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Throughout the year, there may be changes to the information contained in the Student Handbook. The Student Handbook is available on the University website: www.newhaven.edu/studenthandbook


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WELCOME A Message from the President

Dear Student, You will quickly find that at the University of New Haven, we put students first. We are committed to helping each and every one of you reach your potential and succeed in the classroom and in whatever else you choose to do. The more than 60,000 alumni who came before you began their college experience with similar hopes and dreams for the future. They left with a new sense of themselves and the possibilities before them. We are confident you will too. Since 1920, the University of New Haven has provided a personal, pragmatic, and transformative education, full of opportunities for students from a wide range of backgrounds and from around the world. We promise you that this is an environment in which you can succeed. We truly believe your success starts here! As you embark on this wonderful chapter, I want to encourage you to take advantage of everything the University has to offer — our more than 100 degree programs, our wealth of extracurricular activities, state-of-the-art classrooms and facilities, our thriving Division II athletics program, and even our marching band! Take hold of the unique opportunity you have to learn from our distinguished faculty who are here to teach and mentor you. This is an exciting time for you, filled with potential and promise. On behalf of all of us at the University, thank you for letting us be a part of this important period in your life. I wish you all the best in your University of New Haven career. Sincerely,

Steven H. Kaplan, Ph.D. President

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A Message from the Dean of Students

Dear Student, The Office of the Dean of Students at the University of New Haven would like to welcome you to a new academic year! The University of New Haven's commitment is students' first and their holistic development, intellectual, mental, physical, emotional, and social abilities, which is vital for student success. If you are a new student, welcome you to the Charger family! Returning undergraduate and graduate students welcome back! The University faculty and staff have been preparing for your arrival. I want to remind you of the many opportunities and resources available to you on campus to be a successful student this year — one of those resources available to you is the Student Handbook. The Student Handbook is your guide to critical information that you should know as a student. It includes the resources and information that you will need to navigate and enhance your college experience as a student. Joining the Charger family entails both rights and responsibilities. The University of New Haven has a substantial obligation to develop a community of learners based on mutual trust, integrity, respect, kindness, care, and empathy. As a result, the Student Handbook policies are designed to assist individuals in respecting the rights of others and creating a supportive and inclusive community that fosters learning and growth. Please familiarize yourself with the different policies and procedures that will affect your experience inside and outside the classroom. As you continue to embark on your academic journey, I encourage all of you to take advantage of your college experience. Explore who you are through the many different co-curricular programs and experiences to find your passion and enhance your skill sets. Most of all, know your social commitment and responsibility as a student, promote open dialogue with others, and make responsible personal choices now and always. College is a journey, not a destination. I wish your great success in your academic journey.

Ophelie Rowe-Allen, Ed.D. Dean of Students

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TABLE OF CONTENTS WELCOME.................................................................................................................................................. 3 A Message from the President................................................................................................................ 3 A Message from the Dean of Students ................................................................................................... 4 INTRODUCTION ...................................................................................................................................... 12 HISTORY .................................................................................................................................................. 13 CAMPUS LIFE RE-IMAGINED: RESPONSE TO COVID-19 PANDEMIC ............................................. 14 Introduction ............................................................................................................................................ 14 Chargers Care: A Pledge to Help Stop the Spread of COVID 19 ........................................................ 14 COVID-19 Student Directives ............................................................................................................... 15 Failure to Uphold Student Directives .................................................................................................... 19 Reporting COVID-19 Related Code of Conduct Behaviors.................................................................. 19 Conduct Process During Social Distancing .......................................................................................... 20 Helpful Tips to Address COVID Related Behaviors ............................................................................. 20 Promoting Diversity and Inclusion ........................................................................................................ 21 COVID-19 Health Ambassadors ........................................................................................................... 21 Student Support .................................................................................................................................... 21 ACADEMIC ............................................................................................................................................... 23 Colleges and Departments ................................................................................................................... 23 Faculty ................................................................................................................................................... 23 Advisors ................................................................................................................................................. 23 LIBRARY ................................................................................................................................................... 24 The Marvin K. Peterson Library ............................................................................................................ 24 INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY .............................................................................................................. 26 Educational Technology Support Services ........................................................................................... 26 Computer Labs ...................................................................................................................................... 26 Student Technical Support .................................................................................................................... 26 Network Services .................................................................................................................................. 27 Internet Services ................................................................................................................................... 28 THE CENTERS FOR ACADEMIC SUCCESS AND ADVISING ............................................................ 28 Center for Student Success ............................................................................................................... 29 UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN STUDENT HANDBOOK REV. 1/12/2021

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Center for Learning Resources ............................................................................................................. 30 ACADEMIC SERVICE LEARNING .......................................................................................................... 31 STUDY ABROAD/STUDY AWAY ............................................................................................................ 32 University of New Haven Policy on Alcohol and Drugs for Study Abroad Programs .......................... 33 Prato Campus ....................................................................................................................................... 35 DIVISION OF STUDENT AFFAIRS.......................................................................................................... 35 Dean of Students................................................................................................................................... 36 Spiritual Life and Campus Ministry ....................................................................................................... 36 Community Service ............................................................................................................................... 36 Counseling and Psychological Services ............................................................................................... 37 University Dining Services .................................................................................................................... 37 Accessibility Resources Services ......................................................................................................... 39 Accessible Van Service ..................................................................................................................... 40 Health Services ..................................................................................................................................... 41 Walk-In Clinics/Urgent Care Centers ................................................................................................ 42 Hospitals ............................................................................................................................................ 43 Dental Care........................................................................................................................................ 43 Pharmacy........................................................................................................................................... 43 Transportation.................................................................................................................................... 44 Student Health Insurance .................................................................................................................. 44 Medical Requirements Prior to Entering the University .................................................................... 44 Medical Records ................................................................................................................................ 44 Excuse/Absence Policy ..................................................................................................................... 45 Long-Term Absences ........................................................................................................................ 45 International Services............................................................................................................................ 45 Myatt Center for Diversity and Inclusion ............................................................................................... 46 Graduate Student Services ................................................................................................................... 47 Career Development Center ................................................................................................................. 48 Residential Life ...................................................................................................................................... 51 Center for Student Engagement, Leadership and Orientation ............................................................. 51 Recognized Student Organizations................................................................................................... 52

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Career Closet and Campus Pantry ....................................................................................................... 54 STUDENT EMPLOYMENT OFFICE ........................................................................................................ 54 INTERCOLLEGIATE ATHLETICS ........................................................................................................... 54 Intercollegiate Athletic Facilities ............................................................................................................ 55 RECREATION, FITNESS, AND INTRAMURALS .................................................................................... 55 Recreation Facilities .......................................................................................................................... 56 BANKING SERVICES .............................................................................................................................. 56 BURSAR’S OFFICE.................................................................................................................................. 56 Monthly Payment Option ....................................................................................................................... 57 Delinquent Student Account Policy....................................................................................................... 57 Withdrawal From Classes ..................................................................................................................... 58 CAMPUS BOOKSTORE ........................................................................................................................... 59 FINANCIAL AID ........................................................................................................................................ 59 Special Circumstances.......................................................................................................................... 60 Award Revisions.................................................................................................................................... 60 Financial Aid Refund Policy .................................................................................................................. 60 Return of Title IV Funds ........................................................................................................................ 61 Academic Requirements for the Retention of Financial Aid Eligibility ................................................. 62 UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN POLICE DEPARTMENT ...................................................................... 63 Law Enforcement ............................................................................................................................... 63 Safety Services .................................................................................................................................. 63 Emergency Telephones .................................................................................................................... 64 First Aid .............................................................................................................................................. 64 Lost and Found .................................................................................................................................. 64 Protective or Restraining Orders ....................................................................................................... 64 Campus Security and Fire Safety Report ......................................................................................... 65 STUDENT ID CARD/CAMPUS CARD ..................................................................................................... 65 Adding Funds to Your Card ............................................................................................................... 65 REGISTRAR’S OFFICE ........................................................................................................................... 66 Mailed Transcripts ............................................................................................................................. 66 Expedited Mailed Transcripts and/or Electronic Transcripts ............................................................ 66

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UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN DENTAL CENTER ................................................................................ 66 VETERAN STUDENT SERVICES ........................................................................................................... 67 Military and Veteran Student Services Office and Veterans Representative ...................................... 67 VA Certifying Official ............................................................................................................................. 67 ROTC ........................................................................................................................................................ 67 ACADEMIC POLICIES AND REGULATIONS ......................................................................................... 68 Family Rights and Privacy Act .............................................................................................................. 68 Definition of Public Records Involving Students ................................................................................... 69 Definition of Student Records ............................................................................................................... 69 Notification of Social Security Number Collection and Use.................................................................. 72 Student Declaration of Current Residence and/or Relocation ............................................................. 73 Change of Address ............................................................................................................................... 73 Attendance Policies ............................................................................................................................... 74 Resolution of Student Classroom Problems ......................................................................................... 75 Undergraduate Academic Standards.................................................................................................... 75 Leave of Absence Policy ....................................................................................................................... 75 Withdrawal from the University ............................................................................................................. 76 CODE OF CONDUCT .............................................................................................................................. 81 I. Value Statement ................................................................................................................................. 81 II. Charger Compact .............................................................................................................................. 81 III. Philosophy ........................................................................................................................................ 82 IV. Authority ........................................................................................................................................... 82 V. Jurisdiction ........................................................................................................................................ 83 VI. Definitions ........................................................................................................................................ 84 VII. Proscribed Conduct ........................................................................................................................ 86 VIII. Student Conduct Procedures ........................................................................................................ 89 IX. Disciplinary Records ........................................................................................................................ 97 X. Interpretation and Revision............................................................................................................... 97 UNIVERSITY POLICIES ........................................................................................................................... 99 Non Discrimination Policy and Affirmative Action Statement ............................................................... 99 Gender Identity/Expression Policy ........................................................................................................ 99

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Academic Integrity Policy and Procedures ......................................................................................... 103 Policy on Responsible Conduct in Research (RCR) .......................................................................... 117 Student Employee Confidentiality Policy ............................................................................................ 119 Acceptable Computer and Network Usage Policy .............................................................................. 122 Policy on Cell Phones ......................................................................................................................... 124 Electronic Services Access Policy in the Peterson Library ................................................................ 124 Posting Policy ...................................................................................................................................... 127 University of New Haven Good Samaritan Policy .............................................................................. 130 Substance Use Policy ......................................................................................................................... 130 Tobacco-Free, Smoke Free, Vape Free Campus Policy ................................................................... 137 Fire Arms, Weapons, and Explosives Policy ...................................................................................... 141 Hazing Policy ....................................................................................................................................... 143 Policy on Harassment and Bias-Motivated Offenses ......................................................................... 146 University of New Haven Freedom of Expression Statement ............................................................ 148 Sexual Harassment & Misconduct at the University........................................................................... 149 Policy on Filing A Grievance ............................................................................................................... 151 Student Protest and Demonstration Policy ......................................................................................... 156 Motor Vehicle Policies ......................................................................................................................... 158 General Guidelines for Advertising on Campus ................................................................................. 158 Policy on Sales and Solicitation .......................................................................................................... 159 Policy on Personal Property................................................................................................................ 159 Policy on Keys ..................................................................................................................................... 160 Policy on Pets...................................................................................................................................... 160 Policy on Self-Balancing Scooters & Hoverboards ............................................................................ 160 Drone Policy ........................................................................................................................................ 160 Policy on Publications and Communication Media............................................................................. 162 Involuntary Leave of Absence Policy .................................................................................................. 162 University Events Policy ...................................................................................................................... 166 Policy on Emotional Support Animals in University Housing ............................................................. 167 Contract for Emotional Support Animals in University Housing ......................................................... 174 Guidelines for Service Animals on Campus ....................................................................................... 175

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Service Animal Emergency Contact and Documentation .................................................................. 178 Fire Safety ........................................................................................................................................... 179 RESIDENTIAL LIFE ................................................................................................................................ 184 Mission Statement ............................................................................................................................... 184 Vision Statement ................................................................................................................................. 184 Diversity Statement ............................................................................................................................. 185 Residence Hall Staff ............................................................................................................................ 185 Room Occupancy Procedures and Guidelines .................................................................................. 186 Residence Hall Check-in/Check-Out Procedures ........................................................................... 186 Lockouts and Lost Keys .................................................................................................................. 186 Damage and Vandalism .................................................................................................................. 187 Mid-year Departure.......................................................................................................................... 187 Graduating Students........................................................................................................................ 188 Academic and Administrative Dismissals from the University ........................................................ 188 Failure to Pay Required Fees.......................................................................................................... 188 Administrative Action Policy ............................................................................................................ 188 Release of Information .................................................................................................................... 189 Room Changes ................................................................................................................................ 189 Roommate Conflicts ........................................................................................................................ 189 Entry to Resident Rooms ................................................................................................................ 189 Vacation Periods and Break Housing ............................................................................................. 190 Personal Property Insurance ........................................................................................................... 190 Storage ............................................................................................................................................ 191 Room Selection ................................................................................................................................... 191 Requests for Modified Housing ....................................................................................................... 191 Study Abroad ................................................................................................................................... 192 Meal Plan ......................................................................................................................................... 192 Residence Hall Policies and Procedures ............................................................................................ 193 Quiet Hours and Community Responsibility ................................................................................... 193 Guest Policy..................................................................................................................................... 194 Guest Policy Violations .................................................................................................................... 194

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Parent/Guardian Visitation .............................................................................................................. 194 Health and Safety Inspections ........................................................................................................ 195 Fire Safety Inspections .................................................................................................................... 195 Conservation.................................................................................................................................... 195 Electricity.......................................................................................................................................... 195 Prohibited Items ............................................................................................................................... 195 Posting Policy .................................................................................................................................. 197 Solicitation, Advertising, and Political Canvassing ......................................................................... 197 Outward Facing Surface Policy ....................................................................................................... 197 Services and Amenities....................................................................................................................... 198 Safety and Security ............................................................................................................................. 200 Fire Safety ........................................................................................................................................... 201 Minimum Sanctions for Violation of the Fire Code ............................................................................. 201 Sanctions and Fines for Residential Life Policy Violations................................................................. 203 UNIVERSITY COMMITMENT TO A DRUG-FREE ENVIRONMENT STATEMENT............................. 203 Drug-Free and Smoke-Free Environment .......................................................................................... 203 Why We Give You This Information.................................................................................................... 203 Standards of Conduct ......................................................................................................................... 204 State and Federal Legal Sanctions Concerning Drugs and Alcohol .................................................. 204 Alcohol and Drug Abuse ..................................................................................................................... 210 Counseling and Treatment for Drugs and Alcohol Abuse .................................................................. 217 Diversity Policy ........................................................................................................................................ 220

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INTRODUCTION The Student Handbook is a resource guide for the University of New Haven; one that you can refer to whenever you need it. For example, you may not be concerned now with graduation procedures, financial aid, or Library hours, but when you need information on these or other topics, this Handbook is one of the first places to check. The Handbook is a source of accurate information about the University of New Haven, its services, activities, procedures for getting things done, and people on campus who can assist you. It is the responsibility of all University of New Haven students to become familiar with the contents of this Handbook. The University Policies section, for instance, contains important University policies covering such concerns as grading, the student conduct system procedures, and much more. The Residential Life section contains information specific to resident students and their guests. The University of New Haven is more than classes, labs, and exams. It is residence halls, educational programs, social and athletic events, and many club and organization activities. It is people growing, working, talking, and playing together. In short, the University of New Haven is a community — your community. While its primary function is educating students, it has, like any community, many other functions: housing, governing, and supporting students and maintaining their health and safety. As a community, the University of New Haven offers you many alternatives. You have your choice of many academic majors, activities, and careers. It’s your choice, too, whether you want to spend a free hour studying at the Library, playing basketball, or just relaxing under a tree. University of New Haven’s faculty, administrators, and staff are here to assist you in any way we can. Your success starts here! Note: The University reserves the right to make, at any time, whatever changes it deems necessary to the contents of this handbook.

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HISTORY The University of New Haven was founded in 1920 as the New Haven YMCA Junior College, a division of Northeastern University. The College offered instruction in business and engineering to local students. The College also owed much to Yale University, for the use of its buildings and laboratories and for the assistance of its faculty and graduate students for nearly forty years. Because of the growing student demand for day as well as evening courses, the University first built a modern classroom building near East Rock in New Haven in 1958; in the same year it also received state authorization to offer bachelor of science degrees in engineering and business. Outgrowing even its new building, the University acquired the former New Haven County Orphanage complex (now known as Maxcy Hall) in West Haven in 1960. The University continued to grow on its new campus. The University of New Haven not only added new buildings; it enlarged the scope of its academic degrees into the arts and sciences, public safety, hotel and restaurant administration, and graduate education. Since the 1970s both the undergraduate and graduate student populations have included significant numbers of international students attracted by the University’s career-oriented programs in the colleges of Business, Engineering, Arts and Sciences, and Criminal Justice and Forensic Sciences. A number of the University’s undergraduate degree programs have been nationally recognized, most notably the nationally accredited engineering programs, forensic science, and music and sound recording. University of New Haven currently offers more than 100 undergraduate and graduate degree programs. Faculty have come to University of New Haven with degrees from prestigious American and international universities and have established an impressive record of research and publication. On July 1, 2004, Steven H. Kaplan, Ph.D., became the sixth president of the University of New Haven, launching a new era of expansion and advancement for the University. Through the leadership of University officers, the Board of Governors, and the faculty, the University of New Haven continues to evolve as it frequently reassesses its mission, its programs, and its campus. The University of New Haven stands apart from other institutions of higher learning because of its commitment to the concept of experiential learning — bringing practice into the classroom to educate its students and show them the world ahead. With the skills we teach and the foundation we build, our students go on to choice jobs or to further study in business, law, education, and more.

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CAMPUS LIFE RE-IMAGINED: RESPONSE TO COVID-19 PANDEMIC Introduction The year 2020 is our centennial year and it is arguably no better time to “Reimagine the University of New Haven.” We are living in an unprecedented time, which continues to demand that we have selfdiscipline and act upon our personal and social responsibility as citizens for the common good. The University of New Haven is rising to this challenge in the spirit of resilience, courage, and optimism. The Fall semester will require a focus on the well-being of self and others, especially those community members who are most vulnerable to COVID-19. The University of New Haven has created a structure to address the public health and safety challenges as a result of COVID-19. Below are the new Community Standards and Student Directives created in partnership with the Division of Students Affairs, Academic Affairs, and Student Success for engaging both on and off campus.

Chargers Care: A Pledge to Help Stop the Spread of COVID 19 As Chargers, there are values and expectations that we all share which provide the framework for how we interact as individual members of the community and speak to who we are and what we stand for as a community. Today, as the effects of this pandemic impact the Charger community and the world, we must all do our part to care for the health and wellbeing of every member of our campus community. The three significant components to this pledge include: • We pledge to care for ourselves. • We pledge to care for others. • We pledge to care for our Charger community.

The Chargers Care Pledge As a member of the Charger community, each of us plays an important role in maintaining the health and wellbeing of the University of New Haven. Therefore, in adherence to the Charger Compact, I will assume responsibility for my actions and inactions related to the COVID-19 pandemic to care for myself, others, and the Charger community. I pledge to: 1. Care for Myself: • Monitor for the symptoms of COVID-19 and report to a medical professional if I experience fever of 100.4˚ F (38˚ C) or higher, dry cough, difficulty breathing, chills, repeated shaking with chills, muscle pain, headache, sore throat, or loss of taste or smell. • Wash my hands often with soap and water and/or use hand sanitizer. • Engage in COVID-19 screening, testing, and other measures to protect myself from harm. UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN STUDENT HANDBOOK REV. 1/12/2021

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• Practice holistic wellness to support my social, physical, nutritional, financial, mental, spiritual, and intellectual needs. 2. Care for Each Other: • Maintain appropriate physical distancing in both on and off-campus settings to protect our community and beyond. • Stay in my residence if I feel ill or after exposure to someone who tested positive for COVID-19. • Wear an appropriate facemask and other protective gear as directed by the University. • Recognize when other members of the community may be struggling and support them to find appropriate resources. 3. Care for the Charger Community: • Identify, support, and educate others on the Chargers Care Pledge to ensure the health of our campus community. • Keep clothing, belongings, personal spaces, and shared common spaces clean. • Engage in testing and contact tracing to preserve the wellness of the community. • Carefully observe instructional signs and follow directions as provided by the University.

COVID-19 Student Directives Students, as members of the University of New Haven, are required to follow the Student Code of Conduct policies and be stewards of the Charger Compact and Charger Pledge on-campus, off-campus, and online. Due to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, directives are in place to maintain the safety and well-being of the University community both on and off campus.

Visitors and Guests No guests (other than immediate family) are permitted on campus at this time. Family visits are permitted during traditional business hours and can only take place in open areas outside of all buildings including University sponsored housing.

The following updates to the guest policy are now in place: • Residential students only have card access to their own residence hall. • Invited guests (ONE GUEST PER STUDENT) are permitted access to other residence halls provided they are with a host from that building. Please note, guests (residential and/or commuter) are expected to follow all physical distance requirements and wear face coverings. While serving as host to an invited guest, students are expected to uphold these student directives and will be held accountable for their guest’s actions. • Guests are not permitted in any residence hall private rooms. UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN STUDENT HANDBOOK REV. 1/12/2021

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• No outside guests, including parents or guardians, are permitted inside the residence hall rooms until further notice. • Students are encouraged to meet with their guests outside of the building or in a common area. • Residential students are not permitted to host any overnight guests in the residence halls, which includes students from other buildings or those living in the same residence hall. • Office of Residential Life staff and contracted security staff members stationed inside all residential halls will be checking University identification, COVID-19 compliance status, and student status via the CoVerified app to ensure students are cleared to be on campus and are in compliance with the visitor policy rules. • Violations of these policies will be documented and referred to the Dean of Students Office. • Beginning the spring 2021 semester, students found responsible for the violation of the guest policy will be subject to the following fines, in addition to other applicable sanctions. Specifically, fines will be levied against students who have violated the guest policy while functioning as a host in their residential building. 1. A charge of $50.00 will apply for a student’s first violation of the guest policy. 2. A charge of $100.00 will apply for a student’s second violation of the guest policy. 3. A charge of $150.00 will apply for a student’s third violation of the guest policy. 4. All subsequent violations of the guest policy will result in a suspended housing suspension sanction for residential students. All subsequent violations of the guest policy will result in a restriction to campus access for specified timeframes for commuter and off-campus students. • Students found responsible for violation(s) of the guest policy will also have their guest privileges revoked for a specified timeframe during the academic semester. A revocation of guest privileges sanction means that during the period of revocation students CANNOT host guests in their residential building and CANNOT be a guest in any University residential building. 1. A first violation of the guest policy will result in a minimum revocation of guest privileges for fourteen (14) consecutive days (weekends included). 2. A second violation of the guest policy will result in a minimum revocation of guest privileges for twenty-one (21) consecutive days (weekends included). 3. A third violation of the guest will result in a minimum revocation of guest privileges for the remainder of the academic semester. Depending on the date the guest privileges revocation will begin, the Hearing Officer reserves the right to extend the revocation to a future academic semester(s).

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Face Coverings Students are required to wear appropriate face covering at all times. Two face coverings have been provided to each community member. To the extent that someone would like to purchase their own face coverings, it is the expectation of the University that this face covering will not be explicit, discriminatory, derogatory, violent, offensive, infringing or otherwise contain inappropriate content. Face coverings are to cover the nose and mouth at all times in the following areas: • Academic buildings (classrooms, lecture halls, hallways, Peterson Library, study spaces, and laboratories. • University residential spaces (lounges, hallways, and other common spaces). • All University offices and some dining facilities. • Social & community spaces including indoor and outdoor spaces. • In transit between classes, during meetings, or gatherings with other students, staff, or faculty and on the shuttles and courtesy vans.

Acceptable Face Covering All campus individuals must wear masks that are at least 2-ply fabric and tight fitting across the nose and mouth. No gaiters, bandanas or loose covering will be allowed.

Exceptions for Face Coverings Students are exempt from wearing face covering only when they are in their assigned room in University housing and in other places as outlined by the university (eg. Beckerman Recreation Center and while eating in dining venues). No other exceptions will be made. The face covering must be worn when walking through the dining hall and serveries and can only be removed when sitting at a table when you are actively drinking or eating.

The Recreation Center The Beckerman Recreation Center and participation in any an in-person ChargerREC programs will require a face-covering. As hydration is a crucial component when exercising, members may uncover their face for short durations when hydrating. Members should ensure when they remove their face covering they are at least 6 ft. from others. We acknowledge the CT guidelines for fitness centers allow for face coverings to be removed is social distancing of 12 ft. can be maintained, however since this standard cannot be met at all times within our facility and the health of our community is paramount, members are required to wear a face covering at all times.

Student Meetings and Social Gatherings • Avoid groups and gatherings. Students groups should have limited face to face meetings and informal gatherings. Student group meetings or gatherings should maintain physical distancing UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN STUDENT HANDBOOK REV. 1/12/2021

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requirements at all times. Students are encouraged to gather virtually whenever possible. Most in-person social events and parties are prohibited. • Students must wear face coverings and maintain at least six feet physical distancing at all times when indoors or outdoors. • Students seeking approval to host social gatherings must receive approval from authorized University personnel for all events and must follow the State of Connecticut guidelines and directives on campus. • Members of the University of New Haven Community are expected to adhere to all local, state and institutional guidelines related to COVID-19. This includes social gathering and NO LARGE GATHERINGS.

Testing and Isolation • Stu Students must monitor for the symptoms of COVID-19 and immediately report to Health Services if they experience fever, dry cough, difficulty breathing, chills, repeated shaking with chills, muscle pain, headache, sore throat, or loss of taste or smell. • During the semester, students with possible COVID-19 symptoms are required to isolate in University residence or at home and notify Health Services. • Quarantine due to possible exposure or close contact with someone who has COVID-19 will be required as appropriate by the University. • All students are required to be tested for COVID-19 within the 5 days prior to returning to campus. For more information on testing refer to the University’s COVID-19 page. • Students in isolation cannot return to campus until cleared by Campus Health Services. • Students are required to participate in random on campus testing when instructed to do so.

Health Monitoring • All students are required to complete a daily health screening through the CoVerified App. • All individuals on campus must be prepared to show clearance to be on campus using the CoVerfied App to authorized University personnel upon request. • All students must have an understanding of the Isolation and Quarantine procedure as directed by the University. Please refer to the University’s Covid-19 page for more detailed information.

Student Travel University sponsored off-campus travel will be very limited for 2020-21 academic year. Classes and student organizations will not be permitted to conduct field trips in most cases. Faculty and staff also will not be supported for University-sponsored travel. Students are strongly encouraged not to engage in non-essential travel during the academic term. Travel to Affected States (so called “Red States”) during the semester is not permitted.

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Failure to Uphold Student Directives Students who fail to follow these directives should know that they can be asked to forfeit their privilege of remaining on campus to fulfill their academic obligation. To maintain the health and safety of the University community, the Dean of Students may take administrative action to prohibit students from participating in any in-person academic and co-curricular activities including removal from University housing, disciplinary probation, suspension from the University for a semester and/or possible dismissal or expulsion. The Dean of Students Office will independently adjudicate cases according to sanctioning guidelines and past student conduct history. Intentional and egregious violations will be handled swiftly and severely. Specific Policy Violations Include But Are Not Limited To: • Failure to Comply with Asymptomatic Testing within 2 Business Days • Failure to Comply with daily Symptoms Checking • Failure to Comply with wearing a face covering • Violation of the Guest/Campus Access Policy • Violation of the Illness Policy • Violation of the Social Gathering Policy Intentional Non-Compliance with COVID-19 Directives: • Probation for a semester or a year • Interim Suspension from the University pending official conduct hearing • Cancellation of University Housing Contract • Suspension/Expulsion from the University Evidence that an individual and/or group has violated the University’s guidance and expectations related to COVID-19 will result in serious consequences. Suspected violations that are deemed to be egregious, such as hosting large parties and gatherings or violating quarantine and/or isolation requirements, will immediately result in an immediate interim suspension from the University followed by a formal hearing to evaluate the violations and determine further sanctioning including but not limited to suspension, or even expulsion, from the University.

Reporting COVID-19 Related Code of Conduct Behaviors Community members are encouraged to report any violation of these directives on the Covid 19 Reporting Form found on the Report It page. The University encourages all members of the community, when acting in good faith, to report wrongful conduct. Making a report "in good faith" means you provide a complete and honest account that you believe to be true.

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Anyone found to have committed an act of retaliation against another person for making a good-faith report or for cooperating with an investigation into a report will be subject to disciplinary action. All reported concerns are reviewed promptly and confidentially, and only those with a need to know are informed of and involved in an investigation. Investigations will be conducted in an ethical manner and in compliance with all applicable laws and University of New Haven Code of Conduct policies.

Conduct Process During Social Distancing The Dean of Students Office remains fully committed to providing services and resources for students. Staff members are accessible via their University email, during scheduled in-person office hours, and weekly office hours via Zoom. General questions or concerns can be directed to DeanofStudents@newhaven.edu. A list or more detailed frequently asked questions can be found below: Q: Can I meet with a conduct officer in-person or virtually? A: Student appointments, including conduct hearings, take place via Zoom. Only virtual meetings will be permitted. Your conduct officer will explain this in more detail at the time of your appointment. Q: What can students expect to receive as possible sanctions (outcomes) for conduct cases in regards to failure to comply with COVID-19 expectations? A: Sanctions are intended to educate students on the effects of their behavior and invoke change in future decision-making. Sanctions will be tiered based on level of severity of violation, repeated offenses, and/or intent. In response to blatant disregard for policy as well as the health and safety of our community members, considerations include removal from housing, probation and/or suspension. We are taking matters of health and safety very seriously.

Helpful Tips to Address COVID Related Behaviors When addressing any kind of COVID related behavior, here are some helpful tips that can help you to engage with your follow peers. REMIND & REINFORCE • Don’t shout. • Address your peers by name or ask them how they would like to be identified before addressing the concern. • Shouting can escalate the situation, so even though that may be first instinct due to the physical barrier of the face covering. Remember that speaking in an unnatural way — such as shouting — is not sustainable and often distorts the quality of rapport you want to build with a student. • Please stick to your regular volume for the best results, maintain good eye contact, and remind students of the directives of wearing a face covering.

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REQUEST AND RETRIEVE • Take your time when speaking • Allow a little more space between your words to enable the listener to follow your conversation better when you ask them to wear a face-covering. • Be mindful of your environment — think about your environment and try to move away from distracting noise, especially other people talking. If it is in an office or classroom, ask the student to step outside, so not everyone hears the conversation. • Know where the resources are to direct students to request a mask. Community Health Ambassadors will be on campus to assist students. REFUSAL, REPORT, & RETREAT • If someone refuse to wear a face-covering, please let them know that you will be filing a report for refusal to follow university directives. • Use the COVID-19 reporting form on MyCharger • Call UPD for assistance if needed.

Promoting Diversity and Inclusion The University of New Haven is committed to ensuring that all members of the community is respected, feel valued, accepted and appreciated. Please find the University of New Haven Diversity Statement HERE and the University of New Haven’s Freedom of Expression Policy found on myCharger.

COVID-19 Health Ambassadors Health Ambassadors contribute to the education of the campus community on COVID-19 related health measures using various modes of delivery including in-person, and remotely through social media. Ambassadors will assist with answering protocol questions and relaying COVID-19 related policies and procedures to the campus community. They will also provide feedback to Health Coordinators regarding the impact of various measures and initiatives.

Student Support We understand that this situation may cause stress and anxiety for community members. Students are encouraged to utilize campus resources to assist them in dealing with adjusting to our new normal. Please visit myCharger to learn more. Available resources include: • Counseling and Psychological Services • Health Services

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• Charger Recreation • Dean of Students Office • Campus Pantry and Career Closet: email closetpantry@newhaven.edu for assistance • Spiritual Life and Campus Ministry

We are Charger Strong!

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ACADEMIC Colleges and Departments The University has five undergraduate colleges — the College of Arts and Sciences, College of Business, Tagliatela College of Engineering, the Henry C. Lee College of Criminal Justice and Forensic Sciences, and the School of Health Sciences — as well as the Graduate School. Each College is led by a Dean responsible for the planning, implementation, and evaluation of the school’s academic programs. Most degree programs are offered by academic departments administered by a Department Chair. Under the direction of the Dean, the faculty within a school make decisions that affect you: they determine which courses will be offered and when; the course content, grading standards, and requirements for the majors offered; and the advising system. The educational efforts of the faculty are supplemented by other units within the University.

Faculty In addition to classroom teaching and advising, University of New Haven faculty members fill several other roles: as researchers and consultants both inside and outside the University, advisors to student groups, and members of committees that develop educational policies or advise the administration on University matters. When not in the classroom, faculty may be keeping up with new developments, discovering new information, or developing new methods of disseminating knowledge. Their goal is to translate these efforts into course materials and presentations that provide you with the most up-to-date education.

Advisors Your faculty advisor can help you design a program to meet your goals, select your courses, and satisfy all of your academic needs. All students have assigned faculty advisors. If you’re not sure who your advisor is, or if you are looking for a new one, check with your department office. You should meet with your advisor at least once per semester for preregistration to review your selection of courses. Your advisor approves your course choices as well as course changes made through the Add/Drop procedure.

Faculty Advisor Information It is the student’s responsibility to select courses in accordance with prerequisites, the advisor’s recommendations, the departmental plan of study (if required), and the requirements for the degree. Students needing further explanation of program requirements or course sequencing should request academic advisement. Advisement sessions are held prior to each semester. A student is not required

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to file a formal plan of study with the Graduate School. It is the student’s responsibility to meet the stated requirements for the degree.

Success Advisor Information Student Success Advisors are eager to work one-on-one with students to help set personal and academic goals that will contribute to their success. Success Advisors motivate students to reach their full academic potential. By working individually with one of the advisors, students can develop skills and strategies to overcome academic challenges if and when they arise.

LIBRARY The Marvin K. Peterson Library 203.932.7197 203.932.7195 203.932.7189

Circulation Desk Recorded Message of Hours Reference Service

Library hours are posted at: http://www.newhaven.edu/academics/library/marvin-k-peterson/ or https://mycharger.newhaven.edu/web/mycharger/library Staff members are available in person for student support, by phone (203.932.7189) during Library service hours, by email (LibraryHelp@newhaven.edu), through the Ask a Librarian Chat Service in MyCharger (https://mycharger.newhaven.edu/web/mycharger/library#), or through 24/7 interactive chat at www.newhaven.edu/library/askalibrarian. Students can also request a research consultation by completing the form at http://www.newhaven.edu/academics/library/research.php. The Marvin K. Peterson Library includes three floors of quiet study space, an Information Commons, 4 study rooms, comfortable seating, stacks, and reference areas. Both iMacs and desktop computers are available in the Information Commons, as well as 4 high-speed black/white printers, a color printer, and a scanner. Wireless networking is available in all areas of the library. Students can plug in their laptops to connect to the campus network at more than 100 ports available throughout the library’s three floors. Students with their own personal laptops can print to the black/white and color printers. The home page of the Marvin K. Peterson Library at http://www.newhaven.edu/academics/library/, is where the online catalog for books, journals, videos, government documents, and course reserves is located. Students can access the Library by logging into MyCharger and selecting “Library” on the lefthand scroll. The search box at the top of the page will search across multiple databases, e-journals, newspapers, print books, e-U.S. Government Documents, e-books, Google Scholar and many other sources of information. Over 150 Library Guides and finding aids are also available to assist students with research. Topics range from library resources in specific disciplines to style sheets on citing sources in papers. Using their University of New Haven credentials, students can sign in and access online UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN STUDENT HANDBOOK REV. 1/12/2021

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commercial database services using the “Databases” link. From there, students can access links to fulltext databases, such as Academic Search Premier, Psychology and Behavioral Sciences Collection, Criminal Justice with Full Text, Engineering Village, or Hoover’s Online to name a few. The Marvin K. Peterson Library has more than 247,516 titles of books and government documents in our physical collection. Access to 247,522 full-text e-books and over 65,388 full-text e-journals is available for research and study purposes. The library is a U.S. Government Documents Depository and, among other subjects, receives extensive business, technological, environmental and demographic information. Educational videos/DVDs and music CDs are also available. To borrow materials, students need a current University of New Haven ID card. Students must be registered in order to be eligible for borrowing privileges. Most materials are loaned out for one month and can be renewed, either in-person or online. Exceptions are the materials that professors place on reserve for you to read in the Library. Books labeled “Closed Reserve” and “Reference,” as well as periodicals and newspapers, may not be taken from the building. There are photocopy machines, scanners, and reader printers for using the microform holdings. Online commercial databases are used for accessing materials published on many subjects. The Library provides access to many databases including ProQuest Direct, ABI/INFORM, Criminal Justice Periodical Index, Computing, Historical Newspapers, IEEE Computer Science Digital Library, Campus Research, Academic Search Premier, Engineering Village, PsycARTICLES, PsycInfo, Psychology and Behavioral Sciences Collection, SciFinder Scholar, Hoover’s Online, GeoRef, CCH Online, Bloomberg/BNA Tax Management Library, CREDO Reference, Country Watch, Grant Forward, Literary Reference Center, and Country Watch. If an item is not owned by the University of New Haven, it can usually be retrieved from another library. This service is called interlibrary loan. Forms to request articles or books are available online or in the Library. Students who are Connecticut residents may use the extensive public library system, which includes New Haven and West Haven, but must secure a library card from the Connecticut town that they list as their permanent address. Nonresidents can obtain a library card at the West Haven Public Library with a current University of New Haven ID and this semester’s course list and a temporary West Haven Public Library card will be issued to you until the end the current semester. For more information regarding use of other libraries, please contact the Peterson Library at 203.932.7189. Library tours and workshops are offered, and there are library guides available online at http://libguides.newhaven.edu/home. They explain the basics of library use and the different collections and services available. The library publishes a newsletter each semester. Upon request, specialized oneon-one instructional sessions with a librarian are offered to provide practice in the use of information retrieval tools and briefings on the resources available for a specific major or program.

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INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY Echlin Hall • 203.932.7055 The Office of Information Technology is under the direction of the University’s Chief Information Officer (CIO). The department coordinates all computing, networking, and telecommunication services for all University of New Haven community members. The department is organized into several subcomponents in order to provide service-specific assistance.

Educational Technology Support Services Echlin Hall • Room 107 The Director of Educational Technology provides and maintains the Campus Card Office. The department is dedicated to assisting all community members with their academic and educational technology needs.

Computer Labs Information Technology provides for the computing needs of both academic and administrative users by maintaining a number of computer labs. The largest installation of general use computers and printers is in the Marvin K. Peterson Library. Installed software includes web browsers, Microsoft Office, SPSS, and other university-standard software. There are Apple iMacs in the Library, Bartels Hall Lobby, and in the Beckerman Recreation Center on the 2nd floor. Additional labs are located throughout the campus and are discipline-specific and used primarily for instruction. Special-purpose computing facilities include the Industrial Engineering CAD/CAM lab in Buckman Hall, the Electrical Engineering lab in Buckman 203, the System Engineering lab in Buckman Hall, the Graphic Arts labs in Dodds Hall 203 and 207, the Mechanical Engineering Instrumentation lab in Buckman 223, the Math and Physics Department lab in Maxcy Hall, the Hospitality and Tourism lab in Harugari Hall 114, and the Environmental Science lab in Charger Plaza. For availability of these labs, contact the given department’s administrative staff. For more information on the various computer labs on campus, go to www.newhaven.edu/computerlabs.

Student Technical Support Campus Bookstore Information Technology provides complete service for student-owned computers with no charge for labor. The Student Technical Support Office is located in the Campus Bookstore, and provides hardware and software support for PCs, Macs and Unix machines, including hardware repair* and software installation. Please note that the Support Office does not sell, stock, or provide parts. Students needing replacement parts will need to obtain the replacement parts which the office will then install. The office will help UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN STUDENT HANDBOOK REV. 1/12/2021

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students obtain warranty replacement parts when appropriate. To contact Student Technical Support please email studenttechsupport@newhaven.edu or call 203.932.8324 option 2. *OIT only replaces “accessible” components i.e. hard drives, memory, etc. OIT cannot replace screens or any part deemed too invasive to install. The Student Technical Support office also administers the campus software licensing program. The University has a licensing agreement with Microsoft which provides low-cost and free software under the Volume Licensing Program. All students may download a free copy of Microsoft Office via their university email, and use is allowed on up to 5 devices including tablets and smart phones. OIT also has a variety of software, including Adobe, available at a discounted student price. Software can be purchased and downloaded via the myCharger portal at http://mycharger.newhaven.edu on the Information Technology - IT Information for Students page.

Network Services Network Account: All registered students receive a University of New Haven network account. The account name and password is automatically generated within 3–5 days of registration.

The account name is: First Initial, Last Name (first 4 characters) lowest available numeral For example, first-year student John Smith registering in the Fall of 2020 has the network account name jsmit1. Conflicting names will be assigned a sequentially higher number that will follow the last name instead of 1. A letter is provided at Orientation or mailed to students indicating the account name, password, and instructions on how to access the account. Student Network Accounts are active perpetually for access to records and email. However, other network based resources will no longer be available upon graduation or leaving school. The Office of Alumni Relations can also provide a forwarding email account that students can maintain for an unlimited time. For information, go to: http://alumni.newhaven.edu.

This account will provide students access to the following services: • Every student network account includes an email mailbox. The University has partnered with Microsoft to provide every student a perpetual email account at Microsoft. • Email addresses are as follows: networkaccount@unh.newhaven.edu. • Students registered in future off-campus programs may be assigned an account with a different suffix. • Student email accounts are accessible via the web at https://mycharger.newhaven.edu or the University of New Haven homepage. Students are responsible for maintaining their email account, including staying within University mailbox size limits and policies. UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN STUDENT HANDBOOK REV. 1/12/2021

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• The University will use this medium as the preferred method of communication.

Network Logon: The network account allows students to log in to any of the computers on campus (e.g. the Computer Labs) as well as gain access to other network resources (e.g. accessing Library resources). This login is the same user-name and password you use to login to other systems (such as Blackboard or Banner). Students will be required to download the Duo MFA app to their smartphone to verify their identity after logging into https://myCharger.newhaven.edu. More information can be found at https://studentsupport.newhaven.edu/duo

Canvas Logon: The network account will allow students to log in to Canvas. Specific instructions on logging into Canvas are provided in the student account letter sent to every student. Canvas can be accessed through the myCharger Portal at http://mycharger.newhaven.edu and selecting Canvas on the right. Specific instructions on logging into Canvas are provided in the account letter provided to each student. Support information can be found in the Information Technology — Information for Students section of myCharger.

Internet Services Wireless networking is provided in almost every area of the University and continues to expand. Students may connect to the wireless network with their University of New Haven network account. Instructions and details can be found at https://studentsupport.newhaven.edu. The Office of Information Technology will always make its best effort to notify students before any changes to network access are made. All users of the University network are required to have antivirus protection on their computer. The University may, at its discretion, require students to allow an agent that verifies security compliance access to their computer. Students experiencing issues connecting to the network should contact the Student Technical Support Office immediately. Students are not permitted to connect personal network equipment to the University network, including but not limited to wireless routers and switches. If additional connectivity is required in your residence hall please contact the Student Support Office.

THE CENTERS FOR ACADEMIC SUCCESS AND ADVISING The Centers for Academic Success and Advising (CASA) is the umbrella organization encompassing the Center for Student Success and the Center for Learning Resources. CASA is committed to student success at the University of New Haven. CASA’s goal is to provide students with the necessary UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN STUDENT HANDBOOK REV. 1/12/2021

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resources to successfully complete their degrees. CASA staff members collaborate with the Academic and Student Affairs divisions of the University to focus its student success efforts on serving the whole student in a holistic manner.

Center for Student Success Maxcy Hall, 106/210 • 203.932.7237 css@newhaven.edu

HOURS: Monday – Thursday, 8:00 a.m. – 7:00 p.m. Friday 8:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. The Center for Student Success (CSS) works with all undergraduate and graduate students to provide a seamless continuation of support services throughout a student’s time at the University. Success Advisors advocate for students as they seek to resolve issues and concerns related to their academic careers. They challenge and support students to explore all avenues available to them to get the most out of their education. Success Advisors use an appreciative advising philosophy that focuses on student strengths and empowers students to rise to their full potential. They work collaboratively with faculty to identify students who are experiencing challenges in their coursework and assist students on success plans to address these challenges. Academic Peer Mentors (APMs) support CASA staff through their work in the residence halls. A commuter APM works to assist commuter students. APMs assist students with academic strategies and connect them to campus resources. The APM Program is co-administered by the Office of Residential Life, the Center for Student Leadership, Engagement and Orientation, and the Center for Student Success. In addition, the CSS staff collaborates with other University resources to offer programs and services that promote student achievement and degree completion. They provide information to students on their academic programs, as well as tips on study skills, time-management, and other academic success strategies. During the registration process, Success Advisors work with students to prepare them for their advising appointments with faculty advisors and assist with registering for classes. CSS Sponsors the Sophomore Year Experience program where students are provided with opportunities to engage in meaningful conversations and activities to help them find, define and expand their purpose, both in education and life.

Navigate Navigate is a mobile app that provides necessary information about the university that will help get you from orientation to graduation. The app can help you explore the right major, navigate resources from

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financial aid to dining halls, and stay on top of important dates and deadlines — all in the palm of your hand. Through Navigate, you will be able to: • View campus resources and calendars in one location • Access your class schedule • Receive push notifications with important updates and happenings • View reminders and registration hold information • Opt-in to find study buddies in your classes • Message your advisor • Schedule appointments with offices on campus The Navigate app can be downloaded for free from the Apple Store and Google Play; just search for “Navigate Student.” You will also be able to access the Navigate desktop platform by visiting http://newhaven.navigate.eab.com

Center for Learning Resources Marvin K. Peterson Library, Lower Level Reception: 203.932.7215 Director: 203.932.7213 CLR@newhaven.edu www.newhaven.edu/clr

HOURS OF OPERATION: Monday – Thursday, 9:30 a.m. – 10:00 p.m. Friday, 9:30 a.m. – 2:30 p.m. Sunday, 3:00 p.m. – 10:00 p.m. **Limited hours are available during the summer in certain divisions. The Center for Learning Resources (CLR) provides students with the academic content and skills support they need for success. The CLR offers students free tutoring by peer and professional staff in a variety of courses. Most subject-specific tutoring is geared toward under-classmen, although tutoring is offered for upper-classmen and graduate students in high-demand subject areas. Computer Lab support is available for all students. The CLR uses a metacognitive approach that engages students in the learning process and promotes independent learning strategies to ensure the best possible change of student success. The Math, Science, and Business Lab tutors assist students in math, hard and theoretical science, engineering, and business courses. Staff primarily provide small to mid-size group support. The Computer Lab offers students access to computers equipped with the latest version of the MS Office Suite as well as course-based software such as PHStat, SPSS, and Excel for classes. The Lab

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is staffed by students who provide support in the aforementioned programs and specialized tutoring in graphic design and some programming languages. The Peer Tutoring Program (Undergraduate and Graduate) consists of student tutors supporting major- and minor-based courses ranging from accounting to physics, chemistry, engineering, dental hygiene, and more. Peer tutors are usually housed in areas affiliated with the department they support. Workshops: CLR workshops are designed to help students succeed in their educational and professional pursuits. Workshops are free to attend and cover topics such as the calculus mastery test and chemistry finals preparation. Supplemental Instruction (SI) is a focused service combining the best of the worlds of tutoring and extended classroom support. SI leaders work in conjunction with faculty for a particular course to answer questions about subject material and expand on areas in which faculty identify students as needing additional assistance. Sessions range from small to larger groups and allow students to ask questions and solidify their understanding of material in a non-judgmental and engaging format. Learning Assistant Program: Learning Assistants work alongside faculty in select math and science classes by attending class and providing instructional assistance to students during class time. Learning Assistants are available outside of class to provide supplemental instruction and/or tutoring specifically to students in those classes. Multi-Campus Support: The CLR offers tutoring support at Orange and our Yale-New Haven campuses. Online tutoring for students on the Prato campus is also offered on an ad-hoc basis. Students are encouraged to make appointments via our EAB Navigate and are also welcome on a dropin basis as tutors are available. To learn more, visit our website at www.newhaven.edu/academics/CLR.

ACADEMIC SERVICE LEARNING 203.479.4588 www.newhaven.edu/servicelearning The Office of Academic Service-Learning supports the mission of the University of New Haven by incorporating community service, civic engagement, social awareness, and responsibility into the curriculum to enhance student learning and to respond to the need of the surrounding community. Through academic service-learning, students become socially responsible and active citizens who lead purposeful and fulfilling lives Academic service-learning is a form of experiential education where students participate in community service projects that enhance what is taught in the classroom within a graded, credit-bearing course. Students participate in community service projects at local nonprofit and public organizations to address a defined need mutually agreed upon by the partner and the instructor. The service is comparable to classroom readings, discussions, and assignments and the work of the partnership UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN STUDENT HANDBOOK REV. 1/12/2021

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should equally benefit both the student and the community. Service-learning courses can be found by looking for the ‘S’ designation on the course number. Reflection is an essential component of service-learning as it provides students with a venue to understand how their experience connects with academic course content. Appropriate reflection activities will direct the student’s attention to new interpretations of events, allowing for an examination of critical issues related to the community service project. Students are encouraged to find personal relevance in the service provided to enhance the development of civic learning. The Service-Learning Office provides the framework for students to become socially responsible through the following civic learning objectives: Leadership — Students will apply their leadership with or without a formal position. Social Responsibility — Students will identify as a member of the community and will take action to address public problems and issues. Cognitive Examination — Students will apply their academic knowledge and personal experience to address public problems and issues. Learning About Self and Others — Students will identify personal strengths, values, and goals. Community Engagement — Students will contribute to their community by advancing its quality of life.

