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Appendix I: Methodology ......................................... 170 

Appendix II: Definitions ............................................ 172  Appendix III: Santa Cruz County Telephone Survey Results, 2011 ........................... 180  Appendix IV: Past Community Heroes 1996‐2010 ...................................................................... 194 

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APPENDIX I: METHODOLOGY Quality of Life Indicators The CAP community assessment model relies on clearly defined indicators in order to understand concepts or systems within the community which may be too large or complex to understand and discuss. As an example, we might ask ourselves, “Do people have adequate access to health care?” Increasing use of the emergency room for non‐emergency purposes could be an indicator that they do not. For the purposes of this project, special groups known as Technical Advisory Committees (TACs) developed over one hundred quality‐of‐life indicators. These committees were represented by a rich mixture of professionals, advocates, and community volunteers, all of whom were experts in the respective areas under review. The TACs used special criteria to develop the quality of life indicators used for this project. These criteria stipulated that indicators need to be understandable to the general user and the public, responsive to change, relevant for policy decisions, and updated regularly.

Primary Data INDICATOR SELECTION Measures of community progress depend upon consistent, reliable, and scientifically accurate sources of data. One of the types of data gathered for this project is primary data. The only primary data are from a telephone survey of a sample of Santa Cruz County residents. There is much to be learned from people’s perceptions of their community, especially when those perceptions contradict the empirical evidence about its conditions. In order to capture and understand the diverse perspectives of community members Applied Survey Research conducts a telephone survey, in both English and Spanish, with over 700 randomly selected county residents. The intent of the survey is to measure the opinions, attitudes, desires, and needs of a demographically representative sample of the County’s residents. Respondents are primary asked questions with confined options in addition to open‐ended questions. The survey was conducted annually between 1995 and 2005, and biennially since 2005.

SAMPLE SELECTION AND DATA WEIGHTING In 2011, 722 surveys were completed with county residents. Telephone contacts were attempted with a random sample of residents 18 years or older in Santa Cruz County. Potential respondents were selected based on phone number prefixes, and quota sampling was employed to obtain the desired geographic distribution of respondents across North County, South County, and the San Lorenzo Valley. In order to address the increasing number of households without landline telephone service, the sample included wireless‐only and wireless/land‐line random digit dial prefixes in Santa Cruz County. All cell phone numbers were dialed manually (by hand) to comply with Telephone Consumer Protection Act (TCPA) rules. Respondents were screened for geography, as cell phones are not necessarily located where the number came from originally. As previously mentioned, quotas were used with respect to respondents’ location of residence. The quotas were designed to obtain sufficient samples to allow generalization to the overall population within each of the three designated geographic areas (North County, South County, and the San Lorenzo Valley). This method of sampling necessitated an over‐sample of the San Lorenzo Valley due to its small size in relation to the rest of the county. The over‐sampling of San Lorenzo Valley allowed for reliable comparisons with the other two regions (North County and South County). 170

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Data from the CAP 17 survey were “weighted” along several demographic dimensions prior to data analysis. Data weighting is a procedure that adjusts for discrepancies between demographic proportions within a sample and the population from which the sample was drawn. For example, within the CAP year 17 survey, the sample was 55% female and 45% male, whereas the population in Santa Cruz County is very near to evenly split between the two genders. When the data are weighted to adjust for the over‐sampling of females, answers given by each female respondent are weighted slightly downward, and answers given by each male respondent are weighted slightly upward, thus compensating for the disproportionate sampling. The survey data for CAP 17 were simultaneously weighted along the following demographic characteristics: gender, ethnicity, and geographic location. Weighting for both ethnicity and gender was performed to be region‐specific (based on 2000 Census data) to account for differences across the three regions of Santa Cruz County. The weighted data were used in the generation of the overall frequency tables, and all of the cross‐ tabulations, with the exception of the regional cross‐tabulations. For the regional cross‐tabulations, the regional weights were dropped so that the San Lorenzo Valley oversample could be utilized. Two important characteristics of weighted data need to be mentioned. First, within a weighted data set, the weights of each person’s responses are determined by that individual’s characteristics along the weighted dimensions (gender, ethnicity, geographic location). Thus, different respondents will have different weights attributed to their responses, based on each person’s intersection along the three weighted demographic dimensions.

