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A challenging and inspiring world. Social Sciences undergraduate programmes


Welcome to Social Sciences Social science addresses many of the major issues we face today and, whatever your subject, you will find undergraduate study at Southampton challenging and inspiring. Our divisions foster an interdisciplinary approach, while retaining the individual strengths of each specialist subject area. All of our programmes offer significant flexibility and exceptional support from our research-active community of academic staff. As one of the top 75 universities in the world* and a founder member of the prestigious Russell Group of leading research universities in the UK, we provide an outstanding education. As an undergraduate student, you can expect to be taught by researchers at the forefront of their disciplines, tackling some of today’s global challenges. What are the implications of high population growth, climate change and economic uncertainty? How will technology impact on our working lives in the future? What can policymakers do to improve the wellbeing of older people? How can we tackle poverty? Southampton is one of the leading entrepreneurial universities in the world and has excellent relationships with business and industry. You will benefit from these strong links and will have many opportunities to develop your entrepreneurial skills. You will have a warm welcome when you join our friendly undergraduate community. With access to our Students’ Union and state-of-the-art sports centre, based on an attractive green campus, you have all the ingredients for a fantastic student experience. *2011 QS World University Rankings

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2 1. Research excellence What challenges do we face as the world’s population reaches seven billion? Page 4 2. Research and learning We focus on your talent and encourage you to personalise your learning Page 6 3. Our academics Our academics’ interests are wide-ranging, reflecting all areas of the social sciences relevant to today’s world Page 10 4. Learning environment Studying at Southampton is a unique and exciting experience Page 12

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5. Planning your career Social scientists are in demand more than ever before Page 14

In this brochure 5

Learning environment

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Planning your career

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Student life

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Southampton and region

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Programme overview

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Applying and funding

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International undergraduates

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How to get here

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Addressing global challenges. World population reaches seven billion Southampton social scientists brought together academics, policymakers, teachers, students and the public in 2011 to debate what the birth of the seven billionth person means for the world and the challenges we face as the global population continues to grow. The debate was organised by the ESRC Centre for Population Change (CPC), the UK’s first research centre on population change. The CPC is based at the University of Southampton and National Records of Scotland and is led by our Head of Social Sciences, Jane Falkingham. Jane said: “This landmark population figure brings into focus a whole series of questions about what we need to address globally in the face of a growing, diverse and ageing population: questions about food security, energy needs and social care.� The CPC is at the cutting edge of demographic research and brings together academics from many different disciplines. Understanding the drivers and implications of population change is essential if we are to develop appropriate global policies. The centre conducts innovative research in areas such as the dynamics of fertility and family formation, modelling population growth, living arrangements across the life course, and the demographic and socio-economic implications of migration. www.southampton.ac.uk/socsci/research

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Research and learning

You will be taught by academics working at the forefront of their fields and learn about worldleading research as it takes place, giving you the kind of education that will put you among the most sought-after graduates. Southampton is at the forefront of curriculum innovations in the UK and Social Sciences has been actively involved in design and delivery. We will encourage you to give feedback about your experience, which we will use to shape and make improvements. And you will be offered numerous opportunities to take advantage of the interdisciplinary nature of the social sciences, with a wide range of research-focused modules that not only cross subject boundaries but also use advanced education technologies. Depending on your chosen programme, you could experience a variety of learning methods such as private and public sector placements and group

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projects, all supported by virtual learning environments. You will be challenged intellectually and encouraged to develop your ability to work and to learn independently, while group work will give you give you the transferable skills – such as communication, teamwork and project management – to put your subject knowledge into practice and achieve your career aspirations In the final year of study, our students produce a dissertation on an approved project of their choice, with prizes awarded to the most impressive. The social sciences encompass many different subjects and address many of the most pressing problems facing society today. The dissertation provides an opportunity to link apparently disparate areas of study, applying the theoretical skills you have acquired in lectures and seminars to fascinating real-world issues. The students featured on the next three pages were all winners of one of our dissertation prizes.


Jazz and community Identity formation, symbolic consumption and the enactment of jazz in the British jazz scene was the subject of Jon Howe’s dissertation (BSc Applied Social Sciences (Anthropology)). For years there has been a growing jazz scene in Britain, but it remains an understated music genre in terms of its minority specialist appeal in the culture of musical appreciation. Jon’s research used deep interviews with members of the local jazz scene to explore the significance of music in their lives, with a particular focus on how individuals connected to a jazz scene community. The research used contemporary theoretical debates to explore the meaning of music and community construction in ‘consumer culture’, linked to processes in the commercialisation of music.

From cyber bullying to intimidation in the home Chelsey Newsom (BSc Applied Social Sciences (Criminology)) conducted research at the cutting edge of criminology, combining research on bullying with the rise of social media technologies such as Facebook. Her research was conducted with young people in Bermuda in order to test theories developed in other locations in the UK. Chelsey demonstrated the ease with which cyber bullying can be facilitated and spread, and how it can develop into more intrusive forms of intimidation, so that bullying is no longer limited to school and on the way home but enters the family environment.

Homophobia in education The issue of homophobia in education was the subject of Rebecca Nash’s dissertation (BSc Sociology). Rebecca conducted a comparative study of teacher attitudes and experiences in two institutions: secondary and tertiary. She employed a mixed methods approach, combining both quantitative and qualitative methodologies, to explore differences between the sectors in terms of frequency of experience, training, anti-bullying policies and perception of the acceptability of homophobic harassment. The research successfully challenged the existing literature in this area, which tends to portray a negative picture of teacher avoidance or apathy, and highlighted several examples of positive responses by teachers to tackling this form of abuse. Rebecca was self-motivated, well organised and independent, using supervisory sessions to discuss a wealth of interesting ideas and theoretical approaches.

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Challenging UK retirement policy Maria Martin (BSc Population Studies) examined whether government plans for the retirement age in the UK are sustainable given the current predictions of future demographic structures. Maria’s work was independent and methodologically advanced. She thoroughly analysed an interdisciplinary area spanning demography and macroeconomics, expertly handling data and analytical methods. She also offered suggestions for addressing certain limitations of the proposed approach in further research. As a result of applying her own projections of labour force participation rates, Maria challenged some of the currently prevailing views on retirement policy in the UK.

Are student rents too high? Research by Janos Barberis (BSc Economics and Finance) examined the complaints often made by students that rents in Southampton are excessive. Janos analysed empirical data gathered by various surveys during the year using quantitative methods. His understanding of econometrics enabled him to assess whether the student housing market is efficient, while micro-economics offered a method to

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model the supply and demand of dwellings in the student area. His conclusion was that, contrary to popular belief, student rents are fair. Janos’s research had practical consequences. It corrected the false beliefs of local economic agents, proposed policy changes for better urban planning of student accommodation and created a framework that could be replicated elsewhere.

Self-presentation and social networking Social networking sites and identity formation was the subject of Stacy Trimble’s dissertation (BSc Applied Social Sciences (Criminology and Psychological Studies)). Stacy developed an excellent set of research questions, drawing on existing psychological measures of self-presentation and identity in the context of social networking site use. The resulting study was well written and presented professionally and with precision. Stacy read widely and enthusiastically around her chosen subject area, giving herself the time and intellectual space to formulate original ideas, which were well grounded in the existing body of literature. Stacy also made good use of links with her old secondary school, collecting data from the current cohort of sixth formers.


Chinese aid to Africa Maximilian George-Wagner’s dissertation (BSc Politics and International Relations) examined China’s development aid in Africa as part of an ongoing framing of global rules on foreign assistance to developing countries. His thesis proposed an alternative analysis of the mutual constitution of norms involving western-framed rules under the US-led Washington Consensus and the Chinese Framework for Aid Assistance. Maximilian’s study exposed a gap in the existing literature on the topic and engaged critically with the relevant literature.

Political disengagement in the UK Thomas Bassett (BSc Politics and International Relations) looked at responses of the political elite to the issue of political engagement in Britain. His dissertation drew on qualitative data from interviews conducted with MPs and local councillors (the political elite) and tested their attitudes by contrasting their position with evidence from researchers and academic commentators on the causes of and solutions to disengagement. The elite are viewed as a whole and their positions contrasted with insights from the literature. The scope of the interviews and the care taken by Thomas in recording the key findings were impressive and the analysis

appropriate to the limited numbers involved. The result is a fascinating picture of an elite who appear to be aware of the causes of disengagement but are unclear what to do about it.

Can the yield curve predict recession? Andrew Wong’s dissertation (BSc Economics) explored the forecastability of business cycle regimes with the yield curve and other financial variables using a qualitative data model known as ‘probit’. This involved creating an artificial binary variable coding recessions over time and subsequently using the maximum likelihood estimation technique to estimate the probit, linking the probability of being in a recession at one time to past values of the yield curve and other variables. An important goal of Andrew’s study was to assess whether the role of the yield curve as a predictor of recessions has evolved over time and decreased in importance. The dissertation required him to undertake considerable independent research and absorb challenging new material and techniques. As with most good studies, Andrew’s dissertation used a few very clear questions and hypotheses, tested those hypotheses using formal econometric techniques, and assessed the results critically in relation to the existing literature.

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Our academics As an undergraduate student at Southampton, you will be learning from academic staff at the forefront of their disciplines. Here are just a few of our academics.

1. Professor Jane Falkingham

3. Dr Andrew Hinde

Head of Social Sciences

Head of Social Statistics and Demography

A consistent theme running through Jane Falkingham’s research is the effect of global demographic change on social and economic welfare. She has interests in the ageing population, in particular the design of pension systems and their impact on resources in later life, and the redistributive effect of the welfare state and how it varies across an individual’s life course.

Andrew Hinde’s particular interests are in the demography of developing countries, especially recent fertility changes and the historical demography of England between 1800 and 1950.

Jane is Director of the ESRC Centre for Population Change, based at Southampton. She has recently led projects examining the impact of economic transition on living standards in Kyrgyzstan and Tajikistan and the relationship between poverty and health in the slums of Nairobi and Accra.

2. Professor Bernard Harris Head of Sociology and Social Policy Much of Bernard Harris’s work is concerned with analysing the causes and consequences of changes in health and living standards. He has examined long-term changes in human development in Britain and changes in health indicators, including changes in height, weight, morbidity and mortality. Bernard has published widely on the history of poverty, the relationship between gender and wellbeing, and the role played by voluntary organisations in welfare provision. His recent book (co-authored with Floud, Fogel and Hong), The Changing Body: Health, Nutrition and Human Development in the Western World since 1700, was published by Cambridge University Press in 2011.

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His research includes analysing sex differentials in mortality in 19th century England, examining the relationship between the New Poor Law and aspects of England’s demography between 1834 and the end of the 19th century, and using Friendly Society data to analyse sickness and mortality in Britain. Andrew is on the editorial board of several journals. His book, What is Population History?, will shortly be published by Polity Press.