STUDY ABROAD/STUDY AWAY Maxcy Hall 109 • 203.932.7175 www.newhaven.edu/studyabroad The University of New Haven offers study abroad and study away opportunities all over the world. (“Study away” includes some opportunities within the United States for which most processes for study abroad apply.) Through study abroad, students discover firsthand diversity beyond the borders of home. Students are challenged to critically examine both host cultures and their own, in almost every way, including social relations, resource use, political systems — you name it! It’s an exciting journey that should lead to intellectual growth and new confidence and independence. The Study Abroad Office can introduce students to a variety of programs. These programs vary in duration and some are led and taught by our own faculty, while others are exchange programs with partner universities. Still yet, some programs are arranged through affiliate organizations that provide their own campuses abroad or help integrate students in foreign universities. On all semester programs, students have access to their federal financial aid, except for work-study. For the Tuscany Campus and exchange programs, students maintain access to their institutional aid such as scholarships and grants. The University of New Haven is the “School of Record” for “CEA Global Education,” which means that all faculty and courses at CEA’s seven “CEA Study Centers” in Buenos Aires (Argentina), Paris UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN STUDENT HANDBOOK REV. 1/12/2021

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(France), Dublin (Ireland), Florence and Rome (Italy), and Barcelona and Seville (Spain) are approved by a faculty committee appointed for that purpose. The option to study abroad is available to all University of New Haven students in good standing, with a minimum G.P.A. of 2.0, no pending disciplinary actions, and no financial holds. Some programs require higher G.P.A. or pre-requisite courses.

University of New Haven Policy on Alcohol and Drugs for Study Abroad Programs Philosophy The University of New Haven works with students to maintain an environment where students can develop holistically. Our goal is to create a living and learning environment that supports healthy choices and lifestyles which enable students to lead purposeful and fulfilling lives. Students are supported in making informed, responsible decisions in accordance with the host country/countries and University policies.

Policy The following policies seek to apply the University of New Haven institution policies in overseas settings where U.S. law cannot be enforced. These policies are in addition to the policies outlined in the student handbook for each study abroad program. In compliance with all federal, state and local laws, the University of New Haven prohibits the possession, manufacture, sale, distribution, and unlawful use/abuse of any and all controlled substances and drugs. Additionally, the University of New Haven recognizes all laws and regulations of any host countries for study abroad students. University of New Haven students are expected to comply with these laws and regulations as well as the University policies. Any appeals or issues with the policies listed below must be directed to the University of New Haven Dean of Students Office. 1. The University of New Haven has a zero-tolerance policy regarding the purchase, sale, possession or consumption of drugs other than those permitted in the program’s host country and prescribed by a physician. Students found to be in possession of or who have purchased, sold, or consumed any illegal drugs or to have misused any prescribed drugs, will be removed from the program at the student’s expense and without any refund. In addition, the student may face removal from the University of New Haven and other disciplinary action. 2. Alcohol misuse is defined as alcohol consumption that is harmful or potentially harmful to the program participant or others. Alcohol abuse is misuse that is consistent and systematic. Alcohol misuse may include but is not limited to any of the following behaviors caused by alcohol consumption: a. Absence from academic activities or events b. Illness or incapacitation UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN STUDENT HANDBOOK REV. 1/12/2021

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c. Loud, abusive, inappropriate or disrespectful behaviors d. Destruction of property e. Disobeying the host countries’ laws and regulations f.

The presence, possession or use of common source containers of alcoholic beverages (including but not limited to kegs, beer balls, other bulk containers requiring a tapping device or spigot, punch bowls, trash cans, or other containers used as punch bowls) by individuals or groups is prohibited. Wine bottles are not considered common source containers.

g. Intoxication is defined as the point where the quantity of alcohol a person consumes exceeds the individual’s tolerance for alcohol and impairs behavioral or physical abilities. 3. Alcohol misuse or abuse will not be tolerated and may lead to expulsion from the study abroad program at the student’s expense and without any refund. In addition, the student may face removal from the University of New Haven and other disciplinary action. 4. Students are expected to abide by the alcohol and drug laws of the country or countries where they are studying or traveling. It is the responsibility of students to learn and understand the laws and regulations of their host country or countries. Regulatory information for various countries is available at the U.S. State Department’s “Consular Information Sheets” (http://travel.state.gov/content/passports/english/country.html) 5. In contracting with in-country providers for meal services or other activities, program directors should avoid including any alcohol with those services. If a student is able to purchase alcohol on his/her own during a program activity, that purchase should only be allowed if the participant is legally eligible. Directors should also ensure that other options are available besides alcoholic beverages. a. Any provision of alcoholic beverages by a meal service at a program sanctioned activity requires prior approval by the Senior Associate Dean of Students. b. The University requires that non-alcoholic beverages and food be served at all events where alcohol is present and encourages entertainment where appropriate. 6. Even when the program has not contracted for services directly, directors should avoid encouraging students to visit locales or establishments where excessive drinking is known to be common or encouraged. With regard to the University of New Haven Tuscany Campus, the Meal Plan vouchers must not be exchanged for alcohol. Should any directors find that establishments are providing alcohol to students in exchange for vouchers or are serving excessive amounts of alcohol, thus not acting in agreement with the University of New Haven alcohol policy, they should cancel their arrangements with said businesses immediately. 7. Program directors, site directors, and faculty members should not provide alcohol to or purchase alcohol for any students participating in any University of New Haven study abroad program. UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN STUDENT HANDBOOK REV. 1/12/2021

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Any provision of alcoholic beverages by a program director, site director or faculty member at a program sanctioned activity requires prior approval by the Senior Associate Dean of Students. 8. Although not directly responsible for students’ decisions to consume alcohol, directors should monitor students’ consumption and remind them of possible consequences for misuse or abuse. Students involved in substance policy violations will be referred to the University Conduct System, and may be subject to additional consequences within their study abroad program. 9. Because the directors and faculty members are role models and their behavior sets the standard for the program, when participation in program functions, directors and faculty members should take particular care to avoid any appearance of excessive alcohol consumption.

Prato Campus The University of New Haven’s international campus is located in the historical city of Prato, just 20 minutes from Florence, Italy. The city is your campus where you will live, learn, explore, and grow as you immerse yourself in the culture and language of Italy. The Prato Campus offers a wide range of core and elective courses every semester, and students also benefit from unique experiential opportunities such as interning at the city police headquarters or volunteering in local schools and charities, while making local friends at the weekly conversation exchange. Being in Europe means students can also explore cities like Rome, Venice, Barcelona, Dublin, and Paris on the weekends or during longer semester breaks! Students are advised to visit the Study Abroad Office for program advisement, and students should consult with their academic advisor to select the optimal time to study abroad, select courses, and determine how courses will be treated upon return to campus. Through good planning, study abroad may meet major, core, or elective course requirements. Visit the website for updated program options, forms, and procedures.

DIVISION OF STUDENT AFFAIRS www.newhaven.edu/student-life Student Affairs departments and programs support student learning both in and out of the classroom through programs which focus on student engagement and success, diversity and inclusion, campus life, career development, and wellness. The more students invest in the University and its opportunities, the more successful and rewarding their learning experience will be. Students will be faced with a wide variety of challenges during their tenure at the University for which support or assistance is required. Students are encouraged to actively seek out a Student Affairs staff member with questions or concerns. Our mission is to assist students in their intellectual, social, emotional, physical and spiritual development. In addition, Resident Assistants, Orientation Leaders,

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Wellness Peer Educators, Diversity Peer Educators, Academic Peer Mentors and other student leaders are selected and trained to support student success. Our goal is to help students succeed and maximize their learning while at the University.

Dean of Students Bartels Hall, Level 4 • 203.932.7238 www.newhaven.edu/DeanofStudents The Dean of Students Office provides support and advocacy for students. We answer questions; provide information about and referrals to campus resources; assist in students’ adjustment to the University; promote programs which address student needs, concerns and interests; and help students in resolving problems of all types. We challenge students to conduct themselves with integrity in both personal and academic matters and we hold them accountable for their decisions and actions. Our goal is to foster a community of mutual respect where students are actively engaged members of the University community.

Spiritual Life and Campus Ministry 205 South Campus Hall • 203.931.6040 www.newhaven.edu/spiritual The Office of Spiritual Life & Campus Ministry provides students, faculty and staff with opportunities for the development and expression of religious ideas and values and the work that flows from them. The office serves as a clearinghouse on matters of religious services, programs, and enrichment opportunities that are available in the communities surrounding our campus. The University of New Haven Meditation and Spirituality Center, located at 15 Ruden Street on the ground level, was created to fill a need in our community. In the Fall of 2013, this space was opened to provide students a place to enrich their spiritual development. The Meditation and Spirituality Center has a dedicated space for students of the Muslim faith. There are separate prayer rooms for men and women and foot-washing stations for convenient ritual washing.

Community Service Bartels Hall, Level 4 • 203.479.4585 The mission of the Office of Community Service is to foster relationships between the University of New Haven community and the Greater New Haven community. The office organizes community service activities on campus; promotes community service opportunities to members of the University community; houses a database of community agencies and programs needing volunteer assistance; develops programs, forums, and workshops which focus on community service issues; and coordinates UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN STUDENT HANDBOOK REV. 1/12/2021

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programs such as Alternative Spring Break, Allingtown Clean-Up and the President’s Public Service Fellowship Program. All members of the University of New Haven community are encouraged to use the services of the office.

Counseling and Psychological Services Sheffield Hall, Ground Level • 203.932.7333 www.newhaven.edu/counseling Counseling and Psychological Services (CAPS) provides free, confidential consultation and counseling for any concern a student may have. Examples include interpersonal distress, homesickness, depression, anxiety, trauma, grief and loss, suicidality, and sexual assault/ discrimination. The Center is staffed by licensed clinical psychologists, social workers, and counselors who provide confidential individual and group therapy, as well as crisis intervention. Psychiatric services and medication management are available from our part-time psychiatrist. The CAPS mascot is the Cownseling Cow and students can pick up a stress cow with CAPS information on it by just stopping by the Center. Finally, Dogs in the Hall, therapy dog visits, happen twice a semester. CAPS Cownseling Cow and Dogs in the Hall programs have their own Instagram pages so students can keep track of their activities at any time @thecownselingcow and @dogsinthehalls. As most of our services will be offered remotely until further notice, students should make an appointment by calling us at 203.932.7333. Sessions will be conducted via HIPAA-compliant online platforms. We will be minimally staffed on campus to respond to emergency situations. Students who may need to consult with a counselor after hours should call the main number and select option 2. Students should consider speaking with someone in CAPS before concerns become so overwhelming that interfere with academics, relationships, work, and other important pursuits. Students may not think that their issue is pressing enough to consider counseling, but CAPS staff encourage all students to reach out. Staff would prefer students contact us before it becomes a crisis. If students do find themselves in crisis, they can call or drop by CAPS between 8:30 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. (Monday through Friday), call the University of New Haven Police Department at 203.932.7070 if after hours or on the weekend (call 911 if you are away from campus), or contact/go to the emergency department of any local hospital. All initial appointments are considered consultations and students are not considered in treatment until the student and clinician agree on that together). Often, students feel much better from just one session.

University Dining Services Bartels Hall, Level 1 • 203.932.7185 https://newhaven.sodexomyway.com The University Dining Services consists of the Marketplace Food Court, Jazzman’s Brew & Bakery, The Charger Café, New Coffee shop (to be named) Re-Charge (C-Store), NRgize Lifestyle Café, Wow Café, UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN STUDENT HANDBOOK REV. 1/12/2021

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FöD, (Food on Demand) and University Catering. You can find our facilities all around campus. Please feel free to call us and visit when you are in Bartels Student Center. We always welcome comments and suggestions.

The Marketplace (Bartels Campus Center) • Deli Favorites • Beach Grill • Salad Bar • Simple Serving (Allergy Free) • Pizza, Pasta and More • TexMex Station • Vegan/Vegetarian Station • Charger Sauté • Grainery • My Zone (Gluten Free, Dairy Free)

Jazzman’s Brew & Bakery (Bartels Campus Center) • Gourmet Coffee, Cappuccino and Espresso • Fresh-baked Muffins, Scones and Pastries • Sandwiches, Salads and Snacks • Fruit Smoothies and Cold Beverages

The Charger Café (Peterson Library) • Starbucks Coffee, Tea and Espresso • Fruit Smoothies • Baked Goods • Salad and Sandwiches

Moe’s Southwest Grill (Bergami Hall) • Burritos • Rice Bowls • Quesadillas • Nachos • Stacks • Salads

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Re-Charge (C-Store) (Sheffield Hall) • Beverages • Groceries/Snacks/Frozen Food • Health and Beauty Items • Sushi • Grab-N-Go

NRgize Lifestyle Café (Recreation Center) • Fruit Smoothies • Meal Replacement Shakes

Wow Café (Bergami Hall) • Wings • Quesadillas • Salads • Fries • Burgers • Wraps • Sandwiches

FöD — Food on Demand (Westside Hall) • Appetizers (Made to Order) • Salads • Entrees (Made to Order) • Hand-crafted Sandwiches • Desserts Please call or visit us. We welcome your comments and suggestions. Our office is conveniently located on the lower level of the Bartels Campus Center or visit us at DiningServices@newhaven.edu.

Accessibility Resources Services Sheffield Hall, ground level, rear • 203.932.7332 www.newhaven.edu/student-life/accessibility-resources-center/index.php The Accessibility Resources Center (ARC) is responsible for and committed to providing services and support that promote access and educational equity for students with disabilities. The Center provides assistance with and information about issues of access and full participation for students with UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN STUDENT HANDBOOK REV. 1/12/2021

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disabilities, individuals with chronic health-related disorders and/or military service-related conditions. Any University of New Haven student who meets eligibility criteria can benefit from the services of the Center. ARC is staffed by a Director, an Assistant Director, an Accessibility Specialist, an Accessibility Services Coordinator, four Graduate Learning Assistants, and an Administrative Secretary. The Center provides the coordination of all classroom accommodations, weekly learning assistance appointments and limited tutoring, exam proctoring, electronic textbooks, assistive device loans, and assistive technology and training. Our professional staff serve as advocates and liaisons to ensure access to all offerings of the University including, but not limited to, academic, cultural, and recreational offerings. Staff is available to answer questions or provide assistance when the need arises. Complaints arising from matters related to disability should be brought to the attention of the Director of the Accessibility Resources Center and/or the Dean of Students.

Accessible Van Service General Description The Accessible Van Service is a free service available to students, faculty, staff and the general public. The service provides safe and timely campus transportation. Our accessible van is equipped with a manual wheelchair ramp and our drivers are trained in the use of this vehicle and the requirements for safe wheelchair accessibility. The Accessible Van Service gives priority to those passengers with temporary or permanent disabilities. Student passengers with permanent disabilities or temporary medical conditions must register through the Accessibility Resource Center (ARC). Employee passengers with permanent disabilities or temporary medical conditions must register through the Human Resources Office. All passengers must provide adequate documentation as required by either ARC or HR to use this service. Once registered, those requesting a pick-up must call University Police Dispatch at 203.932.7014. The accessible van will be available to individuals with disabilities on an as-needed basis. Once registered, there are two ways for passengers to arrange for pick-ups: You may either forward a list of pick-ups that will repeat on a weekly basis to Julie Carbonella, Public Safety Director of Operations via email at jcarbonella@newhaven.edu or you can call University Police Dispatch at 203.932.7014 to request a pick-up as needed during normal service hours. Pick-ups are available on a first-come, firstserved basis. Please contact the University Police Department for hours of operation 203.932.7014.

No Shows If a passenger does not show up at a pick-up location within five minutes of the designated time, the pickup is designated a “No-Show� and the AVS Van will leave for its next pick-up. If you then call needing a ride, please keep in mind that the van may not be able to return immediately.

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If a student passenger consistently No-Shows (two times or more in a week), the student will be referred to the Dean of Students which may result in suspension of van privileges. Employees that consistently No-Show (two times or more in a week) will receive a warning and referred to Human Resources which may result in suspension of van services. As a courtesy, please inform our dispatcher if you will not be needing any of your scheduled pick-ups, as it may prevent a fellow passenger from obtaining one.

Passenger/Driver Relations Drivers are expected to be polite and courteous to passengers and the same expectation applies to passengers utilizing this service. If you ever have any complaints about a driver’s behavior, please contact Julie Carbonella, Public Safety Director of Operations via email at jcarbonella@newhaven.edu. Van drivers are required to remain in the vehicle at all times and are only able to exit the van in order to open vehicle doors and deploy/retract the manual ramp for wheelchair passengers. Van drivers are not able to assist in loading persons or personal items onto the vehicle so please plan accordingly. Van drivers are required to wear seatbelts. Cellphone use and the use of tobacco products are strictly prohibited.

Questions If you have any questions about the service, please feel free to contact Julie Carbonella, Public Safety Director of Operations, via email at jcarbonella@newhaven.edu.

Health Services Sheffield Hall, ground level, facing the Quad • 203.932.7079 www.newhaven.edu/HealthServices

HOURS: Academic Year Only Monday – Thursday, 8:30 a.m. – 5:30 p.m. Friday 8:30 a.m. – 4:30 p.m. Unless otherwise posted Health Services provides initial care and diagnosis for minor injuries and illnesses and referral and followup care for more serious conditions. The office, in most cases, is the primary provider of on-campus medical care of students. Health Services also provides care and counseling in health-related matters. Health Services is open to ALL University students without charge. Staffing includes: registered nurses, a full-time administrative assistant, office coordinator, and nurse practitioners, as well as a part-time physician. We provide a daily medical clinic with a prescribing clinician. Clinician hours are posted each day. Appointments are required.

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2020-2021 – We strongly recommend that students obtain their Annual Flu Vaccine early in the season. Contact your Primary Medical Office, Local Pharmacy, Local Urgent Care Center to obtain the vaccine, you may also contact Health Services to inquire about clinics.

Walk-In Clinics/Urgent Care Centers In the event that the office is closed or on the weekend, there are several walk-in clinics/urgent care centers that may be utilized. Please contact the individual office pertaining to daily and weekend hours. Offices include: Stony Creek Urgent Care Orange 236 Boston Post Road, Orange, CT 203.815.1054 (evening and weekend hours available) DOCS Urgent Care 109 Boston Post Road, Orange, CT 203.298.4599 (evening and weekend hours available) DOCS Urgent Care 636 Campbell Ave., West Haven, CT 203.691.1584 (evening and weekend hours available) Milford Walk-in Center 831 Boston Post Road, Milford, CT 203.876.4101 (evening and weekend hours available) NorthEast Medical Group 500 Elm Street West Haven, CT 203.479.3600 COS ORTHO Walk-in 330 Boston Post Rd. Orange, CT 203.795.4784 (evening and weekend hours available) Dr. Umapathy 309 Main Street, West Haven, CT 203.933.4001 Internal Medicine of West Haven Dr. S. Gottiparthy 764 Campbell Ave., West Haven, CT UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN STUDENT HANDBOOK REV. 1/12/2021

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203.931.0034 203.931.0034 Planned Parenthood 345 Whitney Ave., New Haven, CT 203.503.0450

Hospitals Hospital Emergency Departments for acute health problems that cannot wait until morning. Yale New Haven Hospital 20 York St., New Haven, CT 203.688.2222 Yale New Haven Hospital, St. Raphael’s Campus 1450 Chapel St., New Haven, CT 203.789.3464 Milford Hospital 300 Seaside Ave., Milford, CT 203.876.4000

Dental Care If dental care is needed please contact Health Services during regular business hours at which time a listing of local dentists can be obtained, or visit the University of New Haven Dental Center.

Pharmacy There are several local pharmacies near the University including: CVS Pharmacy Orange Ave., West Haven CT (across from the University) 203.931.4543 Walgreens Campbell Ave., West Haven, CT 203.932.9311 Walgreens Boston Post Road, Orange, CT 203.795.6001 Stop and Shop Elm Street, West Haven, CT 203.931.9478

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RiteAid Elm Street, West Haven, CT 203.933.5260

Transportation Transportation to any of the urgent care centers is the responsibility of the student. Students may utilize private car, Connecticut Transit (public bus), or taxi cab (203.777.7777). If an ambulance is necessary for the transport due to severity of an illness or injury, patients will be taken directly to the emergency room. The University of New Haven Police will not transport any student for medical attention.

Student Health Insurance All full-time undergraduate students and all full-time international students are required to have health insurance. The University of New Haven offers student health insurance for those who do not have private insurance. Information about the University student health insurance program and the online waiver system for those who have private insurance can be located on the Bursar’s Office webpage. For specific questions regarding health insurance, please contact Health Services at 203.932.7079.

Medical Requirements Prior to Entering the University All students are required to show proof of the following immunizations prior to entering the University: a. Proof of two (2) MMR’s = measles/mumps/ rubella. The first injection after your first birthday (as long as the first injection is after 1/1/69 or thereafter) and a booster injection, or proof of immunity by blood test. b. Varicella (chickenpox): (1) two valid does of injection or (2) date of disease or (3) blood test proving immunity. c. Blood Test providing proof of immunity is also acceptable. d. All students living in campus housing must also provide documentation of a valid meningitis vaccine. Students will not be permitted to move into residence halls without providing proof of vaccination to Health Services. Note! Any meningitis vaccine given more than 5 years prior to arrival on campus, will require students to obtain a meningitis booster. e. A meningitis vaccination is also required of all University of New Haven athletes (even if they are not living on campus). f.

Athletes must also show Sickle Cell Testing Results according to compliancy with NCAA.

Medical Records Health Services maintains all medical records, which are confidential and cannot be released without the consent of the student.

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Students who are graduating or who leave the University may want to request their medical records. State law requires that the University keep medical files for a period of seven (7) years after a student has left the institution. After that time period, all records are destroyed. Please contact Health Services for further information regarding your medical records.

Excuse/Absence Policy Health Services does not routinely issue medical excuses/absence notes for confirmation of illness. The medical staff will provide a medical excuse/absence note only if the student was treated in the Health Services Office, and the student must have been absent from class for three (3) or more days for medical reasons. A student who is absent from class fewer than three (3) days for medical reasons should discuss the issue with his/her instructor or professor. If the instructor or professor requires a note for medical absence of fewer than 3 days, the instructor or professor must submit a written request on University letterhead to Health Services. The Health Services medical staff will not provide an absence note for illnesses or problems for which we never provided care. Students who received care for an illness or injury from a private physician, emergency room or clinic in the community, should request an excuse note from that medical provider. A copy of that note should also be provided to Health Services for filing purposes. Should you become ill and will be out of classes for several day – Complete the online Student Illness Notification Form – (www.newhaven.edu/illnessnotification). This form will be sent to Health Services to notify us of your illness or injury and our department will touch base with you to obtain additional information.

Long-Term Absences In the event of a long-term illness, a family emergency, death in the family, hospitalization, etc., students should contact the office. A staff member will then notify instructors/professors.

International Services 19 Ruden Street, Lower Level • 203.932.7475 www.newhaven.edu/iso The International Services Office advocates for and advises the international student population at the University on U.S. immigration and visa-related issues. In addition to federally required immigration services, the ISO provides information, resources, immigration guidance, tips, and advice that can help international students succeed. The office also supports and facilitates the transition of international students to the University community as they adapt to the U.S. educational system and the American culture in general. The ISO provides UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN STUDENT HANDBOOK REV. 1/12/2021

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orientations and workshops on topics of interest such as maintaining visa status, employment in F-1 status, adjusting to the U.S. educational system, health and wellness, practical matters, and Understanding American Culture. The ISO celebrates individuals in an intercultural environment and exposes the University of New Haven community to the international population through cultural celebrations like Saudi National Day, Diwali, Lunar New Year, Ramadan/Eid and the annual International Festival as well as other programs and events. Our overall vision is to foster global awareness throughout the university community. Our goals are to keep the students engaged through not only providing spaces and opportunities for them to come together and share aspects of their cultures but also to learn about American culture as an international student. A more detailed view of international student regulations is available on the ISO webpages in myCharger, but the three most important issues for international students are: • Keep visa documents up to date. If either the student’s passport or I-20 expires, they are in jeopardy. • International students may not work without proper authorization. The student visa strictly limits employment and working illegally is cause for deportation. Students should visit the ISO if they need employment authorization. • With few exceptions, the international student must always enroll full-time (12 credits undergrad, 9 credits grad). The student should communicate regularly with the ISO (read emails from the ISO) and then they should be OK. The student should communicate regularly with the ISO (read emails from the ISO) and then they should be OK. Students may feel free to discuss any questions or concerns with their international student advisors in the ISO, 19 Ruden Street, lower level.

Myatt Center for Diversity and Inclusion Gerber Hall, Level 1 • 203.932.7427 CDI@newhaven.edu http://www.newhaven.edu/student-life/diversity-inclusion/myatt-center.php The Myatt Center for Diversity and Inclusion assists the University in promoting cultural diversity, awareness, and sensitivity throughout the campus community. Its programs, services, and activities promote cultural identity and understanding within a multicultural environment. Staff members can assist students with finding information about scholarships, internships, student leadership conferences, and other events that may be of interest to specific populations of students (i.e. women, students of color, members of the LGBTQIA (Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer, Intersex, Asexual) community. The Myatt Center for Diversity and Inclusion presents activities and workshops and co-sponsors programs with departments such as the International Services Office, the Center for Student UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN STUDENT HANDBOOK REV. 1/12/2021

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Engagement, Leadership, and Orientation, the Office of Residential Life, and various recognized student organizations. Workshop opportunities include the University of No Hate workshop series and Safe Zone 101. Faculty department chairs are also welcome to email the Director directly to ask about workshops on culturally competent faculty, microaggressions and implicit bias in the classroom, and many other topics. If there’s a specific event you would like to see, please let us know! Leadership opportunities within the office include service as Diversity Peer Educators and student office assistants. The mission of the Diversity Peer Educators program is to generate a comfortable campus climate where students can accept themselves while discovering similarities and embracing differences within the community. They strive to serve as role models who challenge stereotypes and reject prejudices through advocacy, education and community building. Office assistants work with the Director to create and execute educational and social programming; work closely and cooperatively with staff, students and organizations toward the development of the office; and serve as informational resources for students.

Graduate Student Services Gatehouse, 100 • 203.479.4570 gradservices@newhaven.edu www.newhaven.edu/gradservices Visit our MyCharger Page under the Student Life Tab for more information Graduate Student Services is a convenient, one-stop office to meet graduate student needs. Staff members are happy to discuss any concerns or answer any questions students may have. Staff members can help connect students to any University department or office and are here to serve as your advocate and support system. The office is responsible for the oversight of graduate student orientation and plans numerous programs for graduate students including professional, academic, community service, and social programs such as our monthly Grad Night Outs. The office also provides a variety of opportunities for students to enhance their networking skills both in person and virtually. Additionally, every April the Office of Graduate Student Services organizes Graduate Student Appreciation Week, a week of programs and special promotions offered to our graduate student community. In addition to programming the Office of Graduate Student Services has numerous student leadership positions and opportunities for graduate students to get involved on campus. Every year the office selects a diverse group of graduate students to serve as “Go-Getters” on the Graduate Engagement Team. There are also opportunities for students to be involved as a Graduate Student Orientation Leader or to get involved with one of the many positions available on the Graduate Student Council (GSC) which includes executive board positions, senate positions, or graduate student committees.

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Career Development Center Bartels Student Activity Center, 103 • 203.479.4858 CareerDevelopmentCenter@newhaven.edu Visit us in myCharger under Student Life In support of the University’s experiential learning initiative, the mission of the Career Development Center is to inspire, educate, and prepare students and alumni to make informed decisions leading to life-long career success. Additionally, we focus on providing professional and proactive services to our community/employer partners. The Career Development Center provides complete career development services, resources, programs, and guidance to students through the integration of career development into academic, student life, and athletics, as well as stand-alone programming and events. We focus on educating students on potential major and career options, connecting with resources to learn about careers, preparing students for experiential opportunities, helping students learn from and leverage their experiences into marketable skills, and guiding them through the internship, job, and graduate school application process. Our career development professionals are educators first and foremost; we teach students the career development process including how to research options and make decisions, how to write their own resumes/cover letters, how to conduct a successful job search, and more, as these are lifelong skills required to navigate the global job market of today and tomorrow. Through partnerships across campus with faculty and staff, and by working closely with the Career Development Center from your first day here at the University until your last, we will guide you in the right direction and be there to assist in any career development-related endeavor. To maximize the resources of the Career Development Center, and to ensure you turn your academic career into a successful work career, follow the Four-Year Plan outlined below. Be sure to connect with the Career Development Center regularly to guide you through the process.

First Year (Getting Acquainted): • Engage with the Career Development Center during your SOAR experience. • Visit the Career Development Center and familiarize yourself with the resources and staff available to assist you. • Take the FOCUS Career Assessment program to assess your interests, skills, and work values to find majors and careers that fit you. Meet with a Career Advisor to interpret results and develop a personalized Career Action Plan. • Build your ChargerLink career profile to begin researching potential jobs and internships, and to begin connecting with employers. • Talk with faculty about career options in your major.

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• Get involved with student organizations, service-learning projects, residence life activities and community events that interest you. • Attend a Resume Writing workshop to learn the process and start and/or improve your resume. • Begin identifying and building the competencies most sought by employers and graduate students by engaging in a CLE initiative on campus. • Gain practical experience by getting a summer job related to your potential major or career interests. • Consider a summer elective internship to begin applying your classroom knowledge to the real world, and to begin exploring industries and careers that appeal to you. • Begin exploring internships and jobs; connect with a Career Advisor to learn about opportunities. Attend career and networking events on campus to learn about employers, career fields, and potential opportunities.

Second Year (Exploring Your Options): • Continue to explore your major and career goals by connecting with a Career Advisor. • Continue to build your ChargerLink career profile. • Begin researching potential jobs and internships. • Begin connecting with employers. • Research more information about your potential career field via the Career Development Center website, talking with faculty and staff, or meet with a Career Advisor to find resources. • Participate in job shadowing experiences and/or informational interviews with professionals who are working in careers that you are considering. Visit the CDC for opportunities. • Continue getting involved in extracurricular activities to develop leadership and collaborative skills. • Work with a Career Advisor in the Career Development Center to build a Personalized Career Action Plan — steps to take to achieve your goals. • Explore internship opportunities in your major area; undertake your first internship. • Attend Career Development workshops, programs, and events, or engage in require academic course sessions with CDC guest speakers/teachers. • Continue to develop and improve the competencies most sought by employers and graduate students by engaging in a CLE initiative on campus. • Attend career and networking events on campus to connect directly with alumni and employers for opportunities. UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN STUDENT HANDBOOK REV. 1/12/2021

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• Register for an Academic Service Learning course to connect your field of study with real life issues in the local community. • Begin planning for a Study Abroad trip — meet with the Study Abroad Office to learn of requirements — planning for a trip takes close to a year!

Third Year (Making Decisions): • Begin to narrow your career choices and meet with a Career Advisor for guidance and support as you make decisions. • Update your resume and cover letter; have them critiqued by Career Development staff. • Develop a Faculty-Mentored Research Project — see your academic advisor. • Secure an internship or part-time job in your career field — visit CDC for help. • Attend career and networking events on campus to connect directly with alumni and employers for opportunities. • Thinking about graduate school? Research programs and admissions requirements and discuss potential programs/schools with your faculty. Attend faculty and CDC programs/events on grad school prep including admissions tests and how to write a personal statement • Undertake your Study Abroad opportunity; learn how to communicate the experience in person and in writing (interviews and resume). • Undertake your second internship opportunity. • Attend Mock Interview events on campus to learn how to market yourself effectively to employers. • Attend Career Development workshops, programs, and events. • Continue to build your ChargerLink career profile to begin researching potential jobs and internships, and begin connecting with employers.

Fourth Year (Find Success): • Visit a Career Advisor in the early fall to discuss your goals and develop a plan for your job search. Begin your job search in early fall as this the heavy recruiting season for employers. • Continue to build your ChargerLink career profile to begin researching potential jobs and internships and begin connecting with employers. • Refine your resume and cover letters. • Participate in a mock interview with a Career Advisor to polish your interviewing skills. • Attend career fairs on campus and in your geographical area of interest.

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• Use several methods in your job search (networking, using the Internet, attending job fairs, etc.). Visit the CDC or attend Job Search Workshops for assistance. • If applicable, take graduate school admission test(s) and apply to graduate schools. • Intern! The best way to land a job is to be working your way to graduation. • Believe that your job search will be fruitful!

Residential Life Bixler Hall, First Floor • 203.932.7076 reslife@newhaven.edu www.newhaven.edu/student-life/residential-life/index.php The Office of Residential Life strives to create safe, supportive, inclusive, and engaged learning environments that enhance a student’s holistic development. It provides opportunities for students to create a community and implement a vision for their future. The Office of Residential Life is committed to co-creating a student-centered environment that values curiosity and discovery, thoughtful and creative expression, authentic and equitable relationships, a sense of belonging and pride, and advocacy for self and others.

Center for Student Engagement, Leadership and Orientation Bartels Hall, Level 4 • 203.479.4582 cselo@newhaven.edu www.newhaven.edu/cselo The Center for Student Engagement, Leadership and Orientation is responsible for initiating programs, activities, and services which serve the educational, social, and cultural needs of the University community. The office works cooperatively with the Undergraduate Student Government Association (USGA), Graduate Student Council (GSC), and other Recognized Student Organizations to coordinate and plan such programs and serves as the primary administrative liaison and advisor to the USGA, medias, and Greek organizations. Many student as well as major University programs are also coordinated through this office, including annual events such as Charge In, Welcome Week, Homecoming, Family Day, Spring Weekend, Senior Week, Commencement Ball, orientation programs, and the annual Awards Ceremony, at which the University recognizes students for outstanding academic achievement and contributions to the University community. The office coordinates Take Charge: the leadership development program. Programs can be tailored to meet the specific needs of the group and can range from workshops focusing on topics such as leadership styles, communication skills, time management, and motivation to team-building exercises.

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Recognized Student Organizations As a student at University of New Haven, you have the opportunity to enhance your University experience by participating in or leading a student organization. With a variety of interest areas, you can choose an already existing organization or start your own; the possibilities are endless. If you are interested in learning more about the Recognized Student Organizations, check out the CSELO website at www.newhaven.edu/cselo. You can access all the RSO Policies by visiting Charger Connection and opening the “RSO Handbook” under Campus Links. In the RSO Handbook, you will find policies for all Recognized Student Organizations as well as information including but not limited to the following: • Recognition for Student Organizations • Hazing • RSO Travel • Guidelines for Off-Campus Activities • Rental Vehicles • Fund-Raising on Campus • Off-Campus Bank Accounts • Solicitation on and off Campus • Request for University Funding • Lobby Tables • Car Washes • Programs/Events • Product Ordering • Digital Media Copyright

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Career Closet and Campus Pantry Ruden Street Building 19, Room 005 closetpantry@newhaven.edu The University of new Haven cares about its students.  In response to national trend of food insecurity amongst college students and the direct impact it has on our students, staff from the University of New Haven recognized the need and developed a plan to meet that need head on. The goal of these two campus resources is to provide support to current students in need of professional clothing, nonperishable food, and health & wellness products

STUDENT EMPLOYMENT OFFICE The Student Employment Office (SEO) is located in Bergami Hall to the left of Dunkin Donuts. We offer services to students who are seeking on-campus employment opportunities while attending the University or have already acquired an on-campus position. Our mission is to exude attentive, knowledgeable and courteous customer service while providing an efficient employment process for the campus community. Our primary responsibilities are: • to equip students and supervisors with student employment guidelines and procedures • promote employment opportunities for students • verify employment eligibility • regulate student employment practices • monitor compliance with federal and state employment regulations

INTERCOLLEGIATE ATHLETICS Charger Gymnasium • 203.932.7016 www.NewHavenChargers.com The University of New Haven has one of the most respected and successful NCAA Division II athletic programs in the country, with Charger teams combining to make over 135 post-season tournament appearances. The University is a member of the Northeast 10 Conference, one of the most prestigious and celebrated athletic conferences in the nation. Student-athletes have won numerous conferences, regional, and national awards, both athletically and academically. The University offers 17 varsity sports: baseball, men’s basketball, men’s cross country, football, men’s soccer, men’s indoor and outdoor track and field; women’s basketball, women’s cross country, women’s field hockey, women’s lacrosse, women’s soccer, softball, women’s tennis, women’s indoor and outdoor track and field, and women’s volleyball. UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN STUDENT HANDBOOK REV. 1/12/2021

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In 2019-20, prior to spring athletic seasons being cut short, Charger athletics put together strong seasons in their fall and winter sports. Football closed out the season with four straight wins to finish tied for best record in the NE10 Conference. Volleyball advanced to the NCAA East Regionals for the 14 th consecutive season. Men’s Soccer beat rival Southern Connecticut for the first time since 1984. Women’s Soccer received the Platinum Team Ethics and Sportsmanship award, one of only five teams in the country. Field Hockey set a new program record for wins in a season. Cross Country had two student-athletes earn allconference honors. Women’s Basketball finished the year with 18 wins and advanced to the NE10 tournament quarterfinals. Men’s Basketball made an incredible run through the NE10 tournament and advanced the championship game for the second straight season. For more information about all the Charger Athletic programs, follow us on Twitter (@UNHChargers) and Instagram (unhchargers).

Intercollegiate Athletic Facilities North Campus Charger Gymnasium is located on the North Campus and is home to the University of New Haven men’s and women’s basketball and volleyball programs. It also serves as a practice facility for University of New Haven’s other varsity athletic teams and as a gathering place for large University-wide events. The Charger Athletics Center includes a full-size basketball court with seating for 1,000, which saw the installation of a brand new floor and new bleachers during the summer of 2019. The building also houses the varsity athletic weight room, equipment room, administrative offices, and sports medicine facilities. Adjacent to the gymnasium are newly renovated tennis courts, a varsity softball field, Frank Vieira Field (baseball), and Kayo Field at Ralph F. DellaCamera Stadium, a multi-purpose field which is home to the Charger football and field hockey programs. The stadium includes newly installed blue and gold turf and a cutting-edge video display scoreboard.

Main Campus Kathy Zolad Stadium is located on the Main Campus, adjacent to the David A. Beckerman Recreation Center. In the summer of 2007 the field underwent a $1.3 million transformation which saw the installation of a synthetic turf surface, new scoreboard, bleachers, press box, and fencing. In 2019, the field was replaced with new turf and an updated Chargers logo at midfield. The field is home to the men’s and women’s soccer and women’s lacrosse programs and serves as a practice facility for all of the Chargers’ varsity athletic programs as well as Club Sports and RECSports.

RECREATION, FITNESS, AND INTRAMURALS Main Campus • 203.932.2965 www.newhaven.edu/ChargerRec ChargerREC’s mission is to engage the University of New Haven community in lifelong wellness, development, physical activity, and learning opportunities by providing comprehensive recreational programs, services, and facilities. ChargerREC encompasses the following programs and services: UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN STUDENT HANDBOOK REV. 1/12/2021

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Intramural Sports, GroupX Classes, Club Sports, Adventure Recreation, Massage Therapy, Personal Training, and Special Events and Programs.

Recreation Facilities The home of ChargerREC is the David A. Beckerman Recreation Center; a 56,600-square-foot student recreation center that features multi-purpose group fitness studios; weight room & fitness center; racquetball courts; hardwood activity courts (for basketball, volleyball, and badminton); a multi-activity court (for basketball, volleyball, indoor soccer, floor/roller hockey & various other activities); jogging track; juice bar; locker rooms (men’s, women’s & individual use) and lounge areas. In addition to the Beckerman Recreation Center, students have access to two turf fields (DellaCamera Stadium and Zolad Stadium) and the University of New Haven Tennis Courts. During the academic year, the Beckerman Recreation Center membership fee for all current full-time and part-time University of New Haven students is included in their tuition package. University of New Haven faculty, staff, alumni, and family members are eligible to purchase memberships. For more program information, hours, and policies, please visit our MyCharger Page at https://mycharger.newhaven.edu/web/mycharger/chargerrec.

BANKING SERVICES An Automated Teller Machine located near the Campus Bookstore and maintained by Wells Fargo Bank offers on-campus banking services. There are a number of banks in the New Haven area, and each has several locations. The banks have similar policies regarding cashing or bouncing checks. They cash checks only for people who have accounts with them. If you write a check without sufficient funds to cover it, you will be charged a fee. Some banks require a minimum balance in a checking account; others charge a fee for each check written. You will be charged the printing costs for checks imprinted with your name and local address.

BURSAR’S OFFICE Bergami Hall • 203.932.7220 onestop@newhaven.edu www.newhaven.edu/Bursar The Bursar’s Office is responsible for all aspects of tuition billing, payment processing, and refunds. The Bursar’s Office is located within the One Stop Student Financial and Registrar Services Office. The One Stop provides a centralized and efficient customer experience while assisting students and their families with their student billing, financial aid and registrar questions.

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All billing for tuition, fees, and room and board is processed electronically through ePay, the University’s online billing and payment system. Through ePay, you can access your tuition statement, view account activity, make a payment in a secure environment, and set up others to have similar access. In order for others (parents, grandparents, etc.) to discuss and access your tuition account, you must provide permission by registering those individuals to be authorized payers. Students (and any Authorized Payer) will receive an email notifying you when your bill is ready to be viewed. To make a payment on ePay, you can use your Visa, MasterCard, Discover, American Express, debit card or a U.S. checking or savings account. Please note a service fee applies to call credit and debit card payments. Payments can also be made in person via check or cash at the One Stop or via mail.

Monthly Payment Option As a convenience to our students, we are pleased to offer the option of making tuition payments on a monthly basis through Nelnet Campus Commerce (formerly Tuition Management Systems — TMS). The monthly payment option is an interest-free alternative to lump-sum payments that are due at billing time. This option allows you to spread out your payment for the academic year over a period of 10 months and can limit the amount of loan money you may need to borrow to meet the cost of education. The One Stop staff is prepared to answer questions about the plan as well. All University bills need to be paid by the published due date. If your payment is late, you will be assessed a late fee equal to 1% of your unpaid balance due. If your bill remains unpaid for one month or more, an administrative hold will be placed on your account. This administrative hold will prevent you from registering for future semesters, accessing or being issued your academic transcript, from being issued your diploma and from being allowed to participate in the room selection process with Residential Life. The administrative hold is only removed after the outstanding balance is paid in full. Should a bill remain outstanding for an extended period of time, the account will be referred to an outside collection agency and an additional collection fee will be added to the balance due. The student will be responsible for paying this additional fee. The account will also be reported to a national credit bureau.

Delinquent Student Account Policy Once a student is no longer active (i.e. not enrolled in a current or future term), the University will produce and mail a paper bill in an attempt to collect payment of a past due balance before being forwarded to a collection agency. All correspondences regarding a delinquent account will be mailed to the student’s most recent address on file in Banner. It is the student’s responsibility to maintain an accurate address with the University. If payment in full is not received by the established due date noted, the account will be referred to an external collection agency. Once this occurs, the student must contact the collection agency and work with them exclusively. The University will no longer be able to speak with the student because the account is under the control of the collection agency. Payment arrangements must be made directly with the collection agency, and the account holder is responsible for the additional fees associated with UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN STUDENT HANDBOOK REV. 1/12/2021

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collection efforts. In addition, collection agencies report delinquent tuition accounts to a national credit bureau. The University receives funds from the collection agency for all payments made during the prior month on or around the 10th of the following month. Once payment in full is received by the University from the collection agency, the financial hold on the account can be released. Consequentially, students will then have access to certain previously restricted University services such as viewing grades, requesting transcripts and receiving their diploma. However, if a student wishes to return to the University after being sent to a collection agency and subsequently paying their bill in full, the student must pay the University in advance for the next semester they wish to attend. Payment in advance can be an actual payment, proof of an approved student or parent loan, and/or a complete financial aid award that will cover the entire balance for the next semester the student wishes to attend. The monthly payment plan is not an option for advance payment. The collection agencies the University employs are: Allied Account Services 422 Bedford Ave Bellmore, NY 11710 800.486.2929 Collection Recovery Services 29 Regency Plaza Glen Mills, PA 19342 800.250.8206

Withdrawal From Classes The Course Withdrawal form is located in myCharger on the One Stop Student Financial and Registrar Services Page under Registrar Forms. Formal withdrawal must be completed during the first four weeks of the semester in order to obtain cancellation of tuition and fees according to the following schedule:

Fall/Spring Courses Percentage of Refund

Date of Withdrawal

100%

Before course begins

80%

1st week of semester

60%

2nd week of semester

40%

3rd week of semester

20%

4th week of semester

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0%

After 4th week of semester

Online Courses, Summer/Winter Intercession Courses and Mini Term Courses Percentage of Refund

Date of Withdrawal

100%

Before class begins

50%

1st week of semester

0%

After the first week of classes

A student who withdraws from the University is still accountable for contractual agreements with the Office of Residential Life and Dining Services. Room and meal charges are prorated based on the schedule above.

CAMPUS BOOKSTORE Main Campus • 203.932.7030 The Campus Bookstore, located near the Campus Center, is the main source for purchasing required course textbooks and academic supplies. Operated by Follett Higher Education Group, the Campus Bookstore also provides a full line of University of New Haven-imprinted clothing and merchandise, greeting cards, candy, stamps, gifts, and school and residence hall supplies. Information regarding the return of books is posted in the Campus Bookstore. Hours are posted on the website at: https://www.bkstr.com/newhavenstore/home.

FINANCIAL AID Bergami Hall • 203.932.7315 financialaid@newhaven.edu “How much will my education cost this year in dollars and cents? Where will I get the money? How can I reapply for the financial aid I will be receiving this year?” To be considered for University-awarded financial aid, all students must file a Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). In addition, students may be required to submit appropriate tax documents as part of their application. Information on all sources and types of financial assistance, including grants and scholarships, loans, graduate assistantships, and work study programs, is available directly through the office and on the University website. All students must reapply for financial aid each year. No aid sources are automatically renewed, and most require that application forms be submitted by January 1 for consideration for the following academic year. UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN STUDENT HANDBOOK REV. 1/12/2021

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Special Circumstances The FAFSA is based on prior year income information. If your family’s financial situation changes due to unemployment, death of a wage earner, divorce or separation, etc., you should notify the Financial Aid Office by completing a Special Circumstances Form (found in the Forms section of the online Financial Aid system) and all appropriate supporting documentation. Your circumstances will be reviewed to determine if changes should be made to your financial aid award. Submission of an appeal does NOT guarantee an adjustment to the student’s award.

Award Revisions It is the University of New Haven’s policy to award the most accurate financial aid package possible. The student is responsible for notifying the Financial Aid Office of any changes to his or her financial aid application. In addition, other University departments may provide information to the Financial Aid Office indicating a change. Please be advised that these changes may yield an adjustment to the student’s award. A revised award supersedes any previous award received. Some common reasons for revisions are: • We determine that inaccurate information was reported on the FAFSA • There are corrections or updates to the FAFSA following the completion of the Verification process • You have a change in Housing Status (for example, on-campus to living off-campus) • You change your Academic Status (for example, full-time to part-time) • You have a change in major, enrollment, credits taken, or have Satisfactory Academic Progress deficiencies (More information regarding academic progress is in the next section.). • You receive aid from other sources (for example, through local civic groups, the Division of Rehabilitation Services, State Scholarship Programs, Employee Tuition Remission, etc.) NOTE: The University makes every effort to fit your Outside Scholarships into your financial aid package. Outside Scholarships are awarded from civic groups, churches, businesses, high schools, etc. Outside Scholarships do NOT include: tuition exchange scholarships, any tuition remission benefits, vocational rehabilitation benefits, etc. These types of awards will be substituted dollar-for-dollar from any institutional grant, including merit scholarships. Contact us if you know you will be receiving an award like this so that we can advise you as quickly as possible as to how your financial aid award may be impacted

Financial Aid Refund Policy When students are entitled to a refund as a result of withdrawal from courses, refunds of charges and financial aid will be based on the institutional refund policy as described in the academic policies section UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN STUDENT HANDBOOK REV. 1/12/2021

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of the University catalog and on the Return of Title IV Funds calculation as required by Section 484B of the Higher Education Act. Federal regulations require that any unearned Title IV aid be returned to the program(s) that provided the funds.

Return of Title IV Funds A withdrawal requires the University to calculate the amount of unearned aid a student has received. The University must: • Determine the student’s official withdrawal date as documented in the Registrar’s Office. The withdrawal date is used to determine the percentage of the payment period completed and therefore the amount of aid a student earned. Students who have completed more than 60% of the term are not subject to the federal calculation. • Determine the amount of aid earned by the student. The University must calculate earned aid by multiplying the total aid disbursed or which could have been disbursed (excluding Federal Work Study) by the percent of the payment period the student completed. If less aid has been disbursed than a student has earned, then a post-withdrawal disbursement must be made. The University will notify the student or parent in writing within 30 days of the withdrawal date that a post-withdrawal disbursement is available. The student/parent must respond within 14 days of notification in order to receive the funds. The student/parent may accept all or part of the post-withdrawal disbursement. If more aid was disbursed than earned, then the University, the student, or both must return all unearned aid in a specific order: 1. Unsubsidized Direct Student Loans 2. Subsidized Direct Student Loans 3. Federal Direct PLUS Loans 4. Federal Pell Grants 5. Federal SEOG 6. Other Title IV assistance for which return of funds is required. Students are responsible for repaying all unearned aid a school is not required to return, as well as any balance created on their University Bursar account by the application of the Title IV return of funds formula. The University will notify the student in writing within 30 days of determining an overpayment. Students must repay as follows: • Loans: repayment according to terms of the loan • Grants: repayment is 50% of unearned grant.

