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Gender Pay Gap Report 2018

GENDER PAY GAP REPORT 2018

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University of Derby

INTRODUCTION

At the University of Derby our talented and motivated staff work in a high performance culture that promotes well-being, diversity, transparency and opportunity for all. We work as a community, where diverse skills and experience is valued, and where individuals are given the space and support they need to develop and grow.

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The gender pay report was brought in by the Government Equalities Office and it is our duty to publically report on what the gender pay gap between our male and female employees is, including the distribution of gender by pay quartile, the percentage of staff receiving bonuses by gender, and the gender gap on these bonuses. As an organisation committed to equality, diversion and inclusion we are working to reduce the pay gap year on year. Since last year our mean gender pay gap has decreased by 0.8% to 12.2%, and our median gender pay gap is now 11.4%, a decrease of 2.1%. While this is significantly lower than the national average (the median 2018 gender

pay gap for all is 17.9%) and progress is being made, there is clearly still work to do. Gender pay gap reporting is an important step towards addressing the imbalance, and as an organisation we look forward to working together to continue to close the gap.

Professor Kathryn Mitchell Vice-Chancellor & Chief Executive


Gender Pay Gap Report 2018

WHAT IS GENDER PAY GAP REPORTING? The aim of gender pay gap reporting is to tackle the gender pay gap that exists in organisations and provide transparency around gender pay gap differences.

To ensure that we are compliant with the statutory data requirements, the report uses a number of metrics: • The mean (average) hourly gender pay gap (%) of all full pay relevant employees • The median (midpoint) hourly gender pay gap (%) of all full pay relevant employees • The mean gender bonus pay gap (%) of all full pay relevant employees • The median gender bonus gap (%) of all full pay relevant employees • The proportion (%) of men and women who receive bonus pay • The proportion (%) of men and women on 4 equal population quartiles according to pay bands

It is important to understand that there is a difference between the gender pay gap and the issue of equal pay.

Equal pay means that men and women in the same employment performing equal work must receive equal pay (Equal Pay Act 1970)

Gender Pay Gap identifies the difference between the average earnings of men and women across the organisation or labour market.

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University of Derby

GENDER PAY GAP

Our Gender Pay Gap Report 2018 is based on data from April 2017 to March 2018 and shows that the University has seen a decrease in its gender pay gaps compared with the data from 2017. The mean gender pay gap for 2018 is 12.2%, a decrease of 0.8% and a median gender pay gap of 11.4%, a decrease of 2.1%. Our figures are also below the national average1. We included 1306 men and 1977 women in our gender pay gap analysis. The main reason behind the University’s gender pay gap is the higher number of women in the lower pay quartiles. This effect mirrors the pay distribution that is seen in the general population, where women are clustered into the lower paying occupations.

1 Office for National Statistics, 2018

Gender Representation by Quartile The percentage of men and women in each pay quartile (%), with quartile 1 being the lowest paid staff and quartile 4 representing the highest paid.

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The number of men working in the lowest Quartile (1) has increased by 1%. This increase is positive, because encouraging men to apply for roles within this quartile helps to balance the distribution of staff within the organisation. In addition, the numbers of men in Quartile 3 have increased by 3%. This shift is representative of the shift of women who have moved out of Quartile 3 and are now dominant in the highest Quartile (4). Quartile 4 reflects the numbers of staff in management and leadership roles and the data shows that more women (51%) than men now occupy these positions, with an increase of 1%.

Pay gap between men and women Pay Gap

2017

2018

Mean

13.0%

12.2%

Median

13.5%

11.4%


Gender Pay Gap Report 2018

2017 - Quartile 1

2017 - Quartile 2

67% 33%

FEMALE

65% 35%

MALE

2018

2017 - Quartile 3

FEMALE

66% 34%

FEMALE

MALE

Bonus Gap between Men and Women The cohorts of staff who are eligible for consideration for a bonus payment during the pay review exercise are those on a senior management contract, academics who receive a ‘very good’ or ‘outstanding’ merit rating assessment and support staff at the top of their grade who receive a ‘very good’ or ‘outstanding’ merit rating assessment. The bonus is not consolidated into basic salary. The data presented in this report shows an overall increase in the number of people receiving a bonus. This is because the University was awarded Gold status in the Teaching Excellence Framework (TEF) and, in recognition of the contribution made in achieving TEF Gold, all staff received a gift voucher1. In rewarding all of our staff in this way, we have experienced an ‘exceptional’ increase in the bonus gap for this year and, because of this, the data is presented to show a bonus pay gap which is inclusive of the TEF Gold vouchers and also without them. Without TEF Gold reward vouchers, our mean bonus pay gap is 3.2% and demonstrates a significant reduction by 14.2%. The median bonus pay gap is -9.1%