4. Professor Graham Smith Head of Politics and International Relations Graham Smith has two main research interests. The first focuses on the design of institutions that increase and deepen citizen participation in political decisionmaking and the second on the role of third sector organisations in responding to climate change. Graham is leading a collaboration of social scientists and engineers examining whether community green initiatives can achieve significant energy savings in UK households. His team is researching the impact of a community intervention on domestic energy use and drawing comparisons with a range of other community initiatives that aim to alter existing energy practices.


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5. Professor Grant Hillier Head of Economics and Econometrics Before coming to Southampton, Grant Hillier held posts at Monash University, Australia, and the University of Cambridge. His research and teaching interests are in econometric theory. Grant is currently Associate Editor of Econometric Theory and a Fellow of CeMMAP (Centre for Microdata Methods and Practice). He publishes in core econometrics journals, including Econometrica, Econometric Theory and the Journal of Econometrics.

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Further information To find out more about our academics visit www.southampton.ac.uk/socsci/about/staff

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Learning environment We have a spirit of research that is firmly embedded in our culture, which helps to set us apart from other universities. It is this environment that makes studying here a unique and exciting experience. Libraries Our facilities are among the best in the country. The Hartley Library on the Highfield Campus is one of the leading research libraries in the UK. Facilities include a state-of-the-art learning centre, with consultation rooms, ‘walk in’ internet access, a language study area with computers linked to software for a range of languages, a café and a study lounge. The Hartley Library houses specialist collections, which include the Broadland Archives, the papers of the Duke of Wellington, world-renowned collections relating to Jewish history and culture, and the Ford Collection of British Official Parliamentary Publications.

Research centres and facilities With a reputation for linking fundamental research with real-world applications, Southampton is home to cutting-edge research centres that consistently break new ground.

Further information To find out more about our research centres and facilities, visit www.southampton.ac.uk/learningenvironments

Designed by some of our students, our new teaching and learning space has state-of-the-art technology, including a haptic touch-screen wall, facilitating interactive learning in a social, open-plan environment

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Our research centres have strong links with business, industry and government. For example, our National Oceanography Centre Southampton provides large-scale infrastructure and support for the entire UK marine research community while collaborating with the oil, gas and communications industries. We also strive to bring together national and international experts to address critical issues facing society, and this is the case in our Institute for Life Sciences where biosciences help tackle issues such as climate change and human health. All of our research centres at Southampton focus on global challenges that truly impact on society. Our Optoelectronics Research Centre focuses on photonics research and the ORC has played a major role in developing the optical telecommunications technology that underpins the internet. Other facilities include the Southampton Wind Tunnels for aerodynamics testing, yacht and sail design and the University’s supercomputer, one of the most powerful university-owned supercomputers in the UK. We also have our own flight simulator, which is unique in the UK. The Southampton Flight Simulator is a state-of-the-art facility developed by students for students. First-year undergraduates can learn to fly, from take-off to landing, putting theory from their lectures into practice.


Social Sciences Social Sciences hosts several internationally significant research centres and a number of extremely active research groups. Centre for Research on Ageing (CRA) CRA is a multidisciplinary research centre examining key issues in ageing and the life course and informing policy at the national and local level. Centre for Citizenship, Globalization and Governance (C2G2) Merging insights from political science and international relations, C2G2 focuses on the central political questions of today: power, cooperation, security, inequality and democracy. Centre for Global Health, Population, Poverty and Policy (GHP3) GHP3 investigates the interrelationships between health, population and poverty at the societal and individual level. ESRC Centre for Population Change (CPC) The first of its kind in the UK, CPC undertakes research on fertility, household dynamics, migration and population growth. ESRC National Centre for Research Methods (NCRM) Each research group in NCRM conducts research and training in social science research methods. The coordinating hub is based at Southampton. ESRC Third Sector Research Centre (TSRC) TSRC works closely with practitioners and policymakers to enhance knowledge of the third sector through independent and critical research. Southampton Statistical Sciences Research Institute (S3RI) www.southampton.ac.uk/s3ri Work Futures Research Centre www.southampton.ac.uk/wfrc

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Planning your career

“During my degree, I had the opportunity to study in America for a semester. That was one of the best experiences of my life and it also opened up lots of different opportunities. I am now an intern in London with a company that deals with the non-proliferation of nuclear weapons. I know I got my internship because of Southampton’s reputation. It has really offered the next step for me.” Rebecca Pryce BSc Politics and International Relations, 2011

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At Southampton, we offer much more than an education, encouraging you to think about and work towards the employment and postgraduate opportunities best suited to you.

Your passport to success Our innovative Graduate Passport scheme is a personal development programme that aims to enhance your employability skills and help you reach your full potential. You can choose from over 60 possible activities, including volunteering, leadership roles in clubs or societies, internships, and much more. www.southampton.ac.uk/careers/passport/index. html

Enhancing your employability Your degree will enable you to develop transferable skills highly valued by employers, such as independent thinking, problem solving, report writing and teamwork. Throughout your degree, you will attend employability workshops linked to your programme of study, which will encourage you to plan for your career. At Career Destinations, the University’s dedicated careers service, we offer a variety of services, from web resources for career development, careers advice and a jobs portal to skills workshops and mock interviews. We also offer internship and placement opportunities with a range of national and international employers.

Student enterprise Fish On Toast is the student-led University of Southampton entrepreneurs’ society. Open to all students, it aims to help you turn your business ideas into reality with various courses and seminars to help you start your own business or to improve your employability skills. www.fishontoast.com You can also get involved in our Students in Free Enterprise (SIFE) society. SIFE challenges students to create enterprises that are ethical, sustainable and improve people’s quality of life. A team from Southampton represented the UK at the SIFE World Cup in Malaysia in 2011. www.southampton.ac.uk/studententerprise

Careers in social sciences Social scientists are in demand more than ever before and studying for one of our undergraduate degrees will prepare you for employment in a wide variety of roles. We work closely with Career Destinations and organise career talks (often given by graduates from our degree programmes), provide information on relevant jobs and internships, offer opportunities for you to network with employers, and hold employability workshops on the skills needed to make the successful transition to graduate work. We have placement opportunities across a range of organisations and financial support may be available for students who wish to take unpaid work. Our employability activities include alumni networking through organised activities and events. We offer modules linked to work and employability, including a third-year option module that involves a placement at a local school or college. We strongly believe that it is our responsibility to encourage you to think about and work towards developing your career plans at an early point in your degree and we aim to provide you with a range of opportunities that will help you fulfil your career aspirations.

Exchange programmes and studying overseas We offer students the opportunity to spend one semester abroad, usually in their final year of study. This is a competitive scheme and students who wish to take part must have a strong marks profile by the middle of year two of their degree. Studying abroad will enhance your CV and demonstrate to future employers and postgraduate admissions officers that you are flexible, independent, have strong networking skills and can adapt to working in different cultural environments.

Further information To find out more about Career Destinations, visit www.southampton.ac.uk/careers

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Student life The University of Southampton’s six campuses all offer a friendly, vibrant and diverse atmosphere for work and leisure. Campuses Our main Highfield Campus, in the north of Southampton, is home to the Students’ Union, the Jubilee Sports Centre, the Hartley Library, a 330-seat Uniplex cinema and three leading arts venues: The Nuffield Theatre, the Turner Sims concert hall and the John Hansard Gallery. A few minutes’ walk from Highfield is Avenue Campus, which houses most disciplines within Humanities and the Centre for Language Study. It has a library, lecture theatres, focused study spaces and catering amenities. Three miles west of Highfield is Southampton General Hospital, one of the country’s leading teaching hospitals and the base for Medicine. The campus offers modern laboratories, computer suites, refurbished lecture theatres, catering facilities and a specialist health services library.

synthetic turf pitches and a number of grass pitches. We also offer a wide range of water sports to cater for everyone, from beginners to elite athletes. You can also take part in a whole host of clubs and societies, from snowboarding and mountain biking to photography and philosophy. Whatever your interests, SUSU organises a diverse range of events and activities to keep you entertained. Our societies range from the cultural and course-related to the international, sporting and political.

Accommodation With 20 halls of residence and first-class facilities it’s no wonder our accommodation is so popular. We have more than 5,000 places in 20 halls, providing a wide range of living arrangements and all offering excellent value for money.

Located on the city’s waterfront, the National Oceanography Centre Southampton is one of the world’s leading research centres for the study of ocean and Earth sciences. The campus has its own fitness suite, sports hall and catering facilities.

Our halls vary in size, character and facilities, but they all provide the same high-quality accommodation in a safe, diverse, inclusive environment. We have accommodation specifically for undergraduates, from standard packages to self-catered studio flats. We also have a limited number of properties suitable for couples and families.

Winchester School of Art is located 12 miles north of Southampton, in Winchester city centre. The campus provides purpose-designed studios and workshops, an extensive specialist library, Students’ Union facilities, a café and a well-stocked art supplies shop.

If you are a UK or EU student, we welcome your application for a place in halls, which we allocate subject to availability. If we are unable to offer you a place in halls, we can give you help and advice on securing private rented accommodation.

Our branch campus for engineering is in EduCity, Iskandar in Malaysia and benefits from innovative world-class facilities for engineering and full access to the learning resources at our UK campuses. It offers undergraduate students the opportunity to study in a safe international environment.

Social life

International students If you are a full-time registered international undergraduate student, you are guaranteed an offer in halls for your first year of study, provided that you are unaccompanied, live outside Southampton and we receive your accommodation application by the advertised deadline.

As an undergraduate student you will automatically become a member of Southampton University’s Students’ Union (SUSU), one of the largest in the UK. The Students’ Union provides a range of places to eat great food, hear top bands, see the latest films and get information and advice.

Contact us

The Jubilee Sports Centre houses a 25m swimming pool, badminton and squash courts and a fitness studio. Our outdoor facilities include eight tennis courts, two floodlit

www.southampton.ac.uk/accommodation

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University Residences Tel: +44 (0)23 8059 5959 Email: accommodation@southampton.ac.uk


“After a tour of the campus, viewing the halls of residence and a visit to the city centre I knew that this was where I wanted to study anthropology.� Charlotte Bowden, BSc Applied Social Sciences (Anthropology), third year


Southampton and region Southampton is a thriving modern city, steeped in history and culture. Just over an hour south of London, Southampton has excellent transport links with the rest of the UK.