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Students who owe Title IV grant repayments have 45 days to: • Repay in full • Make arrangements to repay the University • Make arrangements to repay the U.S. Department of Education. Students who fail to take positive action to repay their grant will be reported to the Department of Education and NSLDS immediately after the 45-day period has elapsed. Additional information and examples of refund calculations are available in the Financial Aid Office.

Academic Requirements for the Retention of Financial Aid Eligibility All students receiving financial aid must be making satisfactory academic progress (SAP) and be in good academic standing in order to be eligible to receive financial aid. In other words, you must earn a certain cumulative GPA (CGPA) and successfully earn 67% of the total credits you attempt (called pace). At the end of every academic year, we will check your academic transcript to make sure that you have achieved the required credits, CGPA, Pace, and are not on academic probation. If you do not make academic progress, then you will not be eligible to receive financial aid for the next school year until you are in good standing. A student can appeal their academic ineligibility in order to be granted financial aid despite academic deficiencies. The student must write a detailed letter explaining the extenuating circumstances (death, divorce, illness, etc.) that hindered them from making satisfactory progress. The letter must be accompanied by documentation of the extenuating circumstances (death certificates, doctor’s note, etc.), and explain what has changed that will allow the student to make satisfactory academic progress at the next evaluation period. A financial aid appeals committee made up of various members of the University community, including academic and administrative personnel, will meet to review the appeal letters. Decisions to reinstate eligibility or deny the appeal are made in a fair and equitable manner based on the information the student provided in the letter, the supporting documentation, and a review of the academic record. If the financial aid appeals committee approves the appeal, then the student will be awarded their financial aid package for one term following the appeal and will be considered on “Financial Aid probation.” After completion of that term, the student must meet the Satisfactory Academic Progress requirements to be eligible for aid for future terms. If the appeals committee upholds the loss of financial aid, then the student will need to make payment arrangements with the Bursar’s Office. In addition to achieving Pace and a specific CGPA, financial aid eligibility is limited to accumulated attempted credit hours totaling no more than 150% of the published credit hours required to receive an undergraduate degree. This is your maximum time frame for receiving financial aid. At all times throughout the students’ enrollment, federal regulations require schools to ensure that students are successfully completing 67% of the credits they are attempting to stay on track for graduating on time. UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN STUDENT HANDBOOK REV. 1/12/2021

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For example, a program that requires 120 credit hours x 1.5 = 180 maximum allowable credit hours attempted for financial aid eligibility. Every semester that you are enrolled in school will be counted, even the semesters when you do not receive financial aid. Transfer credits accepted by the University from other institutions will count as both hours attempted and hours completed towards the maximum credit hour limit. Students who have lost their merit scholarship(s), due to falling below the minimum QPR requirement may take summer classes at the University of New Haven in order to try and raise their QPR to the minimum standard. The QPR must be officially posted to the University of New Haven academic transcript prior to the first day of the fall term in order to have the merit award(s) reinstated. Otherwise the student will not have their academic record reviewed again until the following May.

UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN POLICE DEPARTMENT Campus Bookstore, Lower Level University of New Haven Emergency: 203.932.7070 Routine: 203.932.7014 Fire Department: 911 Ambulance: 911 West Haven Police Emergency: 911 www.newhaven.edu/police The University of New Haven Police Department is a fully sworn, accredited police department and is responsible for providing 24/7/365 police services to help ensure the personal safety of all University students, faculty, staff, and guests.

Law Enforcement The department provides law enforcement protection on the campus and enforces local, state, and federal laws. Criminal incidents are investigated when reported or discovered. You are encouraged to report any incidents to the University of New Haven Police Department as soon as they occur.

Safety Services The University of New Haven Police Department responds to emergencies, motor vehicle accidents, disputes, criminal complaints and personal injury accidents.

LiveSafe App All members of the campus community are encouraged to download the LiveSafe App associated with the University of New Haven. With the LiveSafe app, you have a fast and direct connection to the University of New Haven Police Department, twenty-four hours a day, seven days a week. Not just for emergencies, the app can help you — and us — be more pro-active in keeping everyone in our community safer. UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN STUDENT HANDBOOK REV. 1/12/2021

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Please note: LiveSafe replaces all previous public safety apps for the University of New Haven, and is available to both students and family members, as well as employees. 1. Download the app on your iPhone or Android. 2. Select "University of New Haven, Main Campus� as your affiliation. 3. Fill in your user profile. 4. You're set! Start using the app to stay safe every day.

Emergency Telephones Emergency telephone call boxes and blue phones are installed at key locations on campus for student safety. They may be found in parking lots including the Dental Hygiene and Echlin Hall lots, adjacent to the residence halls, at the North Campus, and elsewhere on campus. Students should familiarize themselves with their locations in the event that they need to use an emergency telephone. In case of emergency, the emergency telephone may be activated by pressing the black button on the front. A connection will be made to the University of New Haven Police Department. Once the phone is activated, there is a two-way connection which remains active, allowing the individual to speak with the dispatcher or monitor activity in the area of the telephone to be monitored by the University of New Haven Police Department. In addition, when activated, a blue strobe light will continually flash to further identify the location of the emergency and an officer will respond to the location of the emergency telephone. False activation of an emergency telephone has serious implications for student safety. Anyone involved in tampering with or falsely activating an emergency telephone will be subject to disciplinary action, a fine, possible expulsion from the University, and full prosecution under the laws of the State of Connecticut. Should a student witness a false activation of an emergency telephone, he or she should contact the University of New Haven Police immediately.

First Aid Immediate first aid is available to members of the University community and their guests by contacting the University Police Department or by calling 911.

Lost and Found If you find items of value in the buildings or on the grounds, please turn them in immediately to the University of New Haven Police Department. Students are urged to put their names on personal property, including textbooks. Serial numbers of items of value should also be recorded.

Protective or Restraining Orders Employees or students who obtain protective or restraining orders against another individual listing campus locations as protected areas, must provide a copy of the order to the University of New Haven Police Department and Human Resources. UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN STUDENT HANDBOOK REV. 1/12/2021

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Campus Security and Fire Safety Report In keeping with state and federal laws concerning campus safety and security, the University maintains information related to campus crime statistics and security measures and these are provided annually to all current students and employees. The data is also available upon request to all prospective students and their families. This information is available on the University of New Haven website, and a hard copy may be obtained free of charge at the University of New Haven Police Department.

STUDENT ID CARD/CAMPUS CARD Campus Card Office Campus Bookstore 8:30 a.m. – 5:30 p.m., some additional late hours available www.newhaven.edu/campuscard All students are issued a University of New Haven Campus Card. The card includes the following features: picture ID, 16-digit ISO number, proximity chip, access to online and in-house University of New Haven library services, and optional paid access to dining, vending, and third-party vendor services. All students are required to have a current Campus Card and must keep the card with them when on campus to identify themselves as a member of the University of New Haven community. Some events may require ID to be displayed to gain entry. Once issued, the card is valid for 4 years or until you leave the University. Upon leaving the University the card must be returned. Your card is issued at no charge; however, the lost/damaged card replacement cost is $20. Lost cards will be replaced by the Campus Card Office in the Campus Bookstore. Make lost/damaged card payment using Charger Cash to pay for a replacement card. Charger Cash can be used to make purchases at the University of New Haven Bookstore, the Post Office in Maxcy Hall, on-campus vending machines, and a number of local businesses including Subway, CVS, 7-Eleven, Dunkin Donuts and other locations. Your card should be treated as a debit card — if you lose secure possession of the card, report it immediately. The University is not responsible for funds lost as a result of the loss of your card. If the card is lost, login to the LMS and deactivate your card immediately using the eAccounts module or report the loss to the Campus Card office during business hours at 203.932.7062.

Adding Funds to Your Card There are three ways to add money to the Charger Cash account on your card. (This account works at all locations that take the card, including Dining Services.) You may add money to your card online. You must log in eAccounts (we recommend using the mobile app) to use this method and pay with a credit or debit card (Visa/MasterCard). Your parents can also make guest deposits this way. You may also a dd money to the card by using the add value machines (located in the Marvin K. Peterson Library). These machines take 1, 5, 10, and 20-dollar bills. Deposits may also be made by check to the Bursar’s Office. Payment by check is subject to verification of available funds.

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REGISTRAR’S OFFICE Bergami Hall • 203.932.7309 Email: registrar@newhaven.edu Location: One Stop Office, Bergami Hall Hours: Monday – Friday: 8:30 a.m. – 4:30 p.m. All academic transcript requests must include the student name (and previous name(s), if applicable), student identification number, dates of attendance, and signature of the student, plus the full street address, city, state, and zip code along with the name of the institution or third party to which the transcript will be sent.

Mailed Transcripts To submit a request through the University Registrar for your official transcript, download a Transcript Request Form (http://www.newhaven.edu/resources/documents/ academics/registrar/transcript-requestform.pdf) and submit for processing. Detailed information is available on the form. Transcripts processed through the University are free of charge and will be processed within 3-5 business days. Transcripts will be mailed to the address provided.

Expedited Mailed Transcripts and/or Electronic Transcripts For expedited services or to request an electronic version of your transcript, you may submit a request online at https://www.credentials-inc.com/CGI-BIN/dvcgitp.pgm?ALUMTRO001397. The University of New Haven has retained Credentials Inc. to accept transcript orders over the internet. Please click on the TranscriptsPlus link below to enter your order. If you are uncomfortable placing an order over the internet, you can call Credentials Inc. at 847.716.3005 to place your transcript request. There is an additional operator surcharge for placing orders over the telephone. Please keep in mind there will be additional fees for this option to meet your desired time frames. Please note a transcript request cannot be processed for any student who has a hold for any reason on their student record.

UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN DENTAL CENTER 419 Boston Post Road (next to Subway) • 203.931.6028 The University of New Haven Dental Center provides preventive dental hygiene (examination, x-rays, cleanings, patient education, fluoride treatments, dental sealants, and referral for continuing care) to students, other members of the University community, and the public. Students enrolled in the Dental Hygiene Program, under the guidance of licensed dental hygiene educators and dentists, provide these services. University of New Haven students receive preventive dental services at a reduced rate.

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Appointments may be made on Tuesdays and Thursdays during the fall semester and on Monday through Thursday during the spring semester and first summer session. For more information or to make an appointment, call the Dental Center at 203.931.6028.

VETERAN STUDENT SERVICES Veteran Student Center, (OASIS) Maxcy Hall, South Porch 2 • 203.931.2907 veteranservices@newhaven.edu

Military and Veteran Student Services Office and Veterans Representative Danielle Desjardins — Maxcy Hall 210D • 203.931.2909 DDesjardins@newhaven.edu You did your part for our country, now the University of New Haven wants to do its part for you. With the Military and Veteran Services Team at University of New Haven, you’ll have all the support you need to achieve your goals for the next phase of your life. Our programs will help you excel in the classroom, connect with other military affiliated students, and give you clear access to all the services and resources to which you are entitled. The Veteran Center offers a place for military affiliated students to gather between classes, use a computer and free printer, and learn about the plentiful resources available to veterans on campus and within the community. The Connecticut Department of Labor, Vocational Rehabilitation, and the New Haven Vet Center are available to meet students on campus to discuss these benefits and services.

VA Certifying Official John M Casarella — Registrar’s Office, Bergami Hall • 203.932.7388 JCasarella@newhaven.edu The University is approved by the State Board of Higher Education for the education of veterans, and those receiving VA educational benefits, under the provisions of United States Code 89358. University of New Haven students who are veterans or are receiving VA educational benefits, should contact the VA Certifying Official (SCO) prior to enrolling and before the beginning of each semester to confirm enrollment information. It is important that the SCO has the VA required documentation to facilitate enrollment certification. This process will expedite processing under the educational program.

ROTC Army ROTC (Reserve Officers’ Training Corps) is an engaging and immersive course of study offered at the University of New Haven. It provides unparalleled leadership training that prepares students for success in any career field. Students will participate in physical training, classroom instruction, UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN STUDENT HANDBOOK REV. 1/12/2021

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leadership lab experiences, and field training exercises in order to learn leadership lessons not taught anywhere else. These lessons set students apart, physically and mentally, as well as develop them into confident and competent leaders. Upon completion of the program the students are prepared to commission as Second Lieutenants (2LT) in the U.S. Army. They can serve in a myriad of branches (occupational specialties) across the Active Duty Army, U.S. Army reserve, and Army National Guard. The AFROTC (Air Force Reserve Officers Training Corps) program is available to University of New Haven students at Yale University’s main campus in New Haven. Through the AFROTC program, University of New Haven students, without paying extra tuition, can pursue a commission as an officer in the United States Air Force. The freshman and sophomore courses carry no military obligation and are open to all students. Scholarships are also available for qualified students. These scholarships pay up to full tuition and fees, as well as money for books and a monthly tax-free stipend.

ACADEMIC POLICIES AND REGULATIONS No one expects you to memorize every policy, but you should be familiar with what is here. You may run into a situation in which you’ll need to follow procedures outlined in this section. In considering the role of students in institutional governance, the University is guided by one overriding principle — namely, that individuals who are directly affected by decisions should have the opportunity to participate appropriately in making those decisions. At the University of New Haven, students are represented on all major committees of governance. In addition, opportunities for collective expression are available through the Undergraduate Student Government Association, Evening Student Council, Graduate Student Council, and residence hall councils. The University may, at its’ discretion, alter the method classes are delivered for any reason at any time. This amended delivery can include, but is not limited to, online classes, hybrid classes, and on ground classes.

Family Rights and Privacy Act The University of New Haven collects and retains information about students for designated periods of time for the express purpose of facilitating each student’s educational development. The University recognizes the privacy rights of individuals in controlling what information about them may be disclosed and, at the same time, attempts to balance those rights with the institution’s need for information relevant to the fulfillment of its educational mission. The University also recognizes its obligation to inform students of the existence and location of records, to explain the purpose of obtaining such information, to provide security for it, to give students access to their records, and to permit students to challenge them when compelling reasons for their retention no longer exist. UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN STUDENT HANDBOOK REV. 1/12/2021

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No information from records, files, and data directly related to a student shall be disclosed by any means (including telephone) to individuals or agencies outside the University without the written consent of the student, except pursuant to lawful subpoena or court order or, in the case of specifically designated officials, as required by the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974. Information contained in such records originating at another institution will also be subject to these policies. {See the subsequent section entitled “Disclosure of Information to Third Parties.”}

Definition of Public Records Involving Students The University is responsible for effectively supervising any access to and/or release of official directory information about students in connection with University commencements, Dean’s List announcements, scholarship presentations, athletic contests, or other University-related news stories, the Public Affairs Office may have occasion to release information about a student. At its discretion, the institution may provide the following directory information regarding students without their consent: name, address (local and permanent); telephone number; email address; date and place of birth; major; student activities including athletics; weight and height (of athletic team members); dates of attendance; date of graduation; degrees, honors, and awards received and where received; most recent educational institution attended; photographs; and the names and addresses of parents, guardians, or spouses. Such information is considered part of the public record of the student’s attendance. As part of the admission application process, the student may request that any of this information not be made public. Such a request may also be made in writing to the Marketing and Communications Office and shall remain in effect until revoked by the student in writing to the Marketing and Communications Office.

Definition of Student Records Student educational records are defined as those records, files, documents, and other materials that contain information directly related to a student and maintained by the University of New Haven or by a person acting for the University pursuant to University policy. Student educational records do not include records of instructional, supervisory or administrative personnel, and ancillary educational personnel, if these records are in the sole possession of the maker and are not accessible or revealed to any other person except a substitute. Other exclusions include: • Notes of a professor/staff member concerning a student and intended for the professor’s/staff member’s own use and so not subject to inspection, disclosure, and challenge. • Records of the University Police Department, except in those instances where they are transmitted within the University administrative process.

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• Records relating to an individual who is employed by an educational agency or institution that are made and maintained in the normal course of business, relate exclusively to the individual in the individual’s capacity as an employee, and are not available for use for any other purpose. • Students’ records in the Financial Aid Office that are reported by parents and/or other agencies are also not subject to inspection. Students’ records made or maintained by a physician, psychiatrist, psychologist, or other recognized professional or paraprofessional acting or assisting in that capacity are not subject to the provisions of access, disclosure, and challenge. Such records, however, must be made, maintained, or used only in connection with the provisions of treatment of the student and not be available to anyone other than the persons providing such treatment or a substitute.

Confidentiality of Student Records Students are required to update their FERPA contact information annually regardless of whether or not they choose to release your records. Students are emailed at the beginning of the fall semester with information and the link to make the update. The link is also available in myCharger on both the Student Resources and One Stop Student Financial and Registrar Services pages.

Location of Student Academic and Financial Aid Records Academic records of currently enrolled University of New Haven students are maintained by the Registrar’s Office, located in Bergami Hall. Academic records include, but are not necessarily limited to, the following basic items: admissions application, acceptance letter, high school transcript, former college transcripts, grade/program changes, and course substitutions. Also included may be correspondence from academic departments as it relates to a student’s program of study. Students may have access to their records, as well as the right to review and the opportunity to challenge the content of their records, as defined in the section on Disclosure. Inspection and review of academic records are possible with a written, dated request to the Registrar, who is responsible for controlling access to and disclosure of student educational records.

Financial Aid Records Financial aid records for all students in all divisions of the University are maintained by the Financial Aid Office, located in Bergami Hall. Records include University applications for financial aid, financial statements submitted directly or through processing agents, tax documents, letters to and from students and parents concerning financial aid applications, letters to and from students concerning financial aid award decisions, and some loan documents. Student employment records are maintained by the Student Employment Office; however, payroll records are maintained both by the Student Employment Office and the Payroll Office, which is located in Bergami Hall.

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Policies on Disclosure of Student Records Letters of recommendation and other information obtained or prepared before January 1, 1975, which were written on the assumption or express promise of confidentiality to the authors, will not be available for inspection, disclosure, or challenge. Letters of recommendation and other information written and/or compiled after January 1, 1975, are available to students in accordance with the following guidelines.

Disclosure to the Student The student has the right to inspect — in the presence of a staff member — official University records, files, and data primarily directed to himself/herself. The right includes any explanation of any information contained in these sources. The student is entitled to such rights within 45 calendar days after making his/her written request to the appropriate University office. The opportunity to inspect and review records will be confined to normal business hours of the University. Educational records of the student will not be released to the student, his/her parents, or any third party so long as a financial indebtedness or serious academic and/or disciplinary matter involving the student remains unresolved. This does not preclude the student from having personal access to the records, merely from obtaining the release of the information. Students may not have access to confidential financial statements of parents or to any information contained in such statements.

Disclosure of Information to Third Parties Disclosure of information contained in student records, files, and data is normally controlled by the student. Disclosure to others (including parents or guardians) of student academic information or disciplinary action requires a prior release from the affected student. Such a release should be obtained using the standard University of New Haven form found in myCharger. The party receiving access to the records is to be reminded that he/she should not permit access to the information by an additional person without further written consent of the student prior to such an additional transfer of information.

Disclosure to Other Educational Institutions Disclosure of appropriate academic records may be made to officials of other educational institutions to which the student has applied and where he/she intends to enroll. The student must provide written authorization.

Disclosure Pursuant to Judicial Order Information concerning a student shall be released if properly subpoenaed for a judicial, legislative, or administrative proceeding. An effort will be made to give advance notice to the student of such an order before compliance by the University.

Disclosure to Federal and State Authorities The policy shall not preclude access to student records by authorized federal and state officials in connection with the audit and evaluation of federally supported education programs or with enforcement of federal and state legal requirements which relate to such programs.

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Disclosure Under Emergency Conditions On an emergency basis, information about a student may be released by a designated official of the University when that information is necessary to protect the health or safety of a student. Disclosure to Educational Agencies or Institutions Information which will not permit the individual identification of students may be released to educational agencies or institutions for the purpose of developing, validating, and administering predictive tests and measurements. Similarly, information may be released to accrediting organizations in order for them to carry out their accrediting functions. Disclosure to Parents or Guardians of Dependent Students See the previous section entitled “Disclosure of Information to Third Parties.”

Challenge of Record Entry The student is entitled to challenge and/or add to the actual basis of any record entry contained in records, files, and/or data. The purpose of this challenge entitlement is to ensure that entries are not inaccurate or misleading, or in violation of his/her privacy or other rights as a student, and to provide an opportunity for the correction or deletion of any inaccuracies or misleading, inappropriate data contained therein. The substantive judgment of a faculty member about a student’s work, expressed in grades and/or evaluations, is not within the purview of this right to challenge. A student may request a hearing to challenge the content of his/her record(s). The request should be submitted to the appropriate University officer under whose jurisdiction the disputed material falls. The designated officer will allow the student to submit to his/her record(s) a statement commenting upon the challenged information. The contents of the student’s challenge will remain in the student’s records regardless of the outcome of any challenge. If a record entry question has not been satisfactorily resolved by this informal procedure, the student is entitled to request a hearing on the matter. The hearing must be held within a reasonable period of time, and the student shall be given sufficient notice of the time, date, and location of said hearing. A hearing officer will be designated by the Dean of Students, and the student will be given a full and fair opportunity to present evidence relevant to the validity of the record entry. The student will be furnished, within a reasonable time following the hearing, with a written decision from the designated hearing officer. An adverse decision may be appealed in writing by the student to the Provost and, finally, to the President of the University.

Notification of Social Security Number Collection and Use Public Act No. 08-167 is specifically designed to protect the confidentiality of Social Security Numbers (SSNs) and requires other personal information to be safeguarded against misuse. In compliance with this Connecticut state law, the University of New Haven issues this notification regarding the purpose for the collection and use of Social Security Numbers.

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The University collects SSNs to perform specific duties and tasks necessary to the College. The University is required to report to the Internal Revenue Service the name, address, and SSN of any person from whom tuition and related payments are received. Collection, access, and use of Social Security Numbers are limited to the following departments, which will carefully safeguard the information: Admissions, Registrar, Financial Aid, Bursar’s Office, Business Office, and Payroll. Like other private data, SSNs will be stored in a secure manner, and will not be stored on portable storage devices, and will be shredded before discarding. SSNs will not be used as identification numbers on student ID cards or elsewhere and will not be required to access an unsecure internet or website. All Social Security Numbers are protected by federal regulations and are not released to unauthorized parties or disclosed unlawfully.

Student Declaration of Current Residence and/or Relocation In accordance with federal regulations the University of New Haven will follow all guidelines to determine students’ location throughout their enrollment. The addresses that students enter on their formal application to the University will be the initial determinant of a student’s location. Thereafter, the University will require all students to verify both a current local address of where the student will be physically located during the current year and a permanent home address. Students who subsequently relocate or change addresses must update their student record with the new location information within 10 days of the change of address. Please follow directions below to update information. Important note if relocating during the course of a program: Students who are matriculated in an academic program that may allow them to pursue professional licensure or certification should keep in mind that licensing and certification requirements vary by state and that relocating during the course of a program to another state could impact whether that student can meet the eligibility requirements of that state. If students are considering relocating, they should contact their program advisor or department chair to check for licensure or certification eligibility requirements.

Change of Address If you change your permanent home address, the following instructions should be followed: Step 1: Log into MyCharger and click on the SSB icon. Step 2: Click on Personal Information Step 3: Click on Update Address and Phones

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Step 4: Click on the “Current” link and update your information. Then, click Submit. To create a new address, click on the down arrow in the box located next to “Type of Address to Insert” and select type of new address.

Attendance Policies Religious Observance Policy for Students The University of New Haven respects the right of its students to observe religious holidays that may necessitate their absence from class or from other required University-sponsored activities. Students who wish to observe such holidays should not be penalized for their absence although, in academic courses, they are responsible for making up missed work. Instructors should try to avoid scheduling exams or quizzes on religious holidays, but where such conflicts occur, should provide reasonable accommodations for missed assignment deadlines or exams. If a class, an assignment due date, or exam interferes with the observance of such a religious holiday, it is the student’s responsibility to notify his or her instructor, preferably at the beginning of the term, but otherwise at least two weeks before the holiday. In a similar vein, students who will not participate in other required activities due to religious observance should notify the staff or faculty member who oversees the program with the same lead-time. Although this policy appears in the Student Handbook, all course syllabi should refer to this policy so that students are aware of their rights. Should a student feel his or her right to observe a religious holiday was violated, the student has a right to appeal through the student grievance procedure which is found in the Student Handbook. There should no prejudicial effect for a student who avails him/herself of the policy.

Attendance Regulations Students are expected to attend regularly and promptly all their classes, appointments, and exercises. Faculty have the right to require a standard of attendance, even if it conflicts with professional and jobrelated responsibilities of students. Students whose jobs require that they be absent from class must realize that it is their responsibility to determine whether such absence is permitted by the instructor, and to meet the requirements for making up missed classes if the instructor allows such time to be made up. The instructor has the right to dismiss from class any student who has been absent more than two weeks (pro-rated for terms different from that of the semester). A dismissed student will receive a withdrawal (W) from the course if they are still eligible for a withdrawal per the university “Withdrawal from a Course” policy, or a failure (F) if not. Students will be removed from any/all classes at the end of the registration period if they have not been attending. Residential students who are not attending classes will be asked to leave their residence hall and will be responsible for the associated cost of their time on campus. A student who is not officially registered in the course is not permitted to attend classes or take part in any other course activities. UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN STUDENT HANDBOOK REV. 1/12/2021

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In the case of religious observance, students seeking an accommodation should consult with their instructor. The university’s policy regarding observance of religious holidays appears in the Student Handbook.

Resolution of Student Classroom Problems Matters dealing with course grades should be handled between the student and his/her instructor. Occasionally students are confronted with classroom situations that may cause concern. Resolution of most problems may be achieved by discussing the matter with the instructor directly, which the student should do first. If the issue is not resolved at this level, please refer to “How to File a Grievance” in the University Policies section of this handbook. Matters related to classroom disruptions should first be handled between the student and the faculty member. If issues cannot be resolved after an appropriate and timely dialogue, concerns may be forwarded to the Dean of Students Office for disciplinary review.

Undergraduate Academic Standards Class Standing Academic class standing is determined by the total number of credits successfully completed (including transfer credit awarded) as follows: 1–26 hours

First-Year

27–56 hours

Sophomore

57–86 hours

Junior

87+ hours

Senior

Leave of Absence Policy Undergraduate matriculated students may interrupt continuous enrollment by electing to take a leave of absence from the University for medical or personal reasons. Before taking a leave of absence, students are encouraged to discuss their particular situation with an academic adviser, the dean of their school, an academic skills counselor in the Office of Academic Services, or a counselor in the Counseling Center. The policies regarding leaves of absence are as follows: 1. A Leave of Absence from the University form must be submitted on or before the first day of classes Students must file for a leave of absence through the Registrar’s Office or the Office of Academic Services. 2. Students who are on University disciplinary probation are not eligible for a leave of absence. UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN STUDENT HANDBOOK REV. 1/12/2021

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3. A student who has been dropped or dismissed from the University for disciplinary or academic reasons is not eligible for a leave of absence until properly reinstated. 4. A student who has withdrawn as a degree candidate is not eligible for a leave of absence. If a student withdraws while on leave of absence, the leave is invalidated. 5. Leaves of absence are not required or granted for intersession or summer terms. 6. Normally, leaves are not approved for a period longer than two semesters. Under special extraordinary circumstances, usually medical in nature, a leave of absence may be approved for a maximum of four semesters or two years. 7. A student who wishes to return later than the semester originally stated on the leave of absence form must notify the Registrar’s Office that they will extend the leave of absence, not to exceed the maximum period as outlined above. 8. Taking a leave of absence may affect a student’s financial aid. Students receiving financial aid are encouraged to contact the Financial Aid Office before taking a leave of absence. 9. A student who fulfills the conditions of an approved leave of absence may return to the University and register for classes without applying for readmission; such students may preregister for the semester in which they plan to return. 10. A student who does not apply for an extension or who exceeds the maximum period but wishes to return to the university must file a Resumption of Studies application. Upon successful approval from the chair of the department (or designee) in which the student’s major is housed, the student may register for classes. 11. International students must contact the International Services Office to discuss the necessary actions to their SEVIS records in order to maintain F-1 or J-1 visa status during their leave of absence. All students receiving financial aid should contact the Financial Aid Office, and residential students should contact the Residential Life Office, before taking a leave of absence.

Withdrawal from the University Undergraduate Students An undergraduate student who wants to withdraw from the University should consult with a representative from Centers for Academic Success and Advising (CASA) to discuss the withdrawal and make a preliminary evaluation of readmission possibilities. Once the decision in consultation with CASA is made, the student should complete the official University Withdrawal form and submit it to the Office of the University Registrar. Students who are withdrawing are advised that:

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Students who withdraw are subject to prorated tuition and fee charges based on the last date of attendance in classes and according to the established withdrawal policy (see academic calendar for withdrawal deadlines and refund percentages if applicable) of the Bursar’s Office. 1. Students who withdraw from the University and have their tuition prorated according to the established withdrawal policy will be graded with a “W” for each registered course. 2. Students must withdraw from the University prior to the Final Examination period. 3. Resumption of studies will require approval of the chair of the department (or designee) in which the student’s major is housed. 4. Students resuming studies at the University after a withdrawal may continue with their original degree requirements or may be required to transition to the academic requirements in effect at the time of resumption. This choice may depend on changes that have occurred at the Connecticut Office of Higher Education, accrediting agencies, or where applicable laws have changed. Some courses that were taken at the University longer than five years prior to the resumption date may need to be approved by the chair of the department (or designee) in which the student’s major is housed. 5. International students should be aware that withdrawal from the University will affect their F-1 or J-1 visa status, and must contact the International Services Office to discuss their options.

Graduate Students A graduate student who wants to withdraw from the University should consult with a representative from Centers for Academic Success and Advising (CASA) to discuss the withdrawal and make a preliminary evaluation of readmission possibilities. Once the decision in consultation with CASA is made, the student should complete the official University Withdrawal Form and submit it to the Office of the University Registrar. Students who are withdrawing are advised that: 1. Students who withdraw are subject to prorated tuition and fee charges based on the last date of attendance in classes and according to the established withdrawal policy (see academic calendar for withdrawal deadlines and refund percentages if applicable) of the Bursar’s Office. 2. Students who withdraw from the University and have their tuition prorated according to the established withdrawal policy will be graded with a “W” for each registered course. 3. Students must withdraw from the University prior to the Final Examination period. 4. Resumption of studies at a later date is not automatic. An application for resumption of studies must be made to the Office of the Registrar. 5. Students readmitted to the University after a withdrawal are held to the academic requirements in effect in the catalog at the time of readmission. Courses that were taken at the University longer than five years prior to the readmission date may not apply to a current degree program. You are advised to speak to the Academic Department as to the validity of those course credits. UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN STUDENT HANDBOOK REV. 1/12/2021

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6. International students should be aware that withdrawal from the University will affect their F-1 or J-1 visa status and must contact the International Services Office to discuss their options.

Withdrawal Dates and Percentage of Charges for Undergraduate and Graduate Students Date of Withdrawal*

Percentage Charged

Transcript

Pre-registration period through the first day of classes

0%

Dropped — No Grade

Second day of classes through the end of the first week

20%

W grade on transcript

Through the end of second week of classes

40%

W grade on transcript

Through the end of third week of classes

60%

W grade on transcript

Through the end of fourth week of classes

80%

W grade on transcript

From the fifth week of classes to end of term

100%

W grade on transcript

*Consult the Academic Calendar on the University of New Haven website for term specific deadline dates.

Full-time Students Withdrawals from the University are processed by the Registrar’s Office Formal withdrawal from the University prior to submission by faculty of any final course grades will result in no grades recorded on the student’s transcript for the academic period for which the withdrawal is declared. Formal withdrawal must be completed during the first four weeks of the semester in order to obtain cancellation of tuition and fees according to the following schedule: Percentage of Refund 100%

Date of Withdrawal Before course begins

80%

1st week of semester

60%

2nd week of semester

40%

3rd week of semester

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20%

4th week of semester

0%

After 4th week of semester

A student who withdraws from the University is still accountable for contractual agreements with the Office of Residential Life and Dining Services. Thus, all residential students should contact the Residential Life Office before withdrawing, and all Meal Plan students should contact the Dining Services Office. Because of the serious ramifications of formal withdrawal from the University, students contemplating this action should discuss the matter with their advisor or a counselor as soon as problems are perceived. All students who subsequently decide to withdraw must initiate a formal withdrawal as described above. If a student wishes to return to the University after having withdrawn and at least one semester has elapsed, the student must reapply to the University through the Undergraduate Admissions Office.

Part-time Students Tuition and fees are refunded in full when the class for which enrollment was submitted is full, the class is cancelled by the University, or the University rejects the enrollment application failing grade, it is the responsibility of the student to request a “W” (Withdrawal) directly from the instructor. A formal refund request must be initiated in writing at the time that a course is dropped and submitted to the Bursar’s Office. A student may drop a course through the self-service registration system or by completion of a drop card submitted to the Registrar’s Office. Tuition is refunded according to the following scale: Percentage of Refund 100%

Date of Withdrawal Before course begins

80%

1st week of semester

60%

2nd week of semester

40%

3rd week of semester

20%

4th week of semester

0%

After 4th week of semester

Students may elect to have their tuition refund credited toward their next semester or term at University of New Haven. All refund requests must be initiated in writing BEFORE THE END OF THE FOURTH WEEK. This refund policy does not apply to Summer and intersession terms. Students desiring to formally withdraw from a course may do so by the last date to drop a course as published in the Academic Calendar. Formal withdrawal removes the student’s name from the course roster and removes the course enrollment from the student’s transcript. Formal withdrawal from a course may be initiated through a

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course drop via the self-service registration system or by completion of a drop card submitted to the Registrar’s Office no later than the published last date to drop. Students who elect to stop attending a course after the last date to drop will remain on the course roster, and the course enrollment will remain on the student’s transcript. To avoid the possibility of receiving a failing grade, it is the responsibility of the student to request a “W” (Withdrawal) directly from the instructor.

Graduate Students To be eligible for a refund of tuition, students must notify the Registrar’s Office in writing of their intention to withdraw. Withdrawal notification may be submitted to the Registrar’s Office by mail or in person. The date of the postmark on the mailed written notice, or the date of submission for those brought in person, will determine the amount of refund, if any, due the student. If a refund is due, students must indicate whether the refund should be issued directly (refunds are issued in the same form as the original payment) or credited to their University of New Haven account. The refund policy for graduate students who withdraw from any course or from any program is as follows: Percentage of Refund

Date of Withdrawal

100%

Before course begins

80%

1st week of semester

60%

2nd week of semester

40%

3rd week of semester

20%

4th week of semester

0%

After 4th week of semester

No refunds will be made for courses taken and subsequently waived. Refunds may require several weeks to process.

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CODE OF CONDUCT UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN STUDENT CODE OF CONDUCT

I. Value Statement The educational process is ideally conducted in an environment that encourages reasoned discourse, intellectual honesty, openness to constructive change, and respect for the rights of all individuals. The Student Code of Conduct is designed for the promotion and protection of such an environment at the University of New Haven.

II. Charger Compact As a University community, there are values and expectations that we all share which provide the framework for how we interact as individual members of the community and speak to who we are and what we stand for as a community. As a Member of the University of New Haven Community: 1. I will strive for academic excellence. Striving for academic excellence means developing ways to motivate myself to reach my full academic potential, taking full advantage of University resources, and seeking experiential education opportunities to maximize my learning. 2. I will assume responsibility for my words, actions and inaction. Assuming responsibility for my words, actions and inactions means considering consequences before acting, resolving issues in a non-violent manner, holding myself and others accountable for choices made and reflecting on my mistakes. 3. I will respect the dignity, rights and property of all persons. Respecting the dignity, rights and property of all persons means ensuring that my actions reflect an appreciation for the uniqueness of all community members as well as a respect for individual and community property. 4. I will strive to appreciate, respect and learn from others whose experiences and opinions are different from mine. Striving to appreciate and learn from others whose experiences and opinions are different from mine means actively seeking opportunities to exchange ideas and personal histories with others. 5. I will conduct my academic and personal life with integrity. Conducting my academic and personal life with integrity means authentically representing myself through my words and actions. 6. I will strive to contribute positively to the campus, local and global communities. Striving to contribute positively to the campus, local and global communities means committing to being a proactive contributor whose community engagement reflects the goal of creating a better UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN STUDENT HANDBOOK REV. 1/12/2021

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present and future for all.

III. Philosophy The University embraces the philosophy that personal and academic freedom must be preserved and recognizes that the exercise of individual rights must be accompanied by an equal responsibility to assure that the same rights are not denied to others. By accepting membership in the University community, a student acquires the rights as well as the responsibilities of that community. The University’s approach to student discipline is an educative and proactive one, to ensure the safety and security of all University community members. Discipline is the concern of the entire University community: student body, faculty, administration, and staff. Acting in the belief that representative student groups should share responsibility with other University personnel for administering campus policies and regulations, the University allows provisions in its disciplinary process for student involvement in the resolution of student conduct matters.

IV. Authority University students are recognized as being both citizens in the larger community and members of an academic community. In their roles as citizens, students are free to exercise their fundamental constitutional rights. Rights and responsibilities under local, state, and federal laws are neither abridged nor extended by status as a student at the University of New Haven. However, as members of the academic community, students are expected to fulfill all responsibilities, which accompany their membership. When the educational purpose of the institution is affected by the conduct of students, the University must exercise its disciplinary responsibilities in accordance with the authority of the Board of Governors of the University of New Haven and local, state, and federal laws. The administration of discipline for all students at the University is under the leadership of the Dean of Students, who shall: 1. Determine the composition of Student Conduct Boards and Appeals Review Boards. 2. Determine whether the Student Conduct Board or Appeals Review Board should review cases. 3. Develop policies for the administration of the student conduct system and procedural rules for the conduct of the Student Conduct Board Hearings and the Appeals Review Board that are not inconsistent with provisions in the Student Code of Conduct. Decisions made by the Student Conduct Board and/or Student Conduct Administrator shall be final, pending the normal appeal process. In the case of an appeal, the decision of the Appeals Review Board shall be final.

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V. Jurisdiction The University of New Haven Student Code of Conduct shall apply to conduct that occurs on University premises, at University-sponsored activities, online, and off-campus. Each student shall be responsible for his/her conduct from the time of application for admission through the actual awarding of a degree, including without limitation conduct that may occur before classes begin or after classes end, as well as during the academic year and during periods between terms of actual enrollment, and conduct that is not discovered until after a degree is awarded. The Student Code of Conduct shall apply to a student’s conduct even if the student withdraws from school while a disciplinary matter is pending. When students are alleged to have violated a law of the local community, state, or nation, the University will not request special consideration for those individuals because of their status as members of the University community. The office of the Dean of Students is available to inform students of sources of legal and other appropriate assistance. It should be noted that unlawful acts, civil or criminal, committed off or on campus are inconsistent with University standards and educational goals. Students who are alleged to have committed, or have been convicted of committing, such acts may be subject to suspension, dismissal, and/or other sanctions at the discretion of the Dean of Students. In the case of serious circumstances, when it has been determined that a clear and present danger to the University community exists, a decision may be made by the University without a hearing. There will be no appeal of this decision. Students are responsible for the actions of their guests at all times, including at University-sponsored events on and off campus. Prosecution of a student by federal, state, or local authorities will not preclude disciplinary action by the University. University disciplinary proceedings may be instituted against a student charged with violation of a law, which is also a violation of the Code of Conduct. Certain proceedings under this Code of Conduct may be carried out prior to, simultaneously with, or following civil or criminal proceedings off campus, even if the student is cleared of such charges. Effective with its publication, the material contained in this document shall serve as the official description of the student disciplinary system for the University of New Haven. References to this disciplinary system contained in such other publications as the catalog, the Residential Life section of the Student Handbook, and the Housing Agreement shall be derived solely from this source. In case of any conflicts or inconsistencies with any other rules, regulations, policies, and directives now existing, this Code of Conduct shall govern and shall be enforced by the University. The most current copy of University regulations will be found on the University’s website.

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VI. Definitions 1. The term “University” means the University of New Haven and all related campuses including all land, buildings, facilities, and other property owned, used, leased, or under the control of the University. 2. The term “student” includes all persons taking courses through the University, both full-time and part-time, pursuing undergraduate, graduate, or professional studies, and any online courses. Graduate students who serve as assistants or otherwise, and all other students employed parttime, are classified as students rather than as faculty or other University employees for the purposes of the Code of Conduct. The University/College retains conduct jurisdiction over students who choose to take a leave of absence, withdraw or have graduated for any misconduct that occurred prior to the leave, withdrawal or graduation. If sanctioned, a hold may be placed on the student’s ability to re-enroll [and/or obtain official transcripts and/or graduate] and all sanctions must be satisfied prior to re-enrollment eligibility. A person shall be considered a student during the period while the student is under suspension from the institution. The Student Code of Conduct applies at all locations where the University offers its educational programs. 3. The term “faculty member” means any person hired by the University to conduct classroom or teaching activities or who is otherwise considered by the University to be a member of its faculty. 4. The term “University official” includes any person employed by the University and performing assigned administrative or professional responsibilities. 5. The term “member of the University community” includes any person who is a student, faculty member, or University official and any other person employed or retained by the University. The Vice President for Student Affairs shall determine a person’s status in a particular situation. 6. The term “University premises” includes all land, buildings, facilities, and other property in the possession of or owned, used, or controlled by the University, including but not limited to offcampus facilities and adjacent streets and sidewalks 7. The term “University property” means all real and personal property owned or used by the University and includes without limitation all such property in the possession of, or subject to the control of, the University. 8. The term “organization” means any number of persons who have complied with the formal requirements for University recognition/registration. 9. The term “group” means three or more persons who are associated with each other and who have not complied with University requirements for registration as an organization. 10. The term “registered student organization” means a group or association of students, which has complied with the requirements of registration as enumerated by the Center for Student Engagement, Leadership, and Orientation.

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11. The term “University-sponsored activity” means any activity on or off campus which is initiated, aided, authorized, participated in, or supervised by the University. 12. The term “Student Conduct Board” means any person or persons authorized by the Dean of Students to determine whether a student has violated the Student Code of Conduct and to recommend sanctions that may be imposed when a rules violation has been committed. 13. The term “Student Conduct Administrator” means a University official authorized on a caseby-case basis by the Vice President for Student Affairs and Dean of Students to impose sanctions upon students found to have violated the Student Code of Conduct. The Dean may authorize a Student Conduct Administrator to serve simultaneously as a Student Conduct Administrator and the sole member or one of the members of the Student Conduct Board. The Dean may authorize the same Student Conduct Administrator to impose sanctions in all cases. 14. The term “Appeals Review Board” means any person or persons authorized by the Dean of Students to consider an appeal from a Student Conduct Board’s determination as to whether a student has violated the Student Code of Conduct or from the sanctions imposed by the Student Conduct Administrator. 15. The term “shall” is used in the imperative sense. 16. The term “may” is used in the permissive sense. 17. The “Vice President for Student Affairs and Dean of Students” is that person designated by the University President to be responsible for the administration of the Student Code of Conduct. 18. The term “policy” means the written regulations of the University as found in, but not limited to, the Student Code of Conduct, Student Handbook, University web page and computer use policy, and Graduate/Undergraduate Catalogs. 19. The term “Complainant” means any person who submits a charge alleging that a student violated this Student Code of Conduct. When a student believes that s/he has been a victim of another student’s misconduct, the student who believes s/he has been a victim will have the same rights under this Code as are provided to the Complainant, even if another member of the University community submitted the charge itself. 20. The term “Dean’s Witnesses” means individuals called by the student conduct administrator to present information documented in an incident or police report. Dean’s witnesses will have the same rights under the code as are provided to the complainant. 21. The term “Accused Student” means any student accused of violating this Student Code of Conduct.

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VII. Proscribed Conduct Behavioral Standards Students are required to engage in responsible social conduct that reflects credit upon the University community and to model good citizenship in any community. Any student found to have committed or to have attempted to commit the following misconduct is subject to the disciplinary sanctions outlined in Article VII. Students who witness violations of University policy or procedures that are potentially harmful to the safety and well-being of other students may be charged with a violation or violations if they fail to remove themselves from such situations and/or report the incident to proper authorities. The following are examples of misconduct but are not intended to be an exhaustive listing: 1. Violation of the University’s Academic Integrity Policy. 2. Actual or threatened abuse, physical assault, injury to persons or damage to property. 3. Violation of the Sexual Misconduct/Relationship Abuse/ Stalking Policy. 4. Harassment and/or intimidation via any means: conduct causing alarm, or recklessly creating a risk, by: a. exhibiting, distributing, posting, or advertising publicly offensive, indecent, or abusive matter concerning persons; b. using abusive or obscene language or making obscene gestures or any act of public indecency; c. making personal slurs or using epithets based on sex, gender, race, color, age, creed, national or ethnic origin, physical or mental disability, veteran status, pregnancy status, sexual orientation, or other protected status; d. harassment or intimidation of persons involved in a University disciplinary hearing or of persons in authority who are in the process of discharging their responsibilities. 5. Violation of the University’s Hazing Policy. 6. Detaining anyone on University property in a room, building, or other area by force, threat, or intimidation or in any other way restricting his/her freedom of movement. 7. Disorderly conduct: conduct causing inconvenience, annoyance, or alarm, including any action which can reasonably be expected to disturb academic pursuits or to interfere with or infringe upon the privacy, rights, health, or safety of the University community. 8. Improper use of any electronic devices that causes disruption in the classroom, library, or any University-owned or University-operated facilities. 9. Disruption or obstruction of the teaching, research, or administrative functions, of the University. 10. Violation of published University policies, rules, or regulations including but not limited to: UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN STUDENT HANDBOOK REV. 1/12/2021

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a. Violation of the Substance Abuse Policy; b. Violation of the Alcoholic Beverage Policy; c. Violation of the Acceptable Computer and Network Usage Policy; d. Violation of Housing and Food Service Agreements; and related policies; e. Violations of University motor vehicle and parking regulations; f.

Violations of the Student Protest and Demonstration Policy;

g. Violations of the Firearm, Weapons, and Explosives Policy; h. Violations of the Tobacco Free, Smoke Free Campus Policy. 11. Behaviors or activities which are a danger to the safety of self or others. 12. Possession and/or use of laser pointers, except in the case of official classroom presentations. 13. Violation of fire, health, and safety regulations. This includes, but is not limited to, a. Failure to comply with administrative building or residence hall evacuation procedures, tampering with fire protection apparatus, causing false fire alarms, arson, and unauthorized possession and/or use of prohibited items. b. Health and safety concern determined to be in violation of the health, safety, or maintenance codes, including excessive trash/garbage, suspension from and attachment of objects to the ceiling (posters, banner, flags, tapestries, etc.). 14. False reporting of emergency. The false report of a bomb, fire, or other emergency in any building, structure, or facility by means of activating a fire alarm or emergency telephone or in any other manner. 15. Destruction, vandalism, abuse, misuse, of personal/ University property or facilities. 16. Theft - Intentional and unauthorized taking or attempted taking of University/College property or the personal property of another, including goods, services and other valuables. 17. Unauthorized entry into or presence in any University building or facility. Unauthorized possession, duplication, or use of keys/cards to any University premises. 18. Falsification, forgery, misuse, or modification of any University document, record, or instrument of identification. This includes, but is not limited to, transcripts, registration materials, withdrawal forms, grade reports, identification cards, timecards, absence excuses, applications, contracts, and agreements. It also includes furnishing false information to a University official, office, or disciplinary body. 19. Violation of local, state, or federal laws as stated in Article IV. UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN STUDENT HANDBOOK REV. 1/12/2021

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20. Interference or failure to comply with firefighters, police officers, student patrol, residential life staff, or other University employees engaged in performance of their official duties. 21. Failure to comply with the directions of or to provide identification to any properly identified member of the University staff, including the police department, engaged in the performance of official duties. 22. Abuse of the disciplinary system, including but not limited to: a. falsification, distortion, or misrepresentation of information before a Student Conduct Board; b. institution of a disciplinary proceeding knowingly without cause; c. attempting to discourage an individual’s proper participation in, or use of, the disciplinary system; d. attempting to influence the impartiality of a member of a Student Conduct Board prior to and/or during the course of a disciplinary proceeding; e. harassment (verbal or physical) and/or intimidation of a member of a Student Conduct Board prior to, during, and/or after a disciplinary proceeding; f.

failure to comply with sanction(s) imposed under the Student Code of Conduct;

g. influencing or attempting to influence another person to commit an abuse of the disciplinary system. 23. Unauthorized use of the name or insignia of the University of New Haven. 24. Holding a raffle or lottery on campus property without proper University and other approval. 25. Violations of policies and regulations which pertain to student organizations and activities, including, but not limited to, registration/recognition, elections, scheduling of facilities, and use of University funds. 26. Violation of the University policy on solicitation or sale of material on campus. 27. Possession of dogs, cats, or other animals on University property and in the residence halls is prohibited. Exceptions include service animals as defined by the Americans with Disabilities Act Amendments Act, approved Campus Police k9 animals, animals involved in approved research studies, pet fish in accordance with Residential Life policy, or University approved emotional support animals. 28. Failure to meet financial obligations to the University and its authorized vendors including, but limited to, student bills and organization dues, or fraudulent payment methods including the issuing of a check or money order that cannot be honored by a financial institution is a violation of the student code of conduct.

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29. Students are responsible for the actions of their visitors and guests at all times, including at University-sponsored events both on-and off-campus and in the residence halls.