SAMPLE REPRESENTATIVENESS A sample size of 722 residents provides 95% confidence that the opinions of survey respondents do not differ from those of the general population of Santa Cruz County by more than +/‐ 3.4%. This “margin of error” is useful in assessing how likely it is that the responses observed in the sample would be found in the population of all residents in Santa Cruz County if every resident were to be polled. For example, within the CAP 17 sample, 80.3% of survey respondents indicated that they have health insurance. Therefore, we are 95% confident that across all residents of Santa Cruz County the percentage of people who have health insurance is between 76.9% and 83.7% (80.3% +/‐ 3.4%). It is important to note that the margin of error is increased as the sample size is reduced. This becomes relevant when focusing on particular breakdowns or subpopulations in which the overall sample is broken down into smaller groups. In these instances, the margin of error will be larger than the initially stated interval of 3.4%. The geographic quota sampling produced a confidence interval of +/‐ 6.5% at the level of each of the three geographic regions (North County, South County, and the San Lorenzo Valley). This confidence interval can be applied when examining the results of the regional comparisons. It should be understood that all surveys have subtle and inherent biases. ASR has worked diligently with the CAP Steering Committee to reduce risks of bias and to eliminate identifiable biases. One remaining bias in this study appears in the area of respondent self‐selection; the capturing of opinions only of those willing to contribute approximately 20 minutes of their time to participate in this community survey.

DATA ANALYSIS Significance testing on the overall CAP 17 data was performed using proportion Z testing, to determine whether differences observed within the CAP 17 data would be likely to be expected across the population of the entire County of Santa Cruz. In charts illustrating survey results, an asterisk indicates when statistically significant differences were found between survey subpopulations.

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DATA PRESENTATION Demographic breakdowns of survey results are presented on the web, as downloadable PDFs, rather than in the report. The overall results remain in the report, and demographic comparisons on key indicators appear throughout the document. Question‐by‐question cross‐tabulations for ethnicity, region, age, gender and income are available on the Applied Survey Research Website at: www.appliedsurveyresearch.org or www.santacruzcountycap.org.

Secondary Data Secondary data are collected from a variety of sources, including but not limited to: the U.S. Census; federal, state, and local government agencies; academic institutions; economic development groups; health care institutions; libraries; schools; local police, sheriff and fire departments; and computerized sources through online databases and the Internet.

CALIFORNIA HEALTH INTERVIEW SURVEY (CHIS) Some responses from the CHIS are included in the health section in this report. The CHIS is the largest health survey of its kind in the nation as well as the largest telephone survey in California. The major areas covered in the survey include health‐related behaviors, health insurance coverage, health status and conditions, and access to health care services. To ensure diverse populations were included in the survey, telephone interviews were conducted in six languages: English, Spanish, Chinese (Mandarin and Cantonese dialects), Vietnamese, Korean, and Khmer (Cambodian).

CALIFORNIA HEALTHY KIDS SURVEY (CHKS) The CHKS is a comprehensive youth self‐reported data collection system that provides essential and reliable health risk assessment and resilience information to schools, school districts, and communities. It is developed and conducted by a multidisciplinary team of expert researchers, evaluators, and health and prevention practitioners. The Santa Cruz County CHKS is conducted bi‐annually at all public schools throughout the county.

AMERICAN COMMUNITY SURVEY (ACS) The ACS replaced the decennial census long‐form sample questionnaire. The ACS offers broad, comprehensive information on social, economic, and housing data and is designed to provide this information at many levels of geography. ACS data is updated each year and is now available in 1 year, 3 year, and 5 year estimates depending on the size of geographic region.

APPENDIX II: DEFINITIONS Demographics FAMILY: refers to a group of two people or more (one of whom is the householder) related by birth, marriage, or adoption and residing together; all such people (including related subfamily members) are considered as members of one family. Beginning with the 1980 Current Population Survey, unrelated subfamilies (referred to in the past as secondary families) are no longer included in the count of families, nor are the members of unrelated subfamilies included in the count of family members. The number of families is equal to the number of family households; however, the count of family members differs from the count of family household members because family household members include any non‐relatives living in the household.

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HOUSEHOLDER: refers to the person (or one of the people) in whose name the housing unit is owned or rented (maintained) or, if there is no such person, any adult member, excluding roomers, boarders, or paid employees. If the house is owned or rented jointly by a married couple, the householder may be either spouse. The person designated as the householder is the “reference person” to whom the relationship of all other household members, if any, is recorded. The number of householders is equal to the number of households and includes those households with one single individual. The number of family householders is equal to the number of families.