A lively city Close to the city centre, the University forms an integral part of this dynamic, multicultural city. Our location offers a vibrant mix of recreation, culture and entertainment – from restaurants, cafés, bars and nightclubs to cinemas, sports facilities, internationally acclaimed arts venues and one of the south of England’s top shopping centres. The University is next to Southampton Common, a protected Site of Special Scientific Interest with extensive areas of public open space and managed woodland. Whether you fancy a lunch with friends or dancing into the small hours, Southampton has the right venue. From intimate lounge bars and roof terraces to Leisure World, which houses a casino, bowling alley, several restaurants and bars, a 13-screen cinema and two nightclubs, there is something for everyone. Historic Oxford Street is home to Southampton’s finest restaurants, but wherever you are in the city you will be spoiled for choice, with a wide variety of cuisines on offer from across the globe catering for

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every budget. In the city centre you will also find West Quay, one of the south coast’s top shopping centres. Whatever your musical tastes there are great venues in Southampton for live music. For example, The Joiners is known for up-and-coming bands – Coldplay, Oasis and Radiohead all played there before they were famous. The Guildhall is a multipurpose venue that stages jazz and rock as well as contemporary and classical music. Southampton’s thriving port handles in excess of 42 million tonnes of cargo annually. As the cruise industry capital of northern Europe, the city is engaged in sustained and continued urban development that strives to improve its already enviable facilities.

A connected city Just over an hour from central London, Southampton has excellent transport links with the rest of the UK and internationally, by road, rail, sea and air. The city is serviced by two mainline railway stations, with direct trains to London Waterloo and easy connections to Eurostar at St Pancras International. Southampton Airport offers regular flights to UK and major European destinations. Our own award-winning uni-link bus service connects all Southampton


Southampton offers a vibrant mix of recreation, culture and entertainment

campuses and halls of residence, the city centre, the airport and both railway stations.

and donkeys in the open forest by local inhabitants, known historically as the ‘commoners’.

Less than half an hour from Southampton is the New Forest National Park, with vast open heathland and beautiful forest. The resorts of Bournemouth and Poole are just down the coast, while a short ferry ride takes you to the Isle of Wight, which hosts Skandia Cowes Week, the largest and most prestigious international sailing regatta in the world.

A modern city

A historic city Southampton has a fascinating history. It was from here in 1415 that Henry V set sail for Agincourt and in 1620 the Pilgrim Fathers embarked on their historic journey to the New World. Titanic left Southampton on her ill-fated voyage in 1912. We also have a rich aviation heritage, with the Spitfire, the fighter aircraft that won the Battle of Britain, developed in the region in the 1930s. As well as being an area of outstanding natural beauty, the New Forest has a fascinating history. Created in 1079 by William the Conqueror as an area for hunting deer, it became an important source of timber for the Royal Navy. Today the forest retains many historical rural practices, such as pasturing of ponies, cattle, pigs

Today, Southampton has one of the biggest commercial ports in Europe and the city is known across the world as the home of the giant cruise liners, Queen Mary 2 and Queen Victoria. Its coastal location means that there is a vast range of opportunities for sport and leisure, with waterfront marinas and a major focus on water sports, sailing and ocean racing. The city hosts the largest on-water boat show in Europe – the annual Southampton Boat Show.

Winchester The historic city of Winchester – England’s ancient capital – is just 12 miles north of Southampton and is home to the University’s internationally renowned Winchester School of Art. Popular for its bustling shopping streets and spectacular architecture, Winchester is perhaps best known for its 11th century cathedral and the Great Hall, which houses the mysterious Round Table of King Arthur. The city’s rich cultural heritage is complemented by a lively atmosphere and a wide variety of pubs and restaurants, museums, theatres and galleries.

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Programme overview All of our undergraduate students engage with issues that matter today.

“I think the BSc Economics and Finance at Southampton strikes just the right balance. The quantitatively rigorous economics modules helped me understand the core principles of theoretical and empirical finance but also left room for options that fitted my personal preferences and interests. The lecturers were really helpful, not only with the course material but also with academic, careers and even personal advice.� Viktoriya Peycheva BSc Economics and Finance, 2011

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Southampton has a world-class reputation for teaching and research in the social sciences. We are one of only 12 UK universities to be awarded a sole institution ESRC Doctoral Training Centre (DTC). Whichever division of social sciences you join, you will be taught by internationally respected academics.

Our Economics division is widely recognised for the high quality of its research and teaching. In three consecutive assessments of research quality by the Universities Funding Council, we have been among the top-ranked economics divisions in the UK, and we aim to reflect this excellence in all our undergraduate teaching programmes.

We offer undergraduate degrees in many of the key social science disciplines, from applied social sciences programmes, with pathways in anthropology, criminology and psychological studies, to sociology and social policy degrees. All are designed to provide the highest quality learning experience.

Politics and International Relations at Southampton is one of the leading divisions of its kind in the UK and includes several internationally renowned political scientists and theorists among its staff. We are committed to the wellbeing of our 300 undergraduates and work hard to nurture excellent relations between staff and students.

Our undergraduate programmes offer a great deal of flexibility. For example, politics degrees can be combined with international relations, economics, history, sociology, philosophy or languages, while degrees in economics can be combined with accounting, actuarial science, management sciences, mathematics, philosophy or politics. Southampton is at the forefront of curriculum innovations in the UK and Social Sciences has been actively involved in design and delivery. We offer our students many opportunities to take advantage of the interdisciplinary nature of the social sciences, with a wide range of research-focused interdisciplinary modules that not only cross subject boundaries but also use advanced education technologies.

Teaching and learning Our programmes are structured to cater for each student’s needs and future aspirations. Blending innovative approaches with established teaching methods, we offer a variety of learning experiences.

Innovative and traditional teaching methods provide a top-class student experience in the groundbreaking BSC Population and Geography run by our Social Statistics and Demography division. The programme will provide you with essential career-specific skills, with many modules including computer workshops where you will analyse demographic and geographic datasets. Excellent results in the 2008 RAE placed Sociology and Social Policy at Southampton third in the UK. Whichever degree you choose – sociology, social policy or applied social science – you will gain fascinating insights into the world around you. You will examine real-life case studies and engage in theoretical debates on areas of human life that you have never experienced.

Assessment and progress

We use a variety of assessment methods in Social Sciences. Typically there is a mixture of exams, Lectures introduce new ideas and key concepts and coursework, presentations, group work and a are the backbone of many courses. Many social science final-year dissertation. The feedback you receive degrees are interdisciplinary and lectures may bring through assessment is vital to help you learn and students from different programmes together. progress. You will also exchange valuable feedback Seminars, usually involving 15 to 20 students, explore with your fellow students. ideas in greater depth through lively discussion, while tutorials, comprising even smaller numbers, give you the opportunity to play a key role in discussion and debate. You will work individually and in groups on various projects relevant to your interests and aspirations.

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BSc Accounting and Economics (NL41) −− Option modules: Topics in Macroeconomics 2; The BSc Accounting and Economics combines Industrial Economics 2; International Trade Theory and the study of economics with a thorough Policy; Development Methods of Econometrics: working knowledge of accountancy. The Econometrics 2; Problem Structuring Methods; programme provides exemptions from certain Management Research; European Business professional accounting examinations and is an Environment; Operations Management; Tax Policy and ideal choice for those wishing to pursue a career Practice in accountancy. The degree is taught in YEAR THREE conjunction with Management.

Eight modules are studied each year, with four in each semester.

During year three you will study for a dissertation in economics or management, equivalent to two modules, a piece of independent research on a topic of your choice spread over both semesters.

YEAR ONE

Semester one

Module choices in year one are dependent on whether you have studied mathematics and/or economics at A level.

Compulsory modules: Applied Microeconomics 3; Financial Accounting 3

Programme structure

Semester one −− Students who have A level economics take Principles of Microeconomics −− Students who do not have A level economics take Foundations of Microeconomics −− Students who have A level mathematics at grade C or above take Mathematics for Economics −− Students who do not have A level mathematics at grade C or above take Introduction to Mathematics for Economics −− Compulsory modules: Financial Accounting 1; Introduction to Management Semester two −− Compulsory modules: Statistics for Economics; Management Accounting 1; Principles of Macroeconomics YEAR TWO Semester one −− Compulsory modules: Financial Accounting 2; Applied Microeconomics 2; Macroeconomic Policy 2 −− Option modules: Microeconomic Theory 2; Statistical Theory 2; Introduction to Econometrics; Organisations and Management; Financial Management; Company Law (for Accounting) Semester two

Economics

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−− If you intend to undertake the Management dissertation in year three, you must select Management Research in year two −− If you intend to undertake an Economics dissertation in year three, you may not select Management Research −− Compulsory modules: Portfolio Theory and Financial Markets; Management Accounting 2

Semester two Compulsory modules: Macroeconomic Policy 3; Management Accounting 3

Key information Start date: October Duration: three years Entry requirements: our typical entry requirements may be subject to change. For the latest information, visit www.southampton.ac.uk/entryreq GCSEs: English at grade C or above (or equivalent English language qualification) A levels: three A levels: AAA, plus AS level mathematics at grade B or above (if not taken to A level); or four A levels: AABB, plus AS level mathematics at grade B or above (if not taken to A level).
Although A level economics is not required, preference will be given to applicants taking at least one analytical A level subject (economics, mathematics or a science-based subject) IB: 36 points, 18 at higher level, with at least 5 points in standard level mathematics (not maths studies) Language requirements: if English is not your first language you will be required to pass an approved English test, normally IELTS 6.5 or TOEFL 580 Fees: www.southampton.ac.uk/fees Funding: for information on scholarships, visit www.southampton.ac.uk/scholarships Career destinations: accounting; management; finance; banking; professional training and management schemes


BSc Economics (L100) This single honours degree programme provides you with the opportunity to study economics in the greatest depth and provides a considerable amount of choice. It will equip you with the knowledge and understanding necessary to undertake graduate study in economics or to pursue a career as an economist. You can choose between a number of pathways during the degree to reflect your background and interests. For example, if you are considering progressing to a masters in economics, you can choose to continue with microeconomic theory and topics in macroeconomics in year three. If you enjoy investigating the quantitative principles underlying econometric techniques, you may choose between two econometric pathways. Programme structure Eight modules are studied each year, with four in each semester. YEAR ONE Semester one

Semester two −− Students who took Statistical Theory 2 in semester one must take Econometrics 2 −− Students who took Introduction to Econometrics in semester one must take Methods of Econometrics −− Compulsory modules: Topics in Macroeconomics 2 YEAR THREE −− During year three you will study for a dissertation, equivalent to two modules, a piece of independent research on a topic of your choice spread over both semesters. Semester two −− Compulsory modules: Macroeconomic Policy 3

Key information Start date: October Duration: three years Entry requirements: our typical entry requirements may be subject to change; for the latest information, visit www.southampton.ac.uk/entryreq GCSEs: English grade C or above (or equivalent English language qualification)

−− Students who have A level economics take Principles of Microeconomics −− Students who do not have A level economics take Foundations of Microeconomics −− Compulsory modules: Mathematics for Economics

A Levels: three A levels: AAA including A level mathematics; or
four A levels: AABB including A level mathematics at grade B or above. Although A level economics is not required, preference will be given to applicants taking at least one analytical A level (economics or mathematics or a science-based subject)

Semester two

IB: 36 points, 18 at higher level

−− Compulsory modules: Principles of Macroeconomics; Economics Perspectives and Policy; Statistics for Economics

Language requirements: if English is not your first language you will be required to pass an approved English test, normally IELTS 6.5 or TOEFL 580

YEAR TWO

Fees: www.southampton.ac.uk/fees

Semester one

Funding: for information on scholarships, visit www.southampton.ac.uk/scholarships

−− Compulsory modules: You will take either Statistical Theory 2 or Introduction to Econometrics, plus: Applied Microeconomics 2; Macroeconomic Policy 2; Microeconomic Theory 2

Career destinations: business and financial professionals; commercial, industrial and public sector managers; administrative, clerical and secretarial positions; media, sales, advertising and PR; education; IT; retail and health; postgraduate study

Economics

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BSc Economics and Actuarial Science (L1N3) If you like mathematics, enjoy problem solving and are curious about financial issues, our BSc Economics and Actuarial Science is for you. The programme offers exemption from all eight core technical (CT) examinations of the Institute of Actuaries and equips you to undertake graduate study or pursue a career as an economist or actuary.