VIII. Student Conduct Procedures A. Charges and Student Conduct Board Hearings 1. A complaint against a student for a violation of the Student Code may be brought by any member of the University community or by a University official on behalf of the University. Complaints must be prepared in writing. Complaints must contain the name(s) of the individual(s) involved and circumstances of the complaint, including specific dates, times, and locations, and name(s) and address(es) of the person(s) filing the report. Complaints should be submitted as soon as possible after the event takes place, preferably within 14 days, but generally must be filed no later than 90 days from the date of the incident to one of the following offices: Dean of Students, Residential Life, or University Police. 2. Students will be notified that a complaint has been filed against them. All charges shall be presented to the Accused Student in written form. The first notification will be made via the student’s University email and will provide a hearing date and time. Failure to attend the hearing will result in a decision being rendered in the matter without the benefit of the student’s input, and additional disciplinary action may be taken. 3. A time shall be set for a meeting with a conduct administrator or the Student Conduct Board. In the case that the student is meeting with the Student Conduct Board, a hearing will take place not less than five nor more than fifteen calendar days after the student has been notified. Maximum time limits for scheduling of Student Conduct Board Hearings may be extended at the discretion of the Student Conduct Administrator. 4. The Student Conduct Administrator may conduct an investigation to determine if the charges have merit and/or if they can be disposed of administratively by mutual consent of the parties and the Student Conduct Administrator. In such event, the disposition shall be final, and there shall be no subsequent proceedings. If the charges cannot be disposed of by mutual consent, the Student Conduct Administrator may later serve in the same matter as the Student Conduct Board or a member thereof. If the student admits to the violation, but agreement is not reached as to what the sanction should be, subsequent proceedings, including a hearing if necessary, shall be limited to determining the appropriate sanction(s). 5. Student Conduct appointment notices are sent through the University of New Haven student email system. Students are responsible for checking their email regularly and are responsible for the content of these communications. 6. The Accused Student shall have access to the complaint that may be used against him/her, except University Police reports when criminal matters are pending. Access shall be defined as the ability to review records in the presence of a Student Conduct Administrator. This information will be available in the Dean of Students Office. Copies of reports will not be provided. UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN STUDENT HANDBOOK REV. 1/12/2021

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7. Students who withdraw prior to the conclusion of the process will not be permitted to return to the University in the future until the hearing process is completed. Sexual misconduct proceedings will continue even if a student withdraws prior to the conclusion of the process. 8. Student Conduct Board Hearings shall be conducted by a Student Conduct Board according to the following guidelines except as provided by Article VII(A)(9) below: a. Normal rules of process or procedure and/or technical rules of evidence, such as are applied in criminal or civil court, are not used in Student Code proceedings. b. Student Conduct Board Hearings normally shall be conducted in private. c. The Accused Student shall have the right to admit responsibility, not admit responsibility, or remain silent at the hearing. If the Accused Student chooses to remain silent, it will be assumed that the student is not admitting responsibility, and the hearing will proceed. d. The Complainant, Accused Student, and their advisors, if any, shall be allowed to attend the entire portion of the Student Conduct Board Hearing at which information is received (excluding deliberations). Admission of any other person to the Student Conduct Board Hearing shall be at the discretion of the Student Conduct Board and/or its Student Conduct Administrator. e. In Student Conduct Board Hearings involving more than one Accused Student, the Student Conduct Administrator, at his or her discretion, may permit the Student Conduct Board Hearings concerning each student to be conducted either separately or jointly. f.

The Complainant and the Accused Student have the right to be assisted by an advisor they choose who is a member of the University community and may not be an attorney. Exceptions are made for the following circumstances: • An advisor may be an attorney if criminal charges are pending in the same matter. • An advisor may be a parent/guardian if separation from the institution is a possible outcome of the hearing. The Complainant and/or the Accused Student is responsible for presenting his or her own information, and therefore, advisors are not permitted to speak or to participate directly in any Student Conduct Board Hearing before a Student Conduct Board. A student should select as an advisor a person whose schedule allows attendance at the scheduled date and time for the Student Conduct Board Hearing because delays will not normally be permitted due to the scheduling conflicts of an advisor.

g. The Complainant, the Accused Student, and the Student Conduct Board may arrange for witnesses to present pertinent information to the Student Conduct Board. Witnesses will provide information to and answer questions from the Student Conduct Board. Questions may be asked by the Accused Student and/ or Complainant to be answered by each other or by UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN STUDENT HANDBOOK REV. 1/12/2021

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other witnesses. Deviations from this procedure will be at the discretion of the Student Conduct Administrator. Questions of whether potential information will be received shall be resolved by the chairperson of the Student Conduct Board. h. Pertinent records, exhibits, and written statements (including Student Impact Statements) may be accepted as information for consideration by a Student Conduct Board at the discretion of the Student Conduct Administrator. i.

All procedural questions are subject to the final decision of the Student Conduct Administrator.

j.

After the portion of the Student Conduct Board Hearing concludes in which all available pertinent information has been received, the Student Conduct Board shall determine (by majority vote if the Student Conduct Board consists of more than one person) whether the Accused Student has violated the Student Code.

k. The Student Conduct Board’s determination shall be made on the basis of whether it is more likely than not that the Accused Student violated the Student Code. 9. There shall be a single verbatim record, such as a tape recording, of all Student Conduct Board Hearings before a Student Conduct Board (not including deliberations). Deliberations shall not be recorded. The record shall be the property of the University. 10. If an Accused Student, with notice, does not appear before a Student Conduct Board Hearing, the information in support of the charges shall be presented and considered even though the Accused Student is not present. 11. The Student Conduct Board may accommodate concerns for the personal safety, well-being, and/ or fears of confrontation of the Complainant, Accused Student, and/or other witness during the hearing by providing separate facilities or alternative electronic methods of communication as determined by the sole judgment of the Dean of Students to be appropriate. 12. All determinations of responsibility will be based only on the information presented before the hearing body, but previous or current disciplinary action taken against students will be used in the consideration of the sanction. 13. Written notification of the hearing body’s decision and a short decision rationale will be emailed within five (5) working days after the conclusion of the hearing. Student Conduct system notices are sent through the University of New Haven student email system. Students are responsible for checking their email regularly and are responsible for the content of these communications. 14. The hearing body will prepare a written justification for the sanction imposed in each case. This justification shall be included as part of the student’s disciplinary file. 15. Except where they have waived the right to a formal hearing, students have the right to appeal the written decision of the hearing body within five (5) working days of receipt. Criteria for appeal shall be stated on the appeal form. Appeal criteria are explained elsewhere in this handbook. UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN STUDENT HANDBOOK REV. 1/12/2021

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16. Students generally have the right to continue in their student status until the conclusion of disciplinary proceedings, except in those instances where interim suspension procedures are applied.

B. Sanctions The following sanctions may be imposed upon any student found to have violated the Student Code: 1. Case Dismissed. Any action which closes a case for either of the following reasons: a. The complainant(s) withdraws the complaint prior to the convening of the original hearing body unless the Dean of Students considers it to be in the interest of the University to continue the matter. b. A not responsible finding is reached by the hearing body. 2. Warning. A notice in writing to the student that the student is violating or has violated institutional regulations and indicating that repetition of infractions of University regulations will result in more severe disciplinary action. 3. Probation. A written reprimand for a specific violation. Probation is for a designated period of time during which a student must show a positive change in behavior and includes the probability of more severe disciplinary sanctions if the student is found to violate any institutional regulation(s) during the probationary period. Disciplinary probation is a status which may involve restrictions, conditions, or terms imposed for a definite period of time which may include but are not limited to ineligibility to participate in University activities or events, periodic contact or counseling with a designated member of the University community, restrictions on access to University facilities and/or housing areas, and change of housing assignment. 4. Loss of Privileges. Denial of specified privileges for a designated period of time. Such action includes but is not limited to use of a specific University facility, campus motor vehicle parking and operating privileges, and social privileges. The Student Conduct Board must specify the date after which the student may regain these privileges. 5. Fines. Previously established and published fines may be imposed. 6. Restitution. Compensation for loss, damage, or injury. This may take the form of appropriate service and/or monetary or material replacement. 7. Discretionary Sanctions. Work assignments, essays, service to the University, or other related discretionary assignments. A work project or special assignment imposed by a Student Conduct Board. Failure to complete a discretionary sanction by the date set by the Student Conduct Board will result in further disciplinary action and a hold being placed on the student’s account. 8. Parental Notification. Notification to a student’s parents that the student has been involved in a violation of the Code of Conduct.

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9. Residence Hall Suspension. Prohibition of the student from living in or visiting the residence halls for a specified period of time. The student may not reapply for a residence room until the suspension is concluded. This sanction can include such measures as suspension from the halls for specified time periods, such as weekends. 10. Residence Hall Expulsion. Permanent prohibition of the student from living in or visiting the residence halls. 11. University Suspension. Separation of the student from the University for a definite period of time during which the student is excluded from classes, residence on campus, and all privileges and activities of the University. During a period of suspension, a student is not permitted on University property without the written permission of the Dean of Students. Suspension is recorded on the student’s academic record for the period of the suspension and removed upon completion of the suspension period. Upon termination of the suspension period, the student may petition the Dean of Students for reinstatement to his/her former student status; the Dean must approve readmission/reinstatement. The University reserves the right to readmit or deny readmission to a student following a period of suspension. 12. University Expulsion. Permanent termination of student status without possibility of readmission to the University. An expelled student is not permitted on University property. A sanction of expulsion must be reviewed and approved by the Dean of Students and the President of the University before it becomes effective. Expulsion is recorded on the student’s academic record. 13. Revocation of Admission and/or Degree. Admission to or a degree awarded from the University may be revoked for fraud, misrepresentation, or other violation of University standards in obtaining the degree, or for other serious violations committed by a student prior to graduation. 14. Withholding of Degree. The University may withhold awarding of a degree otherwise earned until the completion of the process set forth in this Student Code of Conduct, including completion of any sanctions imposed. 15. Sanctions Applicable to Student Clubs, Groups, and Organizations. If a recognized student organization violates a policy or regulation of the University or local, state, or federal law, one or more of the following sanctions may be imposed. a. Those sanctions listed above in Article VII (B) 1–6. b. Loss of selected rights and privileges for a specified period of time. c. Deactivation, defined as loss of all privileges, including University recognition, for a specified period of time. 16. Failure to Complete Sanctions. Failing to complete a student conduct sanction will result in a hold being placed on the student’s University record until the sanction as outlined by the student conduct administrator is completed. More than one of the sanctions listed above may be imposed for any single violation. UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN STUDENT HANDBOOK REV. 1/12/2021

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In each case where the determination has been made that a student and/or group or organization has violated the Student Code, the sanction(s) shall be determined and imposed by the Student Conduct Administrator. In cases in which persons other than, or in addition to, the Student Conduct Administrator have been authorized to serve as the Student Conduct Board, the recommendation of the Student Conduct Board shall be considered by the Student Conduct Administrator in determining and imposing sanctions. The Student Conduct Administrator is not limited to sanctions recommended by members of the Student Conduct Board. The Dean of Students reserves the right to review and alter sanctions imposed by a Student Conduct Administrator or Student Conduct Board. Following the Student Conduct Board Hearing, the Student Conduct Board and the Student Conduct Administrator shall advise the Accused Student, group and/or organization (and a complaining student who believes s/he was the victim of another student’s violent conduct including sexual assault) in writing of its determination and of the sanction(s) imposed, if any. The complainant bears the responsibility of pursuing the matter before a Student Conduct Board. The complainant may withdraw his/her Notification of Complaint only by submitting a written statement to the Dean of Students prior to the convening of the original Student Conduct Board. In that case, the Dean of Students will notify the appropriate parties as soon as possible thereafter. Individuals found to be in violation of the specific conditions of their suspension or expulsion may be subject to further disciplinary action and/or criminal prosecution.

C. Parental Notification The Dean of Students or designee has the authority to determine when and by what means to notify parents or guardians when students under the age of 21 are found to have committed serious or repeated violations of University policies related to the possession, use, or distribution of alcohol or drugs. The Dean of Students or University Police may also notify parents or guardians of student health or safety emergencies. If University personnel perceive that a student is engaging in behavior that is a risk to himself/ herself or others, the student may be transported to an emergency room for evaluation.

D. Emergency and Extraordinary Circumstances It is impossible to anticipate every circumstance under which the disciplinary authority of the University must be exercised. Also, it is possible that compelling circumstances may require that certain procedures normally afforded students be suspended by the University. Students who pose a serious risk of imminent harm (e.g., threats of violent acts against students and/or staff) may be expelled immediately.

Interim Suspension In certain circumstances, the Dean of Students, or a designee, may impose a University or residence hall suspension prior to a Student Conduct Board Hearing. 1. Interim suspension may be imposed only: UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN STUDENT HANDBOOK REV. 1/12/2021

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a. to ensure the safety and well-being of members of the University community or preservation of University property; b. to ensure the student’s own physical or emotional safety and well-being; or c. if the student poses an ongoing threat of disruption of, or interference with, the normal operations of the University. 2. The interim suspension may be imposed immediately and the accused student shall have the opportunity for a preliminary hearing as soon as possible before the Dean of Students or designee. The preliminary hearing shall be concerned solely with: a. Discussion of the nature of the charges. b. Establishment of a date for a formal hearing which shall be scheduled within five (5) working days of the effective date of the interim suspension unless circumstances prevent, in which case a date will be established as soon as possible. c. Whether the conduct and surrounding circumstances reasonably indicate that the continued presence of the student on the University premises poses a substantial and immediate threat to himself or herself or to others or the stability and continuance of normal University functions. d. Provision of an opportunity for the student to show cause(s) why he/she should not be suspended. 3. During the interim suspension, a student shall be denied access to the residence halls and/or to the campus (including classes) and/or all other University activities or privileges for which the student might otherwise be eligible, as the Dean of Students or the Student Conduct Administrator may determine to be appropriate. 4. The interim suspension does not replace the regular process, which shall proceed on the normal schedule, up to and through a Student Conduct Board Hearing, if required. 5. Unless modified by the Dean, the student’s activities during the interim suspension are subject to the same restrictions and conditions set forth under regular suspension. Interim suspension shall continue until a hearing results in the reinstatement, suspension, or expulsion of the student. 6. If the Student Conduct Board recommends suspension or expulsion, the interim suspension shall continue during any period of appellate review. 7. If the Student Conduct Board recommends disciplinary action less severe than suspension, the period of interim suspension shall be lifted. 8. Unless the student is suspended or expelled from the University as the result of the hearing process, he/she will be assisted by the Provost’s Office in the making up of academic requirements, to the extent feasible. UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN STUDENT HANDBOOK REV. 1/12/2021

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Students who violate the terms of any interim suspension shall be subject to further disciplinary action and possible arrest. The University reserves the right to continue the interim suspension of a student without a hearing in cases where off-campus legal action is pending against that student. The interim suspension will continue until such time as the matter has been resolved through off-campus proceedings and a hearing before the Dean of Students or designee. Students under interim suspension from the University and/ or residence halls pending a disciplinary hearing are not entitled to a reimbursement of their tuition, housing, and other fees for the period of interim suspension. If after six months, or within 30 days of the final disposition of a criminal case, there is no change in the status of interim suspension or interim residence hall suspension, the suspension shall become permanent and result in expulsion from the University or the residence halls. A student may apply for one or more extensions for periods of 90 days for good cause as determined by the University. It is the responsibility of the student to contact the Dean of Students regarding any circumstances affecting his or her status. A student under an interim suspension who withdraws prior to a disciplinary case being heard will not be permitted to return to the institution as a student in the future. A Permanent Administrative Withdrawal will be noted on the student’s transcript.

E. Appeals 1. A decision reached by the Student Conduct Board or a sanction imposed by the Student Conduct Administrator may be appealed by the Accused Student(s) within five (5) working days of the date of receipt of the original written decision. In cases of sexual misconduct, the Complainant has the same right to appeal the decision. If no appeal is made within the prescribed time period, the original decision of the Student Conduct Board shall be final, conclusive, and effective immediately. Such appeals shall be in writing and shall be delivered to the Student Conduct Administrator or his or her designee. 2. Appeal requests will be reviewed by the Dean of Students on the following grounds: a. To determine whether the Student Conduct Board Hearing was conducted fairly in light of the charges and information presented, and in conformity with prescribed procedures. Deviations from designated procedures will not be a basis for sustaining an appeal unless the appeal review determines that significant prejudice resulted from such deviation. b. To determine whether the decision reached regarding the Accused Student was based on substantial information; that is, whether there were facts in the case that, if believed by the fact finder, were sufficient to establish that a violation of the Student Code of Conduct occurred. c. To determine whether the sanction(s) imposed was appropriate for the violation of the Student Code of Conduct which the student was found to have committed.

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d. To consider new information sufficient to alter a decision or other relevant facts not brought out in the original hearing because such information and/or facts were not known or available to the person appealing at the time of the original Student Conduct Board Hearing. 3. In considering an appeal, the Dean of Students may exercise any of the following options: a. Approve or reject all or part of the original decision b. Ask the hearing officer/conduct board to reconsider the matter with guidance from the Dean of Students. c. Grant an appeal hearing with the Appeals Review Board. 4. Appeal Review Board: The board will review the decision on the grounds that the student is appealing on, using the student’s conduct file, original hearing recording, and the appeal submission. Students are permitted to present their appeal materials in person before the board. The review board may recommend a change in the original decision to the Dean of Students. If an appeal is not upheld, the matter shall be considered final and binding upon all involved.

IX. Disciplinary Records All records of disciplinary action are maintained confidentially in the Dean of Students Office. In cases that involve suspension or expulsion from the institution, the necessary academic and administrative departments are notified. Action involving expulsion from the University shall be recorded on the academic transcript. No one outside of the institution shall have access to a student’s disciplinary record, nor will the Vice President for Student Affairs and Dean of Students disclose any information in these records without the written consent of the student involved except as may be provided in the Family Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 (described elsewhere in the Student Handbook) or as otherwise required by law. Unless otherwise defined by the student on the student permission form, access shall be defined as the ability to review records in the presence of a Student Conduct Administrator. Students wishing to review their disciplinary records may do so by making a written request to the Dean of Students Office. Records will be made available within one (1) working day from the date of the request. Students who believe that their disciplinary records contain information that is inaccurate, misleading, or otherwise in violation of privacy or other rights should follow procedures described in the Family Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 in order to correct them. Disciplinary records shall be retained for a minimum period of seven (7) years from the date the student leaves the University. Records of suspension or expulsion shall be retained indefinitely.

X. Interpretation and Revision A. Any question of interpretation or application of the Student Code shall be referred to the Dean of Students or his or her designee for final determination. UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN STUDENT HANDBOOK REV. 1/12/2021

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B. The Student Code shall be reviewed every two years under the direction of the Student Conduct Administrator.

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UNIVERSITY POLICIES University policies and procedures provide both a guideline and system of accountability to aid in establishing and maintaining personal and community standards.

Non Discrimination Policy and Affirmative Action Statement The University will recruit, hire, train, and promote persons in all job titles without regard to individual’s sex, sexual orientation, race, color, personal appearance, gender, gender identity or expression, transgender status, marital status, civil union status, ethnicity/national origin, ancestry, religion, age, genetic information, veteran status, disability (including but not limited to, intellectual disability, past or present history of intellectual disorder, physical disability or learning disability) or any other conditions prohibited by Connecticut state and/or federal nondiscrimination laws. The University will ensure that promotional decisions are in accordance and consistent with principles of equal employment opportunity by imposing only valid requirements for opportunities. The University will ensure that all personnel actions such as compensation, benefits, transfers, layoffs, return from layoff, company-sponsored training, education, tuition assistance, and social and recreational programs will be administered without regard to individual’s sex, sexual orientation, race, color, personal appearance, gender, gender identity or expression, transgender status, marital status, civil union status, ethnicity/national origin, ancestry, religion, age, genetic information, veteran status, disability (including but not limited to, intellectual disability, past or present history or intellectual disorder, physical disability or learning disability) or any other conditions prohibited by Connecticut state and/or federal nondiscrimination laws. If you have questions or concerns in regard to this policy contact Caroline Koziatek, The Vice President of Human Resources, Title IX Coordinator and Diversity Officer, in the Human Resource Department at ext. 7479.

Gender Identity/Expression Policy Scope This policy applies to all members of the University community and provides information to University visitors, prospective students and prospective employees. Furthermore, this Policy extends jurisdiction to all University locations, which function in an educational capacity, including, but not limited to, all indoor and outdoor areas on all University. This policy applies to any individual on campus property, including but not limited to: students, employees, contractors, subcontractors, volunteers, visitors, and members of the public, and is applicable twenty-four (24) hours a day, seven (7) days a week.

Policy Statement The University’s Gender Identity/Expression Policy delineates the policies and procedures regarding gender identity and gender expression. The University, and this policy, support an inclusive educational UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN STUDENT HANDBOOK REV. 1/12/2021

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environment, which respects individual identities and the right of an individual to express themselves within the University i community.

Reason for the Policy This policy is intended to inform the University community of policies and procedures that support the freedom of expression for an individual’s gender identity. This policy provides chosen name protocols and outlines the circumstances where an individual’s legal name is still required.

Definitions For purposes of this policy, the following terms are defined below: A. Gender Identity: One's innermost concept of self as male, female, a blend of both or neither — how individuals perceive themselves and what they call themselves. One's gender identity can be the same or different from their sex assigned at birth (a). B. Gender Expression: How one presents oneself and one’s gender to the world via gender cues. This may or may not coincide with or indicate one’s gender identity. Many utilize gender expression in an attempt to determine the gender/sex of another. C. Biological Sex: Assigned sex is a label that you are given at birth based on medical factors, including your hormones, chromosomes, and genitals. When someone is sexual and reproductive anatomy does not seem to fit the typical definitions of female or male, they may be described as intersex.(b) D. Chosen Name: Chosen first name is a name that you commonly use that is different from your legal first name (c). E. Legal Name: The name that identifies a person for legal, administrative and other official purposes. A person's first legal name generally is the name of the person that was given for the purpose of registration of the birth and which then appears on a birth certificate (see birth name), but may change subsequently (d). F. University Community Member: includes any person who is a student, faculty member, or University official and any other person employed or retained by the University. G. University Property: Please refer to the University’s Clery Act: Campus Safety & Security Policy (Policy 8601) for the definition of University property, specifically on-campus property, noncampus locations, and University controlled properties. a. http://www.hrc.org/resources/sexual-orientation-and-gender-identity-terminologyanddefinitions. b. https://www.plannedparenthood.org/learn/sexual-orientation.../gender-gender-identity c. https://www.mcgill.ca/students/records/address/preferred/faq

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d. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Legal_name

Access to University Facilities University community members are permitted to access University facilities that align with their gender identity. Access to campus facilities includes, but is not limited to, restrooms, locker rooms, and residence halls.

Chosen Name Protocols Incoming students may choose to identify a Chosen first name on their application materials, as provided by the Admissions. Current students, upon matriculation, may notify the Registrar’s Office of a request to add a chosen first name to their University records. Similarly, University employees may request to add a chosen name to their University records through the Human Resources Department. Chosen name forms are available in the Registrar’s Office and the Human Resources Department for students and employees respectively. Chosen first names will replace or co-exist with legal first names in the following University information systems: 1. University issued identification cards (see procedure below) 2. Admissions and Recruiting 3. Student Information System, which includes: a. Online Course Rosters b. Unofficial Academic Transcripts c.

Student Listing Report

d. Housing and Disciplinary Reports 4. Canvas Transact & Learn Systems 5. Degree Audit System 6. Display name for University email address

The University will periodically review the chosen name protocols with its information systems to ensure compliance with this policy. Changes will be made as necessary due to updates or modifications in regulation, costs, technical feasibility, or other factors. The University has the right to reject the use of a chosen name if it is deemed incendiary or otherwise inappropriate.

University ID Card Protocol The University of New Haven ID is for University identification only and cannot be used as a legal identification document. The University ID Card will feature an individual’s chosen name upon request. UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN STUDENT HANDBOOK REV. 1/12/2021

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Students who request a new card to accommodate a change in chosen name must make a request in writing to the Dean of Students Office. To facilitate this request; students will then go to the Campus Card Office, to have their new ID card printed. The Dean of Students and Campus Card Offices will maintain a list of campus community members for whom a new ID card has been issued under this policy. Requests for information regarding who has been issued an ID Card under this policy must be made to the Dean of Student’s Office. Employees who wish to obtain a new University ID card with a chosen name will follow the same procedure as above, however the initial request must be made to the Human Resources Department.

Chosen Name/Legal Name Usage There are certain on-campus offices, and circumstances, which require the use of an individual’s legal name. The following offices, and circumstances, are listed below: • Financial Aid Office, including Federal Work Study • Student Employment Office, for all student workers • Payroll Office • Bursar’s Office, including the ePay system • Registrar’s Office, including federal documentation and official academic transcripts • Health Services, including health insurance • Beckerman Recreation Center, specifically the contractual service agreement • Campus Police, specifically any documentation that must be processed by the Police Department for the legal/court system and/or documentation related to parking, arrest paperwork, misdemeanor summonses, and/or infraction complaints. • International Services Office, specifically immigration paperwork such as I-9 forms • Residential Life, specifically any documents that constitute a legal contract or agreement • Human Resources Office, including employment contracts, insurance documentation, etc.

University community members may use their chosen name within the following on-campus offices: • Athletics, excluding medical documentation • Beckerman Recreation Center, including intramural sign-up and participation • Counseling and Psychological Services • Dean of Students Office • Health Services, specifically when requesting appointments/service within the office

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• Myatt Center for Diversity and Inclusion • Residential Life, specifically when requesting gender-inclusive housing, or day to day business • Center for Student Engagement, Leadership and Orientation • Student Mailroom • Register’s Office, specifically when requesting a chosen name on the diploma

Academic Integrity Policy and Procedures I. Philosophy The University of New Haven is an academic community based on the principles of honesty, trust, fairness, respect, and responsibility. Academic integrity is a core University value which insures respect for the academic reputation of the University, its students, faculty and staff, and the degrees it confers. The University expects that all students, graduate and undergraduate, will learn in an environment where they work independently in the pursuit of knowledge, conduct themselves in an honest and ethical manner and respect the intellectual work of others. Each member of the University community has a responsibility to be familiar with the definitions contained in, and adhere to, the Academic Integrity Policy. The policy and procedures to follow apply to all University of New Haven students.

II. Policy Violations of the Academic Integrity Policy include, but are not limited to, the following examples:

A. Cheating “Using or attempting to use unauthorized materials, information, or study aids in any academic exercise.” Cheating includes, but is not limited to: 1. Having unauthorized notes during an exam or quiz, or communication of information by any means concerning the content of an examination during or after the testing period to anyone who has not yet taken the examination. The only materials permitted during an exam are those that an instructor explicitly instructs students they may use. 2. Copying the work of another during a test or quiz. 3. Use of translation software such as Google Translate without instructor permission. 4. Obtaining or providing unauthorized prior knowledge of exam or quiz content. 5. Using another student’s work for a homework or lab assignment or presenting the work of another as one’s own. 6. Using unauthorized materials or information from others for a take-home exam. It is expected

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that students do independent work for exams whether they are take-home or in class. Students are expected to comply with the guidelines set by the instructor. 7. Seeking, receiving, or giving aid during examinations through electronic means (e.g., use of web browsers, cell/smart phone, email, text messaging, Bluetooth communications). 8. Purchasing papers, research, reports, etc. from commercial services or other individuals for use in any manner other than research for which the source of information is appropriately referenced in the student’s work.

B. Collaboration/Collusion 1. Nonpermitted Collaboration. In some instances, instructors may indicate permitted forms of collaboration with other students. If the instructor does not indicate that collaboration is permitted, it should be understood that none is permitted. Students are encouraged to seek clarification from their instructors regarding the acceptable parameters for collaboration should they be in doubt regarding assignments that require group work. Acknowledgement of collaboration is required when presenting authorship of student work. 2. Study Groups and Tutoring. Academic integrity standards do not prohibit students from studying together or from tutoring each other if done in conformance with other provisions of this policy.

C. Plagiarism “Representing the words or ideas of another as one’s own in any academic exercise or resubmitting one’s own work under false pretenses.” 1. Plagiarism includes but is not limited to: a. Copying without proper citation from another student’s paper(s) partially or entirely or from any source, such as a book, article, notebook, video, or other source material, whether published or unpublished. b. Purchasing or securing a paper from any source, to include term-paper vendors and Internet sources, and submitting that paper or specific portions of the paper as one’s own work. c. Inserting a passage from the Internet or any computer source into one’s paper without proper citation. d. Copying data from another source without a proper citation. e. Appropriating another person’s computer programming work for submission as an assignment.

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f.

Failing to attribute material that comes from other media sources or failing to obtain proper permission for the use of such material when creating a web page, film, musical composition, or other forms of presentation or artistic expression as a course assignment.

g. Any other appropriation of another’s intellectual property without proper attribution. h. Submitting an assignment that was written during a prior semester or submitting the same assignment for more than one class simultaneously, including resubmitting all or substantial portions of previously written work for a current assignment, unless instructors in multiple courses are informed of and approve of the submission. Students should consult their instructors if they are unsure of what work of their own they may use in preparing an assignment. The student should assume that, unless the instructor specifically permits it, the use of work from one previous or simultaneous course to satisfy the expectations of another course will be perceived as deceptive, and in addition, the work so used fails to qualify as original work for the assignment. i.

Citing sources improperly, which includes, but is not limited to, failure to use quotation marks or other appropriate notation for direct quotes or for an author’s distinctive phrases, and following an author’s structure of writing and ideas, but rephrasing the sentences partially to give the impression that the whole passage reflects the student’s structure and ideas.

2. Guidance on proper citation may be found below or through other designated resources indicated by your academic department. Resources on Proper Citation of Sources: American Psychological Association. (2010) Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association (6th ed.). Washington, D.C.: Author. Chicago Manual of Style (16th ed.).(2010) Chicago: University of Chicago Press. Gibaldi, J. (2009) MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers. (7th ed.), New York: Modern Language Association. Sources online (http://www.newhaven.edu/library/research-tools.php/) Strunk, W. and E.B. White (2000). The Elements of Style (4th ed.). Boston: Allyn and Bacon. Turabian, K.L. (2013) A Manual for Writers of Term Papers, Theses and Dissertations (8th ed.), Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

D. Fabrication “Unauthorized falsification or invention of any information or citation in an academic exercise.” Fabrication includes: 1. Furnishing false information, distorting data or failing to provide all necessary required

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information to the University’s advisor, registrar, admissions counselor, instructor, etc., for any academically related purpose. 2. Forging a signature to certify completion of a course assignment or a recommendation to graduate school or to employers, internship sponsors, or other sponsors of on or off-campus engagements. 3. Fabricating data in support of laboratory or field work, whether for course-related assignments or for non-course-related internally- or externally-funded, extracurricular, or co-curricular projects. 4. Misrepresenting one’s academic accomplishments. 5. Fabricating or falsifying a bibliography.

E. Facilitating Academic Dishonesty Knowingly helping or attempting to help another to violate any provision of this Policy, iv or otherwise facilitating academic dishonesty. 1. Examples include but are not limited to: a. Providing to other students one’s own work or that of others with the reasonable expectation that these will be used for the purpose of cheating or plagiarism. b. Maintaining a file of exams or papers with the reasonable expectation that these will be used for the purpose of cheating or plagiarism. c. Unfairly advancing one’s academic position by hoarding, stealing, or damaging library materials. d. Theft of other students’ notes, papers, homework, or textbooks for academic gain. e. Placing another person’s work on the Internet without his or her permission for academic gain. 2. The use of any electronic means to assist another without authorization is strictly prohibited. Copyright infringements shall be considered violations of the academic integrity policy. More information on copyright issues and copyright law can be found at: www.newhaven.edu/library/services/faculty/copyright.php.

III. Faculty and Student Responsibilities for Upholding the Academic Integrity Policy A. Faculty 1. Faculty are responsible for creating an educational environment where academic integrity is defined and understood, perhaps by referencing the University’s policy on academic integrity in their course syllabi and explaining, modeling and reinforcing expectations for academic UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN STUDENT HANDBOOK REV. 1/12/2021

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integrity and the consequences for violations. 2. Departments and/or instructors may choose to implement standards more stringent than those contained in this policy, provided they are clearly communicated to students.

B. Students 1. Students are responsible for the completion of their own academic work and for encouraging their peers to act with integrity in all academic matters by: a. Acting with honesty and integrity in all academic matters. b. Learning the principles of ethical conduct, and being familiar with and abiding by the definitions contained in the policy on academic integrity and any other policies established by their instructors, departments, and Colleges. c. Informing the instructor or the Dean of Students if they become aware that any form of academic dishonesty has occurred. d. Clarifying with the instructor/supervisor what their expectations are regarding proper conduct in the completion of assignments (e.g., collaboration, citations, use of study aids on examinations, etc.). 2. Individual students may report a violation of academic integrity to the Dean of Students who will forward the report to the appropriate academic department for investigation.

IV. Procedures for Addressing Cases of Academic Dishonesty For instances of dishonesty in the context of non-course related research and other co-curricular academic projects (e.g., grant-funded research, internship placements, summer research fellowships, work study assignments in laboratory settings), the term “supervisor” may be substituted for the term “instructor” in the procedures to follow. For this policy, “supervisor” is defined as research supervisor, administrative supervisor, or a University official as defined in the Student Handbook. Similarly, reference to a University official (e.g., Provost, Dean of Students) is interpreted to include “or designee” such that the policy or procedure being described may be applied to or carried out by the official’s designee. The procedures below outline the process for adjudicating academic integrity violations only, and are unique to this process. Non-academic Code of Conduct violations follow the procedures outlined in the Student Handbook.

A. Instructor’s First Steps When an instructor or supervisor suspects, or receives an allegation, that a student has engaged in an act of academic dishonesty: 1. The instructor is encouraged to consult with his or her program coordinator, director, or UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN STUDENT HANDBOOK REV. 1/12/2021

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chair regarding the alleged violation. This consultation is suggested so as to allow the instructor to clarify issues of procedure if necessary, and may provide a second opinion regarding the suspected violation. 2. The instructor and department chairperson together will speak with the student, if possible, and inform the student of the alleged violation and to gather more information as necessary. The student will be provided with the option of accepting responsibility for the violation and the sanction, accepting responsibility but not the sanction, or not accepting responsibility. The instructor will then complete the Academic Integrity Online Submission Form and indicate the student’s decision in the narrative section. [If the student is not available for a conference or does not accept responsibility for the violation, this step may be skipped at this point, and will be addressed by the Dean of Students or the Student Conduct Administrator, per IV.B.3 below.] For violations reported to an instructor/ supervisor by others, the instructor will investigate the reported violation and its circumstances, documenting the findings, and then attempt to meet with the accused student to discuss the alleged violation. 3. The instructor and department chairperson will determine whether a violation has occurred and proceed as outlined in Section IV.B below. The student should be advised by the instructor/supervisor of the availability of an appeals procedure, as described below. 4. The instructor will report the violation to the Dean of Students, through the Academic Integrity Online Submission Form. Any supporting documentation will be electronically attached to the online form. Alternatively, a description of the violation and supporting documentation, if any (e.g., a copy of the assignment with plagiarized passages identified), must be provided to the Dean of Students by office mail or email. Notation should be made regarding what effort was made at remedial education with the accused student, and how the student was informed of the violation. 5. Time Limit. Note that violations discovered by an instructor/supervisor more than one year after the time of the alleged violations might not be subject to formal proceedings. Refer to section D.1.b. for guidance.

B. Addressing Integrity Violations 1. Instructors may choose to handle violations of academic integrity with the student at their own discretion, and report the outcome to the Dean of Students, preferably through the Academic Integrity Online Submission Form, accompanied by supporting documentation. The student will be notified of the placement of the form in the file by the Dean of Students if and when this occurs. (If a grade of “F” is given for a course, the instructor may notify the Registrar immediately, or may proceed normally to do so through on-line end-of-term grading.) 2. The first finding of a violation of academic integrity will result only in an academic penalty. It will be recorded as written warning, but not a code of conduct violation. Subsequent violations will be recorded in the student’s conduct record.

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3. As necessary, the Dean of Students will consult with the instructor/supervisor who reported the violation to gather information about the events, the sanctions imposed by the instructor/supervisor, and the rationale for the sanctions. The Dean of Students may suggest alternative or additional courses of action to the instructor/supervisor, recognizing that the decision regarding the sanction remains the prerogative of the instructor/supervisor except in circumstances described in IV.E.3, IV.F.3, and IV.F.4 of this policy. If not completed previously by the reporting instructor/supervisor, the Dean will solicit the information required to complete Academic Integrity Online Submission Form. 4. The Dean of Students will consult the records of the student to determine if prior violations have been reported, and will notify the student in writing that a meeting with the Dean is necessary in order to discuss the reported violation with the student. If not done previously, the student will indicate whether they accept responsibility for the violation and/or sanction. 5. The Dean of Students will counsel the student on the consequences of the violation. If no sanction has been imposed by the instructor/supervisor, the Dean may determine what consequences are appropriate, in light of the consultations in steps 2 and 3 above and the student’s record. Generally, the sanction imposed by the instructor/ supervisor will be supported. 6. However, if the student a) does not accept responsibility for the violation, b) requests that the sanction imposed be reviewed, or c) requests that the Dean’s actions or other elements of the disciplinary procedure be reviewed, the Dean will counsel the student on the availability of further recourse through the Academic Integrity Board, as described below in section IV.D.1. 7. A student found responsible for his/her first violation of academic integrity will be required by the Dean of Students to participate in a training session and satisfactorily complete an educational module on Academic Integrity. Students who fail to complete the educational module will have a hold placed on their subsequent course registrations until the module is completed. 8. If, when the case is sent to the Dean of Students, it is determined that the student has a prior record of academic integrity policy violations, the Dean of Students will forward the case to the Academic Integrity Board for a hearing in order to determine whether additional consequences are appropriate. 9. If the case is closed following the Dean’s actions, the Dean will communicate as appropriate to the instructor/supervisor, the student, the Student Conduct Administrator, and other staff regarding the outcomes of the case, and will retain necessary records in the student’s conduct file.

C. Academic Integrity Board (AIB) 1. Membership. a. The voting membership of the Academic Integrity Board will comprise seven (7) individuals from the University community:

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• four (4) tenured or tenure track faculty members appointed by the Chair of the Faculty Senate for staggered two-year terms; • one (1) administrative staff member appointed by the Dean of Students; • and two (2) students in good academic standing (one [1] of graduate status appointed by the Graduate Student Council and one [1] of junior or senior status appointed by the Undergraduate Student Government Association). b. The Student Conduct Administrator shall serve as the non-voting Chair of the Board. A pool of alternate members in each of the three categories above may be called upon by the Conduct Administrator in order to address temporary absences or issues of conflict of interest affecting specific cases. Judgments regarding conflict of interest are at the discretion of the Student Conduct Administrator. 2. Quorum. The necessary quorum for the AIB to hear cases and conduct its business shall be 4 of the 7 voting members, and will include at least 1 student member and at least 2 of the faculty members. In all cases, the number of faculty members must be greater than the number of student members—student members may be dismissed by the Conduct Administrator as necessary to maintain a faculty majority. The Student Conduct Administrator must be present, in addition to the membership quorum defined above.

D. Academic Integrity Board (AIB) Hearing Process 1. Submitting Appeals to the Academic Integrity Board a. Format. An appeal brought to the AIB as indicated above in IV.B.6 must be prepared in writing through the Academic Integrity Online Submission Form. Appeals must contain (a) the name(s) of the individual(s) involved; (b) the circumstances of the complaint; and (c) supporting documentation if available, including specific dates, times, and locations. The student requesting the appeal (“student appellant”) will prepare a letter addressed to the AIB explaining the reasons for the appeal and the resolution sought. The Dean of Students is expected to determine that the materials assembled are ready for AIB review. b. Timing. Appeals should be forwarded by the Dean of Students as soon as possible after the conference with the student (IV.B.5, preferably within 5 days. Discoveries of violations a year or more after the date of the alleged violation typically will not be addressed formally through this procedure. In extraordinary circumstances, complaints may be accepted beyond this period, but reasons for doing so must be explained in the complaint. The Dean of Students will determine if a reported violation warrants an exception to the one-year limit. Instructors/supervisors are encouraged to report violations upon discovery, regardless of their latency. Students so reported will be called by the Dean of Students to respond to the allegations described in the Academic Integrity Online Submission Form. The record of the reported violation will remain in the student’s file.

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c. Scope of hearing. If the student appellant does not admit to the violation, the hearing will result in a finding regarding whether a violation has occurred. If the student appellant admits to the violation but disagrees with the sanction or with elements of procedure, the hearing will result in a recommendation regarding these issues alone. If the case is referred to the Board by the Dean of Students because of multiple violations, the hearing will result in a recommendation to the Dean regarding appropriate sanctions. d. Notification. The student will be notified in writing that the appeal has been received by the Academic Integrity Board. A time shall be set for an Academic Integrity Board Hearing, not less than five nor more than thirty working days after the student has been notified. Maximum time limits for scheduling of Academic Integrity Board Hearings may be extended at the discretion of the Student Conduct Administrator. e. Notice of hearing. The student appellant and instructor shall be notified of the date, time, and location of the hearing by electronic mail (delivered to the student’s and instructor’s University of New Haven email addresses of record,) at least 5 working days prior to the scheduled hearing. Both will be advised that the case file may be reviewed prior to the hearing in the Dean of Student’s office in the presence of the Dean. f.

Access to records. The student appellant shall have access to the evidence that may be used against him/ her. Access shall be defined as the ability to review records to be used in the hearing, and in the presence of a Student Conduct Administrator in the Dean of Students’ Office.

g. Hearing procedure. Academic Integrity Board Hearings shall be conducted according to the following guidelines: i.

Confidentiality. Academic Integrity Board Hearings normally shall be conducted in private. Findings and recommendations issued by, and discussions of, the AIB will be kept confidential.

ii.

Attendance. The instructor, student appellant, and their advisors, if any (see “4” below), shall be allowed to attend the entire portion of the AIB hearing at which information is received (excluding deliberations). Admission of any other person to the AIB hearing shall be at the discretion of the Board and/or its Student Conduct Administrator.

iii.

Multiple respondents. In AIB hearings involving more than one student appellant, the Student Conduct Administrator, in his or her discretion, may permit the Academic Integrity Board hearings concerning each student to be conducted either separately or jointly.

iv.

Right to an advisor. The instructor/supervisor and the student appellant have the right to be assisted by an advisor they choose from among a pool of trained advisors as described below who is a full-time staff member of the University community, is not a faculty member, and is not an attorney. Each party is responsible for presenting his or her own

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information, and therefore, advisors are not permitted to speak or to participate directly in any AIB Hearing. a. The advisory pool. The office of the Dean of Students will train and maintain a pool of approximately 5–10 full-time University of New Haven staff members to be available for service as advisors to those involved in AIB hearings. The advisors will be trained regarding this AI policy, the AIB hearing process, the role and conduct of advisors in the administration of this AI policy, protecting confidentiality, and related skills. b. Selecting an advisor. The office of the Dean of Students will present the student or instructor/ supervisor, upon request, with the full list of available advisors, from which the student or instructor/supervisor will choose one. A student should select as an advisor a person whose schedule allows attendance at the scheduled date and time for the hearing because delays will not normally be allowed due to the scheduling conflicts of an advisor. The Dean of Students office will contact the chosen advisor to arrange for their participation and to assure that no conflict of interest exists regarding their service as an advisor. If the chosen advisor is unavailable or unsuitable, the student or instructor/supervisor may choose another from the list following the same procedure. v.

Role of witnesses. The instructor/supervisor, the student appellant, and the Academic Integrity Board may arrange for witnesses to present pertinent information to the Board. Witnesses will provide information to and answer questions from the AIB. Questions may be asked by the student appellant and/or instructor/supervisor to be answered by each other or by other witnesses. Deviations from this procedure will be at the discretion of the Student Conduct Administrator. Questions of whether potentially relevant information and evidence will be received shall be resolved by the Student Conduct Administrator.

vi.

Evidence. Pertinent records, exhibits, and written statements (including student impact statements) may be accepted as information for consideration by the Academic Integrity Board at the discretion of the Student Conduct Administrator.

vii.

Rulings on hearing procedure. All procedural questions are subject to the final decision of the Student Conduct Administrator.

viii.

Majority decision. After that portion of the AIB Hearing concludes during which all available pertinent information has been received, the Board shall determine by majority vote the Board’s findings and recommendations regarding those elements of the appeal in its scope as determined at IV.D.c above.

ix.

Standard of proof. The Academic Integrity Board’s findings shall be made on the basis of a preponderance of evidence that the student appellant violated the Academic Integrity Policy.

x.

Rules of evidence. Formal rules of process, procedure, and/or technical rules of

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evidence, such as are applied in criminal or civil court, are not used in Academic Integrity proceedings. xi.

Absence of parties. Absence of parties. If a student appellant, having been duly notified of a hearing, does not appear before the AIB for a scheduled hearing, the hearing may proceed or be rescheduled, depending on the Board’s judgment regarding the circumstances surrounding the failed appearance. Hearings may proceed without the instructor/supervisor in attendance. The student and instructor are expected to indicate to the Board, through a response to the notification at IV.D.e above, whether s/he intends to appear at the hearing.

xii.

Participation in absentia. In exceptional circumstances, the Student Conduct Administrator shall consider allowing the use of technological means to allow the student to participate in the hearing. The Academic Integrity Board may accommodate concerns for the personal safety, well-being, and/or fears of confrontation of the instructor/supervisor, student appellant, and/or other witness during the hearing by providing separate facilities, by using a visual screen, and/or by permitting participation by telephone, videophone, closed circuit television, video conferencing, videotape, audiotape, written statement, or other means, where and as determined in the sole judgment of the Student Conduct Administrator to be appropriate.

2. Record of hearing There shall be a single verbatim record, such as a tape recording, of all Academic Integrity Board Hearings before an Academic Integrity Board (not including deliberations). Deliberations shall not be recorded. The record shall be the property of the University and retained in the custody of the Student Conduct Administrator. No other recordings are permitted. 3. Determining sanctions All findings of student responsibility for violations will be based only on the information presented before the hearing body, but previous action taken against students for violations of academic integrity will be used in the consideration of the recommended sanction in a given appeal, and in recommending sanctions to the Dean of Students in cases recommended to the Board by the Dean involving multiple sanctions, as required in IV.B.7. 4. Notice of findings and recommendations The Student Conduct Administrator will so notify the parties to the case and to the Dean of Students. The decision of the Academic Integrity Board is advisory in nature; the AIB is not authorized to impose sanctions. 5. Notice of Faculty Member’s Response If the Academic Integrity Board recommends changes to the faculty member’s sanctions, the faculty member will notify the Student Conduct Administrator of the faculty member’s decision regarding the recommendation within five (5) working days. The Student Conduct Administrator UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN STUDENT HANDBOOK REV. 1/12/2021

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will so notify the parties to the case and the Dean of Students. 6. Appeal a. Student appeal of AI process or outcomes: appellants have the right to appeal to the Provost regarding negative findings or recommendations of the Academic Integrity Board or notice of the faculty member’s declining any Academic Integrity Board recommended change in sanctions within five (5) working days of receipt of the notice of the faculty member’s response. (See Section IV.F below) b. Access to General Grievance Committee (GGC): The GGC does not serve as a forum for appeal of AI procedures or outcomes. Students retain their rights to pursue the grievance process, for reasons not related to the academic integrity issue, separate from the AI process. However, the AI process must be completed, including any appeal of the AI process under IV.D.6.a above, before any grievance may be pursued. 7. Student status during proceedings a. Generally, students may continue in their student status until the conclusion of academic integrity proceedings, defined as the final notification of sanctions or the outcome of the student’s appeal. Judgments regarding a student’s permission to remain enrolled, to continue registration for subsequent terms, or other elements of a student’s academic status are made by the Dean of Students in consultation with the Provost, the reporting instructor/supervisor, and others as appropriate. b. Withdrawal from a course in which a student has been accused of an academic integrity violation does not protect a student from receiving an F in the course or from other sanctions, nor will a withdrawal stop further academic dishonesty proceedings. Withdrawal from the University or declaring a change of major likewise will not prevent the disciplinary proceedings or entry of violations in the student’s permanent record.

E. Sanctions for Academic Integrity Violations 1. Sanctions. Dependent on the seriousness of the violation and the student’s record, sanctions for academic integrity violations may include the following: • From the instructor/supervisor: course-specific penalties including but not limited to grade penalties or failure for the entire course, or termination of the student’s employment in the University position in question. • From the Dean of Students and the Provost: range from disciplinary probation through expulsion or revocation of a degree/earned credential; termination of participation in research or the project in question, University support in research, change in course grade, and restitution for any stipends, research funds, or financial support. 2. The minimum sanctions for academic integrity violations will include participation in a training UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN STUDENT HANDBOOK REV. 1/12/2021

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session and satisfactory completion of an educational module on Academic Integrity. 3. Sanctions for subsequent violations. Students found responsible for a second or subsequent violation will receive a minimum sanction of an F in a course (or termination from a co- or extracurricular project). Other sanctions also may be applied. 8. Additional penalties. Other penalties may be imposed by the University to include loss of membership in student organizations and honor societies; ineligibility to participate in study abroad, athletics, or other programs; and/or ineligibility to hold office in a student organization that receives University funds or uses University facilities. (Infractions of this policy that relate to research or other co- or extracurricular activity also may expose the student to civil or criminal proceedings.) 9. Allegations following withdrawal. Violations relating to course-specific performance reported after a student withdraws from the University or after a grade has been given for a course will result in the grade reverting to a “Grade Not Submitted” (GNS). A notation will be placed on the student’s academic record that an academic dishonesty case is pending. The student will have the right to a hearing before the Academic Integrity Board as outlined in this policy. Refer to section D.1.b on time limits. 10. Revocation of degree. Violations reported within a year of graduation may result in revocation of the student’s diploma. The grade given for the course in which the allegation has been made will revert to a “Grade Not Submitted” (GNS), and a notation will be placed on the student’s academic record that an academic dishonesty case is pending. The student will have the right to a hearing before the Academic Integrity Board as outlined in this policy.

