends  by  regular  team   meetings  with  engineering  leads  and  managers.     • • •

Generated a   forecasted   cost-­‐savings   opportunity   of   $1M   by   designing   a   productivity   framework   that   streamlined   the   cost-­‐to-­‐ serve  for  the  Shared  Services  Center  in  Europe. Achieved  a  67%  improvement  in  team  revenues  by  providing  scheduled  analysis  reports  for  4  different  teams. Created  a  learning  curve  model  to  support  senior  management  with  accurate  calculation  of  employee  ramp-­‐up  time.

SPEAR LOGISTICS  PRIVATE  LIMITED  ●  Pune,  Maharashtra,  India  ●  May  20xx  to  Aug  20xx  &  Dec  20xx  to  May  20xx     India’s  premier  contract  logistics  firm  offering  warehousing  operations  and  solutions  nationwide.     Industrial  Engineering  Intern   Optimized  warehousing  operations  for  distribution  centers  of  Siemens  Inc.  and  Honeywell  Turbo  Technologies  Ltd.  Provided  optimal   workforce  planning  solutions  using  aggregate  planning,  forecasting,  and  scheduling  tools.   • •

Reduced the  overall  time  for  the  material  to   be  stored  by  0.5  shift  by  implementing  a  bar-­‐code  scanning  system  to  expedite  the material  receiving  process. Reduced  the  manpower  in  a  warehouse  by  5  per  day,  achieving  an  annual  savings  by  identifying  fixed  &  variable  manpower  in each  warehousing  operation  using  time  &  method  study  principles.

GABRIEL INDIA  LIMITED  ●  Pune,  Maharashtra,  INDIA  ●  Jan  20xx  to  Jun  20xx   Leading  automotive  component  manufacturer  which  provides  the  widest  range  of  ride  control  products  in  India.   Industrial  Engineering  Intern   Conducted   time   studies   for   all   the   processes   in   the   plant   from   material   receiving   processes,   through   assembly,   to   dispatch.   Developed   a   value   stream   map   showing   the   current   state   of   the   firm   and   envisioned   its   future   based   on   time   study   calculations   and   future  production  and  supply  requirements.     • • •

Reduced the  number  of  operators  by  2  per  shift  using  a  line  balance  chart,  standardized  work  chart  and  kaizen  methods. Increased  output  by  100  products  per  shift  by  modifying  assembly  line  layouts,  time  &  motion  study  and  production  capacity analysis. Reduced  the  inventory  carrying  cost  by  25%  by  implementing  an  Excel-­‐based  inventory  model.

EDUCATION

Master of  Science  in  Industrial  Engineering   UNIVERSITY  AT  BUFFALO  ●  SUNY  ●  June  20xx  

TECHNICAL SKILLS  

Proficient in  Microsoft  Office  Suite:  advanced  Excel  ▪  Word  ▪  Power  Point  ▪  Outlook,  Minitab,  Magellan,  SQL,  LOGWARE,  Precision   Tree  ®,  AutoCAD,  CATIA  V5   49


SAMPLE STUDENT RESUME 2

Sample Student

259 Capen Hall, Buffalo, NY 14260. Phone: (123) 456 -7891. Email: sstudent@buffalo.edu Linkedin.com/in/sstudent EDUCATION University at Buffalo, SUNY • Master of Science, Mechanical Engineering, Overall GPA: 3.96/4.0 • Bachelor of Science, Mechanical Engineering, Overall GPA: 3.52/4.0