Semester two

Programme structure

Entry requirements: our typical entry requirements may be subject to change. For the latest information, visit www.southampton.ac.uk/entryreq

Eight modules are studied each year, with four in each semester. YEAR ONE Semester one −− Students who have A level economics take Principles of Microeconomics −− Students who do not have A level economics take Foundations of Microeconomics −− Compulsory modules: Mathematics for Economics Semester two −− Compulsory modules: Principles of Macroeconomics; Statistics for Economics; Quantitative Modelling in Economics

Key information Start date: October Duration: three years

A levels: AAA, including A level mathematics IB: 36 points, 18 at higher level Language requirements: if English is not your first language you will be required to pass an approved English test, normally IELTS 6.5 or TOEFL 580 Fees: www.southampton.ac.uk/fees Funding: for information on scholarships, visit www.southampton.ac.uk/scholarships Career destinations: actuarial profession; insurance; financial services; economics

YEAR TWO

Related courses

Semester one

BA Economics and Philosophy (VL51)

−− Compulsory modules: Applied Microeconomics 2; Macroeconomic Policy 2; Statistical Theory 2; Financial Mathematics

Both economics and philosophy require rigorous analytical thought, exploring fundamental questions about human welfare and social justice.

Semester two −− Compulsory modules: Econometrics 2 −− Option modules: Accounting and Finance for Non-specialists; Stochastic Processes YEAR THREE During year three you will study for a dissertation, equivalent to two modules, a piece of independent research on a topic of your choice spread over both semesters. Semester one −− Compulsory modules: Survival Models −− Option modules: Principles of Finance; Actuarial Mathematics 1

Economics

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−− Compulsory modules: Macroeconomic Policy 3 −− Option modules: Statistical Methods in Insurance; Mathematical Finance; Actuarial Mathematics 2

You will take four modules from each subject each year; you may substitute one module from a third subject. In year three, the dissertation may be written in either subject. BSc Mathematics, Operational Research, Statistics and Economics (MORSE) (GLNo) Mathematics is increasingly applied in the social sciences. The effective management of many organisations relies on solving problems with a significant mathematical and statistical content. This programme will introduce you to the most important mathematical methods applied in these situations and to the mathematical tools used to formulate models of the complex interactions in an economic/social system.


Janos Barberis BSc Economics and Finance, 2010

The degree requires a dissertation in the final year, which is not available at every university. This is a great opportunity to consolidate constructively what you have been taught. I chose to research whether the When I chose the BSc Economics and Finance at student housing market was efficient. When the University of Southampton I was looking for a conducting my research, I came to realise that, as well challenge. The reputation of Economics at as gaining a degree, I was being given the tools to Southampton, the modules offered and the balance analyse the world we are part of. between group work and individual research met my needs and I have been given invaluable skills As an international student, I was also looking for a that I’ve applied both in academia and in the ‘campus experience’. Southampton is a very good professional world. place for this and I have made friendships that have continued after my degree. The student associations The way information is delivered is a particular also enabled me to develop my entrepreneurial skills strength of Social Sciences at Southampton. Lectures (Fish on Toast) and participate in team sport (Rugby are stimulating and the lecturers provide the right Union). The truth is that three years is simply not support when it is needed most. A lot is expected enough to try out the range of activities available. I am during the three years, but the great teaching staff and a proud and thankful alumnus of the University of the quality of the module content makes it a very Southampton. pleasurable experience.

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BSc Economics and Finance (L1NH) Our BSc Economics and Finance combines a firm grounding in economics with the theoretical and empirical analysis of financial markets and institutions. The programme is particularly suitable for those looking for a rigorous understanding of the world of finance with a view to employment in financial institutions or simply wanting to understand more about the world in which we live. Programme structure Eight modules are studied each year, with four in each semester.

During year three you will study for a dissertation, equivalent to two modules, a piece of independent research on a topic of your choice spread over both semesters. Semester one −− Compulsory modules: Principles of Finance Semester two −− Compulsory modules: You will take either International Banking or Futures and Options, plus: Macroeconomic Policy 3; Empirical Finance

Key information

YEAR ONE

Start date: October

Semester one

Duration: three years

−− Students who have A level economics take Principles of Microeconomics −− Students who do not have A level economics take Foundations of Microeconomics −− Compulsory modules: Mathematics for Economics; Financial Accounting 1

Entry requirements: our typical entry requirements may be subject to change. For the latest information, visit www.southampton.ac.uk/entryreq

Semester two

Language requirements: if English is not your first language you will be required to pass an approved English test, normally IELTS 6.5 or TOEFL 580

Compulsory modules: Principles of Macroeconomics; Statistics for Economics; Management Accounting 1 YEAR TWO Semester one −− Compulsory modules: You will take either Statistical Theory 2 or Introduction to Econometrics, plus: Applied Microeconomics 2; Macroeconomic Policy 2; Microeconomic Theory 2 Semester two −− Students who took Statistical Theory 2 in semester one must take Econometrics 2 −− Students who took Introduction to Econometrics in semester one must take Methods of Econometrics −− Compulsory modules: Portfolio Theory and Financial Markets −− Option modules: Topics in Macroeconomics 2; Industrial Economics 2; International Trade Theory and Policy; Development Economics

Economics

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YEAR THREE

A levels: AAA IB: 36 points, 18 at higher level

Fees: www.southampton.ac.uk/fees Funding: for information on scholarships, visit www.southampton.ac.uk/scholarships Career destinations: business and financial professionals; commercial, industrial and public sector managers; administrative, clerical and secretarial positions; media, sales, advertising and PR; education; IT; retail and health; postgraduate study


BSc Economics and Management Sciences (L112) Our BSc Economics and Management Sciences provides an opportunity to focus on the application of economic principles and management science in the context of business organisations. It is a particularly appropriate choice for those wishing to go on to a career in management. The degree is taught in conjunction with Management. Programme structure Eight modules are studied each year, with four in each semester. A minimum of six management modules and six economics modules (excluding the dissertation) must be taken over years two and three. A maximum of two modules from the Social Sciences list (excluding Economics) may be taken in years two and three. Prerequisite requirements must be fulfilled in your choice of options and backtracking (taking year two modules in year three) is not permitted. YEAR ONE Semester one −− Students who have A level economics take Principles of Microeconomics −− Students who do not have A level economics take Foundations of Microeconomics −− Students who have A level mathematics at grade C or above take Mathematics for Economics −− Students who do not have A level mathematics at grade C or above take Introduction to Mathematics for Economics −− Compulsory modules: Introduction to Management

−− Students taking the Management dissertation in year three must take Management Research −− Students taking the Economics dissertation may not take Management Research; special permission will be required if a student who has taken Management Research subsequently decides to select the Economics dissertation −− Compulsory modules: Industrial Economics 2 YEAR THREE −− During year three you will study for a dissertation, equivalent to two modules, a piece of independent research on a topic of your choice spread over both semesters. Semester one −− Economics dissertation or Management dissertation, plus: −− Compulsory modules: Applied Microeconomics 3 −− Option modules: Topics in Macroeconomics; Principles of Finance; Labour Economics, Applied Econometrics; Strategic Management; Knowledge Management −− Managing Innovation; Marketing in the Digital Age Semester two −− Economics dissertation or Management dissertation, plus: −− Compulsory modules: Macroeconomic Policy 3 −− Option modules: Public Economics; Microeconomic Theory 3; Empirical Finance −− Optimisation; Risk Management; Project Management; Digital Marketing: Engaging with the Customer

Semester two

Key information

−− Compulsory modules: You will take either Introduction to Accounting and Financial Control or Financial Accounting 1 (semester one) and Management Accounting 1, plus: Managerial Decisions; Principles of Macroeconomics; Statistics for Economics

Start date: October

YEAR TWO Semester one −− Compulsory modules: Organisations and Management; Principles and Practice of Management Science; Applied Microeconomics 2; Macroeconomic Policy 2

Duration: three years Entry requirements: our typical entry requirements may be subject to change. For the latest information, visit www.southampton.ac.uk/entryreq A levels: AAA, with at least AS mathematics at grade B IB: 36 points, 18 at higher level Language requirements: if English is not your first language you will be required to pass an approved English test, normally IELTS 6.5 or TOEFL 580 Fees: www.southampton.ac.uk/fees

−− Students take at least one module from Business Simulation, Problem-structuring Methods, and Operations Management, plus: two modules from Topics in Macroeconomics 2, International Trade Theory and Policy, and Development Economics

Funding: for information on scholarships, visit www.southampton.ac.uk/scholarships Career destinations: banking; insurance and reinsurance; accountancy; market research; economist; actuary; financial analyst; money market dealer; postgraduate study

Economics

Semester two

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MEcon Economics (L101) The four-year MEcon Economics will offer you the opportunity to study economics in depth and equip you with the knowledge and understanding necessary to pursue a career as a professional economist in the private or public sectors. Programme structure Eight modules are studied each year, with four in each semester. During year three you will study for a dissertation and in the fourth year you will conduct an advanced research project. YEAR ONE

During year four (masters), you will conduct an advanced research project consisting of two pieces of work, the first associated with quantitative methods and of an empirical nature, and the second associated with another module you are studying Semester one Compulsory modules: You will take either Quantitative Methods or Econometrics 1 (taught in semester one and examined in semester two), plus: Microeconomics; Macroeconomics Semester two

−− Compulsory modules: Principles of Macroeconomics; Economics Perspectives and Policy; Statistics for Economics

−− Students taking Econometrics 1 in semester one must also take Econometrics 2 −− Students can also choose up to three modules from the option module list −− If Econometrics 2 or Quantitative Economics is taken, only one other option module should be chosen −− Option modules: Quantitative Economics ; Labour Economics ; Industrial Economics ; Advanced Topics in Econometrics; Finance ; International Trade −− Economic Policy in Development; Topics in Economic Theory; Topics in Macroeconomics; Trade Integration and The Political Economy of Trade Policy

YEAR TWO

Key information

Semester one

Start date: October

−− Compulsory modules: You will take either Statistical Theory 2 or Introduction to Econometrics, plus: Applied Microeconomics 2; Microeconomic Policy 2; Microeconomic Theory 2

Duration: four years

Semester one −− Students who have A level economics take Principles of Microeconomics −− Students who do not have A level economics take Foundations of Microeconomics −− Compulsory modules: Mathematics for Economics Semester two

Semester two −− Students who took Statistical Theory 2 in semester one must also take Econometrics 2 −− Students who took Introduction to Econometrics in semester one must also take Methods of Econometrics −− Compulsory modules: Topics in Macroeconomics 2

Entry requirements: our typical entry requirements may be subject to change. For the latest information, visit www.southampton.ac.uk/entryreq A levels: AAA IB: 36 points, 18 at higher level Language requirements: if English is not your first language you will be required to pass an approved English test, normally IELTS 6.5 or TOEFL 580

YEAR THREE

Fees: www.southampton.ac.uk/fees

−− During year three you will study for a dissertation, equivalent to two modules, a piece of independent research on a topic of your choice spread over both semesters.