F. Appeals to the Provost 1. Right to Appeal. Findings and recommendations reached by the Academic Integrity Board may be appealed to the Provost by the student or by the reporting instructor/supervisor. Appeals shall be in writing and shall be delivered to the Dean of Students’ Office within five (5) working days of the date of receipt of the original notification of sanction by the Dean. In extraordinary cases, the Provost may extend this time limit. Either party to the case is limited to one appeal to the Provost, within which all elements of the case will be reviewed, including a) whether the violation occurred, b) whether appropriate process was followed, and c) whether an appropriate sanction is to be applied. 2. Criteria for appeal. Appeals of findings and recommendations issued by the Academic Integrity Board shall be limited to a review of the actions taken by the Dean of Students and/or Conduct Administrator and to the verbatim record of the Academic Integrity Board Hearing and supporting documents for one or more of the following purposes: a. Fair process. To determine whether the AIB hearing was conducted fairly in light of the nature of the reported violation and information presented, and in conformity with the expectation that a reasonable opportunity will be afforded for the reporting instructor to prepare and to present information that the Academic Integrity Policy was violated, and giving the student appellant UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN STUDENT HANDBOOK REV. 1/12/2021

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a reasonable opportunity to prepare and to present a response to the report. Deviations from designated procedures will not be a basis per se for sustaining an appeal unless the Provost determines that significant prejudice resulted from such deviation. b. Factual basis. To determine whether the findings and recommendations issued regarding the student’s case were based on substantial information, that is, whether there were facts in the case that, if believed by the fact finder, were sufficient to establish that a violation of the Academic Integrity Policy occurred. c. Appropriateness of sanction. To determine whether the sanction(s) imposed by the instructor/supervisor or the Dean of Students, or those supported by the Academic Integrity Board, were appropriate for the violation of the Academic Integrity Policy that the student was found to have committed. d. New evidence. To consider new information or other relevant facts not brought out in the original hearing, sufficient to alter a finding, because such information and/or facts were not known or available to the appealing party at the time of the original AIB hearing. 3. Acting on an appeal. Upon review of an appeal submitted by the student or instructor/supervisor and following consultation with the instructor/supervisor and staff as appropriate, the Provost will render a final decision on the case and act to implement the decision. No further appeals are possible. To the greatest extent possible, the Provost will honor the academic freedom and authority of the faculty member. The Provost will notify the parties to the case, the Student Conduct Administrator, the Dean of Students, and others as necessary. 4. Provost’s discretion to intervene. Provost’s discretion to intervene. It is not necessary for either party to a case to submit an appeal to the Provost in order for the Provost to intervene in a case. While such unsolicited intervention is expected to be very rare, this discretion is necessary in order to protect the interests of the University and its constituents. A written rationale will be provided by the Provost for such action.

G. Maintenance of Records Records of academic dishonesty cases will be considered disciplinary (conduct) records after the first documented incident and will be maintained in the Office of the Dean of Students. All academic dishonesty records will be kept on file for a minimum period of seven (7) years from the date the student leaves the University. Records of suspension or expulsion shall be retained indefinitely. Acknowledgments This policy has been adapted from the Code of Academic Integrity and Acknowledging the Work of Others, prepared by the Office of the Dean of Faculty, Cornell University and used with permission; Academic Integrity Policies and Procedures at Sacred Heart University, WPI, William Patterson College; and A Model Code of Academic Integrity by Gary Pavela.

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I

Pavela, G. (1997) Applying the power of association on campus: A model code of academic integrity. Journal of College and University Law, 24(1), pp 9 et seq. [journal online] available from www.jpo.umd.edu/docs/toomuch2_ wrk.pdf; Internet; accessed 30 January 2007.]

ii

Based on Pavela, page 11. Note that Pavela’s qualifiers “intentionally and knowingly” have been dropped from the definition adopted for the University of New Haven policy.

iii

Pavela, page 10. Note that the qualifier “intentionally” has been dropped from the definition adopted for the University of New Haven policy.

iv

Pavela, page 10. Note that the qualifier “intentionally” has been dropped from the definition adopted for the University of New Haven policy.

v

As defined in the Code of Conduct found in the Student Handbook.

vi

For purposes of this policy, “attorney” is defined as: a) an attorney who is admitted to practice law in Connecticut or in any other jurisdiction, regardless of whether the attorney is on active or inactive status, or b) an individual with a law degree, including without limitation a Juris Doctor or Master of Laws (L.L.M.), but who is not licensed or admitted to practice law. This definition has been drafted broadly to protect the University from any liability that could result from allegations that it condoned the unlawful practice of law by unlicensed attorneys, which is forbidden by Connecticut General Statutes § 51–88(a), and punishable under Connecticut General Statutes § 51–88(b), and Connecticut Practice Book § 2– 44. Relatedly, the CT Professional Rule of Conduct § 1.18 addresses the obligations of attorneys regarding confidentiality that are relevant to the participation of attorneys in a University hearing process.

Policy on Responsible Conduct in Research (RCR) General Requirements Research misconduct transcends honest errors and errors caused through negligence. The practices of making up data or results (fabrication), changing or misreporting data or results (falsification), and using the ideas or words of another person (plagiarism) all represent deception. These acts of misconduct not only undermine progress but the entire set of values on which the scientific enterprise rests1. RCR is applicable across all academic disciplines and areas of study. Responsible conduct in research specifically prohibits the following: 2 • Using another’s work for a research assignment or presenting the work of another as one’s own. • Using unauthorized materials for a research assignment. • Copying data from another source without a proper citation. • Any other appropriation of another's intellectual property without proper attribution.

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1

RCR tutorial created by the Center on Materials and Devices for Information Technology Research (at www.responsibleresearch.org/ accessed 10/16/2011) with the support of the National Science Foundation 2

University of New Haven Academic Integrity Policy and Procedures Effective 5/10/12

Use of Human Subjects in Research The IRB’s major role is to safeguard the rights and welfare of all human subjects who participate in research projects conducted by employees and students of the University of New Haven. All research projects involving human subjects or human material must be reviewed and approved by the IRB. All biomedical, social and behavioral research projects are subject to the IRB. The overall criteria for IRB approval are: • The risks to subjects are minimized as much as possible. • The risks to subjects are reasonable in relation to anticipated benefits. • The informed consent is adequate. • Where appropriate, the research plan makes provisions for the safety of the subjects during the data collection process. • Where appropriate, there are adequate provisions to protect the privacy of subjects and maintain confidentiality of data. • Appropriate safeguards are included within the study to protect the rights and welfare of the vulnerable subjects. • Unauthorized experiments are prohibited.

Use of Animals in Research In order to comply with federal law, including the 1996 Animal Welfare Act, research facilities are required to maintain an Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC) to oversee the use of live animals. The use of live non-human vertebrate animals requires approval by the University of New Haven IACUC. Use of live vertebrate animals by students for independent research requires the approval of both the project supervisor and the University of New Haven Institutional Animal Use and Care Committee prior to the start of research activities. Overall criteria for IACUC approval are: • The use of animals has scientific or educational merit and there is no suitable non-animal alternative. • Proper housing for the animals is available and will be utilized. • The animals will be treated humanely, with appropriate practices in place. • Animals that are sacrificed at the conclusion of the use will be euthanized in an appropriate manner and the organisms disposed of appropriately.

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• Preserved specimens and non-vertebrate animals do not require specific approval unless Department rules state otherwise. Violations of RCR policy will be adjudicated in accordance with the relevant Academic Integrity policy. All students who receive University or external support or credit for research projects will be required to take specialized RCR training before initiating the projects. 1

RCR tutorial created by the Center on Materials and Devices for Information Technology Research (at http://www.responsibleresearch.org/ accessed 10/16/2011) with the support of the National Science Foundation DMR #0120967. 2

University of New Haven Academic Integrity Policy and Procedures Effective 8/27/07.

Student Employee Confidentiality Policy Students may be employed by the University under a variety of circumstances — administrative assistants, teaching assistants, tutors, research assistants, resident directors, coaches, work study positions, and others — and also may serve on numerous committees that expose students to confidential or sensitive information. Student employment and participation on committees and other governance entities benefit both the student and the University. From an organizational perspective, the University’s reputation and effectiveness depend on the ability and intention of all employees to manage our data and records with care and discretion. Managing the affairs of a University requires a wealth of information, which must be free to flow efficiently among those who need it to fulfill their responsibilities. Student employees are accountable for safeguarding the privacy of all University employees, students, and external constituents. Regardless of its form (electronic, oral, written), information must be handled according to standards that are legal, ethical, and responsible. For example, University employees are subject to provisions of these federal laws: • Family Educational Rights & Privacy Act (FERPA) • Health Insurance Portability & Accountability Act (HIPAA) • Gramm-Leach-Bliley Act (GLBA) • Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA) There are additional regulations at the state level, as well as rules that govern educational institutions, financial aid administrators, student athletics administrators, personnel administrators, and so on. Violations of these provisions by student employees endanger both the student and the University. More fundamentally, using information for unintended purposes, or publicizing information carelessly or maliciously, is simply wrong; such acts violate the trust we place in our employees to conduct themselves professionally and responsibly.

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Guidelines for Safeguarding Confidential Information These general guidelines apply to the release of data and personally identifying information, regardless of its form: 1. Data regarding students, employees, finances, and operations should not be provided to non-University employees without your supervisor’s permission. Some data are routinely provided to non-University of New Haven constituents — your supervisor will instruct you on the proper handling of such information. 2. Data regarding students or employees should not be provided to the students or employees themselves, without authorization from one’s supervisor. Some information is provided routinely — your supervisor will instruct you on the proper handling of such information. 3. Information regarding a student can be revealed to specific individuals within the University (including other students) only on a strict “need-to-know basis” and should not be provided to the student’s parents or guardians or to any other individual outside the University without the student’s signed “Student Release – University Records and Information Form.” Your supervisor will instruct you on how to safeguard the privacy of student information as governed by university and government policy. 4. Information available to student employees or committee members through their University positions may not be used for personal gain, to provide ‘favors’ for friends or others, or for any other unintended use.

Types of Information That May Be Sensitive or Confidential The following is a non-exhaustive list of types of information that may be governed by statute or by University policy, or that could be sensitive if mishandled: • Any records from the University’s computer programs concerning students, faculty and staff • Student and employee disciplinary records • Financial Aid records • Employment records and other data maintained by Human Resources or Payroll • Student and employee health records • Telephone messages • Home or cell telephone numbers • Employee or student addresses • Social Security numbers or other personally identifying data • Student visa status or other immigration information • Employee electronic calendars or contact information • Email addresses UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN STUDENT HANDBOOK REV. 1/12/2021

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• Minutes or other records of confidential bodies (e.g., grievance or disciplinary committees of which students are members) • Private conversations conducted in one’s office area

Guidelines for Use of University Computers and Data Systems 1. Unattended Machines – Desktop computers left unattended for more than a few minutes should be locked down, so that a password log-in is required for their continued use. Computers should be locked down or turned off at the end of the day. 2. Secure Access – Password access to computers or campus systems should be provided to students with great discretion, and on a “need-to-know” basis. 3. Setting Passwords – Passwords used to access University computers or systems should be set by office supervisors and should not be changed by others. Any required changes in passwords must be approved by the supervisor. 4. Remote Access – Access to the University’s systems and computers from remote locations (home, classrooms, dorms, etc.) by student employees should not occur, except with the explicit instruction by supervisors. Such access will be exceedingly rare, and will be in response to extraordinary need. 5. Personal Use of University Machines – University computers and technology provided to student employees to perform their jobs should not be used for personal use. Installation of nonUniversity of New Haven applications and hardware is strictly forbidden.

Guidelines for Handling Files and Records 1. Removal of Files – Student employees should not remove paper files, printouts, compact discs, DVDs, flash drives, or other records from the office where they are used without explicit instruction from the supervisor. 2. Offloading files – Files should not be downloaded to the student’s laptop, PDA, or other mobile device without instruction to do so. All files transported off of University systems should be password protected and/or properly encrypted.

Guidelines for Access to University Offices 1. Access “After Hours” – Student employees are not to enter University offices during hours the offices are not open, unless specifically instructed to do so by their supervisor. Campus Police must be notified in writing if students will have access to offices without supervision. 2. Access by Non-Employees – Students who are not employed in a given office are not permitted in secure areas of that office without permission by the office supervisor. Students not employed in the office should not be permitted by computer or other file locations where sensitive information may be seen. UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN STUDENT HANDBOOK REV. 1/12/2021

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General Procedures Supporting This Policy Seeking Guidance on Proper Procedure – Each office will have information relevant to its duties on the proper handling of sensitive data and other information. Further guidance is available on our website regarding our computer systems. The rule of thumb in all cases, however, is simple — if you are in doubt, ask your supervisor for guidance.

A. Reporting Violations 1. Reports by Students — It is important that violations of this information management policy are addressed. If you witness others acting in a way that is contrary to this policy, you are to report your suspicion to your supervisor. If the suspected violation occurs in an office other than your own, you may report your suspicion to the supervisor of that office. 2. Failing to Report Witnessed Violations — Failure to report violations you have witnessed may be interpreted as a willful violation of the policy of your own. Student employees may not aid another student employee in policy violation. 3. Supervisor’s Obligation to Report Violations — Supervisors must report to the Dean of Students the nature of violations of this policy and the disciplinary action taken by the supervisor. The Dean of Students will counsel the supervisor on appropriate further action, if any.

B. Discipline 1. Sanctions — Violations of published information management policies may result in verbal reprimand and corrective counseling, written reprimand, or suspension/termination from University employment, at the discretion of the supervisor. The supervisor may take guidance from applicable statutes or other rules governing the information in question, as well as managerial judgment. Consultation with the Dean of Students is strongly encouraged (see B.3. above). In those cases wherein student conduct actions are anticipated, the student typically will be suspended from their University positions pending the outcome of the case in the student conduct system. 2. Records — Violations are entered on the student’s conduct record and are subject to conduct procedures managed by the Dean of Students. Violations may be subject also to civil penalties as dictated by relevant statute. Prior violations are also recorded in the student’s file maintained by the Student Employment Office, and will be taken into account in the process of application to work in other University of New Haven offices.

Acceptable Computer and Network Usage Policy The acceptable use policy governs the use of computers and networks on University of New Haven campuses. All users of the university network agree to adhere to the Acceptable Usage Policy by accessing our network.

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Internet, Email and Computer Policies Upon acceptance to the University, each student is assigned a University of New Haven network account. This login is used for a variety of purposes including Blackboard, the University’s central record-keeping platform, email distribution lists, emergency warning notification systems, and others. Consistent with the goals of providing timely information and limiting the use of paper-based communication, the University deems its email system to be an official means of notification to staff and students, equivalent to registered mail. Students must review their University of New Haven email on a consistent and regular basis. The student may not establish a non-University of New Haven email address as their principal address for receipt of email from University of New Haven faculty, staff, or system-wide communication unless a given mechanism specifically encourages or provides for the use of non-University of New Haven addresses. Forwarding of mail from the student’s University of New Haven account to one’s commercial account is acceptable. The campus network has been established to provide students of the University of New Haven free access to the Internet and email. It is a privilege, not a right, and should be used for academic purposes only. It is assumed that students will read and understand the guidelines for usage of the student email network. Ignorance of the guidelines set forth is no excuse. The University residential network and email system may not be used for any of the following purposes. Violations may lead to loss of the student’s email account and further disciplinary action. 1. Gaining unlawful entry into any account belonging another user, including but not limited to accounts for email, Blackboard, the University of New Haven portal, Banner SSB, or Financial Aid. 2. Hate mail. 3. Threats to individuals or groups. 4. Unwanted or intrusive social advances or any other type of harassment. 5. Distribution of copyright-protected materials. 6. Knowing distribution, transmission, or introduction of viruses, worms, and Trojan Horses. 7. Distribution of pornographic, libelous, and/or offensive material. 8. Sending information using concealed or forged system or account information. 9. Commercial activities. 10. Sending chain letters or multiple Usenet postings; i.e., “spamming.” 11. Giving an account password to another individual or willfully allowing any other person to use the account. 12. Any activity which violates the proscribed-conduct policies of the University of New Haven.

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13. Any other activity which may be considered illegal or that is harmful to an individual, to the University of New Haven, or to any other institution. 14. Any attempted or successful effort to modify or damage the University network and related equipment, in residence halls or classrooms and offices, including the installation of nonUniversity of New Haven network equipment without express consent from the Office of Information Technology.

File Sharing Downloads It is currently illegal to download or share copyrighted material (i.e., text, audio, or video) on the Internet without the copyright owner’s permission. The University of New Haven does not at this time block the usage of applications that may be used for this purpose. Any person using the University of New Haven network for illegal activity is responsible for any and all legal repercussions of such activity. The University reserves the right to block or disable any illegal user or any application being used for illegal purposes. Users may have their network access revoked if improper/illegal behavior does not cease. As the University of New Haven network’s primary purpose is for educational uses, those applications receive highest bandwidth priority. Download/File Sharing applications and gaming applications receive lowest priority on the network.

Policy on Cell Phones Cell phones can be very disruptive to classes, presentations, productions, and other public events. As a matter of courtesy, the University of New Haven requests that all communication devices be turned off or disabled during all classes or public events. Individual discretion should be used in determining when exceptions should be made related to emergency personnel or situations.

Electronic Services Access Policy in the Peterson Library The computers in the library are primarily to be used by the University of New Haven community for library research and study. Each computer has the Microsoft Office Suite, SPSS, and Internet connectivity to the campus network. Anyone using the library computers for other purposes may be asked to give up the workstation to someone waiting to do research. Library staff provide basic assistance with printing, word processing and other software programs such as MS Word, Excel, and Blackboard that are available on library workstations. However, our primary service focus is on assistance with academic and library research. The computer labs at Echlin Hall, Buckman Hall, the Center for Learning Resources, and elsewhere on campus provide more expert assistance with computer software.

Eligible Users University of New Haven currently registered students, faculty, and staff members have priority in using library computer workstations. You will need to log onto the computer with your University of New Haven

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network account name and password. You may be asked to show a current University of New Haven ID card. Alumni and other patrons 18 years of age and over may use the workstations to access CD-ROM and Federal Depository Library materials on the Internet. We also provide on-site users access to the databases provided by the State, through researchIT CT. Please ask the Librarian at the Information Desk for assistance in logging onto the computer. Please be prepared to show a current picture ID card, such as a driver’s license, valid school ID, or passport. You will be asked to complete a sign-in sheet. As long as a computer is not needed by a University of New Haven student, faculty, or staff member, alumni and other patrons will be accommodated.

Printing Currently enrolled students, faculty, and staff of the University of New Haven will need to swipe their University of New Haven ID card to release printouts at the computer dedicated to the print management system. We encourage downloading information onto flash drives or emailing results to your accounts.

Headphones Headphones to use with the computers are available at the Circulation Desk.

Computer Usage All files are automatically deleted from the system and network hard drives of the library computers every night after closing. Computers automatically shut down 5 minutes prior to the Library’s closing time. The Library reserves the right to impose time limitations on the use of Library computing resources. Because of the high demand for computers in the MKP Library, we ask all users who wish to leave for more than 15 minutes to log off the computers to make them available for others. Any computer left logged in and vacant for more than 15 minutes may be rebooted. Please do not leave personal belongings unattended at any time. The Library assumes no responsibility for damages arising from the use of its computer and network operations.

Courtesy in the Marvin K. Peterson Library The mission of the Marvin K. Peterson Library is to provide the University of New Haven community with state-of-the-art informational, research, and instructional materials, as well as services and facilities. Supporting scholarly endeavors and informational needs of our students and faculty and preserving library collections in those subject areas for use by future generations of scholars is necessary. The Library staff values and will maintain safe and comfortable conditions for library users and staff alike and create an environment conducive to serious intellectual work. In order to fulfill this mission for all

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members of the University community, we ask that those using the Library observe the following courtesies:

Cellular Telephone Use The Library environment must be conducive to research and study. Since cellular phones are commonplace, we expect cell phone users to be respectful of the rights of others and to help maintain a quiet environment while in the Library. Owners of cell phones are expected to turn their cell phone ringers off or to turn the ringer to the lowest possible volume level or put them on vibrate, so as not to disturb others. When using their cell phone, patrons are expected to move to a location away from fellow patrons so their conversations will not disturb those around them. Please move to the phone foyer at the entrance of the Library, to the Library Cafe, or to the lower level for your quiet, brief cell phone conversations. Cell phone users should talk softly and in a conversational tone. The third-level reading room, Library Information Commons, all stairwells, stairwell landings, and all book stacks are off-limits for cell phone use.

Noise Levels The Library environment must be conducive to research and study. The Lower Level of the Marvin K. Peterson Library is designated as an area where discussion and group work are allowed at a normal conversational level not disruptive to others. The Upper Level is designated as a “Quiet Study Floor� where no talking is permitted. While working at any of the computers in the Library Information Commons on the Main Level, quiet conversations should not disturb others. Other areas of the Library, such as the book and journal stacks, are areas where quiet conversations should not disturb others. When necessary, please ask Library Staff for assistance.

Food and Drink Policy Food and drink are allowed only in the Library Cafe located on the Main Level of the Library. Beverages in closed containers are allowed throughout the Library. Food in all other parts of the building is not permitted. The main reason is that spilled food and beverages can damage books, computers, journals, carpeting, and furniture. The crumbs and spills that are left behind attract ants, roaches, and mice which are a serious health concern. We ask for your cooperation on with this.

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Acceptable Behavior Patrons and staff alike are expected to treat each other with dignity and respect. Cordiality and collegiality are the accepted standard. Some examples of behaviors that are NOT acceptable in the Library include: • Raised voices • Verbal abuse • Becoming argumentative, belligerent, or disruptive • Not leaving the Library at announced closing times whether planned or emergency in nature • Entering posted staff areas without express permission of Library Staff • Using emergency doors, exits, and stairwells in non-emergency situations • Not following requests by Library Staff to cease disruptive and inappropriate behaviors.

Consequences Those who fail to follow the above policies will be asked by Library Staff either to comply or leave the library. A University of New Haven ID or another photo ID may be requested. Additional sanctions, including loss of library privileges and/or referral for disciplinary action to the Dean of Students, may be imposed on repeat offenders. Non-University of New Haven offenders may be barred from the library entirely. University of New Haven Police Department will be called whenever necessary.

Posting Policy This policy delineates the standard procedures and policies regarding all posting materials including but not limited to posters, flyers, yard signs, table tents, electronic communications, napkin holders, window clings and promotional materials. A. This policy applies to all University and non-University groups using University facilities or grounds. B. Construction/safety postings distributed by the Office of Facilities and or Campus Police are exempt from this policy.

Reason for the Policy The purpose of this policy is to manage the physical posting and advertising of materials on campus.

Postings and Removal Postings are including but not limited to posters, flyers, yard signs, table tents, electronic communications, napkin holders, window clings and promotional materials.

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All faculty, staff, students, Registered Student Organizations and non-University groups’ postings must first be stamped and approved by the Center for Student Engagement, Leadership and Orientation prior to copying and posting.

Items Not Permitted 1. Posters, flyers, promotional materials, and other forms of public announcement from private individuals or student organizations advertising private parties shall not be permitted on campus or in any campus publication. 2. Materials containing references or logos promoting the sale or consumption of alcohol are prohibited on campus and in any campus publication. 3. Materials containing references to violence or weapons, including but not limited to guns and knives. 4. Materials containing nudity, offensive language or graphics. 5. Material from other Universities and college admission offices. 6. Outside vendors or advertisers are not permitted to post information in the Residence Halls. Postings are permitted for a maximum of two weeks prior to the event and must be removed within 48 hours of event date.

Affixing Under no circumstances may postings be affixed on University or city signs, lamp posts, trees, buildings, walls, doors, fences, elevators, vehicles or any location where the posting may impair safety or cause damage to University property (see Approved Locations 3031.3). • Window postings need approval from the Executive Director, Center for Student Engagement, Leadership and Orientation in consultation with the Director of Campus Space Management. No decals, stickers or tape are permitted on windows, only window clings are permitted. • Use only tacks on bulletin boards and painter’s tape on non-tackable boards. • Approved flyers are only permitted on bulletin boards in locations listed below; materials cannot be posted on windows without permission from the Center for Student Engagement, Leadership and Orientation. • Flyers posted in places other than bulletin boards will be removed and sponsoring group will be notified of the violation. • Yard signs are only permitted on grassy areas on campus with a maximum of 10-yard signs per event. • Requests to hang banners should be noted within your EMS event request or by contacting the Facilities Operations Office. RSO banner content must be approved by the Center for Student Engagement, Leadership and Orientation prior to posting.

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Approved Locations Approved locations for Postings on University property are listed below: a. Kaplan Hall – 2 total; 2 on 2nd floor b. Bartels Campus Center – 3 total; 1 on back of each white board (1 by Information Desk, 1 by Dining Hall entrance), 1 on bulletin board stairwell c. Bartels Campus Center Windows – Major special events may be advertised on the windows of this building using approved washable paint and permission from the CSELO. d. Maxcy Hall – 3 total; 1 on 2nd floor 2 on 1st floor e. Dodd’s Hall – 2 total; 2 on 2nd floor (by the doors) f.

Bergami Hall Game Room – (September-April) 1 total

g. Maxcy Quad – yard signs only h. Residential Quad – yard signs only i.

Residence Halls (September-April), please bring 75 stamped copies to the Office of Residential Life located on the first floor of Bixler Hall (building #20 on the campus map) for approval/distribution

j.

Bucknall Theater boxes (theater/gallery promo only)

k. Department boards must be maintained in accordance with these policy guidelines l.

Banner for Bartels Marketplace – hung off the railing on the mezzanine

m. Outdoor locked display cases – 2

Violations and Enforcement Individuals, departments, Recognized Student Organizations and off-campus businesses or groups that violate the above policy will be notified of the posting violation via email, the second offense will result in loss of privileges for one month and a third offense will result in complete loss of posting privi leges for one semester. The University will bill for any damage that occurs as a result of improper posting. The Center for Student Engagement, Leadership and Orientation will be responsible for enforcement of this policy for Registered Student Organizations, Students or Outside Entities and Facilities Management will be responsible for enforcement with on campus departments (to include conference services groups).

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University of New Haven Good Samaritan Policy Students should not be reluctant to seek help in a substance-abuse-related emergency because of potential disciplinary consequences for themselves and for the person in need of assistance. The safety and well-being of our students are of primary concern at the University of New Haven, and students are encouraged to look out not only for their own health and safety but also for the health and safety of others. Medical assistance should be sought without hesitation when a student’s health and/or safety is threatened or appears to be in jeopardy, and immediate action should be taken to prevent injury/illness/death. The “University of New Haven Good Samaritan Policy” represents an effort to increase the likelihood that students will feel comfortable seeking medical assistance when faced with a substance abuse related medical emergency. While policy violations cannot be completely overlooked, the Dean of Students Office will take into consideration the positive impact of reporting an incident on the welfare of students when determining appropriate sanctions.

Substance Use Policy Philosophy The University of New Haven works with students to maintain an environment where students can develop holistically. Our goal is to create a living and learning environment that supports healthy choices and lifestyles which enable students to lead purposeful and fulfilling lives. Students are supported in making informed, responsible decisions in accordance with CT State Law and University policies. The University provides opportunities for students to: • Become responsible citizens who make intentional decisions related to substance use. • Reduce the effects of substance use that impact student success both in and out of the classroom. • Empower individuals who can serve as advocates for reducing high-risk substance abuse on campus. • Encourage social responsibility. • Sponsor alternative substance free social events and programs. • Teach intervention skills which focus on the responsibility to intervene when others are engaging in high-risk behaviors. • Promote and publicize substance abuse intervention policies and education programs. • Build relationships with student organizations and their leadership relative to their engagement of substance abuse issues on campus. • Provide resources that will assist students who have substance abuse issues in developing a recovery plan. • Find it acceptable to choose not to use substances. UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN STUDENT HANDBOOK REV. 1/12/2021

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• Refuse to condone excessive drinking or intoxication. • Understand that intoxication or substance abuse is not an excuse for misconduct or infringing on the rights of others. Students will work with the University community to: • Encourage fellow students to make safe and healthy choices regarding alcohol use. • Discourage substance use which negatively impacts the University community. • Plan and implement substance free events on and off-campus. • Respect and appreciate the decisions of peers not to use substances. • Promote and advocate for a safe and caring environment where an individual can live and learn. • Assume responsibility for their well-being and the well-being of their peers. • Communicate that actions and inactions in regards to substance use will have a direct effect on their relationship with others and the University. • Demonstrate responsible behavior.

Tobacco Free/Smoke Free Campus Effective June 1, 2015, the West Haven and Orange Campuses are tobacco free, smoke free, and vape free.

Including Parents and Legal Guardians in Conversations About Alcohol and Other Drugs The University supports the idea that students, parent(s) or legal guardian(s), and the University are partners with responsibilities for the promotion of a healthy and positive educational experience for students. University disciplinary policies and procedures are designed to promote an environment conducive to student learning and growth while protecting the University community. It is the belief of the University that students benefit from discussions with their parent(s) or legal guardian(s) about the effects of alcohol or use of controlled substances on their educational experience. The University may notify parents/guardians of students, under the age of 21, who have been found in violation of the Substance Use Policy. Notification of parents/guardians will occur when, in the opinion of the Dean of Students or his/ her designee, violation is significant enough to indicate a greater level of care may be necessary to support the student. It is our general practice to encourage a student to contact his or her parent(s) or legal guardian(s) prior to the University’s notification, however, there may be circumstances when contact will be initiated more rapidly.

Policy University policies and procedures provide both a guideline and system of accountability to aid in establishing and maintaining personal and community standards. UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN STUDENT HANDBOOK REV. 1/12/2021

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In compliance with all federal, state and local laws, the University of New Haven prohibits the possession, manufacture, sale, distribution, and unlawful use/abuse of any and all controlled substances and drugs. The University also abides by and enforces Connecticut State laws regarding alcohol (sec. 30-89, 3089a) which state that only persons 21 years of age or older may buy, deliver, consume, possess, or transport alcoholic beverages, and outlines legal obligations for persons exercising dominion over dwelling units. The possession, sale, or use of powdered alcohol is a violation of Connecticut state law regardless of age effective October 1, 2015.

Alcohol Guidelines and Regulations 1. Use or possession of alcoholic beverages and the sale, delivery, or service to individuals under the age of 21 is prohibited by the University and Connecticut state law. 2. Any public or private use of alcohol by students that leads to intoxication, intrusive, destructive, or violent behavior is unacceptable to the University community and will be treated as a conduct matter. Intoxication is defined as the point where the quantity of alcohol a person consumes exceeds the individual’s tolerance for alcohol and impairs behavioral or physical abilities. 3. All students are responsible for discouraging alcohol-related behavior that is abusive to themselves or to others. Any effort to induce or force a student to drink against his/her expressed desire is prohibited. Students will be held accountable for their behavior at all times to include: a. Instances when they themselves are under the influence of alcohol. b. Instances when they are involved with an individual who is under the influence of alcohol. 4. Alcohol is not permitted in first-year residence halls or in rooms, suites, or apartments in which all residents are underage students. 5. Students and their guests who are 21 years of age or older may have alcohol in their living unit within the residence halls/apartments provided that: a. The student of legal drinking age ensures that those residents of the living unit who are not of legal drinking age do not possess, consume or serve alcohol. b. Intoxicated individuals are not served. c. There is no appearance of underage consumption. d. Failure to enforce the above guidelines makes the host liable under the law, not only for serving alcohol illegally, but also for actions which the individual under the influence might take after leaving a room/apartment. Additionally, students involved will be referred to the University Conduct System for substance policy violations. 6. The consumption of alcohol or possession of an open container (i.e. bottles, cans, cups, squeeze bottles, etc.) is not permitted on University grounds and in public areas such as UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN STUDENT HANDBOOK REV. 1/12/2021

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hallways, lobbies, stairwells, elevators, common areas, etc. with the exception of approved University sponsored events on campus. A closed container is defined as having the manufacturing seal intact. 7. The presence, possession or use of common source containers of alcoholic beverages (including but not limited to kegs, beer balls, other bulk containers requiring a tapping device or spigot, punch bowls, trash cans, or other containers used as punch bowls) by individuals or groups is prohibited. This includes common source containers at tailgate events on campus. 8. Contests (drinking games) involving the consumption of alcohol and possession of any paraphernalia related to such contests are prohibited and will be confiscated if found. 9. The use or possession of funnels to consume alcohol is prohibited. 10. The use or possession of grain alcohol is prohibited. 11. Alcohol is prohibited on any athletic field and at all athletic events, with the exception of University-sponsored receptions 12. Receptions held in academic buildings are the responsibility of the academic departments sponsoring the event and must be in compliance with all state laws and University regulations. 13. Operation of a motor vehicle while under the influence of alcohol is prohibited and subject to University and civil action. 14. Violations of the Substance Use Policy posted on the internet (Facebook, Twitter, Email, etc.) may be subject to disciplinary action. 15. Violations of the Substance Use Policy will be referred to the University Conduct System. 16. Questions that involve employees’ use or abuse of alcoholshould be directed to the Human Resources Office.

Guidelines for Events Involving Alcohol on Campus 1. While alcoholic beverages are generally not permitted at student events, special requests from student groups, clubs and organizations for alcohol service (beer and wine only) at a campus event must be made in writing to the Senior Associate Dean of Students at least three (3) weeks in advance of the event. There will be no exceptions to the three (3) weeks in advance requirement. 2. The Registered Student Organization must submit a Web Request through the Event Management System (EMS) to facilitate a special request to serve alcohol at an event 3. An approved request to serve alcohol within the EMS reservation constitutes an agreement between the sponsoring group hosting the event and the University. Any deviation from the terms outlined in the agreement will result in immediate termination of the event. 4. The group’s faculty or administrative adviser must be present during the entire event to UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN STUDENT HANDBOOK REV. 1/12/2021

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ensure that the sponsoring group adheres to State and Federal law and University regulations. 5. The sale of alcohol is prohibited on campus except in the case of approved special events where the sale and service of alcohol is being conducted by the University Dining Services in accordance with State law and University policy. 6. All alcohol served on campus shall be dispensed by the University Dining Services, with the exception of events held in the lower level German Club Bar. 7. Event planners must make provisions to check identification and to prevent the interaction between those using alcohol legally and underage persons by having a separate serving/consuming area. The serving and subsequent consumption of alcohol at registered events must be limited to a single defined area. Alcoholic beverages cannot be taken from the defined area. Sufficient space shall be designated for the service area to avoid congestion and related disruption. 8. Positive proof of age (a valid State issued photo I.D.) is required at any event at which alcohol is served and/or consumed. 9. The University requires that non-alcoholic beverages and food be served at all events where alcohol is present and encourages entertainment where appropriate. 10. There must be established time limits for the serving of alcohol at any event. It is advised that alcohol service/sale end one (1) hour prior to the end of the event. The Senior Associate Dean of Students and University Police may place limitations on the amount of alcohol permitted at any event. Any violation of limitations or restrictions on the amount of alcohol permitted at any event will be treated as a disciplinary matter in accordance with University conduct procedures. 11. Alcoholic beverages may not be offered as a prize, award, gift certificate or incentive by an individual, group, club, or organization. 12. No social event shall include any form of “drinking contest� in its activities or promotion. 13. Undergraduate Student Activity Fees may not be used for the purchase of alcohol. 14. University of New Haven students will be held responsible for the behavior of their guests at all University events. 15. Campus chapters of international and national organizations may have regulations that go beyond the University’s policy. The policies and procedures contained herein are the minimum requirements applicable to these organizations.

Guidelines for Events Involving Alcohol off Campus 1. Vendor must agree in writing to cash sales only, collected by the vendor during the function. Open bars are prohibited. 2. Alcohol cannot be purchased with chapter funds (this includes USGA funds, chapter dues UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN STUDENT HANDBOOK REV. 1/12/2021

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and off-campus bank accounts). 3. All off campus events with alcohol require that the organization uses buses to provide transportation to and from the venue, all students MUST take the buses as the only means of transportation. 4. A guest list must be submitted to the Office of Student Activities two (2) days prior to the event. 5. All organizations must complete an off-campus form through EMS and also complete a hold harmless form. 6. A University of New Haven advisor must be present at the event for the duration of the entire event. 7. The organization is highly encouraged to use party monitors. Party monitors are members of the organization (18 years or older) who are 100% alcohol free during the social event and hours leading up to the social event. They will help organize the logistics of the event such as: loading and unloading the buses, monitoring the event and ensuring safety, and any other duties that are necessary during the event.

Regulations Regarding Alcohol/Party Promotional Materials and Advertisements 1. Posters, flyers, promotional materials, and other forms of public announcement from private individuals or student organizations advertising private parties shall not be permitted on campus or in any campus publication. 2. Posters, flyers, advertisements, announcements, and any other materials containing references or logos promoting the sale or consumption of alcohol or use of cannabis are prohibited on campus and in any campus publication.

Examples of Sanctions for Violations of the Alcohol Policy If the individual(s) involved in the violation cannot be identified, the sanction will be applied to all residents of a room/suite/apartment or to all members of a club/organization. Level I Offense: Underage individual in the presence of alcohol, of age individual present at an underage alcohol violation, empty alcohol containers in an area where students are not of legal age. Minimum sanction of a letter of reprimand and referral to Drinking Decisions 101. Level II Offense: Underage possession or consumption, open containers with manufacturing seals broken, first violation involving a large and/or disruptive gathering, failure to prevent underage consumption in your assigned room/apartment, or a second Level I violation. Minimum sanction of referral to the BASICS group and a $100.00 fine. Level III Offense: Intoxication, participation in or presence at contests involving the consumption of alcohol and possession of any paraphernalia related to such contests, supplying or serving minors, second level II violation, and/or second violation involving a large and/or disruptive gathering. Minimum

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sanction of referral to the BASICS group or individual substance use assessment, parental notification, and a $200.00 fine. Level IV Offense: Possession of kegs, grain alcohol, or common source containers; possession or use of funnels. Minimum sanction of 1-year disciplinary probation, parental notification, $300.00 fine. If a first violation, minimum referral to the BASICS Group; if a second violation, minimum referral to an individual substance use assessment, and/or other appropriate actions as determined by the hearing body. Level V Offense: Fourth level II violation, third level III violation, any additional violations after a level IV violation, and/or any physical assault developing from intoxication. Minimum sanction of suspension or removal from the residence halls and/or the University and, parental notification.

Narcotics, Cannabis or Controlled Substances The manufacture, distribution, possession, sale, or misuse of any narcotic, cannabis or controlled substance, including prescription drugs, is a violation of University regulations. Intentionally or recklessly inhaling or ingesting substances that will alter a student's mental state is also prohibited. Cannabis products that contain THC are illegal under federal law and prohibited by University Policy. Cannabis products that do not contain any trace of THC such as CBD oil are permitted. A Connecticut Medical Marijuana card does not allow the use of cannabis on any University property. If students are in a location where others are using illegal drugs, they may be held responsible for the violation as well. Students who are suspected to have violated these regulations will be subject to University disciplinary action. If found responsible students will face, but are not limited to, the following sanctions:

Examples of Sanctions for Violations of the Illegal or Controlled Substances Policy Level I Offense: Smell of cannabis smoke in a room/apartment or location on campus, presence where cannabis smoke/use is detected off campus, possession and/or use of drug paraphernalia. Minimum sanction of educational sanctions such a research/reflection paper. Level II Offense: Possession and/or use of unauthorized drugs, second level I violation. Minimum sanction of a $100.00 fine, parental notification, and referral to Cannabis BASICS. Possible removal from the residence halls and/or suspension or expulsion from the University. Level III Offense: Second level two offense. Minimum sanction $200 fine, parental notification, disciplinary probation, and referral to an individual substance use assessment. Possible suspension from the residence hall and or suspension/expulsion from the University. Level IV Offense: Sale, manufacture and/or distribution of illegal drugs. Minimum sanction of suspension and/or expulsion from the University, and parental notification. In addition, the student may be subject to arrest and criminal prosecution in these matters according to federal, state and/or local criminal codes that pertain to illegal or controlled substances.

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The University reserves the right to inspect student rooms and property if reasonable suspicion of illegal activity exists. Reasonable suspicion may be generated by, but is not limited to, observable substances or drug paraphernalia and/or the evidence of substance usage including the odor of marijuana. To preserve the academic integrity and mission of the University of New Haven, University personnel will vigorously pursue investigations and enforcement of these policies. The University has developed this policy in compliance with all federal, state and local laws. The University distributes a drug and alcohol policy statement to all members of the University community on a yearly basis. Copies are available from the Office of the Dean of Students, Human Resources, in course registration books, and in this Handbook.

Substance Use Intervention Programs Drinking Decisions 101: An educational, interactive, program designed to challenge students on their thoughts, choices, and behaviors regarding alcohol use both on- and off-campus. This 90-minute session includes a formal presentation followed by a collaborative discussion. BASICS Group: The BASICS Group is a two-session intervention intended to help those students who have reported incidences of underage, heavy alcohol use or cannabis use. The focus of the group is to help students reduce alcohol/cannabis consumption and problems that are caused and exacerbated by alcohol/cannabis use. BASICS Individual: Students are assigned to meet individually with a therapist at the University of New Haven Counseling and Psychological Services Office. Referrals are intended for those students who have had repeated alcohol/substance use violations, and/or for students who are at great risk for future problems.

Tobacco-Free, Smoke Free, Vape Free Campus Policy As of June 1, 2015, the University of New Haven will be Tobacco-Free, Smoke-Free, and Vape Free. Smoking, the use of smokeless tobacco products, e-cigarettes, vapes and unregulated products will not be permitted on any property, building or space occupied by the University of New Haven including but not limited to that which is owned, leased or managed on the Main Campus, North Campus, Sawmill Campus and Orange Campus. This decision is based on the results of a 2014 survey of the University of New Haven community and the goal to create a healthier learning and work environment for our students, faculty, staff and campus visitors. Research shows that tobacco is the number one cause of avoidable death in the United States, and by establishing a Tobacco-Free/Smoke-Free/Vape Free Campus we will reduce exposure to carcinogens and asthma triggers. This is important for many reasons, including the fact that the Federal Americans with Disabilities Act requires us to maintain an accessible campus which provides accommodation for students and employees with medical conditions, such as asthma, that are triggered by second-hand UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN STUDENT HANDBOOK REV. 1/12/2021

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smoke. This decision also will eliminate the litter caused by improper disposal of cigarette butts and allow facilities staff to focus their efforts on other areas of campus.

Policy Statement Smoking and tobacco product use are prohibited in all facilities and areas of the University of New Haven campus. This includes but is not limited to all indoor and outdoor areas on the Main, North, Sawmill and Orange Campuses. This policy applies to any individual on campus property, including but not limited to: students, employees, contractors, subcontractors, volunteers, visitors, and members of the public, and is applicable twenty-four (24) hours a day, seven (7) days a week.

Definitions Smoking and or Vaping. Inhaling, exhaling, burning, carrying or possessing any lighted or vaporized tobacco product, including cigarettes, vapes, cigars, pipe tobacco or any other lit tobacco products. Tobacco Products. All forms of tobacco, including but not limited to cigarettes, cigarillos, vaping devices, cigars, shisha, pipes, herbal cigarettes, water pipes (hookahs), electronic cigarettes (vaporizers), electronic hookahs, and all forms of smokeless tobacco including but not limited to: • Chew: Tobacco placed between the cheek and gum or upper lip teeth • Orbs: Nicotine-infused orbs consumed like breath mints • Snuff: Fine-ground tobacco inhaled through the nose • Snus: Ground tobacco in a tea bag-like sack kept between the cheek and teeth • Sticks: Nicotine-infused sticks chewed like a toothpick • Strips: Nicotine-infused strips that dissolve on the tongue Tobacco Use. Personal use of any tobacco product, whether intended to be lit or not, which includes smoking and or vaping (as defined above) as well as the use of electronic cigarettes, vaping devices or any other device intended to simulate smoking, the use of smokeless tobacco, including snuff; chewing tobacco; smokeless tobacco; smokeless pouches; and other forms of loose-leaf tobacco, smokeless tobacco; and the use of unlit cigarettes, cigars, pipe tobacco, hookah or other devices using smoke and/or vaporizing products. This also includes use of any product intended to mimic tobacco products, contain tobacco flavoring or deliver nicotine for any purpose other than cessation. University of New Haven Controlled Properties. Any property, building or space occupied by the University of New Haven including but not limited to that which is owned, leased or managed. Tobacco Free/Vape Free Areas. All common areas, classrooms, residence halls, elevators, hallways, University-owned and University-leased vehicles, personal vehicles while on University properties, restrooms, dining areas, conference and meeting rooms, all other enclosed areas on campus, garages, parking lots, outdoor grounds, quads, athletic fields, entrance and exit ways, and any other areas of the University campus. UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN STUDENT HANDBOOK REV. 1/12/2021

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Exceptions For educational purposes, research involving tobacco or tobacco products may be approved as an exception to this policy. Permission must be granted by the Institutional Review Board and Health Services Office, prior to conducting any research. This is to ensure the health and safety of any participants. Theatrical performances that require smoking to keep the integrity of the production may also be an exception. Permission for such performances must be granted by the Dean of Students Office, University of New Haven Police Department and the Campus Fire Marshall.

Enforcement The responsibility for the enforcement and communication of this policy rests with all members of the University community. This policy applies equally to students, employees and visitors. Those who violate the policy may be subject to disciplinary action through the Office of Human Resources or the Office of the Dean of Students.

Communication Supervisors and managers on campus are responsible for leading by example and respectfully communicating the policy to employees, students, volunteers and visitors. Employees, students, volunteers and visitors who observe individuals using tobacco product on University controlled property are encouraged and empowered to respectfully explain that its use is prohibited at University of New Haven and report the individual, if known, to Human Resources or the Office of the Dean of Students. Installation of signage will be placed at appropriately designated entrances and exits of Main Campus, North Campus and Orange Campus. Additional signage will be posted on entrances and exits to campus buildings and University owned and or leased vehicles.

Compliance All University of New Haven students, employees, contractors, subcontractors, volunteers, visitors, and members of the public are required to adhere to this policy.

Violations Violations by students should be brought to the attention of the Office of the Dean of Students (203.932.7432), which will take appropriate educational or disciplinary action. Possible sanctions for student violations of the Tobacco-Free, Smoke-Free, and Vape Free policy are as follows: a. 1st Violation — Warning b. 2nd Violation — Letter of Reprimand, $50 fine c. 3rd Violation — Letter of Reprimand, $100 fine UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN STUDENT HANDBOOK REV. 1/12/2021

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d. 4th Violation — 1 year Disciplinary Probation, $150 fine e. 5th Violation — 1 year Disciplinary Probation, $200 fine, possible removal from University Housing Violations by employees should be brought to the attention of the employee’s supervisor or the Office of Human Resources (203.932.7240), which will take appropriate action as necessary. The University of New Haven generally endorses the use of progressive discipline, which is normally a four-step process. University management may elect to skip any of these steps depending on the severity of the violation. The four steps are: a. Counseling with a verbal warning b. Counseling with a written warning c. Time off/Suspension d. Discharge Violations by students in the ELS Center Program, in Charger Plaza, will be addressed by the ELS Center Director. Consequences for policy violations are explained in the ELS Handbook. Violations by visitors/guest of the University should be brought to the attention of the hosting department/organization or University of New Haven Police Department (203.932.7014). The hosting department/organization and University of New Haven Police Department reserve the right to ask the visitor/guest to leave campus immediately. Violations by vendors should be brought to the attention of the hosting department/organization or the Purchasing Department (203.932.7129).

Cessation Assistance The University of New Haven is committed to supporting all employees and students who wish to stop using tobacco or nicotine products. Assistance for faculty and staff to overcome tobacco or nicotine addiction is available through the University of New Haven health plan or the resources listed below. Student assistance is available through the Health Services Office, located on the ground level of Sheffield Hall. Connecticut Quit Line 1.800.784.8669 www.quitnow.net/connecticut EX — a new way to think about quitting smoking www.becomeanex.org

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Be Tobacco Free betobaccofree.hhs.gov Quit Tobacco www.ucanquit2.org Quit Vaping https://teen.smokefree.gov/quit-vaping/how-to-quit-vaping University of New Haven Employee Health Provider — Meritain Health Contact Human Resources at 203.932.7240 or Meritain Health at 877.219.2955. www.unhhealthplan.com

Fire Arms, Weapons, and Explosives Policy The University of New Haven is committed to maintaining a safe and secure environment for all community members.

Scope This policy applies to employees, students, contractors, vendors and any visitors. This policy applies to any University of New Haven premise, and/or in any building under University control including branch campuses, satellite locations (including University of New Haven non-U.S. locations), and vehicles located on University of New Haven property.

Policy Statement All members of the University of New Haven community, including faculty, staff, and students, as well as visitors, are prohibited from possessing, using, or attempting to use firearms, explosives or weapons (hereafter collectively referred to as “weapons”) on the premises of the University or in any building under University control or at any University-sponsored event without the explicit authorization of the University of New Haven’s Associate Vice President of Public Safety and Administrative Services, whether or not a federal or state license to possess the same has been issued to the possessor.

Definitions Firearm: Any device that shoots a bullet, pellet, flare, tranquilizer, spear dart, paintball or other projectile, whether loaded or unloaded, including those powered by CO2. This includes, but is not limited to, guns, air guns, dart guns, pistols, revolvers, rifles, cannons, etc., and any ammunition for any such device.