Feb 20xx Feb 20xx

EXPERIENCE Research Assistant, University at Buffalo, New York Feb 20xx-Feb 20xx Thesis: CFD Analysis, Optimization and Fluid-Structure-Interaction Simulations (FSI) of an Axial Gas Turbine • Used Solidworks to model an existing turbine blade with optimized 2D & 3D grid (mes) to facilitate transient and steady state fluid analysis of turbine • Implemented & interpreted 3D CFD simulation & heat transfer to study the flow field (fluid) of an axial gas turbine • Re-engineered turbine design to maximize efficiency, resulting in 5.68% improvement in performance. Validated outcome using Goal Design Optimization • Conducted structural analysis (FEA) to obtain stress distribution on blades and determined the critical condition Jun 20xx-Aug 20xx Engineering Intern, TUBA (Hydraulic Iranian Turbines), Iran • Created hydraulic design & optimized the head loss of draft tube of a 250 MW hydro power plant using ANSYS • Provided the hydrostatic test documentation required for the volute (spiral case) of the hydraulic turbine Engineering Intern, National Oil Institute, Iran Jan 20xx-Apr 20xx Pipeline Corrosion Division Jan 20xx-Feb 20xx • Investigated the reasons for separation of three layer coating on the gas pipeline • Served on the team that provided the problem solution, which involved a calibrated reduction of pressure in hydrostatic test and increase of coating thickness • Creating the opportunity for new amendment to the Iranian Gas Standard Pipeline Maintenance Division • • •

Feb 20xx-Apr 20xx

Analyzed the maintenance process of 240 km of a 30 inch pipeline with specified corroded locations Optimized method of maintenance by substituting water with oil in the corroded part by separation pig Achieved desired goal of 450,000 gal/day of crude oil and increased safety procedures

TECHNICAL SKILLS • • • •

Proficient in CFX (Pre-Processing, Solving, Post Processing), Fluent, ANSYS (Workbench, Structural Simulation (Mechanical Model), Design Optimization, (LS DYNA), TurboGrid, BladeGen, ANSYS (APDL) Proficient in SolidWorks, Pro–E, Creo, AutoCAD, Mechanical Desktop Proficient in with MATLAB, Maple, Microsoft Excel Knowledge of reading P&ID, GD&T(Geometric Dimensioning and Tolerancing)

HONORS • • •

Dean’s scholarship, Spring 20xx, Fall 20xx Greiner scholarship, Fall 20xx, Spring 20xx Dean’s list, Fall 20xx,Spring 20xx, Fall 20xx

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HEALTHCARE RESUME SAMPLE 1

HEALTHCARE RESUME  EXAMPLE   Sample  C.  Smith   (xxx) xxx-xxxx xxxxx@buffalo.edu;  www.linkedin.com/in/smith  

EDUCATION University  at  Buffalo,  The  State  University  of  New  York Master  of  Science  in  Occupational  Therapy,  May  20xx Bachelor  of  Science  in  Occupational  Science,  May  20xx Minor  in  Health  and  Wellness              GPA:  3.9/4.0  Dean’s  List   OCCUPATIONAL  THERAPY  RELATED  CLINICAL  EXPERIENCE            Level  II  Fieldwork                            University  of  Rochester  Medical  Center,  Rochester,  New  York     May  20xx–August  20xx • Conducted  and  documented  detailed  evaluations  and  administered  assessments. • Developed,  implemented,  and  modified  appropriate  intervention  plans. • Educated  patients  and  families  on  the  use  of  adaptive  equipment  and  home  modifications. • Collaborated  with  physicians,  nurses,  physical  therapists,  speech  pathologists,  and  social  workers   to provide  holistic  and  comprehensive  patient  care. • Created  and  presented  three,  60  minute  in-service  presentations  to  12+  staff  members. • Utilized  evidence  based  practice  to  design  and  construct  a  mirror  box  for  treatment  with  patients   post-stroke.                School  of  the  Holy  Childhood,  Rochester,  New  York   January  20xx–March  20xx • Developed,  implemented,  and  modified  appropriate  intervention  plans  for  students. • Administered  standardized  assessments  and  completed  re-­‐evaluation  and  annual  review documentation. • Utilized  evidence  based  practice  to  design  a  Response  to  Intervention  program  based  on  student sensory  needs. • Collaborated  with  special  education  teachers,  speech  pathologists,  and  occupational  therapy  assistants to  create  interventions  that  catered  to  each  students  specific  needs.          Level  I  Fieldwork                      Physical  Disabilities:  Mercy  Hospital  of  Buffalo,  Buffalo,  New  York                                    Adult  Developmental  Disabilities:  Suburban  Adult  Services  Inc.  (SASI),  Elma,  New  York                            Pediatrics:  Mary  Cariola  Children’s  Center,  Rochester  New  York   LEADERSHIP  AND  VOLUNTEER  EXPERIENCE            University  at  Buffalo  Student  Occupational  Therapy  Association,  Social  Convener,  20xx–20xx • Organized  more  than  10  events,  demonstrating  good  organizational  and  time  management  skills.          Occupational  Therapy  Student  Mentor,  20xx–20xx            Annual  Step  Up  for  Down  Syndrome  Walk,  Volunteer,  20xx–20xx PROFESSIONAL  AFFILIATIONS            Active  member  of  Pi  Theta  Epsilon  Occupational  Therapy  National  Honor  Society-­‐  Tau  Chapter            University  at  Buffalo  Student  Occupational  Therapy  Association  (SOTA)            American  Occupational  Therapy  Association  (AOTA)            New  York  State  Occupational  Therapy  Association  (NYSOTA)  