Funding: for information on scholarships, visit www.southampton.ac.uk/scholarships

Semester one −− Compulsory modules: Topics in Macroeconomics 3

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YEAR FOUR

Semester two −− Compulsory modules: Macroeconomic Policy 3; Microeconomic Theory 3

Career destinations: business and financial professionals; commercial, industrial and public sector managers; administrative, clerical and secretarial positions; media, sales, advertising and PR; education; IT; health sector, Government Economics Service


BSc International Relations (L250) Our BSc International Relations provides a comprehensive introduction to a new era of global politics, covering economic, military, diplomatic, security, cultural, legal and social issues. Similar in structure to the BSc Politics and International Relations (L260), you will take an additional core module, International Political Economy, in year two and write a dissertation on any area of international relations. Programme structure YEAR ONE Some core modules are common to all politics and international relations degrees in the first year, while others are particular to some degrees. Four modules are studied per semester. Semester one −− Core modules: Introduction to International Relations; Political Systems −− Plus two option modules* Semester two −− Core modules: Introduction to Political Theory; Introduction to Quantitative Methods; Issues in Contemporary Politics −− Plus one option module* * From Politics and International Relations or across the University

YEAR TWO You may select up to two social science options in place of politics options, provided that only two such modules are taken overall. The Research Methods module provides guidance on writing a dissertation, which you will undertake in year three. −− Compulsory modules: Theories of International Relations; Political Theory; Democracy and the Modern State; Research Methods in the Social Sciences Semester two −− Compulsory modules: Understanding International Political Economy; Research Skills in Politics and International Relations −− Option modules: Issues in Third World Politics; Constitutional Politics in Britain; The Theory and Practice of American Democracy; International Security; American Power

Semester one −− Compulsory modules: dissertation −− Option modules: Political Texts; Global Justice; Parliament in British Politics; The New Rising Powers; Globalisation and World Politics; Green Politics Semester two −− Compulsory modules: dissertation −− Option modules: The Theory and Practice of American Democracy; Issues in Third World Politics; Contemporary Theories of Justice; Global Governance; The Political Economy of Finance; Chinese Politics; Arms Control, Disarmament and International Order

Key information Start date: October Duration: three years Entry requirements: our typical entry requirements may be subject to change. For the latest information, visit www.southampton.ac.uk/entryreq A levels: AAB (general studies not accepted); GCSE maths and English at grade C or above IB: 34 points, 17 at higher level Alternative qualifications: BTEC, European Baccalaureate, International Baccalaureate, Irish Leaving Certificate, Scottish Highers Language requirements: if English is not your first language you will be required to pass an approved English test, normally IELTS 6.5 or TOEFL 580 Fees: www.southampton.ac.uk/fees Funding: for information on scholarships, visit www.southampton.ac.uk/scholarships Career destinations: parliament; banking; political journalism; media; public sector; armed forces; international organisations; non-governmental organisations; consultancy; academia

Related courses We also have joint programmes administered by Humanities. For more information on these related programmes please visit: www.southampton.ac.uk/humanities BA Modern History and Politics VL12 BA Philosophy and Politics VL52 BA Politics and French/German LR21/LR22 BA Politics and Spanish/Portuguese and Latin American Studies RL42

Politics and International Relations

Semester one

YEAR THREE

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BSc Politics (L200) Our BSc Politics offers a firm grounding in the three main areas of political theory, comparative politics and international relations. It has a similar structure to the BSc Politics and International Relations (L260) but gives you increased freedom and flexibility to choose specialist modules and to select a dissertation topic. Programme structure YEAR ONE Some core modules are common to all politics and international relations degrees in the first year, while others are particular to some degrees. Four modules are studied per semester. Semester one −− Core modules: Introduction to International Relations; Political Systems −− Plus two option modules* Semester two −− Core modules: Introduction to Political Theory; Issues in Contemporary Politics; Introduction to Quantitative Methods −− Plus one option module* * From Politics and International Relations or across the University

YEAR TWO You may select up to two social science options in place of politics options, provided that only two such modules are taken overall. The Research Methods module provides guidance on writing a dissertation, which you will undertake in year three. Semester one

Politics and International Relations

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−− Compulsory modules: Theories of International Relations; Political Theory; Democracy and the Modern State; Research Methods in the Social Sciences Semester two −− Compulsory modules: Research Skills in Politics and International Relations −− Plus three option modules from: Issues in Third World Politics; Constitutional Politics in Britain; Research Methods in the Social Sciences; The Theory and Practice of American Democracy; Understanding International Political Economy; International Security; American Power and World Order

YEAR THREE You may select up to two social science options in place of politics options, provided that only two such modules are taken overall. Semester one −− Compulsory modules: dissertation −− Plus three option modules from: Political Texts; Global Justice; Parliament in British Politics; Multiculturalism and democracy; The New Rising Powers; Globalisation and World Politics; Green Politics Semester two −− Compulsory modules: dissertation −− Plus three option modules from: The Theory and Practice of American Democracy; Issues in Third World Politics; Contemporary Theories of Justice; Global Governance; The Political Economy of Finance ; Arms Control, Disarmament and International Order; Chinese Politics

Key information Start date: October Duration: three years Entry requirements: our typical entry requirements may be subject to change. For the latest information, visit www.southampton.ac.uk/entryreq A levels: AAB (general studies not accepted); GCSE maths and English at grade C or above IB: 34 points, 17 at higher level Alternative qualifications: BTEC, European Baccalaureate, International Baccalaureate, Irish Leaving Certificate, Scottish Highers Language requirements: if English is not your first language you will be required to pass an approved English test, normally IELTS 6.5 or TOEFL 580 Fees: www.southampton.ac.uk/fees Funding: for information on scholarships, visit www.southampton.ac.uk/scholarships Career destinations: parliament; banking; political journalism; media; public sector; armed forces; international organisations; non-governmental organisations; consultancy; academia


BSc Politics and Economics (LL12) Our BSc Politics and Economics provides a thorough grounding in the complementary subjects of politics and economics while offering choice and flexibility to develop your interests in both fields. Programme structure YEAR ONE Semester one Core modules: Introduction to International Relations; Political Systems; Introduction to Mathematics for Economics or Statistics for Economics*; Foundations of Microeconomics or Principles of Microeconomics* *Introduction to Mathematics if you have GCSE mathematics or A level mathematics at grade D or E *Statistics for Economics if you have A level mathematics at grade C or above *Foundations of Microeconomics if you don’t have A level economics *Principles of Microeconomics if you have A level economics

Semester two Core modules: Introduction to Political Theory; Issues in Contemporary Politics; Principles of Macroeconomics; Introduction to Statistics for Economics or Mathematics for Economics* *Introduction to Statistics for Economics if you have GSCE mathematics or A level mathematics at grade D or E *Mathematics for Economics if you have A level mathematics at grade C or above

YEAR THREE Semester one Compulsory modules: dissertation in politics or economics; Applied Microeconomics 3 Plus one economics option module from: Labour Economics; Topics in Macroeconomics 3 Plus three politics option modules from: Political Texts Global Justice; Parliament in British Politics; The New Rising Powers; Globalisation and World Politics; Arms Control, Disarmament and International Order Semester two Compulsory modules: dissertation; Macroeconomic Policy 3 Plus one economics option module: Public Economics Plus three politics option modules from: Theory and Practice of American Democracy; Issues in Third World Politics; Contemporary Theories of Justice; Global Governance; The Political Economy of Finance; Chinese Politics

Key information Start date: October Duration: three years Entry requirements: our typical entry requirements may be subject to change. For the latest information, visit www.southampton.ac.uk/entryreq

YEAR TWO

A levels: AAB (general studies not accepted), plus AS level mathematics at grade B or above if not taken to A level

Options can be taken from other divisions in years two and three subject to your academic tutor’s approval.

IB: 34 points, 17 at higher level, with at least 5 points in standard level mathematics (not maths studies)

Semester one

Alternative qualifications: BTEC, European Baccalaureate, International Baccalaureate, Irish Leaving Certificate, Scottish Highers Language requirements: if English is not your first language you will be required to pass an approved English test, normally IELTS 6.5 or TOEFL 580

Semester two

Fees: www.southampton.ac.uk/fees

−− Compulsory modules: Research Skills in Politics and International Relations −− Plus two economics options from: Development Economics; Industrial Economics; International Trade Theory and Policy; Topics in Macroeconomics −− Plus one politics option from: Issues in Third World Politics; Constitutional Politics in Britain; American Power and World Order; Theory and Practice of American Democracy; Research Methods in the Social Sciences; Understanding International Political Economy; International Security

Funding: for information on scholarships, visit www.southampton.ac.uk/scholarships Career destinations: parliament; banking; media; public sector; armed forces; international organisations; non-governmental organisations; consultancy; market research; academia

Politics and International Relations

−− Compulsory modules: Applied Microeconomics 2; Macroeconomic Policy 2; Democracy and the Modern State −− Plus one politics option from: Theories of International Relations; Political Theory

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BSc Politics and International Relations (L260) Our BSc Politics and International Relations combines the study of international relations with the more traditional disciplines of political theory and comparative politics. It provides an opportunity to develop a firm grounding in both the theory and practice of global politics, and to develop an in-depth understanding of the contemporary political world.