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accessories, empty holsters and magazines, electronic defense weapons, martial arts weapons, paintball guns, air guns, switchblade knives, or any knives with blades four or more inches in length, swords, bows and arrows, hand grenades, brass knuckles, sling shots, dangerous materials and chemicals such as “mace� or teargas, but excluding normally available over- the-counter oleoresin capsicum (pepper based) deterrents.

Explosives: Any chemical compound or mechanical mixture that contains any oxidizing and combustible units, or other ingredients, in such proportion, quantities or packing that an ignition by fire, friction, concussion, percussion, or detonator, or any part of the compound or mixture, may cause a sudden generation of highly heated gases that results in gaseous pressures capable of producing destructive efforts on contiguous objects or of destroying life or limb. This includes, but is not limited to, fireworks, firecrackers, black powder, dynamite, etc. as well as detonating devices such as detonators, blasting caps, timers, incendiary wire and the like.

Policy Provisions It is prohibited to possess weapons on property owned or controlled by The University of New Haven or at any University-sponsored event without the explicit authorization of the AVP of Public Safety, whether or not a federal or state license to possess the same has been issued to the possessor. The only exceptions to this policy are as follows: 1. All Connecticut police officers and sworn members of other agencies, including Federal agencies such as the FBI, DEA, and ATF in compliance with their professional designation who are actively employed by a law enforcement agency that has a work-related off-duty firearm carry requirement. All officers falling within this exception must also carry their department identification card as well as their department badge/shield. 2. Persons in the military in performance of their official duties to the extent they are legally permitted to possess weapons and with proper display of badge/authority. 3. Licensed faculty or staff who will be using weapons for training purposes. Such use must have received prior written approval by their College Dean, Provost, and Associate Vice President of Public Safety and Administrative Services. 4. University sanctioned groups or events where a particular weapon(s) is a required part of the curriculum or activity, i.e. martial arts classes/clubs; fencing classes/clubs; theatrical events, etc. Such use must have received prior written approval by their College Dean, Provost, and Associate Vice President of Public Safety and Administrative Services.

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All University community members should immediately report unauthorized weapons to the University of New Haven Police Department at 203-932-7070. Anyone possessing a weapon other than those in the exception categories will be asked to remove them from the campus or event immediately. They may also be subject to arrest and/or disciplinary action as discussed below. Exceptions to this policy may be requested in writing to the Associate Vice President of Public Safety and Administrative Services. Only under the most unusual circumstance would an exception be granted. Questions about the applicability of this policy to specific items may also be directed to the AVP of Public Safety. Any student, faculty, or staff member violating this policy shall be subject to the disciplinary policies and procedures applicable to students, faculty or staff. These measures may include up to and including termination from employment and/or expulsion from the University. Additionally, possession of unlicensed firearms or weapons may lead to criminal prosecution by the appropriate jurisdiction.

Hazing Policy The University of New Haven policy on hazing is applicable to all members of the University community and their guests.

Definition of Hazing Hazing is any action taken or situation created which produces mental or physical discomfort, embarrassment, harassment, or ridicule. The University of New Haven policy on hazing is applicable to all members of the University community and their guests.

Understanding the Scope of Hazing The University encourages students to form bonds, build a cohesive community and engage in activities that nurture and encourage friendship, tradition, positive self-esteem and University pride. The term hazing is often misunderstood, and it is not always clear what activities constitute hazing. Hazing is an activity that is a perceived, suggested or forced condition of joining or maintaining membership in an organization. When in doubt it is in the best interest of the group to consult the Center for Student Engagement, Leadership and Orientation, the Dean of Students Office, University Police, Athletics, their organization advisor, or other University officials to seek clarification. Please note that consent to activities that constitute hazing is not a valid justification for the act. The University of New Haven policy on hazing is in compliance with Connecticut Statues, Section 53-23A

Activities that Violate the Hazing Polic: Many behaviors and activities fall in the category of hazing; hazing can range from minor to severe forms of behavior and activities. Examples of hazing during the membership intake/new member process includes, but are not limited to:

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1. Wearing matching uniforms for non-ritual activities 2. Marching/death marching/cutting corners/surfacing 3. Lining-up/locking-up in situations other than new member presentations 4. Social isolation/social probation/social restriction 5. Physical and or psychological shocks 6. Required to shave your head or other part of your body 7. Performing acts of servitude 8. Required to possess or carry certain items at all times 9. Depriving privileges granted to other members 10. Requiring/suggesting/asking new members to live together for the duration of their membership intake/ new member process 11. Food restrictions, consumption of alcohol/drugs or consumption of excessive amounts of liquid or food 12. Giving new members unreasonable time restrictions upon which they must complete a task or assigning menial tasks and assignments 13. Scavenger hunts, drop-offs, kidnappings 14. The use of blindfolds in activities other than the ritual ceremonies 15. Forced to undergo tattooing, piercing or branding 16. Engaging in or simulating sexual acts 17. Engaging in sexually violent or sexually harassing behavior 18. Threatening or causing physical restraint or abuse (including but not limited to being held down, tied up, paddled, taped or confined to a small space) 19. Being nude in a public or private space 20. Damaging, destroying or stealing property 21. Acts that ridicule, embarrass or humiliate a person whether in private or public 22. Any activity that would subject the person to extreme mental stress, such as sleep deprivation 23. Participating in membership intake/new member activities past 11:45 p.m. that interfere with scholastic activities

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Identifying Hazing Before engaging in any act, ask yourself these questions: 1. Did the incident involve physical abuse, sleep deprivation, physical strain, hitting / slapping? 2. Was alcohol consumed? Drugs? 3. Would I be willing to describe or share information about the event to University officials? 4. Would active or current members of the group refuse to participate in this activity with the new members and do exactly the same activity? 5. Would I object to this activity being photographed for the school newspaper or filmed by the local TV news crew? 6. Would I feel comfortable participating in this activity if my parents, professor, coach or University official were watching? 7. Would we get in trouble if a University official walked by? 8. Was I being asked to keep non-ritual activities a secret? 9. Was I doing anything illegal? 10. Did participation violate my values, my organizations values, or the RSO Student and Advisor Handbook? 11. Did this activity cause emotional distress or stress of any kind to myself or others? 12. If someone was injured, would I feel comfortable being investigated by the police or insurance carrier?

Reporting Acts of Hazing Any member of the University community can report an act of hazing. Reports can be made to the Center for Student Engagement, Leadership and Orientation, University Police, the Dean of Students Office, or the Athletic Department.

Process All allegations of hazing will be investigated by an appropriate University official. The investigation will consist of the gathering of information to determine whether the act of hazing has occurred. Once an allegation is made, the organization will be suspended from participating in all activities on campus, representing the University in any capacity or organizing/hosting/co-hosting events on or off campus pending the conclusion of the investigation. At the conclusion of the investigation, the University official will produce a finding as to if the policy was violated, and if so, impose a sanction, based on information gathered. If the investigation results in a sanction, several factors will be considered: UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN STUDENT HANDBOOK REV. 1/12/2021

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1. Nature of the offense 2. Severity of the harm or damage 3. The role of the organization/individual in the act & disciplinary history of the organization/individual 4. Truthfulness of the organization/individual during the investigation The University also reserves the right to report the act to a law enforcement agency if necessary. Individual students found responsible for violating the hazing policy will be subject to disciplinary sanctions as severe as suspension or expulsion from the University. Any organization found responsible for violating the University policies on hazing will be subject to immediate disciplinary action. An organization desiring recognition after the specified period of time shall reapply for recognition through the established campus procedures. If a student affiliated with an organization acts on behalf of the organization to commit an act of hazing, both the student and the organization shall be held liable for the action, and appropriate sanctions shall be imposed. For those organizations which hold national charters, any violations of this policy will result in notification to the national office by the Dean of Students Office.

Policy on Harassment and Bias-Motivated Offenses At the University of New Haven, there is an expectation that all community members are committed to creating and supporting a climate which promotes civility, mutual respect, and open-mindedness. There also exists an understanding that along with the freedom of expression comes the responsibility to support community members’ right to live and work in an environment free from harassment and fear. The University of New Haven community does not tolerate harassment directed toward any person or group, including students, employees, and visitors. It is expected that all members of the University will engage in anti-bias behavior and refrain from actions that intimidate, humiliate, or demean persons or groups or that undermine their security or self-esteem. The University strictly prohibits making submission to harassment either explicitly or implicitly a term or condition of an individual’s employment, performance appraisal, or evaluation of academic performance. The University also forbids harassment that has the effect of interfering with an individual’s performance or creating an intimidating, hostile, or offensive environment. All members of the University community are responsible for the maintenance of a social environment in which people are free to work and learn without fear of discrimination and abuse.

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Definitions of Key Terms Anti-bias Anti-bias describes an active commitment to challenging stereotyping and forms of prejudice such as racism, religious bigotry, sexism, homophobia, ageism, and ableism.

Bias Bias is an inclination or preference either for or against an individual or group that interferes with impartial judgment and is based on traits related to race, ethnicity, country of origin, religion, gender, gender identity/expression, sexual orientation, age, or physical or mental ability, including learning and/or developmental disabilities and past/present history of a mental disorder or other category protected by state or federal law.

Bias-Motivated Incident A bias-motivated incident is a behavior which involves an expression of hostility against the person or property of others because of traits related to their race, ethnicity, country of origin, religion, gender, gender identity/expression, sexual orientation, age, or physical or mental ability, including learning and/or developmental disabilities and past/present history of a mental disorder or other category protected by state or federal law. Examples may include hate mail; threatening phone calls, voicemails, emails, instant messages, text messages; and the use of verbal or written slurs (including vandalism and information posted on social networking websites).

Harassment Harassment consists of abusive behavior directed toward an individual or group because of race, ethnicity, country of origin, religion, gender, gender identity/expression, sexual orientation, age, or physical or mental ability, including learning and/or developmental disabilities and past/present history of a mental disorder or other category protected by state or federal law.

Hate Crimes A hate crime is a criminal offense committed against a person or property which is motivated, in whole or in part, by the offender’s bias against a race, ethnic group/ country of origin, religion, gender, gender identity/expression, sexual orientation, or physical or mental ability or other category protected by state or federal law. If the crime represents a threat to the safety of students or employees, the University will give a timely warning to the community, in accordance with the Clery Act (1990).

Hate Speech Hate speech is speech which is intended to intimidate, humiliate, demean, or incite violence or prejudicial action against persons or groups based on their race, ethnicity, country of origin, religion, gender, gender identity/expression, sexual orientation, age, physical or mental ability, or other category protected by state or federal law.

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Prejudice Prejudice is having a preference for or an opinion about a particular subject, person, or group of people without having sufficient knowledge to justify that preference or opinion.

Campus Protocol for Harassment and Bias-Motivated Incidents The University of New Haven will not tolerate harassment or bias-motivated incidents on the University’s campus. Any person who believes that she or he is being harassed or otherwise subjected to discrimination as specified above is encouraged to immediately seek support from one of the following offices: Dean of Students, Myatt Center for Diversity and Inclusion, International Services, Accessibility Resources Center, University of New Haven Police Department, Campus Ministry, or Residential Life. Students are encouraged to file a report. Incidents will be referred to the Dean of Students Office where a written record of the report will be maintained. To the extent possible, the University will treat all reports confidentially. A person who in good faith reports harassment or a bias-motivated incident shall not suffer retaliation. If, having made a report, a person subsequently believes that he or she has been subjected to retaliation, the person should immediately report it to any of the offices designated above. The Student Conduct Administrator will investigate the incident, review the circumstances, and make a final determination of the case. If there is sufficient proof or documentation to identify the responsible party, he or she will be contacted by the Student Conduct Administrator as part of the investigation. If it is determined that the motivation of the act is biased, discriminatory, or hate-driven, including behavior which injures persons or damages property, the Student Conduct Board will consider enhanced sanctions up to and including suspension or dismissal from the University. Additionally, if the act is judged to be criminal in nature, the incident is subject to police investigation and possible prosecution pursuant to Connecticut general statutes. Such acts will not be tolerated on the University of New Haven campus. University of New Haven reserves the right to separate from the University anyone who is charged with or convicted of a hate crime, regardless of whether the underlying events occurred off campus.

University of New Haven Freedom of Expression Statement The Charger Compact, the University of New Haven statement of our community values, states: As a member of the University of New Haven community, I will strive for academic excellence, I will assume responsibility for my words, actions and inaction, I will respect the dignity, rights and property of all persons, I will strive to appreciate, respect and learn from others whose experiences and opinions are different from mine, I will conduct my academic and personal life with integrity and I will strive to contribute positively to the campus, local and global communities.

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These values and expectations provide the framework for how we interact as individuals and speak to what we stand for as a University community. Because the University of New Haven is committed to free and open inquiry in all matters, it guarantees all members of the University community the broadest possible latitude to speak, write, listen, challenge, and learn. Except insofar as limitations on that freedom are necessary to the functioning of the University of New Haven, the University fully respects and supports the freedom of all members of the University of New Haven community to discuss any problem that presents itself. Of course, the ideas of different members of the University of New Haven community will often and quite naturally conflict. A foundation of the educational process is to provide students the opportunity to be exposed to diverse ideas and opinions. The University of New Haven greatly values civility, and all members of the University community share in the responsibility for maintaining a climate of mutual respect. The University of New Haven’s fundamental commitment is to the principle that debate or deliberation may not be suppressed because the ideas put forth are thought by some or even by most members of the University community to be offensive or unsubstantiated. It is for the individual members of the University of New Haven community, not for the University of New Haven as an institution, to make those judgments for themselves, and to act on those judgments not by seeking to suppress speech, but by openly and vigorously contesting the ideas that they oppose. Indeed, fostering the ability of members of the University of New Haven community to engage in such debate and deliberation in an effective and responsible manner is an essential part of the University’s educational mission. The freedom to debate and discuss the merits of competing ideas does not, of course, mean that individuals may say whatever they wish, wherever they wish. The University of New Haven may restrict expression that violates the law that falsely defames a specific individual that constitutes a genuine threat or harassment, that unjustifiably invades substantial privacy or confidentiality interests, or that is otherwise directly incompatible with the functioning of the University of New Haven. In addition, the University of New Haven may reasonably regulate the time, place, and manner of expression to ensure that it does not disrupt the ordinary activities of the University of New Haven. (See Student Demonstration and Protest Policy). However, these are narrow exceptions to the general principle of freedom of expression, and it is vitally important that these exceptions never be used in a manner that is inconsistent with the University of New Haven’s commitment to free and open discussion of ideas. The University of New Haven would like to recognize the University of Chicago policy statement and the FIRE Model Freedom of Expression Resolution Based on the University of Chicago Statement which were used with permission in the creation of this policy. 3/22/17

Sexual Harassment & Misconduct at the University Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 (“Title IX”) states: "No person in the United States shall on the basis of sex, be excluded from participation in, be denied the benefits of, or be subjected to UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN STUDENT HANDBOOK REV. 1/12/2021

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discrimination under any education program or activity receiving federal financial assistance". Title IX is a federal civil rights law prohibiting discrimination on the basis of sex in education programs and activities. The University of New Haven does not discriminate on the basis of sex in its educational programs and activities, and its actions and policies are consistent with the requirements of Title IX, which prohibits the institution from discriminating on the basis of sex. The University of New Haven adheres to the philosophy that all community members should enjoy an environment free from sexual misconduct of any kind. Under Title IX, discrimination on the basis of sex can also include sexual harassment which is defined as conduct on the basis of sex that satisfies one or more of the following: 1. An employee of the University conditioning the provision of education benefits on participation in unwelcome sexual conduct (i.e., quid pro quo); or 2. Unwelcome conduct that a reasonable person would determine is so severe, pervasive, and objectively offensive that it effectively denies a person equal access to the institution’s education program or activity; or 3. Sexual assault (as defined in the Clery Act), dating violence, domestic violence, or stalking as defined in the Violence Against Women Act (VAWA). Any person may report sex discrimination, including sexual harassment (whether or not the person reporting is the person alleged to be the victim of conduct that could constitute sex discrimination or sexual harassment), in person, by mail, by telephone, or by electronic mail, using the contact information listed for the Title IX Coordinator, or by any other means that results in the Title IX Coordinator receiving the person’s verbal or written report. Such a report may be made at any time (including during nonbusiness hours) by using the telephone number, electronic mail address, or by mail to the office address listed for the Title IX Coordinator. The following person has been designated to handle inquiries regarding the non-discrimination policies and/or laws: Caroline Koziatek, Title IX Coordinator; 300 Boston Post Road, Office of Human Resources, West Haven, CT 06516; 203.932.7479; ckoziatek@newhaven.edu. The University of New Haven’s Sexual Harassment & Misconduct Policy and Procedure (www.newhaven.edu/titleix and www.newhaven.edu/sexualmisconduct) provide information on the University’s grievance procedures and grievance process, including how to report or file a complaint of sex discrimination, how to report or file a formal complaint of sexual harassment, and how the University will respond. Inquiries about the application of Title IX and this part to such recipient may be referred the University’s Title IX Coordinator, or to the Office of Civil Rights. The U.S. Department of Education, Office of Civil Rights is the federal agency charged with enforcing institutional compliance with Title IX regulations. Anyone may contact them directly for more information regarding Title IX or to issue a complaint at: Office of Civil Rights, ocr@ed.gov; 400 Maryland Avenue, SW, Washington DC 20202-1100; Customer Service Hotline: 800.421.3481; website: www.ed.gov/ocr.

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Pregnancy & Parenting Students at the University Title IX prohibits discrimination against a student based on pregnancy, childbirth, false pregnancy, termination of pregnancy, or recovery from any of these conditions. Title IX also prohibits the University from applying any rule related to a student’s parental, family, or marital status that treats students differently based on their sex. Students seeking reasonable accommodations for their pregnancy, related conditions, or parenting may contact the Accessibility Resources Center at (203) 932.7332 to schedule an appointment. Students may also contact Dr. Ophelie Rowe-Allen, Dean of Students and Chief Student Affairs Officer, at (203) 932.7176 or via email orallen@newhaven.edu.

Policy on Filing A Grievance Grievances Against Faculty Members The procedure for investigating formal grievances against faculty members is governed by the General Grievance Committee, empowered by the Faculty Constitution. This committee is accessible to all students at the University of New Haven, and its policies apply to all instructors at the University of New Haven. Its jurisdiction extends to all grievances involving faculty except for allegations of racial/sexual harassment (a separate committee addresses those issues) and cases handled by the student discipline system. A student who wishes to initiate a grievance against an instructor can obtain a copy of the complete statement of the Committee’s Policies and Procedures, as well as the form required to document the grievance, from the offices of the Dean of Students, the Faculty Senate, or the Provost or from the Committee Chair. There is a limit of one year between the time the grievous event happens and the time the student must first contact the Grievance Committee.

How to Pursue a Grievance Student grievances against an instructor demand a sincere effort towards resolution, from both the student and the instructor, before they reach the committee. The student should first speak with the instructor regarding the complaint. If the issue is not resolved, consult with the chair of the department which employs the instructor. Normally, complaints can be resolved at this level. If the issue is not resolved, consult with the dean of the school which employs the instructor and then the Office of the Provost. The form used to initiate a grievance against a faculty member provides space for each of these individuals to document what was accomplished at each of those levels. This important information allows the committee to fully understand the student’s complaint and to decide how to resolve the complaint effectively.

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Interacting with the Grievance Committee In those instances where the instructor’s superiors cannot resolve the complaint, the grievance is forwarded to the Grievance Committee. The committee follows a formal procedure for gathering evidence and scheduling hearings as necessary. Both the instructor and the student have special rights and obligations during this process, so it is important to obtain a copy of the statement of Policies and Procedures. All of the committee’s actions are kept confidential. The conclusions of the committee are binding and are reported to the Provost for implementation.

Grievances Against Administrative Departments The University of New Haven has established grievance procedures for students who have a concern or complaint regarding administrative issues. Individual offices and non-academic programs have developed grievance procedures for their respective office or program. Please refer to the individual department grievance procedures outlined within this handbook, or on the department’s website. If students are not satisfied with the outcome of a fully exhausted institutional grievance procedure, the following organizations may be contacted for assistance: Connecticut Office of Higher Education 450 Columbus Boulevard, Suite 510 Hartford, CT 06103-1841 800.947.1800 www.ctohe.org/studentcomplaints.shtml

Student Grievance Procedures for Grievances Related to Disability Purpose and Scope: The Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA) and the ADA Amendments Act of 2008 were enacted to protect individuals with disabilities against discrimination in areas of employment, housing, public accommodations, education, transportation, telecommunication, health services, and access to public services. Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act prohibits discrimination against individuals with disabilities by recipients of federal funds. In accordance with these laws, the University of New Haven strictly prohibits discrimination in all of its programs, services, and employment on the basis of disability. The purpose of these procedures is to provide the process for addressing student disability discrimination grievances at the level where they occur and in a timely manner. They are means to help students understand methods available to them in the event a problem should arise regarding issues relating to the ADAAA or Section 504 and to ensure that all complaints of discrimination based on disability are thoroughly and fairly investigated. The University of New Haven will conduct a fair and impartial investigation of all allegations of discrimination, with due regard for the rights of all parties. Faculty grievances are not within the scope of these procedures and should be submitted pursuant to the faculty grievance procedures set forth in the Faculty Handbook. Employee grievances are also not within the scope of these procedures and should be submitted pursuant to the separate Employee Conflict Resolution Protocol relating to complaints under the Americans with Disabilities Act UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN STUDENT HANDBOOK REV. 1/12/2021

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Amendments Act and the Rehabilitation Act of 1973. These procedures do not replace any other University policies or procedures.

Policy: The University of New Haven is committed to providing equal access to its programs, services, and employment opportunities for all persons regardless of disability. We affirm our commitment that no qualified student with a disability will be excluded from participation in, be denied the benefits of, or be otherwise subjected to discrimination under any program, service, or activity sponsored by the University of New Haven. The University does not discriminate in admissions, educational programs and services or employment against any individual on account of the individual’s disability. Complaints arising from a matter regarding disability should be brought to the attention of the Director of Accessibility Resources Center and/or the Dean of Students.

Definitions A. Grievance: Grievance means a complaint alleging any policy, procedure or practice which would be prohibited by the Americans with Disabilities Act Amendments Act (ADAAA) or the Rehabilitation Act of 1973. B. Grievant: Grievant means a student who submits a grievance relevant to the ADAAA or the Rehabilitation Act of 1973. C. Respondent: Respondent means any University officer, administrator, faculty or staff member acting in their official capacity and alleged to be responsible for the violation(s) alleged in a grievance. The term may be used to designate persons with direct responsibility for a particular action or those persons with supervisory responsibility for procedures and policies in those areas covered in the grievance. D. Investigator: Investigator means the Director of Accessibility Resources Center or the Vice President for Student Affairs/Dean of Students who when acting in their official capacity is charged with the responsibility to hear, investigate, and make recommendations regarding alleged violations of the ADAAA or the Rehabilitation Act of 1973.

Informal Procedure Although a grievant is not required to utilize the informal procedure prior to initiating the formal grievance procedure, the grievant is strongly encouraged to attempt to resolve complaints informally if possible before filing a formal grievance. The necessary first step toward an informal solution is for the grievant to attempt to personally resolve the complaint by meeting with the person or persons alleged to be directly responsible for the possible violation and/or with persons with immediate supervisory authority related to the complaint. Other appropriate University officials who may have knowledge of the complaint or who may assist in its resolution may also be consulted (e.g. a faculty member, department chair, the Dean of Students, the Director of Accessibility Resources Center, the student ombudsman, the Director of Financial Aid or the University Registrar). UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN STUDENT HANDBOOK REV. 1/12/2021

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The appropriate University official will make every attempt to resolve the matter. This process should not exceed thirty (30) days. If the complaint cannot be resolved informally at this level, any student, who is not satisfied with this attempt at resolution, may file, in writing, a formal grievance as described below.

Formal Grievance Procedure A student who is not satisfied with the results of the informal process should initiate a formal grievance through the following procedure: Grievance Filing: The student shall submit a formal grievance to the Director of Accessibility Resources Center unless the grievance is against the Director of Accessibility Resources Center or other staff of the department. In this case, grievances should be submitted to the Dean of Students. All grievances should be conducted in person and shall provide the following information in writing: a. Name, address and telephone number of grievant(s); b. Nature, date, and full description of the alleged violations including any relevant facts such as the complaining party’s disability, name(s) of the person or persons responsible for the alleged violation(s), and identification of any witnesses who have knowledge related to the complaint; c. A summary of the steps the student has already taken in attempt to resolve the problem; including names of persons involved; d. A statement of the requested resolution for corrective action and the student’s rationale for any requested accommodations, if any; e. Any background information and/or supporting documentation the grievant believes to be relevant; f.

Signature of the person initiating the complaint.

Time Limit for Grievance Filing: 1. The grievance must be filed within (180) days of the alleged violation or within ten (10) days after the conclusion of the informal process if the student has chosen to utilize it, whichever comes first. Notification of Respondent(s): Upon receipt of the formal grievance, the Director of Accessibility Resources Center (or Dean of Students) will conduct an investigation of the matters set forth in the written grievance. In conducting this investigation, the Investigator may forward a copy of the grievant(s) statement to the person(s) whose actions (or inactions) are the subject of the grievance, and may request a written response from the appropriate individuals in the University within (20) workdays. Respondents will be specifically warned not to retaliate against the grievant in any way. Retaliation may subject the respondent to disciplinary UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN STUDENT HANDBOOK REV. 1/12/2021

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action. The Investigator may also choose to interview witnesses, to meet with concerned parties, to receive oral or written statements, and to make appropriate inquiries. The investigation shall generally, but may not always, be completed within thirty (30) workdays. If the investigation cannot be completed within thirty (30) workdays, the Director/Dean shall keep the complainant informed of the status of the investigation. Within ten (10) workdays after completing the investigation, the Investigator will transmit a written copy of its findings and recommendation(s) to the parties and to the appropriate University official who is charged with making a final decision concerning whether to accept, reject or modify the investigator’s recommendations. Either party may also submit to the individual designated to make the final decision, within 10 workdays of receiving the investigator’s recommendations, written arguments in favor of or opposed to the adoption, modification, or rejection of the investigator’s recommendations; or explaining why they believe they have been treated arbitrarily, capriciously, inequitably or in an unfair, unlawful or discriminatory manner. The Dean of Students, who has been designated as the 504/ADA Coordinator) or designee will make the final decision, and in the case of academic matters, will do so in consult with the Office of the Provost. The Dean of Students or designee shall transmit the final decision in writing to both parties within ten (10) workdays. If a decision cannot be reached within ten (10) workdays, the Vice President or designee will keep the complainant informed of the status of the decision-making process. Maintenance of Written Grievance Records: 1. Records shall be kept of each grievance process for a period of seven (7) years. These shall include, at a minimum: the written grievance complaint filed by the grievant, the written response filed by the respondent, and the written finding(s) and/or recommendations of the Investigator. A file of these records shall be maintained in the office of the 504/ADA Coordinator. For purposes of the dissemination of grievance precedents, separate file records and statistics may be kept by the coordinator which indicates only the subject matter of each grievance, the resolution of each grievance and the date of the resolution. These records shall not refer to any specific individuals and shall be treated as confidential unless their disclosure is required by law. Retaliation: 1. No person shall be subjected to retaliation for having utilized or having assisted others in the utilization of this grievance process. Retaliation against any individual who has filed a complaint of discrimination, or who has cooperated in the investigation of such a complaint, or opposes a discriminatory educational practice is unlawful under federal and state law, and is in violation of University of New Haven policy. Reconciliation: 1. Nothing in these procedures is intended to prevent the grievant and respondent from resolving their grievance amicably by signing a written statement of agreement and submitting it for review and approval by the Investigator. If the agreement is approved, the pending grievance shall be deemed dismissed.

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The right of a person to a prompt and equitable resolution of a complaint submitted thereunder shall not be impaired by the person’s pursuit of other external remedies such as filing of a 504/ADA complaint with the responsible state or federal agency nor shall the use of this internal grievance procedure be a prerequisite to other external remedies. These rules shall be construed to protect the substantive rights of interested persons to meet appropriate due process standards, and to assure that the University of New Haven complies with Section 504, the ADAAA and implementing regulations. The Director of Accessibility Resources Center is located in the Accessibility Resources and Counseling and Psychological Services office suite, ground floor, rear of Sheffield Hall and can be reached at 203.932.7332. The Dean of Students Office is located in Bartels Hall Campus Center, Room 205, and can be reached at 203.932.7432. The Dean of Students has been designated the 504/ADA Coordinator, is located in Bartels Hall Room 203A, and can be reached at 203.932.7238.

Student Protest and Demonstration Policy Policy The purpose of this policy is to ensure that freedom of speech, freedom of assembly and the freedom to pursue academic and career objectives are maintained at the University of New Haven. The University of New Haven is a community where ideas and opinions are formulated and exchanged in a manner congruent with the values espoused in our Charger Compact. Each community member has the right of free expression, to pursue their academic and career objectives without unreasonable obstruction or hindrance, and, to communicate their views on current issues, by peaceful, lawful demonstration and protest. Individuals who choose to exercise their rights of freedom of speech and public assembly must understand that these rights come with expectations for behavior. When an individual or group’s conduct endangers the safety of others or disrupts University operations, it loses constitutional protection and may become a violation of law or the Student Code of Conduct. The use of University premises to share ideas and opinions does not imply acceptance or endorsement by the University of the views expressed.

Policy Guidelines It is the responsibility of the event organizers to communicate these policy guidelines and expectations for behavior to all participants prior to the event.

Reservations and Planning In an effort to ensure the safety of the campus community and promote an environment conducive to study, individuals or groups affiliated with the University are required to make an advanced reservation for gatherings and/or demonstrations that are: UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN STUDENT HANDBOOK REV. 1/12/2021

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• organized and/or promoted in advance, • sponsored by a student organization, or • an assembly of one or more community members with a common intent or cause. A member of the University of New Haven community must be designated organizer/liaison for the event and must meet with the Dean of Students or designee and the University Police Chief or designee to coordinate and set parameters for the event at least 48 hours prior to the event. The individual or group hosting such an event must reserve the location where the event will occur in accordance with the normal facilities use policy of the Office of the Associate Vice President for Facilities.

Spontaneous Demonstrations The University recognizes there may be occasions that do not permit the submission of a reservation 48 hours in advance of a demonstration or assembly. Such spontaneous demonstrations or assemblies in response to emergent situations where advance planning is not possible are permitted, but are limited in location to: • Maxcy Quad Circle • Bixler/Gerber Quad in compliance with quiet hour guidelines Any individual, group or organization calling for or organizing such a demonstration or assembly must notify the Office of the Dean of Students and University Police immediately, and comply with the guidelines and expectations set forth in this policy.

Behavior Expected by Observers and Participants Orderly, nonviolent, and non-disruptive picketing and other forms of peaceful protest are permitted on University premises. Demonstrators do not have the right to deprive others of the opportunity to speak or be heard, physically obstruct the movement of others, intimidate by physical proximity, or otherwise disrupt the educational or institutional processes in a way that interferes with the safety or freedom of others. Noise levels shall not disrupt ongoing University activities that are within the proximity of the event. If an event is disrupted by an expressive group or individual, the University Police Chief or designee may request the action to stop or ask the person or group to leave the event and move to another location for the purposes of protest. Placards, banners, and signs are permitted but shall not be utilized in a manner that endangers the safety of or impedes the participation or free movement of others or, disrupts University operations. Behaviors which violate the Student Code of Conduct may be referred for disciplinary action. Such behaviors may also result in criminal charges.

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Relocation of Activity Individuals and organizations engaged in expressive activity on campus may be required to relocate to another area by the Dean of Students or designee, or when immediate action is necessary by the University police department, under the following circumstances: • the location does not safely accommodate the number of participants, • the number of individuals participating in or attending the activity creates unsafe conditions for vehicular or pedestrian traffic, parking, or blocks the ingress or egress to buildings or official University activities, • noise levels are deemed to be disruptive to ongoing University activities which are within the proximity of the event, • severe weather is predicted or taking place that would endanger the safety of the participants, • the activity creates a health or welfare hazard, such as interfering with fire, police or emergency services.

Counter-Protest A protest, demonstration, or event on campus may invite another form of protest. When such occasions arise, the right to peaceful expression of all parties is important. A separate protest area may be designated by University authorities such as the Dean of Students or designee or University Police for those persons with views that differ from the views held by event organizers. Appropriate measures may be taken by University officials to ensure the safety of all participants.

Motor Vehicle Policies Regulations pertaining to the use of automobiles and other motor vehicles shall be established and enforced by the appropriate officials as designated by the President of the University. All provisions of the Vehicle Code of the State of Connecticut, as supplemented by University regulations, will be strictly enforced on the West Haven campus of the University of New Haven. All persons operating a vehicle on campus must have a valid operator’s license, and all vehicles must be properly registered. Continued violations of parking regulations and abuse of parking personnel may result in University disciplinary action. Complete information on Motor Vehicle and Campus Parking regulations can be found at www.newhaven.edu/parking.

General Guidelines for Advertising on Campus 1. Posters, flyers, advertisements, electronic communications, announcements, and any other materials containing references or logos promoting the sale or consumption of alcohol are UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN STUDENT HANDBOOK REV. 1/12/2021

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prohibited on campus and/ or in any campus publication. 2. Posters, flyers, electronic communications, promotional materials, and other forms of public announcement from private individuals or student organizations advertising private parties shall not be permitted on campus and/or in any campus publication. 3. Advertisements from other University and college admissions offices are not permitted in any campus publication. 4. All posters, flyers, and advertisements must be approved and stamped by the Center for Student Engagement, Leadership and Orientation prior to copying and posting.

Policy on Sales and Solicitation The University of New Haven restricts the number and type of student-run sales and solicitation activities (fund-raising projects) that may be directed to students and other members of the University of New Haven community. Only recognized student organizations and department-sponsored student groups may engage in fund-raising projects. Requirements for student organization fund-raising are outlined under the chapter on student organization policies in this handbook. • Individual students may not conduct sales or solicitations on the campus for any purpose. • Sales and/or solicitations may be conducted on campus by recognized student organizations in order to raise money for a philanthropic/charitable project or raise money for organizational operating expenses. • Sales and solicitations must be registered with and approved by the Center for Student Engagement, Leadership and Orientation prior to their occurrence. Questions regarding organization sales and solicitation activities should be directed to the Center for Student Engagement, Leadership and Orientation.

Policy on Political Solicitation Solicitation on behalf of candidates for political office is not permitted except in the case of candidates for major political office (i.e., President, Governor, and University-invited speakers).

Policy on Student Solicitation for Human Subject Research Trials Off-campus organizations are not permitted to advertise on campus in any manner (e.g., via email, flyers, word of mouth, etc.) or in the student newspaper for student participation in human subject research trials.

Policy on Personal Property The University is not responsible for the loss or theft of personal property. Therefore, students are encouraged to engrave valuable personal belongings with their name and driver’s license number. UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN STUDENT HANDBOOK REV. 1/12/2021

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Students are urged to make a list that includes a description of the item, model number or name, size, color, approximate value, special characteristics or features, and serial number. An engraving tool shall be made available by the University Police Department for student use. Matters involving disagreement over personal property between roommates should be handled independently between those students who are involved. Students should record all serial and credit card numbers and keep the record in a safe place.

Policy on Keys The unauthorized possession of any University key is prohibited.

Policy on Pets Possession of dogs, cats, or other animals on University property is prohibited. Exceptions include service animals as defined by the Americans with Disabilities Act Amendments Act, approved Campus Police k9 animals, animals involved in approved research studies, pet fish in accordance with Residential Life policy, or approved emotional support animals.

Policy on Self-Balancing Scooters & Hoverboards Effective January 1, 2016, Self-balancing scooters, more popularly known as hoverboards will not be allowed to be charged, operated, or stored inside of any building or on a property owned or controlled by the University of New Haven. This policy is intended to minimize the risk associated with hoverboards overheating, catching fire, or exploding while charging or riding.

Drone Policy This policy applies to all members of the university community, including but not limited to employees, students, clubs, organizations, vendors and any other individuals who may wish to operate a drone, as part of their employment or any university-related research or activity. Any person operating a drone on any university owned or controlled property is personally responsible for complying with Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) regulations, and any other local, state and federal laws and University of New Haven policies. This policy has been enacted in order to protect and safeguard the safety, security, and privacy of students, faculty, staff, visitors, and all other individuals that may come to the campuses of University of New Haven, or to any other property, owned or controlled by the University of new Haven. Exceptions may be made for official University of New Haven institutional use, or for University sponsored research and/or teaching use. Those exceptions will be delineated by the Department of Public Safety and Administrative Services, and approval will be granted on an individual basis by the Associate Vice President (AVP) for Public Safety and Administrative Services. Drone usage on the University of New

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Haven property, if approved, must comply with all FAA rules and regulations, all local, state and federal laws, and all current University of New Haven policies. For the safety, security and privacy of all University of New Haven students, faculty, staff, and any visitors or contractors on any University of New Haven campus, this policy establishes requirements and prohibitions for the safe operation of Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS), hereinafter to be referred to as a drone — on any property owned or controlled by the University of New haven and has been implemented to insure compliance with any and all local, municipal, state, Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) laws, and any University of New Haven policies.

Definitions a. Drone: For the purposes of this policy, the term drone is an unmanned aircraft (UA) or unmanned vehicle, unmanned remote control and free flight helicopters, airplanes, mechanically propelled or propellant guided balloons and rockets, of any size and weight along with all of the associated support equipment, control station, data links, telemetry, communication and navigation equipment, etc. necessary to operate any of the foregoing objects. b. Federal Aviation Administration (FFA): The FAA is responsible for the safety of civil aviation. Roles include: • Regulating civil aviation to promote safety • Encouraging and developing civil aeronautics, including new aviation technology • Developing and operating a system of air traffic control and navigation for both civil and military aircraft • Researching and developing the National Airspace System and civil aeronautics • Developing and carrying out programs to control aircraft noise and other environmental effects of civil aviation • Regulating U.S. commercial space transportation Prohibitions include, but are not limited to, the following Recreational Use. The use of drones on, or in, any University of New Haven property is strictly prohibited unless it has been determined that said use is for research, teaching, or legitimate business operations. Any representative of an organization planning to use a drone on University of New Haven property must contact and gain written approval from the AVP of Public Safety and Administrative Services, prior to activation. When operating a drone for purposes of recording or transmitting visual images, operators must take all reasonable measures to avoid operation within areas normally considered private. • A drone shall not be used to monitor or record areas where there is a reasonable expectation of privacy in accordance with accepted case law and social norms. These areas include, but UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN STUDENT HANDBOOK REV. 1/12/2021

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are not limited to restrooms, locker rooms, individual residential rooms, or in close proximity to windows, changing or dressing rooms. • A drone shall not be used to monitor or record sensitive institutional or personal information which may be found, for example, on an individual's workspace, or on a computer or other electronic displays. • A drone shall not be flown over people, except for those directly involved in the flight, and may not be operated above public open air events, including crowds or sporting events, or above thoroughfares. The above prohibitions should not be considered an exhaustive list, but should serve as examples.

Policy on Publications and Communication Media Any student-published printed matter bearing the name of the University of New Haven must be produced by a recognized student organization. Student organizations that publish, sell, or distribute printed materials on the campus shall be responsible to the appropriate authorities or individuals for the content of those materials in the areas of libel, invasion of privacy, and obscenity. The standards of the University in the areas of libel, invasion of privacy, and obscenity shall conform to the principles of civil law and the canons of responsible journalism. Altering of any University logo is not permitted. Any Recognized Student Organization that wishes to order products for events, advertisement purposes and/or give-a-ways must abide by the policies outlined in the Recognized Student Organization and Handbook which can be found online on the Center for Student Engagement, Leadership and Orientation page on myCharger. The University radio station, WNHU, is a non-commercial educational FM radio station and is licensed to the University of New Haven. The station must conform to all federal communications regulations and broadcasting codes. All visitors to WNHU facilities must obtain a pass from the general manager prior to entering the station.

Involuntary Leave of Absence Policy The University of New Haven (the “University”) is committed to preserving the safety, security and wellbeing of students and all members of the University community. When a student engages in behavior that is disruptive to the University’s commitments, including behavior that poses a direct threat to members of the University community, the University may require the student to take an involuntary leave of absence. As used in this Policy, “student” means any person who is enrolled in one or more classes offered by the University. An involuntary leave of absence is not intended to replace disciplinary actions that are taken in response to violations of the Student Code of Conduct, nor does it preclude the suspension or dismissal of

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students from the University as a result of such violations. It also does not affect any action taken by law enforcement personnel in connection with the violations. Whenever appropriate, before an involuntary leave of absence is invoked, the University may evaluate reasonable options to reduce the risk to the University community and accommodate the student, and the student will also be permitted to take a voluntary leave of absence from the University. In the event that the risks remain, and the student does not take a voluntary leave of absence, the procedures outlined in this Policy will be implemented.

Procedure When a member of the Dean of Students staff is made aware of a student’s behavior by a member(s) of the campus community, the assigned staff member or designee will: 1. Evaluate accessible information and consult with appropriate University personnel who may include staff from the Dean of Students Office, Residential Life, Health Services, Counseling and Psychological Services, Accessibility Resources Center, and University Police. Other campus personnel may be consulted at the discretion of the DOS. 2. Notify the student that an involuntary leave of absence is being considered. 3. Contact the student’s parents or guardians if deemed appropriate. 4. The Dean of Students staff member assigned the case will provide an opportunity for the student to meet to discuss the implications of and procedures relating to an involuntary leave of absence. 5. Whenever appropriate, the Dean of Students staff member assigned the case will encourage the student to take a voluntary leave of absence, thus eliminating the need to invoke an involuntary leave. 6. The Dean of Students staff member assigned the case may require that the student undergo a psychological or physical evaluation if he/ she believes it will facilitate a more informed decision. In such event, the Dean of Students staff member assigned the case may require the student to provide a report from his/her treating physician, and the University also reserves the right to have the student undergo an examination by a physician of its choice, which would include a review of the student’s medical records. The Dean of Students staff member assigned the case may stay any pending disciplinary action until the evaluation process is completed. If the student fails to initiate the required evaluation or refuses to undergo an evaluation within the time period set by the Dean of Students staff member assigned the case, the student will be placed on an involuntary leave of absence from the University. 7. The student shall sign a release authorizing the results of the evaluation to be provided to the University representatives who are involved in the decision-making process, as identified by the Dean of Students staff member assigned the case. Evaluations will be maintained in strict confidence in accordance with the University’s privacy policies and applicable laws relating to confidentiality. UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN STUDENT HANDBOOK REV. 1/12/2021

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8. Upon consultation with University officials and review of information provided by evaluators, if requested, the Dean of Students staff member assigned the case will make a decision regarding the involuntary leave of absence and provide the student with written notice of the decision. The decision may include continued enrollment with no conditions, continued enrollment with conditions, or an involuntary leave of absence. 9. If the student withdraws from the University, or leaves the University prior to participating in the evaluation, he/she will be prohibited from re-enrolling until the Dean of Students staff member assigned the case has received and evaluated documents from a qualified professional which expressly state that the student does not pose a risk of harm to the health, safety, or property of others, or of disruption, or threatened disruption to the normal operations and activities of the University, its students, faculty, or staff. 10. A letter of notification regarding the decision will be sent to the student within five (5) business days of the receipt of all pertinent information and will specify the terms of the decision and conditions for reinstatement, if applicable. 11. At any time before a final determination is made, the student may initiate the procedures for withdrawal or voluntary leave from the University by calling the Registrar’s Office. The Dean of Students staff member assigned the case will provide the student with information on the relevant procedures.

If an Involuntary Leave is Implemented If the University decides to implement an involuntary student leave of absence, such leave will become effective immediately. The Dean of Students staff member assigned the case will inform the student in writing of the decision and the specific requirements for reinstatement by electronic mail: 1. The specific length of time that the student will be on an involuntary leave of absence from the University will be determined on a case-by-case basis 2. The Dean of Students staff member assigned the case reserves the right to notify the student’s parent, guardian, or other appropriate person of the involuntary leave of absence, if such notification is deemed appropriate. 3. The student’s transcript will reflect a grade of “W” or “I” as determined by each professor for each course in which the student was enrolled that semester and was unable to complete regardless of whether the involuntary leave of absence occurred within the University’s specified class withdrawal period. A notation of “Leave of Absence” may be noted on the student’s transcript. 4. The Registrar will be notified by the Dean of Students staff member assigned the case that the student may not be reinstated without authorization from the Dean of Students staff member assigned the case. 5. Following implementation of the involuntary student leave of absence, the student will not be permitted on the University’s campus or to attend any off-campus University activities, unless UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN STUDENT HANDBOOK REV. 1/12/2021

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and until the student receives express written permission from the Dean of Students staff member assigned the case and/or is reinstated at the University. 6. The student must return his/her Campus Card (identification card) to the Dean of Students staff member assigned the case. If a resident student, the residence hall room or apartment must be vacated immediately and the keys returned to the Office of Residential Life

Appeal 1. The student may appeal this decision to the Dean of Students. 2. Appeals shall be in writing and must be received within five calendar days from the date of receipt of the written notification of the involuntary student leave of absence. 3. The decision to invoke an involuntary student leave of absence will be final and conclusive if the student fails to file a request within the specified time. 4. The student will remain on involuntary leave during the pendency of the appeal process. 5. The Dean of Students or designee will notify the student in writing of his/ her decision regarding the appeal. Generally, appeals will be heard within ten (10) business days, unless circumstances prevent, in which case the appellant will be informed of the status of the appeal. The decision of the Dean of Students or designee will be final. 6. To the extent feasible, the student will be assisted by the Provost’s Office in the making up of academic requirements.

Request for Reinstatement 1. A student who has been placed on an involuntary leave of absence who wishes to be reinstated must submit a formal request for reinstatement to the Dean of Students Office. 2. The student must present evidence that he/she has satisfied all conditions of reinstatement that were established at the time the involuntary student leave of absence was instituted 3. The decision to approve or deny reinstatement will be made at the sole discretion of the Dean of Students or designee. 4. In approving a request for reinstatement, the Dean of Students or designee may impose additional conditions under which the student will be permitted to return to the University. 5. The student will be notified in writing within 10 business days of the decision regarding his/her request for reinstatement, including any conditions and/or requirements under which the student will be permitted to return to the University.

Interim Immediate Involuntary Leave 1. In unusual circumstances, it may be necessary for the University to remove a student from classes and/or from campus while the processes set forth in this Policy are followed. UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN STUDENT HANDBOOK REV. 1/12/2021

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2. The Dean of Students or designee may impose an interim immediate involuntary leave of absence pending a determination about an involuntary student leave of absence if, in the opinion of the Dean of Students or designee, the student’s behavior poses a direct threat to the safety, security and well-being of the University community. 3. The Dean of Students or designee will notify the student in writing by electronic mail to their University email account of the interim immediate involuntary leave and provide the student with an opportunity to discuss the interim immediate involuntary leave of absence and the process for determining an involuntary leave of absence.

International Students International students will be advised that an Involuntary Leave of Absence will likely affect their student visa status and that they should consult with the International Services Office for more information.

Financial Aid Students who are funded with Federal monies should consult the Financial Aid Office regarding the impact of an involuntary leave of absence on their eligibility for aid.

Athletics Student athletes should consult with the Athletic Department regarding the impact of an involuntary leave of absence on their eligibility for athletics.

University Events Policy A. The purpose of the facilities at the University of New Haven is to support the educational mission and strategic goals of the University. The facilities are available primarily for programs offered by and intended for the campus community. As a private institution, the University of New Haven also seeks to reach out and be accessible to the larger community. To the extent that space is available, the University welcomes community groups and organizations to utilize campus facilities for purposes compatible with the University’s mission and strategic goals. The purpose of this policy is to set priorities for facilities usage, define scheduling procedures and policies, provide direction for maximization of space, and establish charges associated with event management and facility usage. Activities shall in no way violate the purposes, property, policies, procedures, or regulations of the University or federal and state laws. All organizations are expected to follow the rules and regulations governing the particular facility or grounds being used. B. The University Events Policy may be found online at www.newhaven.edu/events/policies-andfees.php. Please refer to this site for the most up-to-date version.

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Policy on Emotional Support Animals in University Housing According to University policy, animals, including pets of any kind (except fish in small tanks of five (5) gallons or less) are not permitted on University of New Haven campuses or in University housing facilities with the exception of Service Animals. However, the University is committed to providing access to its programs and services, as such, the University permits qualified students with disabilities who require one, to have an Emotional Support Animal (hereafter referred to as an ESA) as a reasonable accommodation in University residence halls. An ESA will be permitted to live in a student’s personal residence provided it is in compliance with the University's policies regarding such animals. The University of New Haven will accept and consider requests for reasonable accommodation in University housing at any time; however, requests for Modified Housing are heard on a monthly basis, excepting December. Individuals wishing to make a request for an ESA accommodation should complete the Modified Housing packet and submit it to the Accessibility Resources Center as soon as practicably possible before moving into University housing. However, if the request for accommodation is not made by the stated deadlines or is made fewer than 60 days before the individual intends to move into University housing, the University of New Haven cannot guarantee that it will be able to meet the individual’s accommodation needs during the first semester or term of occupancy. If the need for the ESA accommodation arises when an individual already resides in University housing, he/she should contact the Accessibility Resources Center and complete the Modified Housing paperwork as soon as is reasonably possible. The University cannot guarantee that it will be able to meet the accommodation need during the semester or term in which the request is received.