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HEALTHCARE RESUME SAMPLE 2

HEALTHCARE RESUME EXAMPLE #2 Sample Smith (716) xxx-xxxx

sample@gmail.com; www.linkedin.com/in/samplesmith __________________________________________________________________________________________________ EDUCATION University at Buffalo, The State University of New York Doctor of Physical Therapy, May 20XX CLINICAL EXPERIENCE Athleticare, Orchard Park, NY 5/20XX-8/20XX Outpatient Rehabilitation: land based and aquatic therapy • Evaluated and treated adults, pediatrics, and athletes with various orthopedic and neuromuscular dysfunctions. • Treated variety of conditions including rotator cuff tears, meniscal tears, extremity tendonitis and bursitis, arthritis, DJD spinal dysfunction, spinal stenosis, and BPPV. • Caseload also included patients seen after surgical debridement and repair. Absolute Care at Aurora Park, East Aurora, NY 12/20XX-2/20XX Sub Acute Care: adult and geriatric rehabilitation • Evaluated, treated and conducted discharge planning for patients receiving rehabilitative care. • Designed treatment plans for adults and geriatrics in specialized dementia unit. • Participated in wound care treatment involving light therapy to accelerate pressure ulcer healing. Nemeth Hospital & Medical Center, Las Vegas, NV 5/20XX-7/20XX Acute Care and Wound Care • Performed initial evaluations, discharge summaries, and treatment protocol for diverse in-patient cases. • Participated in wound care treatments including selective/nonselective debridement and wound V.A.C® therapy. • Presented in-service to acute rehabilitation department on pulmonary rehabilitation. • Volunteered at an affiliated balance center specializing in vestibular rehabilitation.

RELATED WORK EXPERIENCE Personal Trainer & Fitness Coordinator- Southtowns Fitness Center, West Seneca, NY 20XX-20XX Personal Trainer & Group Fitness Instructor- YMCA Buffalo Niagara, Buffalo, NY 20XX-20XX Growing Up Fit Instructor & Coordinator- YMCA Buffalo Niagara, Buffalo, NY 20XX-20XX SilverSneakers® Fitness Instructor- YMCA Buffalo Niagara, Buffalo, NY 20XX-20XX VOLUNTEER WORK United Day of Caring, Buffalo, NY Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Stacey Scott Lung Cancer Registry, Buffalo, NY Special Olympics New York, Buffalo, NY American Stroke Association, Buffalo, NY Women’s and Children’s Hospital, Buffalo, NY PROFESSIONAL AFFILIATIONS American Physical Therapy Association, proud member since 20XX. CERTIFICATIONS AND DESIGNATIONS Certified Personal Trainer. American Council on Exercise. Certified Group Fitness Instructor. American Council on Exercise. Certified SilverSneakers® Fitness Instructor. HealthCare Dimensions. CPR/AED Certified as BLS Healthcare Professional. American Heart Association. First Aid Certified. American Red Cross. REFERENCES AND PORTFOLIO Available Upon  Request   52


PUBLIC HEALTH RESUME SAMPLE

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SOCIAL WORK RESUME SAMPLE

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EDUCATION RESUME SAMPLE

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BASIC SCIENCES CV TEMPLATE

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HEALTH CV TEMPLATE

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HUMANITIES CV TEMPLATE

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SOCIAL SCIENCES CV TEMPLATE

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UB Career Services – Graduate Student Career Guide  

Everything you need to prepare for your career search.

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