YEAR THREE

Programme structure

Semester two

YEAR ONE

−− Compulsory modules: dissertation −− Plus three option modules from: The Theory and Practice of American Democracy; Issues in Third World Politics; Contemporary Theories of Justice; Global Governance; The Political Economy of Finance; Chinese Politics; Arms Control, Disarmament and International Order

Eight modules are studied each year, with four in each semester. Semester one −− Core modules: Introduction to International Relations; Political Systems −− Plus two option modules* Semester two −− Core modules: Introduction to Political Theory; Introduction to Quantitative Methods; Issues in Contemporary Politics −− Plus one option module* * From Politics and International Relations or across the University

YEAR TWO You may select up to two social science options in place of politics options, provided that only two such modules are taken overall. The Research Methods module provides guidance on writing a dissertation, which you will undertake in year three. Semester one

Politics and International Relations

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−− Compulsory modules: Theories of International Relations; Political Theory; Democracy and the Modern State; Research Methods in the Social Sciences Semester two −− Compulsory modules: Research Skills in Politics and International Relations −− Plus three option modules from: American Power and World Order; Citizenship, Multiculturalism and Democracy; Issues in Third World Politics; Constitutional Politics in Britain; Research Methods in the Social Sciences; The Theory and Practice of American Democracy; Understanding International Political Economy; International Security

You may select up to two social science options in place of politics options, provided that only two such modules are taken overall. Semester one −− Compulsory modules: dissertation −− Plus three option modules from: Political Texts; Global Justice; Parliament in British Politics; The New Rising Powers; Green Politics; Globalisation and World Politics

Key information Start date: October Duration: three years Entry requirements: our typical entry requirements may be subject to change. For the latest information, visit www.southampton.ac.uk/entryreq A levels: AAB (general studies not accepted), plus GCSE maths and English at grade C or above IB: 34 points, 17 at higher level Alternative qualifications: BTEC, European Baccalaureate, International Baccalaureate, Irish Leaving Certificate, Scottish Highers Language requirements: if English is not your first language you will be required to pass an approved English test, normally IELTS 6.5 or TOEFL 580 Fees: www.southampton.ac.uk/fees Funding: for information on scholarships, visit www.southampton.ac.uk/scholarships Career destinations: parliament; banking; media; public sector; armed forces; international organisations; non-governmental organisations; consultancy; market research; academia


Paulina Jakubec BA Modern History and Politics, third year I chose to study politics at the University of Southampton primarily because I have always been interested in current affairs and political issues. It might sound overly idealist but I always felt like I could change the world for the better if I set my mind to it. I honestly believe that my politics degree has armed me with the right skills to achieve great things in life. Some of the most engaging classes have been in global justice, political theory and contemporary politics, where we explored topical issues such as weapons of mass destruction, terrorism and environmental issues. I have especially enjoyed participating in the fortnightly seminars. These have not only improved

my analytical skills but also helped me grow as a person by challenging my views on many occasions. I have thoroughly enjoyed my course and I’ve made many great, like-minded friends. I am planning to pursue a postgraduate degree next year and I have been fortunate enough to receive an offer to study gender politics at the London School of Economics. I have had a passion for women’s rights and gender equality for as long as I can remember and one of my biggest goals in life is to work for UNIFEM, the UN division for the advancement of women. I have found my degree thought provoking and I have been inspired but what I have learned. I would most definitely recommend studying politics at the University of Southampton for anyone seeking a challenge.

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BSc Population and Geography (L701) Our interdisciplinary BSc Population and Geography focuses on people and the world around them, looking at the mechanisms that drive changes in populations and their implications for society and nature. You will study how populations evolve and the causes and consequences of that change. The course takes a global outlook, looking at processes in both the developed and developing world, exploring links between population, geography and development, poverty, environmental and social change.

YEAR THREE

For students interested in geography, the programme provides a specialisation that distinguishes them from other geographers. For those interested in population issues, it provides a broader theoretical and substantive background that widens opportunities.

−− Project/dissertation on a subject from demography or human geography

Programme structure YEAR ONE Semester one (compulsory modules) −− −− −− −−

Introduction to Demographic Methods Population and Society Economy, Culture and Space Geographical Skills

Semester two (compulsory modules) −− Globalisation and Uneven Development −− Introduction to Quantitative Methods −− Plus two option modules

Social Statistics and Demography

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Semester one −− Project/dissertation on a subject from demography or human geography Two option modules from: −− −− −− −− −−

Population and The Environment Applied Population Analysis Geographies of Health and Healthcare Global Urbanism Plus one module from a recommended list

Semester two

Two option modules from: −− −− −− −− −− −−

Migration Population and Health Reproductive Health Advanced Geographic Information Systems Geographies of Social Justice, Welfare and Rights Plus one module from a recommended list

Key information Programme Director: Dr Jakub Bijak Start date: October Duration: three years Entry requirements: our typical entry requirements may be subject to change. For the latest information, visit www.southampton.ac.uk/entryreq A levels: AAB (including geography)

YEAR TWO

IB: 34 points, 17 at higher level

Semester one (compulsory modules)

Language requirements: if English is not your first language you will be required to pass an approved English test, normally IELTS 6.5 or TOEFL 580

−− −− −− −−

Population in Developing Societies Critical Human Geographies Introductory Geographic Information Systems Research Methods in the Social Sciences

Semester two (compulsory modules) −− Population Processes in the Developed World −− Innovation, Creativity and Space −− Plus two option modules

Fees: www.southampton.ac.uk/fees Funding: for information on scholarships, visit www.southampton.ac.uk/scholarships Career destinations: national and local governmental institutions; UK-based and overseas development organisations; Office for National Statistics; finance; marketing; market research; commerce; postgraduate study


Eleanor Walsh Population and Geography, first year When I attended the open day at Southampton I was intending to study human geography. I really enjoyed the case study style of geography at A level and the focus on globalisation, migration, resources and international development. However, when I spoke to members of the Geography division here, they suggested Population and Geography. I instantly decided that I wanted to pursue this degree. Not only was it the first of its style in the country, it ticked all the right boxes. And it hasn’t failed to meet my expectations. This unique course looks at the mechanisms that drive population change and the implications of that change on society and nature. The programme is interdisciplinary, with lectures focusing on a wide

range of social and geographic issues and the different modules complementing each other. For example, the study of inequalities in the geography module is complemented by the study of consequential migration patterns in the population module and further supported by analysis of demographic data and measures in the demographic module. This is all underpinned by regular tutorials and seminars where you can freely discuss the implications of such changes. I have also been overwhelmed with the excellent pastoral care I have received at Southampton. My tutor is very supportive and is always quick to respond to my queries. With the broad and substantive background given by this degree, I look to a future in international development working with the United Nations to overcome global inequalities.

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BSc Applied Social Sciences (Anthropology) (LL36) The Anthropology Pathway of our BSc Applied Social Sciences will help you comprehend the complexities of contemporary life. Our students study aspects of culture and society linked to family life, local and national political systems, beliefs, gender relations, sexualities, conflict, human rights, ethnicity and communication alongside important issues and debates linked to modern human lives and concerns in our rapidly changing world.

YEAR TWO

well as appreciating the importance of understanding the social world beyond. Being part of our Applied Social Sciences programme, you will also study areas of criminology, sociology, psychological studies and social policy over the three years of your course. We find that these extra disciplines enable our anthropology students to consider a wide range of careers.

YEAR THREE

Semester one −− Compulsory modules: Social Theory; Social Anthropology; Culture, Communication and Cognition; Research Methods in the Social Sciences Semester two

−− Compulsory modules: Research Skills; Cosmology, Ritual and Belief −− Option modules: Youth, Crime and Society; Race and Ethnicity in a Global Context; The Psychology of Groups and its Application to Real-world Settings; a range of Graduates will gain new perspectives from which other options to look at their own culture and its social system, as

For more information, visit www.southampton.ac.uk/appsocsci Programme structure You will take a number of interdisciplinary social sciences modules as well as specialising in anthropology.

−− Compulsory modules: Sexuality and Intimacy; dissertation −− Option modules: Issues in Law Enforcement and Social Control; Psychological Disorders; a ranger of other options Semester two −− Compulsory modules: Anthropology, Film, and Representations of the ‘Other’; Human Emotions: Social and Cultural Dimensions; Applied Social Sciences in Policy and Practice; dissertation

Key information

YEAR ONE

Duration: Three years

Semester one

Entry requirements: our typical entry requirements may be subject to change. For the latest information, visit www.southampton.ac.uk/entryreq

−− Compulsory modules: Social Problems and Social Policy; Social Science Perspectives −− Option modules: Introduction to Criminology; a range of other options Semester two

Social Statistics and Demography

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Semester one

−− Compulsory modules: Foundations in Social Theory: Traditions of Thought and Argument; Introduction to Quantitative Methods; Exploring Other Cultures −− Option modules: The Making of Psychology; a range of other options

Language requirements: If English is not your first language you will be required to pass an approved English test, normally IELTS 6.5 or TOEFL 580 Fees: www.southampton.ac.uk/fees Funding: for information on scholarships, visit www.southampton.ac.uk/scholarships Career destinations: overseas development; local and central government; business and public administration; public relations and marketing; equality and diversity work; consultancy and self-employment; voluntary sector; journalism, publishing; probation and police work; human resources; teaching; postgraduate studies and research; third sector; community outreach; culture and mediarelated industries; tourism


BSc Applied Social Sciences (Criminology) (LM39) As one of the pathways in our BSc Applied Social Sciences programme, this degree specialises in criminology over three years. You will also enjoy a selection of option modules in anthropology, psychology, sociology and social policy. The programme will enable you to understand crime in a social and cultural context while building transferable skills to suit your intended career or postgraduate future. Criminology at Southampton builds a number of research fields into a contemporary study of crime and criminal behaviour. Areas of study include criminal justice, policing and the penal system, mass media representations of crime, and the realities of the non-fiction world. You will study the public’s perception of crime and the state’s reaction and link them to policy formation and sociological debates. For more information, visit www.southampton.ac.uk/appsocsci Programme structure

YEAR TWO Semester one −− Compulsory modules: Social Theory; Perspectives in Criminology; Crime, Social Change and Society; Research Methods in the Social Sciences Semester two −− Compulsory modules: Research Skills; Youth, Crime and Society −− Option modules: Cosmology, Ritual and Belief; Race and Ethnicity in a Global Context; The Psychology of Groups and its Applications to Real-world Settings; a range of other options YEAR THREE Semester one −− Compulsory modules: Issues in Law Enforcement and Social Control; Issues in Global Crime and Justice −− Option modules: Sexuality and Intimacy; Psychological Disorders; dissertation; a range of other options Semester two −− Compulsory modules: Penology; Applied Social Sciences in Policy and Practice; dissertation

You will take a number of interdisciplinary social sciences modules as well as specialising in criminology.