Definitions Emotional Support Animal. Emotional Support Animals (ESAs) are animals that provide emotional support which alleviates one or more identified symptoms or effects of an individual’s existing disability. To be considered an accommodation, an ESA must be required by an individual with a disability, in their residence, in order for the individual to have an equal opportunity to use and enjoy their residence/dwelling. Dangerous, poisonous, illegal, or any other animals that pose a direct threat to the health and/or safety of the campus community will not be permitted as ESAs. Size restrictions may also apply. Animals whose sole function is to provide comfort or emotional support are Emotional Support Animals, not Service Animals. This policy does not apply to Service Animals on campus. Approved ESA. Approved Emotional Support Animals (ESAs) are animals that have been permitted in designated areas of student housing as a reasonable accommodation under this policy. Pet. A pet is an animal kept for ordinary use and companionship. A pet is not considered an Emotional Support Animal nor a Service Animal. Individuals are not permitted to keep or bring pets on University property or in University housing except as stated above. UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN STUDENT HANDBOOK REV. 1/12/2021

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Owner. The Owner is the resident student who has an approved Emotional Support Animal (ESA) in university housing under this policy. University Housing. Any facility owned or operated by the University for the purpose of housing residential students, whether leased or owned.

Emotional Support Animal Application and Approval Process A student seeking to keep an ESA in University housing must notify the Office of Residential Life and Housing and make a formal request through Accessibility Resources Center. To do so, a new student must submit a written notification of his/her need for an ESA along with their room deposit; returning students should notify the Associate Director for Housing and Operations. Students must also must complete and submit a Request for Modifications to Housing – ESA packet. The Request for Modifications to Housing must include appropriate documentation from a qualified professional provider. This Request must be submitted to the Accessibility Resources Center by the stated deadlines (the first of the month in which a committee meeting will be held), and not less than 60 days before the student intends to move onto campus. Documentation should not be submitted with your written notice to Residential Life. Documentation submitted to the Accessibility Resources Center must be recent, must be from a reliable third party who is a qualified professional with whom the student has an established therapeutic relationship (treating physician, psychiatrist, psychologist, social worker or other mental health professional). The qualified professional must not be a family member, and must be from the state of the student’s residence or from the state of the University’s campus the student attends. Documentation must include a statement identifying a diagnosed mental health disability and the reason (for what functional limitation) the ESA is required. There must be an identifiable and clearly established relationship between the individual's disability and the assistance the animal provides. If the third party/qualified professional returns the Verification Form without sufficient information for the 504/ADA/FHA Committee to determine whether an accommodation is necessary, the Director of Accessibility Resources Center will inform the individual in writing of the verification’s insufficiency and may request additional information, including speaking directly with the individual supplying the thirdparty verification of disability. Once an application for Modified Housing has been received, it will be reviewed at a regularly scheduled meeting of the 504/ADA/FHA Committee for approval or denial. Generally, the presence of only one ESA will be approved for a student, in order to fulfill the intent of the FHA requirements in providing support to the student with a mental health disability. The 504/ADA/FHA Committee will consider any and all relevant city, state, and local ordinances when approving or denying any ESA request. The University may consider the following factors, among others, as evidence in determining whether the presence of the animal is reasonable, renewing requests, or in determining housing assignments for individuals with Emotional Support Animals: 1. The size of the animal is too large for available assigned housing space; 2. The animal's presence would force another individual from individual housing (e.g. serious UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN STUDENT HANDBOOK REV. 1/12/2021

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allergies); 3. The animal's presence otherwise violates individuals' right to peace and quiet enjoyment; 4. The animal is not housebroken or is unable to live with others in a reasonable manner; 5. The animal's vaccinations are not up-to-date; 6. The animal poses or has posed in the past a direct threat to the safety or health of the individual or others such as aggressive behavior towards or injuring the individual or others, potential transmission of zoonotic diseases; or 7. The animal causes or has caused excessive damage to housing beyond reasonable wear and tear. Once the 504/ADA/FHA Committee has reviewed the request, the student will be notified of the Committee’s decision in writing. After notification, the student’s roommates or suitemates must meet with the Associate Director of Housing and Operations in the Office of Residential Life and Housing to sign an agreement for living with the proposed ESA. If a roommate or suitemate does not agree with living with the proposed ESA, general housing policies relative to roommate agreements will apply allowing either the non-agreeing student or the student with the approved ESA to be moved to a different location. The student with an approved ESA must complete an ESA Registration form including a clear photo of the student and animal, must meet with a staff member of Accessibility Resources Center to review and sign this policy, and must submit appropriate documentation of the animal’s vaccinations and/or health. Copies of the animal’s documents will be kept on file in the Accessibility Resources Center, the Office of Residential Life and Housing, University Police, and the Facilities Department. While applications submitted after stated Modified Housing deadlines may be accepted, they will not be heard until the next scheduled meeting of the 504/ADA/FHA Committee. Late applicants risk delay or possible denial of their requested accommodation; given the high demand for University housing it is unlikely the University will have sufficient vacancies to accommodate late applicants. Any approval under this policy is valid for one academic year. Students must notify the Accessibility Resources Center of their desire to continue utilizing this accommodation for each subsequent year. No proposed ESA may be kept in University housing at any time prior to the individual receiving approval as a reasonable accommodation pursuant to this Policy. Any student found to have an animal on campus prior to it being approved as an ESA is in violation of the University’s Conduct Policy and may have conduct charges brought against him/her.

Office of Residential Life & Housing Notifications and Student’s Appeal Rights If the request for an ESA is approved, the University will notify the Owner, who will be required to sign an ESA or Service Animal Student Responsibility Agreement. Failure or refusal to sign this Agreement will be presumed to be an indication that the student does not intend to abide by this policy and will result in a revocation of the approval. UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN STUDENT HANDBOOK REV. 1/12/2021

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During the housing application process, the Office of Residence Life and Housing will inform students that they may encounter Approved ESAs in the residence halls. Resident students with medical condition(s) who may be affected by an Approved ESA (e.g., respiratory diseases, asthma, severe allergies) are asked to inform Residential Life during the housing application process, or at any other time, if they have a health or safety related concern about exposure to an Approved ESA. All roommates or suitemates of the Owner must acknowledge in writing that the Approved ESA will be in residence with them. In the event that one or more prospective roommates or suitemates do not approve, or have a health or safety related concern regarding exposure to the Approved ESA, general University policies regarding roommate or suitemate disagreements will be followed to enable either the Owner and the Approved ESA or the non-approving roommate(s) or suitemate(s) to be moved to a different location. Written acknowledgement from a parent is required for roommates or suitemates under age 18. In light of potential health or safety concerns of all residents, students may request that the Office of Residence Life and Housing place a sign on his/her door to notify the other residents on the floor of the presence of an Approved ESA. The notice will be limited to information about the Approved ESA’s presence: there will be no disclosure of the student’s disability. The Accessibility Resources Center and Office of Residence Life and Housing staff will collaborate, as necessary, to resolve conflicts related to an Approved ESA. Staff members will consider the needs and/or accommodations of all resident students involved. The requesting student may appeal a denial of a request for an Approved ESA by submitting additional information to the 504/ADA/FHA Committee for consideration. If the appeal is denied, the requesting student may appeal the Committee’s decision within five (5) business days after notification of the denial to the Dean of Students or designee. The student must appeal the denial in writing. The decision of the Dean of Students or designee is final.

Owner’s Responsibilities for Approved ESAs in University Housing The Owner must comply with the following provisions regarding behavior and care of Approved ESAs: Vaccination. In accordance with local ordinances and regulations, the Approved ESA must receive all required and/or recommended immunizations against diseases. Local licensing requirements must be followed. The University may request an updated verification regarding an Approved ESA’s vaccinations at any time during the ESA’s residency, but verification will at a minimum be required at the start of each year the animal is in residence. Health. Approved ESAs must be in good health as documented annually by a licensed veterinarian. The University has authority to direct that the Approved ESA receive veterinary attention in appropriate circumstances. Control. The Owner must be in full control of the Approved ESA at all times. No Owner shall permit the animal to go loose or run at large. If an animal is found running at large, the animal is subject to capture and confinement and immediate removal from University housing. The ESA must remain in the Owner’s

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residence hall room at all times and be on a leash, harness, or other tether, or in an appropriate crate when being transported to and from the student’s residence hall room. The ESA must remain within the confines of the Owner’s residence hall room except for transport or natural relief. Cleanliness. It is the Owner’s responsibility to remove and properly dispose of the Approved ESA’s waste (e.g. urine, excrement, fur, cage shavings, etc.), which must be placed in a sturdy plastic bag before disposal, and must be disposed of in an outside trash receptacle. An Approved ESA must be clean and well groomed, and measures should be taken at all times for flea, tick, or other infestations and odor control. The Owner will be held responsible for any room damages, including excess cleaning and/or replacement of any carpeting or furnishings.

Other Conditions The Owner is responsible for assuring that the Approved ESA does not unduly interfere or adversely affect the routine activities of University housing or other residents. In addition, the Approved ESA must not pose a threat to the health, safety, or property of anyone in the University of New Haven's community. The care and supervision of the Approved ESA is solely the responsibility of the Owner. The Owner is responsible for ensuring the safety of an Approved ESA and the University community. If it is suspected that an ESA is being neglected, mistreated, or has been abandoned, the University may contact the animal control division of the West Haven Police Department. The animal may be removed without warning if removal is warranted due to safety concerns. The Owner is financially responsible for the Approved ESA, including for any bodily injury or property damage caused by the Approved ESA. The Owner’s financial responsibility may include replacement of furniture, carpet, window, wall covering, and costs of damage to other University owned property. The Owner is expected to cover these costs at the time of repair and/or move-out. The Owner must notify the Accessibility Resources Center and the Office of Residential Life and Housing in writing if the Approved ESA is no longer needed or is no longer in residence. To replace an Approved ESA, the Owner must submit a new written request to Accessibility Resources Center for review by the 504/ADA/FHA Committee. The Owner agrees to abide by all other University policies, including all University housing policies. Any violation of this policy may result in immediate removal of the Approved ESA from the University. Reported violations will be reviewed by the Office of the Dean of Students. Approved ESAs may not be left overnight in student housing without the Owner being present. Approved ESAs must be taken with the Owner if the Owner leaves campus overnight. The Owner must make proper arrangements for the care of an ESA while the residence halls are closed for breaks. The need to care for an Approved ESA is not on its own a valid reason for permission to stay on campus over a break or any other period when University housing is closed. Approved ESAs (caged or uncaged) must be in a crate or cage when the Owner is absent from the room and/or when University personnel are present in the room to complete work orders. UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN STUDENT HANDBOOK REV. 1/12/2021

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Approved ESAs are not permitted to display behaviors or create noises that are deemed disruptive to others (e.g. excessive barking, growling, biting, hissing, scratching), unless said noises/behaviors are part of the needed disability service to the Owner. The University may require an Owner to remove his or her Approved ESA when it is out of control and the Owner does not take action to control it, when it is not housebroken, or when it poses a threat to health and safety. Should the ESA be removed from the premises for any reason, the Owner is expected to fulfill his/her housing obligations for the remainder of the housing contract. The University may prohibit the use of Approved ESAs in certain locations due to health or safety hazards, where ESAs may be endangered, or where their use may compromise or fundamentally alter the nature of a program or activity. (For example, dining facilities located within the residential facility). From time to time, the University may use pesticides, pest control devices, de-icing materials, cleaning supplies, and other materials for the maintenance and operation of University housing. The University is not responsible/liable for harm to an Approved ESA permitted to reside with an Owner in University housing. The University will make an effort to notify students in advance so that if the student feels the need to remove or otherwise protect their ESA, they may do so. The Owner will provide emergency contact information for an individual should the Owner be unable to care for the ESA at any time. A current University student or University personnel (unless the University personnel are the parents/guardians of the student) are not appropriate choices for an emergency contact and will not be permitted. Revocation of Approval

Revocation of Approval The University will take appropriate measures, up to and including revocation of approval for an ESA if, among other reasons: • The Owner violates any term of this policy, after notice and reasonable opportunity to cure when possible; • The Approved ESA is no longer needed to assist with a disability; • The University determines that the Approved ESA is a direct threat to the health, safety, or property of anyone in the University community, or that the Approved ESA is adversely affecting University’s programs and activities or studies; • The University discovers that false or misleading information was provided in the Owner’s application for approval of an Approved ESA. The University reserves the right to make an interim accommodation while determining appropriate measures. The requesting student may appeal revocation of approval of a previously Approved ESA within five (5) business days of the notice of revocation to the Dean of Students or designee. The student must do so in writing. The decision of the Dean of Students or designee is final.

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The University reserves the right to amend these guidelines at any time as circumstances require.

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Contract for Emotional Support Animals in University Housing In the event of an emergency in which I, the Owner, is unable to care for my ESA, the contact person stated below will be responsible for the care of my ESA (All information is required to be completed – Please type or print.):

Name: _______________________________________ Relationship to Owner: __________________ Phone: (_____) __________________ Email: _____________________________________________ By my signature below, I verify that I have read, understand, and agree to abide by this Policy on Emotional Support Animals in University Housing. __________________________________________________________________________________ Owner (Signature Required even if under 18 years old)

Date:

If Owner is under 18 years old: I, _________________________________, am the parent or legal guardian of the Owner. I have read, understand, and agree to this Policy on Emotional Support Animals in University Housing __________________________________________________________________________________ Signature

Date

Student’s Name: ________________________________ Residence Hall/Room#: _______________ Animal’s Name: _________________________________ Type of Animal: ______________________ Breed: __________________________ Coloring/Markings: _________________________________ Age: ________ Weight: ___________ Gender: __________ Spay/Neuter: ( ) yes

( ) no

License # (if applicable) ________________ Vaccination verified _____ Date of vaccination ________ Veterinarian check-up verified _____

Date of check-up _____ Notes: _____________________

__________________________________________________________________________________ CAS Staff Signature ________________________________________________ Date ____________ cc: Residential Life & Housing, Facilities, Security

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Guidelines for Service Animals on Campus University of New Haven is committed to providing access to its programs and services for individuals with disabilities. The University follows the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and the most up-to-date guidance from the Department of Justice (DOJ) with regard to service animals on campus. In accordance with ADA and DOJ, the University of New Haven notes the following regarding persons with disabilities who bring service animals to campus, including University Housing.

Definitions “Service animals,” as defined by the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), are dogs individually trained to do work or perform tasks for people with disabilities. Examples of such work or tasks include guiding people who are blind, alerting people who are deaf, pulling a wheelchair, responding to and protecting a person who is having a seizure, or performing other duties. Service animals are working animals, not pets. The work or task a dog has been trained to provide must be directly related to the person’s disability. Dogs whose sole function is to provide comfort or emotional support do not qualify as service animals under the ADA guidelines. A “Handler” is a person/student with a disability who is directly served by a service animal or a personal care attendant who handles the animal for a person/student with a disability.

Handler Responsibilities and Guidelines for Animal Care 1. Under the ADA, service animals must be harnessed, leashed, or tethered, unless these devices interfere with the service animal’s work or the individual’s disability prevents use of these devices. In this case, the individual must maintain control of the animal through voice, signal, or other effective controls. 2. The handler is responsible for the actions of the service animal, including bodily injury and/or property damage caused by the service animal. The handler’s financial responsibility may include replacement of furniture, carpet, window, wall covering, and costs of damage to other University owned property. The handler is expected to cover these costs at the time of repair and/or move-out. 3. The cost of care (health and safety) for the service animal is the sole responsibility of the handler. In accordance with local ordinances and regulations, the service animal must receive all required and/or recommended immunizations against diseases. Local licensing requirements must be followed. The University may request an updated verification regarding a service animal’s vaccinations at any time during the service animal’s residency, but verification will at a minimum be required at the start of each year the animal is in residence. These records will be maintained in the Accessibility Resources Office and will be shared with the Office of Residential Life and Campus Police. 4. The handler is to ensure that the service animal is not disruptive or a nuisance to members of the University of New Haven community. Disruptive behavior includes loud barking or other

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distracting actions by the service animal unless said noises or behaviors are part of the needed service to the handler. A nuisance is defined as, but not limited to, excessive noise, physical harm to humans or other animals, and destruction of property. To the extent possible, the handler should ensure the service dog does not approach or sniff people, dining tables, or the personal belongings of others. 5. The handler must take precautions to assure the service animal does not block any emergency exits. 6. Service animals must be housebroken. It is the handler’s responsibility to remove and properly dispose of the service animal’s waste (e.g. urine, excrement, fur, etc.), which must be placed in a sturdy plastic bag before disposal, and must be disposed of in an outside trash receptacle. If the handler is not physically able to clean up after the service dog, then the handler must hire and pay someone who is physically able to perform this service. The handler should keep the animal from urinating in gardens or cultivated areas of the campus. 7. If the service animal resides in University housing, the handler will provide emergency contact information for an individual should the handler be unable to care for the service animal at any time. A current University student or University personnel (unless the University personnel are the parents/guardians of the student) are not appropriate choices for an emergency contact and will not be permitted. If a service animal resides in University housing, the Accessibility Resources Center will share a copy of the emergency contact information with the Office of Residential Life and the University of New Haven Police Department. 8. First-year students who requires the use of a service animal and choose to reside in University sponsored housing, are encouraged to notify the Accessibility Resources Center (ARC) of the intent to live in University housing so that ARC can make appropriate arrangements regarding placement, roommates/suitemates or other required accommodations. Current students who reside on campus should choose roommate(s) and/or suitemate(s) who are comfortable residing with the animal. For first year students who have not selected his/her own roommate, prospective roommates will be notified of the presence of a service animal in the room. All roommates or suitemates of the Owner must acknowledge in writing that the service animal will be in residence with them. In the event that one or more prospective roommates or suitemates do not approve, or have a health or safety related concern regarding exposure to the service animal, general University policies regarding roommate or suitemate disagreements will be followed to enable either the handler and the service animal or the non-approving roommate(s) or suitemate(s) to be moved to a different location. 9. The service animal cannot pose a direct threat to the health or safety of others. If the service animal is deemed to pose a physical threat to others, actions will be taken to remove it from University property. 10. If it is suspected that a service animal is being neglected, mistreated, or has been abandoned, the University may contact the animal control division of the West Haven Police Department. UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN STUDENT HANDBOOK REV. 1/12/2021

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The service animal should not be left alone for unreasonably long periods of time. 11. Routine care for the service animal is expected for health and safety reasons, and includes flea and tick prevention, de-worming, routine vaccinations, bathing, and annual examinations by a veterinarian.

Service Animals on Campus Service Animals may accompany the handler throughout the University property. The University may implement certain restrictions in some areas based on health and safety. Examples may include, but are not limited to, science/research laboratories with sterile conditions, classrooms with research or demonstration animals, areas where protective clothing is necessary, custodial closets, boiler rooms, facility equipment rooms, and areas identified by state law as being inaccessible to animals. The Residential Life staff will inspect residential facilities on a regular basis as a part of routine health and safety checks of all residential space. If fleas, ticks, or other pests are detected during inspection, the unit will be treated using fumigation methods by the University approved pest control service. Those costs will be billed to the student/handler’s account.

Removal of a Service Animal Service animals may be removed from University of New Haven premises under the following circumstances: 1. The service animal is not housebroken (see #6). 2. The service animal is out of control and the handler does not take effective action to control it. If improper animal behavior occurs repeatedly; the handler may be prohibited from bringing the service animal into any University facility until the handler can demonstrate that he/she has taken significant steps to mitigate the behavior. 3. The service animal demonstrates a direct threat. A handler may be directed to remove a service animal that University of New Haven determines to be a substantial and direct threat to the health and safety of individuals. Any service animal that displays vicious behaviors toward other students, staff, or guests, may be barred from campus. When there is a legitimate reason to ask that a service animal be removed, the Accessibility Resources Center will work with the student with the disability to obtain goods or services without the use of the animal. The University reserves the right to amend these guidelines at any time as circumstances require.

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Service Animal Emergency Contact and Documentation All information is required to be completed – Please type or print: Student Name: _____________________________________________________________________ Residence Hall/Room# _______________________________________________________________ Service Animal’s Name_______________________________________________________________ Breed____________________________ Coloring/Markings_________________________________ Age_______ Weight_______ Gender__________ Spay/Neuter______ (

) yes

(

) no

License # (if applicable) ____________________ ____Vaccination(s) verified. Date of vaccination(s) __________________________ ____Veterinarian check-up verified. Date of check-up:________________________ Emergency Contact Information: Name: __________________________________________________________________________________ Relationship to Handler: ___________________________ Phone number: ______________________ Notes: ARC Staff Signature ________________________________________________ Date ____________ cc: Residential Life, Facilities, Campus Police By my signature below, I verify that I have read, understand, and agree to abide by the Guidelines for Service Animals in University Housing. ______________________________________________ Handler’s Signature (Required even if under 18 years old)

___________________ Date

If Owner is under 18 years old: I, _____________________________, am the parent or legal guardian of the Handler. I have (Please Print)

read, understand, and agree to these Guidelines for Service Animals in University Housing. _______________________________________________ Parent/Guardian Signature

____________________ Date

________________________________________________ ARC Director/Assistant Director Signature

____________________ Date

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Fire Safety Fire Alarm Procedures 1. When the alarm sounds, all occupants must evacuate the building quickly and safely. If you are aware of a resident in need of assistance, please notify an RA and Public Safety officials. Students should meet in the following areas: • The Atwood – Student Parking Area • Bergami Hall – go to the upper parking lot; • Bethel – the grassy area between Bethel and the Gate House; • Bixler Hall/Gerber Hall – Quad between Bixler and Gerber Hall; • Celentano – Quad between Celentano and Bixler; • Dunham Hall – Quad between Celentano and Bixler; • Forest Hills – Buildings 1and 2 should move to the north side of the complex, by the fence. Buildings 3 and 4 should assemble along the fence area on the south side of the property. These locations allow for fire vehicles to maneuver around these buildings. • Savin Court – Rear Parking Lot at Northern Fence Line; • Main Street Condos – Sidewalk in Front of Complex; • Park View – Rear Parking Lot • Sheffield Hall – Quad between Celentano and Bixler; • Westside Hall – Westside Hall Parking Lot • Winchester Hall – Quad between Celentano and Bixler; 2. The Fire Department will ensure that the building has been properly evacuated. 3. The Fire Department and University of New Haven Police Department will determine the cause of the alarm. 4. Any student found in his/her room/apartment during an alarm will be subject to disciplinary action. 5. Once the building has been evacuated, Residential Life staff members will ensure that students are staging in the appropriate location and that students do not return to the building until the proper time. 6. The Fire Department determines when it is appropriate to return to the building. Under no circumstances should you return unless told to do so by a Residential Life staff member acting for the Fire Department or by members of the Fire Department themselves.

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Fire Safety Tips 1. If you smell smoke or see a fire, pull the alarm if not sounding, notify others as you leave the building through the nearest safe exit. 2. Before opening the door, feel it with the back of your hand to see if it is hot. If the door is hot, do not open it. Place something to block the space under the door, stay in your room near a window, and alert rescue personnel to your location. If the door is not hot, put your shoulder up against it, and open it slowly. If the hallway appears to be clear, exit the building. If you encounter smoke, seek an alternate exit, or return to your room and seek assistance from rescue personnel. 3. If you must pass through a smoke-filled corridor, cover your nose and mouth with a cloth, and stay as low to the ground as possible while evacuating the building. 4. Never use the elevator when the fire alarm is sounding. 5. Never prop open fire doors; their purpose is to hold back the fire during an emergency. 6. Students should attend fire safety training held throughout the year. Training is offered during residence hall floor meetings, twice a semester during the evening, and upon requests made to the Public Safety Department. 7. Once the Fire Department responds, the nature and location of the problem will be identified. Fire Alarms • DON'T IGNORE ALARMS! • Immediately exit building. • Before opening a door, feel the door. If it's hot, keep door closed and find a second way out. • If trapped, call 911 and tell them your location. Seal the door and signal for help from your window. Open windows slightly at the top and bottom and be prepared to close if smoke rushes in. • Call 911 from a safe location. • Notify emergency personnel if you know or suspect someone is still inside. Escape Planning • Begins before emergencies occur. • Learn your buildings evacuation plan and the location of all exits. • Practice using alternate means of egress and learn how the door hardware works. If You Discover Smoke or Fire • Activate alarm if not sounding by locating the nearest pull station (usually located near the exits). • Notify others as you exit. • Report to building muster location. • DON'T DELAY ACTIVATING ALARMS OR CALLING 911! UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN STUDENT HANDBOOK REV. 1/12/2021

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Encountering Smoke • Stay low, drop to hands and knees if necessary and crawl toward exit. • Smoke will rise. • Breathe through your nose and use a filter such as a shirt or towel. Trapped In Room • Close doors and place towels under door to prevent smoke from entering. • Call 911 and give your location. • Stay low as smoke will rise. • Get to a window to signal for help. Clothes on Fire • STOP, DROP & ROLL (cover your face with your hands). • Continue to roll around on ground to smother flames. • Call 911to seek immediate medical attention. Exits • Know and practice using additional ways out. • Ensure egress paths are passable and not blocked. • Don't store items in exit corridors, stairs, or doorways. • Make sure doors open as intended before an emergency occurs. Fire Drills • Treat all drills as real emergencies. • Practice using alternate exits. • Close door to your room as you exit. • Evacuate to buildings muster location. Smoking • UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN IS A SMOKE FREE CAMPUS Electrical Hazards • Don't overload circuits. • Don't pinch, tack or staple cords against walls or furniture or run under carpets. • Only use electrical devices having a label from an independent testing agency. • Use light bulbs with the wattage intended for appliance. • Don't use appliances that malfunction or trip breakers.

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Cooking • WATCH WHAT YOU HEAT! Never leave cooking unattended. • Cook only where permitted. • Use only approved devices. • Keep cooking area clean and uncluttered. • Cook only when alert, not sleepy or drowsy from medicine or alcohol. • If you use electric appliances, don't overload circuits. • If fire starts in microwave, keep door closed and unplug the unit. Grilling • All grilling on campus must follow the University's Grilling Policy. • Grills should be on a flat, stable surface a safe distance from combustibles. • Maintain a 3 foot safe zone barrier around grill. • Never leave grill unattended. Most accidents involving grills occur when left unattended. • Do not wear loose clothing and use long handled utensils. • All grilling must go through EMS. Candles • Not permitted in residence halls or offices. • If approved, must be on flat, stable surface where they will not accidently overturn. Fire Extinguishers • Only use on small fires in their incipient stages. • Have an escape route and work toward an exit. • Remember P.A.S.S. • Pull pin. • Aim nozzle at the base of the fire. • Squeeze handle to discharge agent • Sweep the nozzle across the base of the fire. • If fire is too large, close door to room, activate alarm and evacuate. • Fire Extinguishers video FEMA: https://youtu.be/BLjoWjCrDqg. Sprinklers • Don't hang anything from sprinkler components. • Keep storage at least 18"below sprinkler heads. • Notify the Facilities Department of damaged sprinkler components. UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN STUDENT HANDBOOK REV. 1/12/2021

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Off-Campus Housing • Ensure you have working smoke alarms in each bedroom, outside sleeping areas and on every level. • Carbon monoxide detectors should be located outside each sleeping area and on every level. • Ensure you have two ways out of each room and building. • Make sure windows open easily. • Don't overload circuits, have ample electrical outlets for your devices. • Find out when the last Fire Marshal inspection occurred (should be within past year). • Ensure heating system is maintained and inspected yearly. • Make sure building address is clearly visible from the street for emergency responders. False Fire Alarms False fire alarms have serious implications for student safety. Anyone involved in endangering public safety and/or tampering with fire safety equipment will face disciplinary action, including possible expulsion from the University, and will be subject to full prosecution under the laws of the State of Connecticut. Bomb Threats Making bomb threats is a serious offense. Individuals found to be involved in this type of activity will face disciplinary action, including possible expulsion from the University, and be subject to full prosecution under the laws of the State of Connecticut. Anyone receiving or hearing such a threat should report it immediately to a Residential Life staff member and the University of New Haven Police Department.

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RESIDENTIAL LIFE Office of Residential Life Bixler Hall 203.932.7076 reslife@newhaven.edu Monday-Thursday 8:30 a.m. – 6:00 p.m. and Friday 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. This section of the Student Handbook has been written as a guide and reference for resident students at the University of New Haven and includes information and policies specific to resident students and their guests/visitors.

Mission Statement The mission of the Office of Residential Life is to create a safe, supportive, inclusive and engaged learning environment that enhances students’ holistic development. We provide opportunities for students to create community and implement a vision for their future.

Vision Statement Our vision is for the residential community to create spirited life-long Chargers.

In Partnership With Members of the University of New Haven We Will... • Build collaborative relationships that connect students with University partners to support academic success and personal development. • Co-create a residential environment that intentionally seeks student input and feedback by practicing open and honest dialogue. • Immerse students in a community engagement model that prepares them to be active members of the University community and emerge as responsible global citizens. • Foster an environment of mutual respect that promotes discovery and appreciation of self and one another. To serve our mission, we commit to co-creating a student-centered environment that values: • Curiosity and Discovery • Thoughtful and create expression • Advocacy for self and others • Authentic and equitable relationships • As sense of belonging and pride

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Diversity Statement The Office of Residential Life believes diversity and inclusion enriches learning and instills a sense of belonging that enhances community. We commit to co-creating an environment that supports and affirms diversity in all manifestations. We recognize and are dedicated to the continuous development of our staff to serve the growing needs of our community. In partnership with members of the University of New Haven, the Office of Residential Life will infuse diversity and inclusion into our staffing practices, community, education and programming.

Residence Hall Staff Resident Assistants (RAs): Student staff specially trained to assist students who live in each residence hall. RAs plan programs and activities to help you get to know each other and build a sense of community and a positive feeling within your hall. RAs are on duty in the evenings and available to assist their community members should a concern or urgent situation arise as well as to address incidents involving University policies. RAs are a great resource if you have a question, concern, or are just looking to get more involved on campus. Academic Peer Mentors (APMs): Student staff assigned to each first-year residence hall to provide academic support and guidance to the residential community. APMs provide programs on study skills, time management, and academic exploration to name a few and receive training through the Center for Student Success and Office of Residential Life. Community Supervisors: Live-in professional and/or graduate-level staff members who directly supervise the Resident Assistant staff. They provide leadership and guidance for their residence hall community. Their offices are typically located within the residence halls.

Community Officer Program The Office of Residential Life partners with the University Police Department to pair a University Police Department Officer with each residential area. The Community Officer co-programs with the Resident Assistants and plays an integral role developing the residential community.

Hall Councils Participating in your hall council gives you an opportunity to get involved, meet people, and have some input about your living environment. You can also gain valuable experience as a student leader. Hall Council members plan hall-wide events, and also serve as a voice for residential students to help develop a sense of community and positive living environment.

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Room Occupancy Procedures and Guidelines The Housing License Agreement is binding for the entire academic year. Residents are expected to live in the room assigned to them and are responsible for its condition. Each room will be inspected by Residential Life staff prior to check-in and after check-out. Any uncleanliness, damage, theft, vandalism, or loss of University property, including loss of issued keys, will be charged to the student's account. Damage to any common areas within the residence halls and any fines levied by civil authorities (e.g., for false alarms, etc.) will be prorated among the residents of the entire building. Please refer to the Housing License Agreement for billing and cancellation procedures. The University reserves the right to assign students to any vacant residence hall space, to increase the number of occupants in any room/suite/apartment, or to re-assign a student at any time for any reason. In the event that a large number of vacancies occur in any residence hall, the Office of Residential Life reserves the right to consolidate students.

Residence Hall Check-in/Check-Out Procedures When checking into your assigned room/suite/apartment, residents receive their key(s) from a Residential Life staff member and are required to complete a Room Condition Report. The Room Condition Report should be completed accurately and in detail and with any previously damaged items indicated. Residential Life staff will assist you if you have any questions about completing the Room Condition Report. Failure to complete it may result in your being charged unnecessarily when your room/suite/apartment is checked again when you move out. When checking out of your assigned room/suite/apartment, you will make arrangements with a Residential Life staff member to return your keys and complete the check-out portion of the Room Condition Report. You will return your room/suite/apartment keys to Residential Life staff at the time of check-out or you will be billed for the cost of a lock change. Your room/suite/apartment must also be clean and free of trash and personal items. Any items left after you move out will be discarded. Failure complete these procedures may result in a $25 fee as an improper check-out. Detailed check-out information is distributed at the close of each semester.

Lockouts and Lost Keys When checking into the residence hall, each student receives a room/suite/apartment key. A temporary replacement key for your room/suite/apartment will be issued at the time the lost/stolen key is reported, and your student account will reflect a lock change charge. Should the lost/stolen key be found after the lock is changed, the lock change charge will remain on your account. All students residing in a room/suite/apartment will need to go to the Office of Residential Life with their University of New Haven ID card to pick up their new key. If you are locked out of your room/suite/apartment, Resident Assistants can help you. They will let you into your own room only; they will not give you access to someone else's room.

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If you are habitually locked out, the Resident Assistant can and will refuse to let you into your room. It is your responsibility to carry your keys with you at all times or replace your keys if you have lost them. Leaving your door unlocked is dangerous and also places you and your roommates' belongings at risk.

Damage and Vandalism It is imperative that students be concerned with the care and treatment of all University property, including that found in individual rooms and public areas. Residents share responsibility for ensuring that University property is not damaged or stolen. Damage charges may be assessed for any intentional or negligent damage by residents. Any damage made by a guest will be charged to the host. Damage charges may be assessed at any point throughout or after the academic year depending on the type and nature of the damage. Pricing for damages may vary depending on location (on campus or off campus) and are subject to change. Examples of damages that may be charged include, but are not limited to, wall repair, broken windows, replacement of screens, and vandalism. If you would like to see a full list of billable damages and charges, please contact the Office of Residential Life. Damage includes, but is not limited to, misuse (either intentional or unintentional) resulting in the need for repairs beyond anticipated wear and tear (as evaluated by Facilities staff) as well as unauthorized alterations to the structure and/or amenities provided in University rooms/suites/apartments.

Tips to Avoid Damage Charges 1. To avoid damaging the walls, while hanging posters, etc., it is highly recommended that you utilize products specifically designed to be removed without causing damage to walls. 2. Do not use nails, screws, push pins or thumbtacks to hang posters, etc. 3. Do not use tape, especially masking tape, which pulls off paint, and scotch tape, which cannot be easily removed. 4. Do not use a sticky, gum-like adhesive substance (Funtac or glue sticks) on any surface. 5. Do not stick decals, bum per stickers, etc. on any surface; they damage the surface they are adhered to. 6. Empty trash regularly, and do not accumulate empty cans, bottles, or other recycling. 7. Complete your Room Condition Report thoroughly, and return it to your RA immediately at check-in. 8. Return all of your keys upon leaving University housing.

Mid-year Departure Students studying abroad/away, taking a leave of absence, or withdrawing from the University for the spring semester, must check out of their housing assignments by the end of the Fall semester and follow the check-out procedures listed above.

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Graduating Students Resident students who graduate mid-year and check-out of the residence hall at that time are subject to the following: 1. Assessed damages during the last semester of residence will be billed to the student's account (if applicable), 2. Room and Board for the ensuing semester will be completely refundable, 3. The Housing License Agreement is binding for students who graduate with an Associate’s degree in January and continue as full-time students for the spring semester. 4. Resident students graduating at mid-year must vacate their housing assignment at the end of the fall semester.

Academic and Administrative Dismissals from the University Residential students who are academically or administratively dismissed from the University between semesters of anticipated occupancy (i.e., fall-spring, spring-fall) shall automatically and immediately lose their room reservation for the ensuing semester. In such cases, students must reapply for housing through the established procedures, regardless of the fact that they may have been reinstated to the University through the appropriate appeals process prior to the next standard period for residence hall occupancy. The following stipulations regarding refunds will apply: 1. Assessed damages during the last semester of residence will be billed to the student's account (if applicable). 2. If an institutional delay in academic or administrative dismissal notification results in a student's improperly commencing residence, the room fee will be prorated as necessary. Residential Life staff will verify the status of any residents academically or administratively dismissed. Such residents will be required to remove their belongings and vacate the residence hall within 48 hours of notification.

Failure to Pay Required Fees In the event that any residence hall fees remain unpaid or overdue, the University reserves the right to withhold from the resident their registration, grades, transcripts, or diploma; to remove the student from University housing; and to refuse future housing requests.

Administrative Action Policy A resident student's Housing License Agreement may be terminated by the Office of Residential Life without referral to the student conduct system for the following reasons: 1. Excessive damage to University property and the living environment; 2. Consistent unsanitary and unhealthful conditions in a residence hall room, suite, apartment,

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or common area; 3. Failure to meet a financial obligation including, but not limited to, housing and damage fees; 4. Unauthorized occupancy of a residence hall room during a vacation period; and 5. Documented disruptive behavior which inhibits the ongoing functioning of the residence hall community.

Release of Information Office of Residential Life reserves the right to contact, in an emergency, individuals designated on file or to release the names, phone numbers, and home and email addresses of roommates to students assigned to a room/suite/apartment.

Room Changes All room changes must have the approval from the Office of Residential Life. Room changes will be permitted after the second week of the semester. Students first meet with their Resident Assistant for a mediation meeting. If no resolution is achieved, a meeting will then be held by the community supervisor before a room change is permitted. Information regarding room changes is available through Office of Residential Life staff. The Office of Residential Life reserves the right to change room assignments for the welfare of the student or the Residential Life program.

Roommate Conflicts During the first weeks of the academic year, residence hall staff facilitate Roommate Agreements for each Room/Suite. Roommate Agreements are available in all residence halls regardless of class year. Students experiencing a conflict with roommates should first try to resolve any issues with their roommates. If this is not successful, students may seek the assistance of their Resident Assistant to aid with conflict mediation. If the conflict cannot be resolved with your RA's assistance, students may contact their Resident Director or Community Director for further assistance.

Entry to Resident Rooms Authorized University personnel may enter student rooms/suites/apartments under the following circumstances: 1. Reasonable cause to believe that a violation of University rules or regulations is taking place; 2. Repairs and maintenance; 3. Health and Safety or Closing inspections; 4. Residents are in compliance with the terms of the Housing License Agreement.

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To the extent possible, students will be given reasonable notice. Duly authorized law enforcement authorities, following appropriate legal procedures, are entitled to enter and search residence hall rooms and residents' belongings. The University also retains the right to inspect student rooms and property if reasonable suspicion of illegal activity exists.

Vacation Periods and Break Housing The residence halls will be closed for all University break periods. You will be notified of the specific times and dates that the halls will close and reopen. Break periods include, but are not limited to, Thanksgiving, Winter Break, and Spring Break. When you leave your room for the vacation periods, you are responsible for the following: 1. All windows must be closed and locked and all doors dead-bolted, 2. All window blinds must be drawn, 3. Clean your room/suite/apartment; empty wastebaskets, remove all perishable food from refrigerators and rooms, and take your trash to the dumpster, 4. All electrical appliances must be unplugged including Micro-fridges (with the exception of University refrigerators), 5. Take all items you will need during the break period. You will not have access to your room/suite/apartment during the break, 6. Remove all your valuable personal belongings. The University is not responsible for lost or stolen property. A Residential Life staff member will check each room/suite/apartment to ensure that the above guidelines have been followed. Students who fail to vacate their room/suite/apartment by the designated time will be subject to a $50 fine and will be assessed a $50 per night charge. All students requesting to remain on campus in Break Housing must have their need to stay verified and approved by the Office of Residential Life by the appropriate deadline. All students requesting Break Housing should complete a Break Housing Application on myHousing, which includes the Break Housing policies and procedures. Unauthorized occupancy of any residence hall room/suite/apartment during a vacation period will result in an occupancy charge and disciplinary action and may result in loss of residence hall privileges.

Personal Property Insurance It is important for students to protect their personal property (stereos, cameras, computers, furniture), as the University is not responsible for the personal property of residents. This includes, but is not limited to, items in rooms, in storage, being delivered on the student's behalf, en route or under any other UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN STUDENT HANDBOOK REV. 1/12/2021

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circumstances. It is recommended that students have personal property insurance as the University does not provide coverage for these items. There are several options for obtaining personal property insurance. This can be confirmed by contacting your family's insurance agent. A parent's homeowner or tenant insurance policy may provide coverage; check the language of the policy to see if you need to add a rider. Also, all residential students receive a brochure from the National Student Services, Inc. (NSSI) regarding coverage for students living oncampus and for those renting apartments off campus (1.800.256.NSSI). They can be reached online at (www.nssi.com). Brochures are also located in the Office of Residential Life. Students should keep an inventory of their property, complete with serial numbers, as a way to prove ownership in the event they need to file a claim with an insurance company.

Storage The University does not provide storage of personal items during the summer months or once a student has left the University. The University reserves the right to immediately dispose of any and all items left in the room/suite/apartment after the halls have closed at the end of the academic year. The University may also immediately dispose of any belongings left by students who have withdrawn from the University or have been removed from housing.

Room Selection The Room Selection Process for current students is conducted each spring for the following academic year. Based on rising class status (sophomore, junior, etc.), each eligible student is assigned a random Room Selection Number which determines the order in which the student selects a room. This process is fully explained by the Office of Residential Life prior to the time of the Room Selection Process. Information is also posted at www.newhaven.edu/roomselection.

Requests for Modified Housing The University of New Haven does not discriminate on the basis of disability and will make every effort to provide appropriate reasonable accommodations within the parameters of available resources. A formal request and documentation of the need for modified housing or modified dining accommodations are required. Both incoming and returning students should make their needs for modified housing and/or modified dining accommodations known to the Accessibility Resources Center located on the ground level of Sheffield Hall. Incoming students should make a request for accommodation by contacting the Accessibility Resources Center as soon as they have been accepted to the University and have made their decision to attend. For returning students, a request for accommodation should be made in conjunction with the process and deadlines set forth by the Accessibility Resources Center. Any student who is in need of specific modifications in housing and/or dining accommodations due to a disability or a disabling medical condition should contact the Accessibility Resources Center to obtain a "Request for Modified Housing and/or Dining Accommodations" packet. Although every reasonable

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effort will be made to accommodate requests, late requests may result in delay, substitution, or denial of accommodations. All requests will be reviewed by the 504/ADA/FHA Committee, and students will be notified of the Committee's decisions. Students will have the right to appeal the Committee's decisions by contacting the University's 504/ADA/FHA Coordinator. Students with mobility, hearing, and visual disabilities should notify the Office of Residential Life and Accessibility Resources Center so that these offices can make University of New Haven Police Department, fire, and other emergency personnel aware of the rooms occupied by persons with disabilities to ensure that appropriate measures can be taken when responding in the event of an emergency.

Study Abroad If students wish to participate in a Study Abroad program for spring semester, they may pay their $500 Room Deposit before leaving at the end of the fall semester. This will enable a student to participate in the Room Selection Process with a group of current University of New Haven students during the Room Selection Process taking place during the spring semester. If students are going abroad for the fall semester, they may pay their $500 Room Deposit during spring semester. Students will be placed in an available room for the following January, prior to their return to the University of New Haven.

Meal Plan Meal plans are required for students residing in University housing with the exception of Main Street Condos, Park View, Savin Court, and the Atwood. Returning students select a meal plan during the Room Selection Process, for the following academic year. First-year students will be assigned the Charger Pride meal plan. First-year students living in University housing select from the Platinum or Gold meal plans. Returning students living in University housing select from the Charger Blue, Charger Gold, and Charger Pride plans. Before purchasing a meal plan, thoroughly review the description of the meal plan so that you fully understand the designated meal times and dining halls in which you can dine with a meal swipe and which designated meal times and dining halls will utilize a charge to your Dining Dollars. During the first week of each semester, the Office of Residential Life coordinates an open enrollment period. During this one week period, eligible students may log into myHousing and update the meal plan that was purchased. All meal plan purchases are final at the end of the open enrollment period. Continuing students assigned to halls where a meal plan is required, that have not selected a meal plan following the completion of the Room Selection Process by the published deadline will automatically be assigned to the Charger Blue meal plan.. First year students will be assigned to a Platinum Unlimited. Students residing in Savin Court, Main Street Condos, Park View or the Atwood are not required to purchase a meal plan but may still opt to purchase a voluntary meal plan at dining.newhaven.edu.

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If a student officially withdraws from the University, a prorated refund will be issued through the 4th week of the semester per the University Refund schedule available at newhaven.edu/bursar. More information regarding the meal plan offerings and dining options at the University of New Haven is available at dining.newhaven.edu.

Residence Hall Policies and Procedures The primary goals of the residential life program are to create a sense of community among the residents of each building and to provide an environment where students may learn and develop positive social and academic habits. If a resident's behavior interferes with or infringes on the rights of others, the Residential Life staff will intervene and discuss the matter with the individual. If discussion does not alter the inappropriate behavior, the student will be referred to the student conduct process. The following conduct is prohibited in or around University residence halls, and violators are subject to immediate action and/or removal by University personnel: 1. Misuse of University property or furniture (e.g., moving beds out of the bed room area, reconstruction of bunkbeds, moving of furniture from public areas into individual rooms, removing University property from a room/suite/apartment or building); 2. Removal of window screens; suspension of articles from windows or ledges; placing of neon signs in windows; signs, symbols, or logos referring to alcohol and visible from outside the building; 3. Presence on building roof areas, window ledges, or other unauthorized areas; 4. Tampering with multi-room/apartment heat control valves; 5. The playing of any type of sports in hallways, suites, apartments, and rooms.

Quiet Hours and Community Responsibility Students are members of a community and are expected to act responsibly and not to interfere with the rights, comfort, or safety of their roommates, other students, and neighbors in the West Haven community. Courtesy hours are in effect 24 hours a day. Your neighbors have the right to ask (and expect you to comply) that you hold noise to a level that they will not be able to hear. Residential Life Quiet Hours are as follows: Sunday - Thursday: Friday & Saturday: During final exams:

10 p.m. – 8 a.m. 1 a.m. – 8 p.m. 24 hours a day

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Be considerate of your neighbors and the greater residential community. You may be asked to take electronic equipment home if repeated noise violations occur.

Guest Policy No guests of students (other than immediate family) will be permitted on campus during the Fall 2020 semester. Family visits will be allowed during normal business hours and held outside or in a common area of the residence halls. • Residential Students will only have card access to their own residence hall, which will help with maintaining social distancing. Only those invited residential guests (ONE PER STUDENT) will be allowed access to other residence halls with a host from that building. Those guests (students) will follow all social distance requirements and not be allowed in the residential room/suite/apartment of the visiting building. • No outside guests, including parents or guardians, will be permitted inside the residence hall rooms/suites/apartments. Students will be encouraged to meet with their guests outside of the building our in a common area. • Residential Students will not be permitted to have overnight guest stay in the residence halls, which will include students from other buildings or those living in the same residence hall. • For violations of these policies, students will be referred to the Dean of Students for violation of the guest policy. • ORL staff or contracted security will be positioned inside all residential halls to check University identification and to ensure compliance with the visitor policy rules. This policy is for the Fall semester and would be subject to change in the spring depending on the COVID-19 restrictions.

Guest Policy Violations A University official may request at any time that a guest leaves the residence hall. In the event of a policy violation, a University Official may deny a guest permission to visit in the building pending the outcome of a student conduct hearing.

Parent/Guardian Visitation Parents/Guardians, when visiting the University of New Haven residence halls, should always be accompanied by their residential student and must be signed into the residence hall at the duty desk during staffed hours. No outside guests, including parents or guardians, will be permitted inside the residence hall rooms. Students will be encouraged to meet with their guests outside of the building our in a common area.

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Health and Safety Inspections The University expects a certain level of cleanliness and also certain fire and safety standards to be maintained in its residence halls. To ensure that these standards are met, the Residential Life staff will conduct regular health and safety inspections of each room/suite/apartment. Students will be notified of the regularly scheduled Health and Safety Inspection period 24 hours in advance. Please note that University officials reserve the right to conduct unannounced inspections if there is reason to believe the health and wellness or safety of residents are at risk. During a Health and Safety inspection, particular attention is paid to the cleanliness in every residence hall room/suite/apartment. Removal of trash to the appropriate assigned area is also critical to note in each inspection. Finally, any other situation that is deemed a health hazard will be noted. If a problem is noted, you will receive a written request to rectify it by a specified date. At that time, the room/ suite/apartment will be re-inspected. Failure to correct a documented problem can result in a $25 fine and possible referral to the student conduct process. If prohibited items are found in a student room/suite/apartment, they may be confiscated and/or discarded by University personnel, and possible referral to the student conduct process. We hope that the inspections will remind you of the importance of upholding University standards and being considerate of the health and safety of the people with whom you live. Every student has the right to a clean and safe living/learning environment.

Fire Safety Inspections Fire Safety Inspections are conducted periodically by the local and University of New Haven Fire Marshals. Please ensure the safety of all resident students by abiding by all fire safety policies.

Conservation Please remember to do your part to conserve energy. Turn off lights, unplug appliances that are not in use, keep your windows shut when the heat is on, and report any problems, such as leaky faucets and heat problems through the Facilities Work Order system available on myCharger.

Electricity Although the University has included the cost of electricity in the housing fee, students should know that an account of each apartment's electricity use will be kept on file in the Facilities Department. With this in mind, students should conserve their use of electricity. Any apartments found to be using an above-average amount may be billed for their excessive use.