56% 44%

MALE

2018

2017 - Quartile 4

FEMALE

2018

68% 32%

FEMALE

MALE

50% 50%

MALE

FEMALE

MALE

2018

53% 47%

FEMALE

51% 49%

MALE

in favour of women, down from 0.0%. As an organisation, we employ more women than men and the rise in the median figure illustrates that we have more women in leadership roles who are eligible for bonus payments. The continued support of women’s professional development through participation in Aurora and Athena Swan initiatives contributes towards the career pipeline of women2. While the quartiles will show that women far outweigh the numbers of men working in the lower level jobs, nevertheless, the quartiles also evidence the greater distribution of women into positions of leadership. With TEF Gold reward vouchers, our data shows that we have a mean bonus pay gap of 10.5%, which is a reduction of 7% and a static median bonus pay gap of 0.0%. The distribution of TEF Gold reward vouchers also affected the proportions of men and women who received a bonus. Without the vouchers the proportions of men receiving a bonus has increased by 1%. Similarly, the proportion of women receiving a bonus has increased by 1%. When the TEF Gold vouchers are included 70.5% of men receive bonus payments compared to 66.5% of women. The significant increase experienced because of the TEF Gold effect does not warrant any intervention, because it was a one-time event that year for the benefit of all staff. However, the underlying bonus increase will become part of any review of pay and reward.

FEMALE

MALE

Bonus gap between men and women Without TEF Gold Reward

2017

2018

Mean

17.4%

3.2%

Median

0.0%

-9.1%

With TEF Gold Reward

2017

2018

Mean

17.4%

10.5%

Median

0.0%

0.0%

Proportions of men and women receiving a bonus Without TEF Gold Reward

2017

2018

Male

10.8%

11.7%

Female

8.7%

9.6%

With TEF Gold Reward

2017

2018

Male

-

70.5%

Female

-

66.5%

1 www.officeforstudents.org.uk (2018) 2 University of Derby, Gender Pay Gap Report Action Plan, (2017)

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University of Derby

WORKING TO CLOSE THE GAP The University welcomes and supports gender pay gap reporting and is committed to reducing the gap year on year. We have a negotiated pay and grading structure across the majority of our staff cohorts. Our job evaluation process underpins our pay, grades and reinforces equal pay. Teaching and research staff are appointed to a grading structure that contains a number of salary scale points in each grade. Staff advance through the grades based on a number of factors and the nature of the Higher Education sector means that academics require time to develop their experience. We are committed to equality, diversity and inclusion (EDI) and it is through these agendas that we are sustaining work towards achieving a reduced gender pay gap. Equality, diversity and inclusion is at the heart of everything that we do in the workplace and we believe that our endeavours will positively influence the gap.

Initiatives currently ongoing include: • The Equality, Diversity and Inclusion Committee implement the EDI strategy and monitors progress. It receives updates from the EDI sub-groups and publishes an annual report. • We have a network of EDI-related subgroups: the Disability Coordinators’ Group, the Gender Sub-Group, the Race Equality Group and the LGBT+ Allies Staff Network. These groups help to embed good practice of equality, diversity and inclusion into the fabric of the organisation. • All staff can access a range of EDI training delivered through workshops, online, guest speakers and seminars. We offer modules on unconscious bias, transgender awareness and mental health first aid. In addition, we support the suite of staff development with MOOCs on dementia awareness, autism, Asperger’s and ADHD.

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Gender Pay Gap Report 2018

Prioritised actions We are prioritising the following actions with objectives referenced into four thematic areas:

Objective

Rationale

Action

Outcome

Operational actions

Track and analyse the career development of women who have participated in the Aurora programme to understand its impact.

Continue to support the professional development of women by increasing participation in Aurora.

The University has offered fully funded places for women on the 2017/18 Aurora programme.

The University will develop an Aurora staff network to help track the career development of women who have been through the programme.

Data collection, analysis and reporting

Carry out gender pay gap analysis for each College and Department

Review the gender pay gap at a local level to understand the issues.

Data is being collated Establish tailored action in order to ensure that plans at college and each area understands department level. their staff demographic and can tailor their action plan accordingly.

Data collection, analysis and reporting

Carry out gender pay gap analysis of our annual pay review by college and department.

Identify any potential biases linked to gender for all cohorts of staff.

Tackle any issues, including a review of recruitment and promotion.

Strategy and Policy

Engage with the learning and teaching family in support of a more balanced representation of women in senior positions.

Increase the underrepresented numbers of women who progress through to professor.

Review the processes Evidence an increase in the number of females in the for recruitment and professoriate. promotion of Associate Professors and Professors.

Strategy and Policy

Embed Athena Swan initiatives into University level action plans in order to support the career development of women and men to add recruitment and retention of talented staff.

Continue to support the Work collaboratively with Athena Swan initiative by colleagues from across holding regular meetings. the University through the Athena Swan Steering Committee.

Theme

Additional data request has been made in support of the annual pay review process

Plan to submit Athena Swan submission for November 2018.

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University of Derby

University of Derby Kedleston Road Derby DE22 1GB T +44 (0)1332 590500 E askadmissions@derby.ac.uk W derby.ac.uk

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Profile for UNIVERSITY OF DERBY

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