Key information

YEAR ONE

Entry requirements: our typical entry requirements may be subject to change. For the latest information, visit www.southampton.ac.uk/entryreq

Semester one −− Compulsory modules: Introduction to Criminology; Social Problems and Social Policy; Social Science Perspectives −− Plus option modules

Duration: Three years

Language requirements: If English is not your first language you will be required to pass an approved English test, normally IELTS 6.5 or TOEFL 580 Fees: www.southampton.ac.uk/fees

−− Compulsory modules: Introduction to Quantitative Methods; Foundations in Social Theory: Traditions of Thought and Argument −− Option modules: Exploring Other Cultures; The Making of Psychology; a range of other options

Funding: for information on scholarships, visit www.southampton.ac.uk/scholarships Career destinations: police; central and local government; voluntary sector; third sector; research; human resources; social services and social work; probation work; private security and the prison service; postgraduate study

Social Statistics and Demography

Semester two

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BSc Applied Social Sciences (Criminology and Psychological Studies) (LC3V) You will mainly study the two disciplinary areas of criminology and psychology. There will also be opportunities to take modules in anthropology, sociology and social policy, but your options in these subjects will reduce in years two and three. We ensure that you study pure criminology modules and others that fuse both disciplines together to create exciting and topical investigations in fields linked to crime, justice, law enforcement, psychological disorders and the motivations behind antisocial behaviour. Some psychological studies modules allow you to explore specific modes of method and aspects of theoretical debates, while others have a close connection to sociological debates, exploring how society and social norms are challenged by deviancy and crime. Your final-year dissertation may focus on either discipline or be interdisciplinary.

−− Compulsory modules: Research Skills; The Application of Psychology to Crime and Justice; The Psychology of Groups and its Application to Real-world Settings −− Option modules: Cosmology, Ritual and Belief; Youth, Crime and Society; Race and Ethnicity in a Global Context −− Plus other option modules YEAR THREE Semester one −− Compulsory modules: dissertation; Psychological Disorders −− Option modules: Sexuality and Intimacy; Issues in Law Enforcement and Social Control Semester two

For more information, visit www.southampton.ac.uk/appsocsci

−− Compulsory modules: Penology; Applied Social Sciences in Policy and Practice; dissertation −− Option modules: Anthropology, Film, and Representations of the ‘Other’; Human Emotions: Social and Cultural Dimensions; Issues in Global Crime and Justice; Contemporary Issues in Psycho-social Studies −− Plus other options modules

Programme structure

Key information

You will take a number of interdisciplinary social sciences modules as well as specialising in criminology and psychological studies. YEAR ONE Semester one −− Compulsory modules: Social Problems and Social Policy; Social Science Perspectives; Introduction to Criminology −− Plus one option module

Social Statistics and Demography

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Semester two

Semester two −− Compulsory modules: Introduction to Quantitative Methods; The Making of Psychology; Foundations in Social Theory: Traditions of Thought and Argument −− Plus one option module YEAR TWO

Duration: Three years Entry requirements: our typical entry requirements may be subject to change. For the latest information, visit www.southampton.ac.uk/entryreq Language requirements: If English is not your first language you will be required to pass an approved English test, normally IELTS 6.5 or TOEFL 580 Fees: www.southampton.ac.uk/fees Funding: For information on scholarships, visit www.southampton.ac.uk/scholarships Career destinations: police work; probation work; prison service and private security; central and local government; voluntary sector; third sector; research; human resources; teaching and training; social services and social work; journalism and the media; postgraduate study

Semester one −− Compulsory modules: Social Theory; Perspectives in Criminology; Research Methods in The Social Sciences −− Option modules: Culture, Communication and Cognition; Social Anthropology; Crime, Social Change and Society; The Individual and Society −− Plus other option modules

Related courses BA Philosophy and Sociology VL53 This combined degree explores human nature, the relationship between the individual and society, and the nature of social institutions.


Kirsty Wright BSc Applied Social Sciences (Criminology and Psychological Studies), third year When applying to university, I was looking for a course that would give me a theoretical basis for my interest in crime, law enforcement and the criminal justice system. I wanted to look beyond the media presentation of crime and gain an in-depth understanding of offending behaviour and the psychological motivations behind it. The modular profile of the BSc ASS (Criminology and Psychological Studies) provided a wide perspective and seemed to open up a range of career possibilities. All the modules are relevant to current events and applicable to society today. The topics not only include

those on criminology and psychology but also anthropology, sociology and social policy. The flexibility of the course and the wide choice of modules have validated my choice of university and course. Other benefits have been the excellent guidance on reading material I have received, a prison visit where I could relate my theoretical knowledge to reality, and the excellent modules in statistics, which have given me transferable skills. The course has confirmed my decision that I want to be a criminal psychologist. I have an honorary psychology placement in the Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services (CAMHS) and an opportunity to work with young offenders. By not studying straight psychology, I feel I have the advantage of greater insight into the application of the discipline.

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BSc Applied Social Sciences (General Pathway) (L310) Our BSc Applied Social Sciences (General Pathway) offers you the opportunity to build your degree around your study interests as you progress, with you in charge of which disciplines you study each year. You will mainly draw from criminology, sociology, anthropology, psychological studies and social policy modules but you may also select options from beyond these disciplines. Students selecting this pathway may not wish to focus on a main discipline, either aiming to widen their prospects as their career or postgraduate aspirations become clearer or simply wishing to enjoy an eclectic experience through all three years of their degree. However, we do not allow you to spread your studies too thinly as this would not be attractive to future employers. With this in mind, the general pathway has been specifically designed to ensure a core depth of learning experience, transferable vocational employment-related skills and graduate academic research skills through its core module structure. For more information, visit www.southampton.ac.uk/appsocsci Programme structure YEAR ONE Semester one −− Compulsory modules: Social Problems and Social Policy; Social Science Perspectives −− Option modules: Introduction to Criminology; a range of other options Semester two

Social Statistics and Demography

40

−− Compulsory modules: Introduction to Quantitative Methods; Foundations in Social Theory: Traditions of Thought and Argument −− Option modules: Exploring Other Cultures; The Making of Psychology; a range of other options YEAR TWO Semester one −− Compulsory modules: Social Theory; Research Methods in the Social Sciences −− Option modules: Culture, Communication and Cognition; Social Anthropology; Perspectives in Criminology; Crime, Social Change and Society; The Individual and Society; a range of other options

Semester two −− Compulsory modules: Research Skills −− Option modules: Cosmology, Ritual and Belief; Youth, Crime and Society; Race and Ethnicity in a Global Context; The Psychology of Groups and its Application to Real-world Settings; a range of other options YEAR THREE Semester one −− Compulsory modules: dissertation −− Option modules: Sexuality and Intimacy; Issues in Law Enforcement and Social Control; Psychological Disorders; a range of other options Semester two −− Compulsory modules: Applied Social Sciences in Policy and Practice; dissertation −− Option modules: Anthropology, Film, and Representations of the ‘Other’; Human Emotions: Social and Cultural Dimensions; Penology; Issues in Global Crime and Justice; Contemporary Issues in Psycho-social Studies; a range of other options

Key information Duration: Three years Entry requirements: our typical entry requirements may be subject to change. For the latest information, visit www.southampton.ac.uk/entryreq Language requirements: if English is not your first language you will be required to pass an approved English test, normally IELTS 6.5 or TOEFL 580 Fees: www.southampton.ac.uk/fees Funding: For information on scholarships, visit www.southampton.ac.uk/scholarships Career destinations: central and local government; voluntary sector; probation and police work; civil service; human resources; business and finance; social and community services; journalism and media; commercial, public and other active research environments; social research; distribution management; education and training; postgraduate study


BSc Sociology (L300) For sociologists, the lives of individuals are understood through studying their wider social contexts linked to the political and economic forces that impact on, for example, selfidentity, inequality, life chances, class, ethnicity, culture and community. A range of contemporary modules will encourage you to look at communities in cyberspace, as well as how sociology can help us understand life in the UK and the wider world in which we live. 


YEAR TWO

The BSc Sociology offers the opportunity to study sociology in depth while providing a considerable amount of choice from ranges of sociology modules and social policy. We also encourage some choice from related disciplines such as anthropology and criminology. Normally studied over three years full-time, the degree may be taken on a part-time basis for a period of not less than four and not more than eight academic years. If you are interested in part-time study then you may be asked for interview so we can give advice on how to manage your studies around other commitments.

Semester two

For more information, visit www.southampton.ac.uk/sociology

Semester two

Programme structure YEAR ONE Semester one −− Compulsory modules: Sociology of Everyday Life; Social Problems and Social Policy −− Plus option modules Semester two

−− Compulsory modules: Social Theory; Research Methods in the Social Sciences −− Option modules: Culture, Communication and Cognition; Social Anthropology; Education and Society; State, Society and Welfare in Britain Since 1800 (Part 1); Class Structure and Social Inequality; State, Society and Welfare in Britain Since 1800 (Part 2); Migration in a Globalising World −− Compulsory modules: Research Skills −− Option modules: Gender and Society; Youth, Crime and Society; Race and Ethnicity in a Global Context; Population and Health; Cosmology, Ritual and Belief YEAR THREE Semester one −− Compulsory modules: Comparative Sociology; dissertation −− Option modules: Comparative Social Policy; Sociology of Gender in the Mass Media; Crime, Space and Social Control; Cyberlives: New Technologies and Social Change; Focusing on Families; Sexuality and Intimacy −− Compulsory modules: dissertation; essay paper −− Option modules: Sociology of Youth; Project: Sociology of Youth; Successful Societies; Project: Successful Societies

Key information Duration: three years Entry requirements: our typical entry requirements may be subject to change. For the latest information, visit www.southampton.ac.uk/entryreq Language requirements: if English is not your first language you will be required to pass an approved English test, normally IELTS 6.5 or TOEFL 580 Fees: www.southampton.ac.uk/fees Funding: For information on scholarships, visit www.southampton.ac.uk/scholarships Career destinations: police; social research; education; local or regional government; social work; international organisations; third sector; media; retail and industry; postgraduate study

Social Statistics and Demography

−− Compulsory modules: Transformations of the Modern World; Foundations in Social Theory: Traditions of Thought and Argument; Introduction to Quantitative Methods −− Plus option module

Semester one

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BSc Sociology and Social Policy (LL34) This degree programme provides you with the opportunity to combine the study of sociology with the study of social policy as connected disciplines. Sociology looks at how society works, while social policy enables a particular focus on the welfare of people, examining some of our most pressing issues at global, national and local levels.

Semester two

You will study issues linked to inequality, education, family life, wellbeing, crime, social conflict and climate change. This degree introduces you to the issues in year one before progressing to offer a deeper understanding of social policy principles and the organisation of the welfare state, the history of social policy and comparative social policy. This will enable you to examine differences and similarities in social policies and their social contexts in different countries, but with a strong focus on the UK. The degree is of particular interest for students who wish to address social and global issues in their career and postgraduate futures.