Prohibited Items Due to the inherent risk to personal safety, the following items are prohibited within the residence halls: 1. Animals and/or pets of any kind (fish in a small tank of no more than five gallons) are UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN STUDENT HANDBOOK REV. 1/12/2021

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permitted in the residence halls as well as approved emotional support and service animals). Residents will be required to remove prohibited animals/pets from the residence hall within 24 hours. Failure to comply with requests to remove an animal/pet will result in further documentation, a conduct hearing, and sanctioning, including but not limited to, probation, a $50 fine, and removal of the prohibited animal; 2. Weightlifting equipment (small hand weights are permissible), dart boards (when mounted on wall); 3. Bicycle storage outside of individual student rooms (may not block egress); 4. Motorcycles other than in student parking areas (must be registered with University of New Haven Police Department); 5. Outside TV or radio antennas/satellite dishes; 6. Electrically amplified instruments, subwoofers and/or drums, DJ equipment (items may be stored but not utilized in the residence halls and must be used in designated practice areas); 7. Non-University beds, mattresses or lofts (including waterbeds), cinderblocks, wicker furniture, cardboard cutouts, carpets with a foam or rubber backing, trash cans larger than 15 gallons, hoverboards; 8. Possession of live Christmas/holiday trees or greens, non-LED string decorative lights (only LED lights with supporting factory tags are permitted in the residence halls); 9. Use of prohibited electrical equipment and appliances including air conditioners, open-coil cooking units, small convection ovens, homemade lighting devices, neon lights and signs, octopus style lamps with multiple arms and plastic light covers, extension cords, halogen lamps, heating blankets, multi-outlet adapters (UL approved power strips are allowed-one per outlet), sun and heat lamps, in-door portable stove top grills, dishwashers, washers, dryers, small freezers, larger than 3.2 -3.3 cubic feet non-University supplied refrigerators; 10. No cooking is permitted in Bergami, Bethel, Bixler, Gerber, and Westside Halls except in the kitchen area. As a result, the following items are prohibited from use: hot plates, heating coils, electric frying pans, toasters, toaster ovens, deep fryers, and crock pots. One microwave unit less than 10 amps is permitted per room. 12. Students in Sheffield, Winchester, Celentano, Forest Hills, Dunham, Ruden, Savin Court, and Main Street Condos wishing to cook may bring closed-coil automatic shut off cooking units such as hot pots, hot plates, crock pots, coffee pots, electric fry pans, closed -coil grills (George Foreman style), toasters, and toaster ovens. One microwave oven unit less than 10 amps is permitted per apartment. All cooking and food prep must take place in University designated kitchens. 13. Use of space heaters, candles, incense, charcoal and gas grills, or anything which uses open flame; UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN STUDENT HANDBOOK REV. 1/12/2021

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14. Construction of additional walls or partitions or physical alteration of a room/suite/apartment, additionally all repairs or alterations to University property must be processed through the University work order system as well as completed by University employees; 15. Free-hanging room dividers used for privacy such as blinds, sheets, bedspreads, curtains, bamboo shades, etc. are against the fire code and are prohibited. Additionally, all room doors shall be able to open a minimum of 90 degrees. 16. Installing additional locks or chains to any door in the residence hall rooms or apartments; 17. Kegs, empty kegs and alcohol cans or bottles or their use as "furniture", or the installation of a bar in any room or apartment, beer pong tables and setups, binge drinking paraphernalia, common source containers, ice luges; 18. All personal upholstered sofas, couches, recliners, and other chairs may not have any rips, tears, or defects; 19. Posters, tapestries, and wall coverings may not cover more than 20% of a wall or hang from a ceiling.

Posting Policy Posters, advertisements, flyers, etc. approved by the Center for Student Engagement, Leadership and Orientation or Office Residential Life may be delivered to the Office of Residential Life during business hours for Resident Assistant posting within the residence halls in approved locations. Any poster in violation of University policies can be removed at the discretion of ORL staff. Posting materials on windows, walls, doors, entrances, etc. is not permitted as this can block the visibility and/or cause damage to the surface.

Solicitation, Advertising, and Political Canvassing Solicitation, sales advertising, and political and religious canvassing by students and non-students are not permitted in the residence halls. Students are not permitted to function as on-campus agents or representatives of off-campus private or commercial firms or enterprises or to conduct a business from any residence hall room or apartment. Individuals violating this policy will be reported to the Office of Residential Life or the University of New Haven Police Department.

Outward Facing Surface Policy At times, students may choose to express themselves within their residential unit on outward facing surfaces, such as exterior room doors, windows, etc. The University expects that such expression be respectful and appropriate for a diverse community. In addition, outwardly facing decorations that defame specific individuals or groups may be incompatible with the University’s Freedom of Expression Statement. In situations where concerns regarding the content of the expression are raised, University UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN STUDENT HANDBOOK REV. 1/12/2021

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of New Haven staff members may discuss with students the appropriateness of the decoration and its impact on the community.

Services and Amenities Activity Fee Each semester, residential students are assessed an activity fee. The money is allocated to the Hall Councils, Resident Assistants, and Office of Residential Life for programs and activities for residential students. Your input and suggestions are crucial so that these groups can have a better understanding of how you would like to see your money spent.

Common Rooms Most residence halls offer a common room for the use of the students housed in that building. These rooms are for social and recreational use with the following guidelines: 1. All University and Residence Hall Policies/Procedures are observed in all Common Areas; 2. Be considerate of others; remember that the Common Room is for the use of all residents; 3. No alcoholic beverages (regardless of students' age) will be permitted in the Common Room; 4. Removal of furniture from the Common Room is prohibited; 5. Any problems with or damage to the Commons Room should be promptly reported to Office of Residential Life staff; 6. The University of New Haven is not responsible for the loss or theft of personal belongings left in the Common Room; 7. Common Rooms are not available to reserve.

Main Street Condo’s Deck Usage In the interest of safety, security, and community aesthetics, the following policies apply to the use of outdoor decks at the Main Street Condos: • Objects are not permitted to be thrown from the deck; • Decks are to be used as an extension of your living room, and not an entry or an exit from any condo, except in the case of a fire or life safety emergency which prevents you from leaving through your front door; • University furniture may not be placed on the deck; • Laundry lines or drying racks are not permitted to be hanging from or placed on the decks; • Decorations of any kind (including banners, holiday lights) are not permitted; • Grills of any kind are not permitted on the decks. UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN STUDENT HANDBOOK REV. 1/12/2021

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• Stereo speakers, or amplified instruments are not permitted; • Garbage, boxes, or plastic bags are not to be left on the decks; • Smoking is prohibited on all decks.

Mail Delivery All residential student mailboxes are located in Bixler, Bergami, Westside, and Celentano mailrooms. You may pick up your mail during the hours posted. As a resident student, you will be assigned a mailbox number that will be yours as long as you remain on campus. Box numbers and keys can be secured at the Mail Department in the basement of Maxcy Hall. The correct mailing address for all resident students is as follows: All other resident students “Your Name” 300 Boston Post Road, “Your Box Number” West Haven, CT 06516 Atwood Residents “Your Name” 1 Atwood Place, “Your Box Number” West Haven, CT 06516 If you have a package, you will be notified via email. You may pick up your package from the Mail Department or the Atwood (as indicated above) with proper ID. Failure to retrieve your package will result in it being returned to sender. Every student is responsible for checking their University of New Haven mailbox. Important, dated campus mail will be sent to you through your mailbox. All keys must be returned before leaving the University at the end of the academic or lease (Atwood residents), or a $25 lost key charge will be assessed to your student account. Please remember to leave a forwarding address with the Mail Department staff should you leave University housing at the end of the academic year.

Maintenance Problems If any University property in your room, apartment/suite, or residence hall (including furniture, windows, toilets, etc.) needs repair, please submit a work order on myCharger. If you fail to report a maintenance problem, you could be held responsible for any resulting damage. All repairs must be done by authorized University personnel. Emergency Work Orders, including active water leaks, broken windows, doors not locking, faulty fire equipment, loss of heat/power, no lights, overflowing toilet should be called in directly to Facilities Services at 203.932.7087.

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Walkways, parking lots, and corridors are lighted for your safety and security. Additional on-campus lighting includes emergency and exit lights. If you should notice a Facilities issue outside of your residence hall on campus, please submit a work order through myCharger. All maintenance requests will be dealt with as soon as possible; higher priority will be given to the more serious repairs.

Laundry Facilities There are washers and dryers located in each residence hall. Your student ID operates the laundry machines facilities except in Savin Court, Main Street Condos, and the Atwood. Main Street Condos and the Atwood are furnished with a washer and dryer in each unit. For your health and safety, all laundry room doors should remain closed. If you have trouble with a machine, report the problem to a Residential Life staff member and/or CSC through the company's link posted in the laundry room. The Office of Residential Life is not responsible for lost or damaged clothing.

Snow Removal It is the student's responsibility to seek information on when and where their vehicle must be moved in the event of a snowstorm. University of New Haven Police Department and Office of Residential Life staff will communicate this information via email and campus postings. To facilitate snow removal in the University parking lots, students will be notified via their University email account as to the specific days and times that cars must be moved.

Safety and Security It is up to every student to help ensure the safety and security of the residential community. It is the responsibility of each student to follow the guidelines listed below and to report any problems that might affect the safety and security of others. 1. All room, apartment, and suite doors must remain locked and the deadbolt engaged (where applicable) at all times for your own safety and the security of your belongings. The University assumes no responsibility for loss of, or damage to, personal property. 2. All windows should be locked when occupants are not in the room/suite/apartment. 3. All exterior residence hall doors are locked 24 hours a day. Propping of exterior doors and/or tampering with locks is considered a serious security violation. Residents involved in such activities may be subject to disciplinary action. 4. Question anyone who appears to have no legitimate reason for being in the building, or request a staff member or a University of New Haven Police Department Officer to assist you. UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN STUDENT HANDBOOK REV. 1/12/2021

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5. If a theft occurs, notify a Residential Life staff member and the University of New Haven Police Department. It is important to do this so that they can begin an investigation, note patterns, and generally be aware of problem areas. 6. Tampering, damaging, or inhibiting the use of emergency/safety equipment, in any residence hall is prohibited. Residents may not use emergency equipment for any purpose other than emergency use. Residents involved in such activities will be subject to disciplinary action. This regulation includes, but not limited to, fire extinguishers, heat and smoke detectors, exit signs, fire alarm pull stations, or defibrillators. If these do not appear to be functioning properly, report that fact immediately to your RA. 7. If you notice a broken room or building lock or any other damaged security device in your residence hall, please notify your RA in order for the appropriate repair to be made.

Emergency Exits Alarmed crash bars are installed on emergency exits in all residence halls for security purposes. Students found using these exits in non-emergency situations will be fined $50 for the first offense and future offenses will result in increased fines and possible removal from housing.

Missing Person Notification Policy In addition to registering an emergency contact, students residing in University housing have the option to identify an individual to be contacted by University of New Haven in the event the student is determined to be missing. If a student has identified such an individual, University of New Haven will notify that person after the student is determined to be missing. Students who wish to identify a confidential contact may do so by logging into myHousing (newhaven.edu/myhousing) and completing the appropriate fields for identifying the name and telephone number of the person to be notified. For more information please contact University of New Haven Police Department or the Office of Residential Life.

Fire Safety Please refer to page 180 regarding Campus Fire Safety Information.

Minimum Sanctions for Violation of the Fire Code VIOLATION • Individual tampering with fire safety equipment • Malicious activation of a fire sprinkler head

SANCTION 1st offense: Mandatory hearing with Hearing Officer,1-yr disciplinary probation, possible removal from the residence halls, Fire Safety Class, and possible suspension and/or expulsion from the University.

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2nd offense: Mandatory hearing with Hearing Officer, removal from the residence halls, possible suspension and/or expulsion from the University, and restitution for resulting damage.

VIOLATION • False fire alarm activated in a suite or apartment • Possession and/or burning of incense or candles (Sanctions begin at 2nd offense level) • Failure to evacuate during a fire alarm (Sanctions begin at 2nd offense level)

SANCTION 1st offense: Verbal warning at time of incident, corrective measures taken. 2nd offense: Mandatory meeting with Hearing Officer, possible disciplinary probation, and Fire Safety Class 3rd offense: Mandatory meeting with Hearing Officer, $100 fine/student, disciplinary probation 4th offense: Possible removal from the residence hall, $200 fine/student

VIOLATION • Unidentified pulling of a false fire alarm in a common area

SANCTION A fine of $500 will be assessed to the building for each incident.

VIOLATION • Possession of prohibited electrical equipment and cooking devices • Failure to remove refuse/garbage from apartment • Use of illegal room dividers (items suspended from the ceiling, stacked furniture, non-University walls, etc.)

SANCTION 1st offense: Written warning, 48 hr. time limit for corrective actions. 2nd offense: Mandatory meeting with Hearing Officer, letter of reprimand, $50 fine/student or per resident of room/suite/apartment if individuals involved cannot be identified. 3rd offense: Mandatory meeting with Hearing Officer, disciplinary probation for one year, $100 fine/student or per resident of room/apartment if individuals involved cannot be identified, possible removal from housing.

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Sanctions and Fines for Residential Life Policy Violations Quiet Hour Violations • First offense – Verbal Warning • Second offense – Mandatory disciplinary meeting with Hearing Officer • Third offense – Removal of stereo or item that is the cause of the violation and/or a $50 fine

UNIVERSITY COMMITMENT TO A DRUG-FREE ENVIRONMENT STATEMENT Drug-Free and Smoke-Free Environment In accordance with federal law concerning a DRUG-FREE campus environment, the relevant University policy and regulations are provided to all current students and employees. The information is also available upon request. No smoking is permitted in any campus residence hall or administrative, academic, or recreational building. Smoking is confined to outdoor space, with ashtrays provided outside each building.

Why We Give You This Information The Drug-Free Schools and Communities Act Amendments of 1989 require an institution of higher education, as a condition of receiving funds or any other form of financial assistance under any federal program, to certify that it has adopted and implemented a program to prevent the unlawful possession, use, or distribution of illicit drugs and alcohol by students and employees. As part of its drug prevention program for students and employees, the University annually distributes in writing to each student and employee the following information: • standards of conduct that clearly prohibit the unlawful possession, use, or distribution of illicit drugs and alcohol by students and employees on its property or as part of any of its activities; • a description of applicable local, state, and federal legal sanctions pertaining to the unlawful possession, use, or distribution of illicit drugs and alcohol; • a description of health risks associated with the use of illicit drugs and the abuse of alcohol; • a description of available drug and alcohol counseling, treatment, rehabilitation, and re-entry programs; • a clear statement of the disciplinary sanctions that the University will impose on students and employees who violate the standards of conduct.

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The University has conducted a biennial review of its drug prevention program to determine its effectiveness, implement needed changes, and ensure that disciplinary sanctions are consistently enforced. The University will continue to conduct such reviews.

Standards of Conduct The unlawful manufacture, possession, use, dispensation, or distribution of illicit drugs and alcohol by students or employees on University property or as part of any University activity is prohibited. Students and employees must comply with this policy as a condition of enrollment or employment.

State and Federal Legal Sanctions Concerning Drugs and Alcohol Connecticut Statutes Connecticut statutes cover a wide range of drug offenses, including the offer, the sale, the possession with intent to sell, the gift, and the mere possession of various types of drugs [Connecticut General Statutes Sections 21a 277, 278, 278a, 279]. Among other provisions, the state laws create the following mandatory minimum prison sentences for first-time offenders who are not “drug-dependent” persons: • Five years for the manufacture, distribution, or sale, or possession with intent to sell, of one ounce or more of heroin, methadone, or cocaine (including “crack”), or one-half gram or more of cocaine in a freebase form, or five milligrams or more of LSD; • Five years for the manufacture, distribution, or sale, or possession with intent to sell, of any narcotic, hallucinogenic, or amphetamine-type substance, or one kilogram or more of a cannabis-type substance (which includes marijuana); • Five years for the offer or gift of any of the above drugs in the respective amounts; • Conviction for illegal possession of drugs carries no mandatory minimum sentence, but the following are the maximum sentences for first-time offenders; • Seven years or $50,000 or both for possession of any quantity of a narcotic, including cocaine and “crack,” morphine, or heroin; • Five years or $2,000 or both for possession of any quantity of a hallucinogen (such as LSD or peyote), other than marijuana, or four ounces or more of a cannabis-type substance (which includes marijuana); • One year or $1,000 or both for possession of less than four ounces of a cannabis-type substance, or any quantity of a controlled drug, such as amphetamines or barbiturates. Any person who possesses any controlled substance within one thousand five hundred feet of the real property comprising a public or private elementary or secondary school and who is not enrolled in such school shall be imprisoned for two years, and that sentence shall not be suspended and shall be in addition to and consecutive to any term of imprisonment imposed under the general possession provisions.

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Convictions for drug-related offenses involving minors or in the proximity of elementary or secondary schools carry the following mandatory sentences in addition and consecutive to any term of imprisonment imposed for violations of the statutes which prohibit the distribution, sale, and possession with intent to sell of various types of drugs: • Two years for the distribution, sale, offer, or gift of any controlled substance by a person eighteen years or older to a person under eighteen years of age and who is at least two years younger than the person violating a statute prohibiting the distribution, sale, or possession with intent to sell of various types of drugs; • Three years for the manufacture, distribution, sale, transport, or possession with intent to sell, dispensation, offer, or gift to another person of any controlled substance within one thousand five hundred feet of the real property comprising a public or private elementary or secondary school or a public housing project; • Three years for employing, hiring, using, persuading, inducing, enticing, or coercing a person under eighteen years of age to violate a statute prohibiting the manufacture, sale, possession with intent to sell, offer, or gift of any controlled substance. Actual sentences depend on the severity and the circumstances of the offense and the character and background of the offender. Connecticut law also prohibits the sale, delivery, or giving of alcohol to minors, intoxicated persons, or habitual drunkards [Conn. Gen. Stat. 30 -86]. The penalty for conviction for delivery or giving of alcoholic liquor to a minor is: • Not more than eighteen months or not more than $1,500 or both. Connecticut law prohibits any person to whom the sale of alcoholic liquor is by law forbidden from purchasing or attempting to purchase such liquor or from making any false statement for the purpose of procuring such liquor [Conn. Gen. Stat. 30–89(a)] and provides the following penalty for convictions: • Not less than $200 nor more than $500. Moreover, Connecticut law prohibits any minor from possessing any alcoholic liquor anywhere to include private property, on any street or highway or in any public place or place open to the public including any club which is open to the public [Conn. Gen. Stat. 30–89(b)] and provides the following penalty: • Not less than $200 nor more than $500. This law does not apply to a minor who possesses alcohol on order of a practicing physician or to a minor who possesses alcohol when accompanied by a parent, guardian, or spouse who is 21 or over.

Federal Statutes Federal law also penalizes the manufacture, distribution, possession with intent to manufacture or distribute, and simple possession of drugs (“controlled substances”) [Controlled Substances Act, 21 U.S.C. 841, 843(b), 844, 846, 859, 860]. UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN STUDENT HANDBOOK REV. 1/12/2021

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The law sets the following sentences for first-time offenders: • A minimum of ten years and a maximum of life imprisonment, a fine not to exceed the greater of $4,000,000 or other applicable penalties, or both, for the knowing or intentional manufacture, sale, or possession with intent to sell, of large amounts of any narcotic, including heroin, morphine, or cocaine (which includes “crack”), or of phencyclidine (PCP), or of LSD, or of marijuana (1,000 kilograms or more of a mixture or substance containing a detectable amount of marijuana, or 1,000 or more marijuana plants regardless of weight); • A minimum of five years and a maximum of forty years, a fine not to exceed the greater of $2,000,000 or other applicable penalties, or both, for similar actions involving smaller amounts of any narcotic, including heroin, morphine, or cocaine (which includes “crack”), or of phencyclidine (PCP), or of LSD, or of marijuana (100 kilo-grams or more of a mixture or substance containing a detectable amount of marijuana, or 100 or more marijuana plants regardless of weight); • A maximum of five years, a fine not to exceed the greater of $250,000 or other applicable penalties, or both, for similar actions involving smaller amounts of marijuana (less than 50 kilograms, except in the case of 50 or more marijuana plants regardless of weight), hashish, hashish oil, PCP or LSD, or any amounts of amphetamines, barbiturates, and other controlled stimulants and depressives; • A maximum of four years, a fine of not more than $30,000, or both, for knowingly or intentionally using the mail, telephone, radio, or any other public or private means of communication to commit acts that violate the laws against the manufacture, sale, and possession of drugs; • A maximum of one year and a minimum fine of $1,000, or both, for knowingly or intentionally possessing any controlled substance. (The gift of a “small amount” of marijuana is subject to the penalties for simple possession.) Penalties may be doubled, however, when a first-time offender at least 18 years old (1) distributes a controlled substance to a person under 21 years of age or (2) distributes, possesses with intent to distribute, or manufactures a controlled substance in or on, or within one thousand feet of, the real property comprising a public or private elementary or secondary school, or a public or private college, junior college, or university, a playground or housing facility owned by a public housing authority, or within 100 feet of a public or private youth center, public swimming pool, or video arcade facility. A term of imprisonment for this offense shall not be less than one year. The State of Connecticut has decriminalized the possession of less than ½ oz. of marijuana. The related statutes and penalties are as follows: • 21a–279a1st. Possession of less than ½ oz. of cannabis-type substance (1st. offense)

$150.00

• 21a–279a2nd. Possession of less than ½ oz. of cannabis-type substance (2nd. Offense)

$250.00

Federal Trafficking Penalties

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Drug/Quantities: Cocaine (Schedule II)

500 – 4999 gms mixture

Cocaine Base (Schedule II)

5 – 49 gms mixture

Fentanyl (Schedule II)

40 – 399 gms mixture

Fentanyl Analogue

10 – 99 gms mixture (Schedule I)

Heroin (Schedule I)

100 – 999 gms mixture

LSD (Schedule I)

1 – 9 gms mixture

Methamphetamine

5 – 49 gms pure or (Schedule II) 50 – 499 gms mixture

PCP (Schedule II)

10 – 99 gms pure or 100 – 999 gms mixture

Penalties: • First Offense: Not less than 5 yrs, and not more than 40 yrs. If death or serious injury, not less than 20 or more than life. Fine of not more than $2 million if an individual, $5 million if not an individual. • Second Offense: Not less than 10 yrs, and not more than life. If death or serious injury, life imprisonment. Fine of not more than $4 million if an individual, $10 million if not an individual.

Drug/Quantities: Cocaine (Schedule II)

5 kgs or more mixture

Cocaine Base (Schedule II)

50 gms or more mixture

Fentanyl (Schedule II)

400 gms or more mixture

Fentanyl Analogue

100 gms or more mixture (Schedule I)

Heroin (Schedule I)

1 kg or more mixture

LSD (Schedule I)

10 gms or more mixture

Methamphetamine

50 gms or more pure or

(Schedule II)

500 gms or more mixture

PCP (Schedule II)

100 gms or more pure or 1 kg or more mixture

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Penalties: • First Offense: Not less than 10 yrs, and not more than life. If death or serious injury, not less than 20 or more than life. Fine of not more than $4 million if an individual, $10 million if not an individual. • Second Offense: Not less than 20 yrs, and not more than life. If death or serious injury, life imprisonment. Fine of not more than $8 million if an individual, $20 million if not an individual. • 2 or More Prior Offenses: Life imprisonment

Drug/Quantities: Other Schedule I & II drugs

Any amount (and any drug product containing Gamma Hydroxybutyric Acid)

Flunitrazepam (Schedule IV)

1 gm or more

Penalties: • First Offense: Not more than 20 yrs. If death or serious injury, not less than 20 yrs, or more than Life. Fine of $1 million if an individual, $5 million if not an individual. • Second Offense: Not more than 30 yrs. If death or serious injury, not less than life. Fine of $2 million if an individual, $10 million if not an individual.

Drug/Quantities: Other Schedule III drugs

Any amount Flunitrazepam (Schedule IV) 30 to 999 mgs

Penalties: • First Offense: Not more than 5 years. Fine not more than $250,000 if an individual, $1 million if not an individual. • Second Offense: Not more 10 yrs. Fine not more than $500,000 if an individual, $2 million if not an individual.

Drug/Quantities: All other Schedule IV drugs

Any amount

Flunitrazepam (Schedule IV)

Less than 30 mgs

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Penalties: • First Offense: Not more than 3 years. Fine of not more than $250,000 if an individual, $1 million if not an individual. • Second Offense: Not more than 6 yrs. Fine of not more than $500,000 if an individual, $2 million if not an individual.

Drug/Quantities: All Schedule V drugs

Any amount

Penalties: • First Offense: Not more than 1 yr. Fine of not more than $100,000 if an individual, $250,000 if not an individual. • Second Offense: Not more than 2 yrs. Fine of not more than $200,000 if an individual, $500,000 if not an individual.

Drug/Quantities: Marijuana

1,000 kg or more mixture; or 1,000 or more plants

Penalties: •

First Offense: Not less than 10 years, not more than life. If death or serious injury, not less than 20 years, not more than life. If death or serious injury, not less than 20 years, not more than life. Fine of not more than $2 million if an individual, $5 million if other than an individual.

Second Offense: Not less than 10 years, not more than life. If death or serious injury, mandatory life. Fine of not more than $4 million if an individual, $10 million if other than an individual.

Drug/Quantities: Marijuana

100 kg to 999 kg mixture; or 100 to 999 plants

Penalties: • First Offense: Not less than 5 years, not more than 40 years. If death or serious injury, not less than 20 years, not more than life. Fine of not more than $2 million if an individual, $5 million if other than an individual. • Second Offense: Not less than 10 years, not more than life. If death or serious injury, mandatory life. Fine of not more than $4 million if an individual, $10 million if other than an individual.

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Drug/Quantities: Marijuana

more than 10 kgs hashish; 50 to 99 kg mixture more than 1 kg of hashish oil; 50 to 99 plants

Penalties: • First Offense: Not more than 20 years. If death or serious injury, not less than 20 years, not more than life. Fine of $1 million if an individual, $5 million if other than an individual. • Second Offense: Not more than 30 years. If death or serious injury, mandatory life. Fine of $2 million if an individual, $10 million if other than an individual.

Drug/Quantities: Marijuana

1 to 49 plants; less than 50 kg mixture

Hashish

10 kg or less

Hashish Oil

1 kg

Penalties: •

First Offense: Not more than 5 years. Fine of not more than $250,000 if an individual, $1 million if other than an individual.

Second Offense: Not more than 10 years. Fine of $500,000 if an individual, $2 million if other than an individual.

Any attempt or conspiracy to commit one of the foregoing federal offenses, even if unsuccessful, is punishable by the same sentence prescribed for that offense. Although in some cases the federal penalties seem somewhat lighter, it is not possible to “trade” a state charge for a federal one. State and federal law thus make crimes of many different activities involving drugs. Simple possession, giving, or even merely offering drugs is illegal, as are such offenses as the manufacture or sale of drugs.

Alcohol and Drug Abuse Substance abuse and drug dependency are problems of staggering proportions in our society today. They are estimated to afflict millions of Americans. Millions more are affected by the actions of the substance abuser; these include the families of substance abusers, the victims of substance abuserelated crimes, and those injured or killed by intoxicated drivers or in drug-related accidents.

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Alcohol Alcohol is a powerful chemical. When taken in small amounts, it usually produces a pleasant sense of relaxation. In larger amounts, alcohol produces a variety of psychological and physiological changes which can place the person or those around him or her in danger. Alcohol abuse can be characterized by one of three different patterns: (1) regular drinking that affects one’s ability to function at his or her best, (2) drinking large amounts of alcohol at regular times (e.g., getting drunk most Fridays and Saturdays), or (3) periods of heavy daily drinking separated by extended periods of sobriety (i.e., binges). Alcohol dependence, i.e., alcoholism, is a disorder that has profound psychological, biological, and societal effects. Alcoholism usually appears between the ages of 20 and 40, although onset prior to age 20 or after age 40 does occur. It is much more prevalent in people with a family history of alcoholism. The course of the disorder is usually progressive, with increasing effects on one’s work and social life and with the development of physical dependence. Short-term effects of alcohol use can include transient problems with comprehension and memory, slowed motor responses, depression, sexual impotence, severe stomach and pancreas inflammation, coma, respiratory arrest, automobile accidents, and increased violence towards both strangers and one’s family and friends. Alcohol use during pregnancy can produce a characteristic group of severe defects in the child known as fetal alcohol syndrome. These defects include facial malformations, mental retardation, seizure disorders, and heart malformations. Chronic alcohol abuse can produce physical complications, including brain damage, liver damage, impotence and infertility, ulcers, and gastrointestinal bleeding. In addition, abrupt cessation of drinking can cause serious, sometimes even life-threatening problems including high blood pressure, seizures, and hallucinations. Death can occur as a result of coma and respiratory failure, impaired coordination and judgment (e.g., in a car accident or suicide attempt), one of the serious chronic medical complications, or severe withdrawal.

Marijuana (Cannabis) Marijuana is the most commonly used illegal drug in the United States. Though physiological consequences depend on frequency, duration, and quantity, marijuana use is associated with impairment of short-term memory, concentration, judgment, perception, and fine motor skills. These impairments will increase the risk of machinery or motor vehicle accidents and injury. This risk continues for four to six hours after ingestion since the active chemical in marijuana (THC, tetrahydrocannabinol) remains stored in body fat cells long after ingestion. When there is frequent use, the above impairments may last for three to six months, even if use of the drug is completely discontinued. Marijuana can be associated with chronic anxiety, depression, and paranoid feelings. It can also significantly exacerbate or increase underlying emotional problems. Frequent use by children and adolescents may have long-term developmental consequences such as lack of motivation, apathy, and difficulty managing current stresses and responsibilities as well as making appropriate plans for the future.

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Makers of designer drugs that are chemically similar to marijuana’s active ingredient THC — called synthetic cannabinoids or colloquially “synthetic marijuana” or “synthetic pot” — are constantly creating new products to evade legal bans on older compounds. Despite the similarity on the molecular level, these drugs are much more dangerous than marijuana, and have resulted in very serious health consequences including overdoses and aggressive or suicidal behavior in users. AB-PINACA, AB-FUBINACA (sold as “Cloud 9,” “Relax,” or “Crown”) is a component of synthetic cannabis products and is sold as a liquid in eyedropper bottles and often used with vaporizing devices — e-cigarettes or hookah pens. Use of this drug reportedly causes hallucinations, aggressive behavior, racing heartbeat, drowsiness, and vomiting. “Spice” is a mix of herbs that produces experiences similar to marijuana. Spice mixtures are sold under many names — K2, fake weed, Yucatan Fire, Skunk, Moon Rocks, Mojo, Scooby Snax and others. These are reported to cause severe agitation, anxiety, and paranoia; raised heartbeat and blood pressure; nausea and vomiting; muscle spasms, seizures, and tremors; intense hallucinations and psychotic episodes, including suicidal fixations and other harmful thoughts. Medical marijuana: Proponents of medical marijuana argue that it can be a safe and effective treatment for the symptoms of cancer, AIDS, multiple sclerosis, pain, glaucoma, epilepsy, and other conditions. Opponents of medical marijuana argue that it is too dangerous to use, lacks FDA-approval, and that various legal drugs make marijuana use unnecessary. They say marijuana is addictive, leads to harder drug use, interferes with fertility, impairs driving ability, and injures the lungs, immune system, and brain. Medical marijuana is legal in Connecticut however, it is not legal to possess or use medical marijuana on the University of New Haven campuses.

Hallucinogens This category includes LSD (lysergic acid diethylamide, also known as “acid”), mescaline, peyote, and ‘’mushrooms.’’ The short-term use of these drugs produces illusions, hallucinations, altered sense of time and space, impaired visual perceptions, and disorientation. These effects lead to impaired judgment and may result in dangerous behavior. Hallucinogen use may also lead to a “bad trip” with anxiety, agitation, hallucinations, and paranoia which results in self-endangering behavior. After a “bad trip,” the person can experience a “flashback.” Flashbacks are recurrences of the experience without taking the drug, and they may recur months and years after the hallucinogen was last taken. Long-term use of hallucinogens may lead to impaired thinking and sometimes precipitate psychosis. PCP (phencyclidine) or “angel dust” may induce violent or destructive behavior which may involve impaired judgment leading to injury to the person who has taken the drug or to other people. Dangerous side effects of PCP are that it also causes amnesia of the intoxicating behavior (up to several hours), and also raises blood pressure, which may become a medical emergency. “N-bomb” refers to any of three closely related synthetic hallucinogens (25I-NBOMe, 25C-NBOMe, and 25B-NBOMe) that are being sold as substitutes for LSD or mescaline. Also called “legal acid,” “smiles,” or “25I,” they are generally found as powders, liquids, soaked into blotter paper (like LSD) or laced on something edible. These chemicals act on serotonin receptors in the brain, like other hallucinogens,

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but they are considerably more powerful than even LSD. Extremely small amounts can cause seizures, heart attack or arrested breathing, and death.

Cocaine Cocaine is a highly addictive, illegal, stimulant drug. Other names for it are Coke, C., Lady, and Snow. (Speed balls are cocaine mixed with heroin, which is a particularly dangerous combination.) Cocaine is a white powder that is snorted, injected into veins, or smoked freebase or as “crack.” Crack is a crystalline form of cocaine that is also known as “rock” from its small white rocklike appearance. Crack produces the most intense cocaine high, and addiction can occur after using it only once or twice. Cocaine “highs” are characterized by feelings of extreme happiness, a sense of limitless power and energy. A cocaine “crash” follows the “high” and includes symptoms of depression, dullness, great irritability, and paranoia. Serious medical complications occur with cocaine use, such as heart attacks (even in young people), seizures, and strokes due to high blood pressure. The psychological effects of cocaine use include violence and paranoia, depression, anxiety, confusion, and personality changes. Extensive use of cocaine may lead to chronic depression. Pregnant women using cocaine have increased risk of miscarriages and stillbirths. Newborns addicted to cocaine are irritable and unresponsive and may have malformed kidneys and genitals, as well as heart attacks and strokes. Cocaine addiction can occur in people of all ages, classes, and educational levels. The addiction often controls and may destroy many aspects of the user’s life and the lives of those people close to the user.

Amphetamines In addition to cocaine, amphetamines are drugs that also stimulate the nervous system and are very addictive. Drugs in this group include benzedrine, dexedrine, and methedrine (“speed”). “Ice” is a smokable form of methedrine. “Ecstasy” (MDMA, methylenedioxymethamphetamine) is an amphetamine variant that produces alterations in visual perception and is sometimes experienced as a hallucinogen as well as a stimulant. Amphetamines give a person increased energy, increased alertness, and a feeling of exhilaration. When amphetamines are abused, adverse effects such as restlessness, nervousness, tremors, loss of appetite, and insomnia are common. Paranoia and psychosis may be precipitated by amphetamine abuse. Tolerance to the euphoric effect of amphetamines may occur which may lead the person to take larger amounts of the drug, which in turn may lead to more paranoia and agitation. This state may also be associated with violence and loss of self-control. If the amphetamines are stopped suddenly, withdrawal symptoms (cramps, sweating, headaches, lethargy, and severe depression) may occur. Molly — slang for “molecular”— refers to the pure crystal-line powder form of the club drug MDMA, which in pill form is known as Ecstasy. Molly, which is usually purchased in capsules, has seen a surge in interest in the past few years. MDMA in any form produces energy and euphoria in users but also may dangerously affect body temperature and cause confusion, depression, and sleep problems. Bath salts are a new family of drugs containing one or more manmade chemicals related to cathinone, an amphetamine- like stimulant found naturally in the khat plant. There have been reports of severe UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN STUDENT HANDBOOK REV. 1/12/2021

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intoxication and dangerous health effects from using bath salts. Some people who abuse bath salts experience paranoia, agitation, and hallucinations; some even lose contact with reality and act violently.

Narcotics There are a variety of medications that are taken to relieve pain. Most non-prescription pain relievers (such as aspirin, Tylenol, Motrin, and Nuprin) are not considered addictive. However, there is a class of stronger pain relievers, available only by a doctor’s prescription that can be addictive. These are referred to as narcotics and/or opioid drugs, most of which are derived from opium. Examples of these drugs include methadone, morphine, codeine, Darvon, Darvocet, Fentanyl, Percocet, Percodan, Oxycotin, Vicodin, Demerol, and certain prescription cough medicines. These drugs differ from the non-prescription pain relievers in their potential for abuse and dependence. With close medical supervision, these drugs may be safely used in specific medical circumstances for a limited time. However, as narcotics also produce euphoria, a person may not want to stop the drug when the pain has stopped, and addiction may occur. Tolerance to the drug is shown by an increase in the amount of drug necessary for the relief of pain. Tolerance can be developed within a short period of time (i.e., within approximately 10 doses or more). This becomes progressive and leads to the craving or need for larger and larger doses without which the person becomes extremely uncomfortable and physically ill with withdrawal symptoms. These include nausea, diarrhea, cramps, weight loss, irritability, sweating, chills, insomnia, and craving for the drug. The time may come when the person “needs” a dose of the drug so large that it is poisonous or lethal. Under these circumstances, coma, suffocation, and death may ensue. This level of tolerance can lead to ingesting these drugs in a way to bypass the digestive track (i.e., crushing the pill and snorting), which changes the rate that the drug is absorbed in the body. The dangerous course of this problem is also seen in addiction to heroin. Heroin is a commonly abused illegal narcotic. It can be used by injection into a vein (“shooting up” or “mainlining”) or ingested intranasally (“snorting”), and death may occur if the amount injected is sufficient to slow or stop breathing. The intravenous use of heroin also carries the additional medical dangers of AIDS and hepatitis from use of unclean needles and syringes. Over the past 10 years, heroin has been available in purer forms, and thus the risk of accidental overdose has also increased. Other risks for overdose include using opioid prescription drugs and/or heroin with another depressant such as alcohol. Salvia is an herb found in southern Mexico and Central and South America. The main active ingredient affects the brain by attaching to targets on nerve cells called kappa opioid receptors. People who use salvia generally experience hallucinations or loss of contact with reality. The effects are intense, but do not last long, appearing in less than one minute and lasting less than thirty minutes. Krokodil is a synthetic form of a heroin-like drug called desomorphine that is made by combining codeine tablets with various toxic chemicals including lighter fluid and industrial cleaners. Desomorphine has a similar effect to heroin in the brain, although it is more powerful and has a shorter duration. Krokodil gets its name from the scaly, gray-green dead skin that forms at the site of an injection. The flesh destroyed by krokodil becomes gangrenous, and, in some cases, limb amputation has been necessary to save a user’s life. UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN STUDENT HANDBOOK REV. 1/12/2021

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“Syrup,” “Purple Drank,” “Sizzurp,” “Lean”: drinking prescription-strength cough syrup containing codeine and promethazine mixed with soda. Codeine is an opioid that can produce relaxation and euphoria when consumed in sufficient quantities. Promethazine is an antihistamine that also acts as a sedative. Users may also flavor the mixture with the addition of hard candies. Codeine and other opioids present a high risk of fatal overdose due to their effect of depressing the central nervous system, which can slow or stop the heart and lungs. Mixing with alcohol greatly increases this risk. Deaths from prescription opioid medications now outnumber overdose deaths from all other drugs (including cocaine and heroin).

Sedatives and Tranquilizers The barbiturates and the benzodiazepines are two of the most commonly used drugs in this group, and they are both known as depressants. The barbiturates (such as phenobarbital, seconal, and amytal) are highly addictive and can be fatal if taken in excess. Although they still have medical uses, they have largely been replaced by the benzodiazepines for the relief of anxiety and insomnia. The benzodiazepine group includes such drugs as Valium, Librium, Ativan, Xanax, Klonopin, Dalmane, Halcyon, and Restoril. While benzodiazepines have approved medical usages and are safe and effective at moderate doses for short periods of time, all the benzodiazepines have a potential for physical and psychological dependence if used at higher doses for longer periods of time. Benzodiazepines may also be used by some people to get “high.” Intoxication with benzodiazepines may occur and resembles alcohol intoxication. Drowsiness, slurred speech, unsteady gait, and lack of coordination are common signs. The effects of the benzodiazepines (and the barbiturates and other sedatives) add to those of alcohol (another depressant) such that when they are taken together, there is increased risk of coma, respiratory depression, and death. Withdrawal from benzodiazepines resembles alcohol withdrawal, and it most often occurs when they are stopped abruptly. Withdrawal begins within hours to days of stopping the drug. Because benzodiazepine withdrawal may have life-threatening complications (such as seizures), discontinuing their use should not be attempted without a physician’s supervision. Rohypnol (roofies, ruffies, rope, rib, roche, Mexican Valium, R2) is a drug which is approved or sold in other countries as a sleeping aid or presurgical sedative. This drug is NOT manufactured or sold in the United States. Rohypnol tablets are white and contain the name “Roche” and an encircled 1 or 2 on one side indicating the milligram. Rohypnol can be placed in drinks and used as an aid to sexual assault of a victim. Sedative effects are felt within 10 to 30 minutes after consuming the drug. Strongest effects occur within one to two hours, with a complete sedative effect lasting 6 to 8 hours, and amnesia lasting up to 10 hours. Individuals may appear drunk and display side effects that may include drowsiness, impaired motor skills, impaired judgment, dizziness, confusion, and amnesia. When this drug is mixed with alcohol, narcotics or other depressants, its effects can be lethal. Sleep medications (Ambien, Lunesta, Rozerem, Sonata). These hypnotics are used for the treatment of insomnia which is characterized by difficulty with falling asleep or maintaining sleep. These drugs

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depress or slow down the body’s functions. All sleep medications have the potential to cause dependence.

Anabolic Steroids Health risks can be produced by long-term use or excessive doses of anabolic steroids. These effects include harmful changes in cholesterol levels, acne, high blood pressure, liver damage, and dangerous changes in the structure of the left ventricle of the heart. On the street, steroids may be called “roids” or “juice.”

Inhalants Inhalants are ordinary household products that are inhaled, huffed, or sniffed to get high. Because intoxication or high lasts only a few minutes, people who abuse inhalants often try to make the feeling last longer by inhaling repeatedly over several hours. Common slang for inhalants includes “laughing gas”, “snappers”, “poppers”, “whippets”, “bold”, and “rush.

ADHD Stimulants Amphetamine stimulants (Adderall, Vyvanse) and methylphenidate stimulants (Ritalin, Concerta) may help control attention deficit symptoms. Prescription stimulants are sometimes abused — that is, taken in higher quantities or in a different manner than prescribed, or taken by those without a prescription (prescription diversion). Because they suppress appetite, increase wakefulness, and increase focus and attention, they are frequently abused for purposes of weight loss or performance enhancement (e.g., to help study or boost grades in school). Because they may produce euphoria, these drugs are also frequently abused for recreational purposes (i.e., to get high).

Non-medical use of Over-the-Counter (OTC) medication The most commonly abused OTC drugs are cough and cold remedies containing dextromethorphan. People often think that prescription and OTC drugs are safer than illicit drugs, but that’s only true when they are taken exactly as prescribed and for the purpose intended. When abused, prescription and OTC drugs can be addictive and put abusers at risk for other adverse health effects, including overdose— especially when taken along with other drugs or alcohol.

Caffeine Bulk bags of pure caffeine powder are readily available online, and these products may be attractive to young people looking for added caffeine stimulation or for help losing weight, but they are extremely dangerous. Just a teaspoon of pure caffeine powder is equivalent to about 25 cups of coffee — a lethal amount. Besides death, severe caffeine overdose can cause fast and erratic heartbeat, seizures, vomiting, diarrhea, and disorientation. Although caffeine is generally safe at the dosages contained in popular beverages, caffeine powder is so potent that safe amounts cannot be measured with ordinary kitchen measuring tools, making it very easy to overdose on them even when users are aware of their potency.

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Counseling and Treatment for Drugs and Alcohol Abuse Alcohol and drug abuse are multifaceted disorders involving psychological, environmental, and biological factors. The goals of treatment for substance abuse vary depending on the severity of the problem. At times a person may be unwilling to enter treatment because he or she is unable to acknowledge or accept that the use of alcohol or drugs is playing a harmful role in his or her life. In these instances, a planned supportive intervention by family, friends, employers, and health professionals may be a useful first step toward getting such a person to accept help. Since any one treatment approach may emphasize only one particular etiologic factor, therapy programs have been designed to address multiple factors and various stages of recovery. Treatment settings may be in-patient or out-patient and may involve individual therapy, group therapy, family therapy, medications, or a combination of these. Educational and family therapies can outline facts and clarify myths about substance abuse and address disordered patterns of family and social interactions. Selfhelp groups such as Alcoholics Anonymous and Narcotics Anonymous are important resources for longterm support, continued abstinence, and social rehabilitation. Lastly, individual and group therapy may be helpful in understanding behaviors and motivations that lead to abuse, in fostering the person’s selfesteem and ability to cope with stress, and in addressing related or co-occurring psychological difficulties. Abstinence is recommended once a person has become dependent on alcohol or another drug. However, medical attention may be necessary to address both the mild and the potentially life-threatening complications of substance abuse. Under certain circumstances, medications and/or Medicated Assisted Treatments may be useful to reduce the craving for alcohol or other drugs and to deter further use of these substances. Medication may also be required to make the detoxification process safe, since withdrawal from alcohol, prescription drugs, heroin, and many other drugs may be distressing and even potentially fatal.

Substance Abuse Prevention and Treatment for University of New Haven Students Counseling and Psychological Services offers both individual and group psychotherapy for substance abusing students who are either self-referred or referred through other University departments. Counseling and Psychological Services works closely with staff from the Dean of Students Office, Residential Life, Health Services, and the Department of Athletics to ensure a holistic approach to supporting students’ substance abuse concerns. The University provides prevention and education for students through an Alcohol and Drug Education Program for first-year students called “alcohol.edu,” as well as a brief group therapy intervention (BASICS) for students who have been identified as “at risk,” or are mandated to attend due to a violation of the Substance Abuse Policy in the University of New Haven Student Handbook. In addition, a substance use task force comprised of Student Affairs staff, faculty, and students addresses behavioral concerns related to substance use, and implements policy updates as necessary.

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If any student has a legal matter related to a substance abuse issue, or is in need of support services outside of Counseling and Psychological Services and Health Services, students are referred to appropriate local and regional substance abuse treatment facilities and self-help groups.

Substance Abuse Treatment for University of New Haven Staff and Faculty The University of New Haven provides eligible employees with access to medical plans and a separate employee assistance program. Both programs may provide assistance to those employees, and their eligible dependents, suffering from alcohol and/or drug dependency issues. Additionally, the University provides extensive educational materials in the Health Library section of the health plan website: www.UNHHealthPlan.com The information provided on the website include educational materials such as articles and/or videos on: • Alcohol and Drug Use • Planning for Alcohol or Drug Relapse • Substance Use Disorder / Treatment Option • Substance Use Problems / misuse in teens and adults and resources for cutting back or stopping drug and alcohol use. • Signs of Drug Use • Drug Withdrawal: What to Expect, Learn what's happening to your body during drug withdrawal. • Assess Your Drug Use • Teen Alcohol and Drug Use • Drug Problems: Helping Someone Get Treatment • Substance Use: Staying Alcohol- or Drug-Free After Treatment • Inpatient and Outpatient Treatment for Substance Use Disorder • LSD, Heroin, Methamphetamine, Cocaine, Ecstasy, Anabolic Steroids • Prescription Medicine Misuse: Setting Goals for Quitting; learn the simple steps that can help you reach a goal of quitting medicine misuse. • Alcohol and Substance Use in PTSD; includes a test to see if you have a problem with alcohol or drugs and steps for getting help. • Quitting Smoking: Medicines Increase Success Rates, Learn how medicine can double or triple your chances of stopping smoking. • Quitting Smoking: Medicines to Help With Cravings, Learn about products and medicines that can take the edge off nicotine cravings.

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• Quit Smoking: How Medicines Can Help, Learn how other people quit smoking by using nicotine replacement and other medicines. • Residential Treatment for Substance Use • Prescription Medicine Misuse: Could You Have a Problem?

Substance Abuse and the Family When family members are substance abusers, there are often far-reaching consequences for the family as a whole. The family’s social and economic status almost always suffers when the substance abuser becomes unable to perform adequately his or her daily work. Emotional tensions and feelings of desperation may lead to violence within the home. Stealing from relatives and employers may occur as the substance abuser needs more money for drugs. This may lead to legal proceedings and further undermining of the family’s financial base. All these consequences usually put a great strain on the family and its cohesive functioning. Emotionally, family members frequently feel overwhelmed. There is often an attempt to cope with the situation by denying that a problem exists. Family members may also take over the abuser’s responsibilities at home and even at work. When this becomes a pattern, it may be difficult for the substance abuser to face the seriousness of his or her problem. Facing the problem is the essential first step toward treatment, and the family is often the key to bringing this about. However, the family may itself be in need of outside support. Alcoholics Anonymous and Narcotics Anonymous sponsor support groups (AlAnon, NARAnon) for family members. Family therapy can also provide much needed assistance to families as they grapple with the destructive effects of the user’s addiction. Women who abuse alcohol, cocaine, and other addictive substances during pregnancy run the risk of giving birth to children with intellectual deficits, severe developmental problems, and physical deformities. Alcohol ingestion during pregnancy is the most commonly identified cause of mental retardation. The likelihood of damage to the unborn child from drinking is significantly increased by the simultaneous abuse of other substances.

Disciplinary Sanctions The University will impose disciplinary sanctions on students and employees who violate the above standards of conduct. Among the disciplinary sanctions which may be imposed on students are reprimand, probation, attendance at an alcohol and drug education class or substance abuse group, an individual counseling session, monetary fine, restriction, suspension, expulsion, and referral for prosecution. Among the disciplinary sanctions which may be imposed on employees are oral warning, written reprimand, suspension, termination, and referral for prosecution. The University may also require completion of an appropriate rehabilitation program.

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DIVERSITY POLICY The University of New Haven is committed to achieving a diverse and pluralistic community which reflects the multiracial and culturally diverse society in contemporary America. The Inclusion, Diversity, Equity & Access Council has been established to guide the University in implementing this Diversity Policy. The University will consistently work toward attracting and retaining a diverse faculty, staff, and student body for the purpose of creating a pluralistic scholarly community. The Council will assist the administration in the development and implementation of programs and policies that support an enriched educational experience for a diverse University community. The University of New Haven does not discriminate in admissions, educational programs, or employment against any individual on account of that individual’s gender, gender identity or expression, race, color, religion, age, disability, sexual orientation, marital or civil union status, national or ethnic origin or any other condition protected by federal and/or state law.

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