−− Compulsory modules: Comparative Sociology; Comparative Social Policy; dissertation −− Option modules: Sociology of Gender in the Mass Media; Crime, Space and Social Control; Cyberlives: New Technologies and Social Change; Focusing on Families; Sexuality and Intimacy

For more information, visit www.southampton.ac.uk/sociology

Entry requirements: our typical entry requirements may be subject to change. For the latest information, visit www.southampton.ac.uk/entryreq

Programme structure

Language requirements: if English is not your first language you will be required to pass an approved English test, normally IELTS 6.5 or TOEFL 580

YEAR ONE Semester one −− Compulsory modules: Sociology of Everyday Life; Social Problems and Social Policy −− Plus option modules Semester two

Social Statistics and Demography

42

−− Compulsory modules: Transformations of the Modern World; Analysing Social Policy; Foundations in Social Theory: Traditions of Thought and Argument; Introduction to Quantitative Methods YEAR TWO Semester one −− Compulsory modules: Social Theory; Research Methods in the Social Sciences; State, Society and Welfare in Britain Since 1800 (Part 1); State, Society and Welfare in Britain Since 1800 (Part 2) −− Option modules: Education and Society; Class Structure and Social Inequality; Culture, Communication and Cognition; Social Anthropology; Migration in a Globalising World

−− Compulsory modules: Research Skills −− Option modules: Youth, Crime and Society; Education and Society; Gender and Society; Race and Ethnicity in a Global Context; Cosmology, Ritual and Belief; Population and Health YEAR THREE Semester one

Semester two −− Compulsory modules: dissertation; essay paper −− Option modules: Sociology of Youth; Successful Societies; Project: Sociology of Youth; Project: Successful Societies

Key information Duration: Three years

Fees: www.southampton.ac.uk/fees Funding: For information on scholarships, visit www.southampton.ac.uk/scholarships Career destinations: social research; civil service; education; social work; international organisations; local or regional government; industry; human resources; third sector; media; postgraduate study; community development; race relations.


Andrew Scullion BSc Sociology, third year What first attracted me to the programme was the fact that Sociology at Southampton was offered as a course in its own right. Most degrees at other Russell Group universities offered sociology only as a supplementary subject. Academics here are passionate about their subject and are actively involved in research, which is a real bonus.

I really liked the fact that I could combine options in international relations, demography, anthropology and especially social policy. The phrase ‘spoilt for choice’ doesn’t quite do it justice. This encourages you to approach things from a different perspective and mix with other students you may not normally mix with – economists, political scientists, social statisticians and even geographers!

I have acquired skills and competencies at Southampton that are integral to the next chapter in The size of the division is an advantage. You are not just my life. I would like to pursue a role in the private another face in the lecture theatre and can build a good sector in communications that would allow some rapport with your lecturers. This harnesses your autonomy for research. After some experience, I would potential and ensures you learn from your lecturers’ hope to cross over to a third sector organisation and experience, wisdom and mistakes! An interdisciplinary help develop policy at a local, regional and national, focus also distinguishes Southampton from the rest. In perhaps even international, level. I know that, with seminars, this has certainly generated good discussion, perseverance, I have more than I need to make the next sharpened me intellectually and given me good chapter a reality. Fifty years from now, this will be an communication skills. experience that made me.

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Applying and funding We are committed to making our admissions fair and transparent. Higher education at Southampton is open to all students with the necessary skills and ability, regardless of age, background or financial circumstances. General entry requirements

Tuition fees and funding

To apply for undergraduate study you must satisfy our general entry requirements and any specific requirements of your chosen programme. Typical entry requirements for applicants with GCE A levels can be found online.

Tuition fees for students entering the University in the 2012/13 academic year are £9,000 a year. Your tuition fee will usually cover compulsory course costs, such as field trips and laboratory clothing, however a contribution may be necessary towards certain elements. Please check with your programme coordinator for more details. We offer a generous student support package, which includes a tapered fee waiver based on household income supplied to us by the SLC, for students from lower income families.

How to apply Apply online at www.ucas.com, the website for UCAS, the Universities and Colleges Admissions Service. Our UCAS code name is SOTON and our number is S27. All students should apply between 1 September 2012 and 15 January 2013. If you are an international student from outside the UK or EU, we may consider your application up until 30 June 2013, however we cannot guarantee there will be vacancies on our courses after the January deadline.

Admissions policy 1. The University of Southampton will: −− recruit students from a wide range of backgrounds, who we believe have the potential to complete their programmes successfully and make a valuable contribution to university life −− attract applicants who enjoy the challenge of forward thinking, the excitement of research findings in their programmes and the high standards of learning and teaching we set ourselves −− foster a diverse learning community in which our students will meet people from different cultures, thereby enhancing their skills of critical reasoning, teamwork and communication, and thus preparing them for successful participation in their chosen careers and roles 2. The University is committed to a system of admissions that ensures fairness, transparency and equal opportunities within the legal framework of the UK and best practice. All reasonable effort will be made to ensure that no prospective or existing student is unreasonably treated less favourably on the grounds of age, race, colour, nationality, ethnic origin, creed, disability, sexual orientation, gender, marital or parental/carer status, political belief or social or economic class, or any other type of discrimination.

The University offers a host of services to enhance and support your student experience. Some of these services, including Sports and Wellbeing membership, a uni-link bus pass and cultural events on campus, will be available to purchase using a Student Entitlement card. The card will be offered to UK and EU undergraduate students paying the £9,000 fees themselves or via the Student Loans Company. For more information about the scheme, visit www.southampton.ac.uk/entitlement We recommend that you visit our website for up-to-date information on tuition fees before you submit your UCAS form. If you are a UK student starting a higher education course in 2013/14, you can apply for loans to help pay for both fees and maintenance. For more details, visit our website, where you also have access to our Finance calculator, a useful tool to help you budget for university study and estimate living costs. www.southampton.ac.uk/money For up-to-date information on tuition fees for international students, visit our website.

Scholarships and bursaries We offer a variety of scholarships and progression awards to the most talented students across our subject areas. For full eligibility criteria, visit our website. www.southampton.ac.uk/scholarships In addition to our scholarship programme, we offer a generous range of bursaries designed to help UK undergraduate students in the most financial need. For more information, visit www.southampton.ac.uk/bursaries

Contact us Tel: +44 (0)23 8059 4732 Email: admissions@southampton.ac.uk visit www.southampton.ac.uk/fees

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International undergraduates The University has a thriving international community. In 2010/11 our student body included 5,000 EU and international students from more than 130 countries.

International Office

Support

Staff from our International Office attend educational exhibitions around the world as well as making numerous visits overseas and to colleges in the UK. Face-to-face contact is the best way of getting to know the University, so if you are unable to visit us in Southampton, make sure that you book an appointment to meet us at one of the exhibitions. For full details of locations and timings of our overseas visits, please contact the International Office.

We have three specialist academic advisors, whose role is to support our international students with their studies. The Students’ Union Advice Centre also provides cultural and personal support.

We provide advice and information to anyone who is considering applying to Southampton. Our aim is to make the process of joining the University as simple as possible. Visit our website, which has information available in many languages, for an introduction to the University.

Welcoming our international students Before leaving home and arriving in the UK, there are a number of things you should do to prepare for university life. These include having the right documentation, filling in forms and registering for various services and programmes. Make sure you read our information for international students on our website, or contact the International Office for advice.

International Welcome Programme

Visas Before you come to study in the UK, it is essential that you find out about the UK’s immigration procedures and how they will affect you. Our website provides information on student visas, police registration, working in the UK and links to other useful websites. www.southampton.ac.uk/visas

English language requirements If English is not your first language, you will need to demonstrate that you have reached a satisfactory standard in an approved English language test. For the majority of our courses we require an IELTS level of 6.5 or equivalent, achieved in the past two years. If you need to improve your English language skills, you can apply to our pre-sessional English language courses. For more information on general English language requirements please visit our website.

We encourage all new international undergraduates to register for our Welcome Programme, specifically designed for international students. This takes place in September each year and includes general events to introduce you to our facilities, subject-specific events to begin your academic induction, and a range of social and cultural activities. The programme offers practical information and presents an opportunity to meet staff and other students. On certain dates before the beginning of the academic year, we arrange to meet new international students from London Heathrow Airport (meet and greet). Our representatives will be there to meet you and transport you directly to the University for the Welcome Programme. www.southampton.ac.uk/welcome

Contact us International Office Tel: +44 (0)23 8059 9699 Email: global@southampton.ac.uk www.southampton.ac.uk/international

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How to get here By rail Fast trains from London and Bournemouth/Weymouth stop at Winchester, Southampton Central and Southampton Airport Parkway. Trains from Portsmouth and Bristol/ M27 (west or east) – leave M27 at South Wales stop at Southampton junction 5 (Southampton Airport) and Central. The uni-link U1 bus service follow map/signs to University campuses. runs between Southampton Central Winchester M3 – exit M3 at junction and Southampton Airport Parkway via 9 or 10. the University. By road Southampton M3 – exit M3 at junction 14, following signs for Southampton (A33). Follow the A33 into Bassett Avenue and follow map/signs to University campuses.

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By coach Southampton coach station is at Western Esplanade, in the city centre. Uni-link U1 buses connect the University’s Southampton campuses and the city centre. By air Southampton Airport is about 20 minutes from the Southampton campuses by bus or taxi. There is a full UK domestic service, as well as flights to mainland Europe and the Channel Islands.


Relevant web links are shown throughout this brochure. Please also consult www.southampton.ac.uk/socsci online for further details and/or any changes which have appeared since first publication of the Social Sciences undergraduate programmes or phone +44 (0)23 8059 8395 for more information.

Disclaimer The University of Southampton will use all reasonable efforts to deliver advertised programmes and other services and facilities in accordance with the descriptions set out in its prospectuses, student handbooks, welcome guides and website. It will provide students with the tuition, learning support, services and facilities so described with reasonable care and skill. The University, therefore, reserves the right if it considers it to be necessary to alter the timetable, location, content or method of delivery of events provided such alterations are reasonable.

Financial or other losses The University will not be held liable for any direct or indirect financial or other losses or damage arising from changes made to the event timetable, location, content or method of delivery of various services and facilities set out herein.

Force majeure The University will not be held liable for any loss, damage or expense resulting from any delay, variation or failure in the provision of services and facilities set out herein, arising from circumstances beyond the University’s reasonable control, including (but not limited to) war or threat of war, riot, civil strife, terrorist activity, industrial dispute, natural or nuclear disaster, adverse weather conditions, interruption in power supplies or other services for any reason, fire, boycott and telecommunications failure. In the event that such circumstances beyond the reasonable control of the University arise, it will use all reasonable endeavours to minimise disruption as far as it is practical to do so.

Š University of Southampton 2012 This information can be made available, on request, in alternative formats such as electronic, large print, Braille or audio tape, and in some cases, other languages. Please call +44 (0)23 8059 7726 to request an alternative format.

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www.southampton.ac.uk/socsci UK and EU undergraduate enquiries: ugapply.fshs@southampton.ac.uk +44 (0)23 8059 5395 International enquiries: global@southampton.ac.uk +44 (0)23 8059 9699

Social Sciences undergraduate brochure  

Social Sciences at the University of Southampton offers a range of undergraduate programmes, including Economics, Population and Geography,...

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