Economy CALIFORNIA WORK OPPORTUNITY AND RESPONSIBILITY TO KIDS (CALWORKS): a program that provides temporary financial assistance and employment focused services to families with minor children who have income and property below state maximum limits for their family size. FEDERAL POVERTY GUIDELINES/THRESHOLDS: poverty thresholds are the original version of the federal poverty measure. They are updated each year by the U.S. Census Bureau. The thresholds are used for preparing estimates of the number of Americans in poverty each year. The poverty guidelines are the other version of the federal poverty measure. They are issued each year by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). The guidelines are a simplification of the poverty thresholds for use in determining financial eligibility for certain federal programs. MEDIAN FAMILY INCOME: divides the income distribution into two equal groups, with half of local families having incomes greater than the median and half having incomes less than the median. The median family income is the sum of monetary income received in the previous calendar year by all household members 15 years old and over, including household members not related to the householder. HUD estimates of median family income are based on 2009 ACS data. ACS data estimates are updated with national consumer price index data and trended at 3% per year from December of the base year (2009). Separate median family income estimates (MFIs) are calculated for all Metropolitan Statistical Areas (MSAs), Primary Metropolitan Statistical Areas (PMSAs) and nonmetropolitan counties (including Santa Cruz County). MEDIAN HOUSEHOLD INCOME: similar to the median family income, the median household income divides the population into two equal groups with half of household incomes above and half below. However, the median household income includes all households, including family households, non‐family households and households of single individuals. SELF‐SUFFICIENCY STANDARD: is based on the costs families face on a daily basis – housing, food, child care, out‐ of‐pocket medical expenses, transportation, and other necessary spending – and provides a complete picture of what it takes for families to make ends meet. It measures how much income is needed for a family of a certain composition living in a particular county to adequately meet its minimal basic needs. TEMPORARY ASSISTANCE FOR NEEDY FAMILIES (TANF): a federal assistance program that provides cash aid to families with children. It replaced what was commonly known as welfare or Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC) July 1, 1997. TRANSIENT OCCUPANCY TAX: measures the taxes levied on out‐of‐town visitors for lodging. WELFARE‐TO‐WORK: designed to help welfare recipients obtain and prepare for employment. The Welfare‐to‐ Work Act, AB 1542, was created in 1997 and established welfare reform in California.

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Education ADJUSTED FOUR‐YEAR DERIVED DROPOUT RATES: an estimate of the percent of students who would drop out during a four‐year period based on data collected for a single year.38 CALIFORNIA HIGH SCHOOL EXIT EXAM (CAHSEE): an exam that helps identify students who are not developing skills that are essential for life after high school and encourages districts to give these students the attention and resources needed to help them achieve these skills during their high schools years. Beginning with the Class of 2006, all public high school students are required to pass the exam to earn a high school diploma. CALIFORNIA STANDARDS TESTS (STAR): an exam used to assess students’ knowledge of the California academic content standards in English‐language arts, mathematics, science, and history‐social science are administered. The exams are only administered to students in California public schools. COLLEGE PREPARATION COURSES: high school courses in which the student has received a minimum grade of “C” or better that are accepted by the University of California and the California State University system as meeting their minimum admission standards. This includes 2 years of History/Social Science, 4 years of English, 3 years of mathematics, 2 years of laboratory science, 2 years of foreign language, and 2 years of college preparatory elective courses. ENGLISH LEARNER (EL): students, formerly known as Limited‐English‐Proficient (LEP) students, are those students for whom there is a report of a primary language other than English on the state‐approved Home Language Survey and who, on the basis of the state approved oral language (grades K‐12) assessment procedures and including literacy (grades 3‐12 only), have been determined to lack the clearly defined English language skills of listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing necessary to succeed in the school’s regular instructional programs. SAT: a national college admissions test. It tests students’ knowledge of subjects that are necessary for college success: reading, writing, and mathematics. It is typically taken by high school juniors and seniors. In 2005 a writing section was added to the existing verbal and mathematics section, raising the total possible score to 2400. Each section of the SAT is scored on a scale of 200‐800, with two writing subscores for multiple‐choice questions and the essay. YOUTH ASSETS: also known as developmental supports and opportunities or protective factors, are measured by students’ perceptions of each of the three key protective factors—Caring Relationships, High Expectations, and Opportunities for Meaningful Participation—in their school and community environments.

Health 5210 CAMPAIGN: is a Santa Cruz County campaign to bring awareness to the daily guidelines for nutrition and physical activity and prevent childhood obesity. 5‐ Fruits and vegetables…more matters! Eat fruits and vegetables at least 5 times a day. Limit 100% fruit juice. 2‐ Cut screen time to 2 hours or less a day. 1‐ Participate in at least one hour of moderate to vigorous physical activity every day. 0‐ Restrict soda and sugar‐ sweetened sports and fruit drinks. Instead, drink water and 3‐4 servings/day of fat‐free/skim or 1% milk.

38 For more information about the Four‐Year Derived Dropout Rate and its calculation, visit the California Department of Education’s

DataQuest website at http://data1.cde.ca.gov/dataquest/. 174

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HEALTHY PEOPLE 2020 OBJECTIVES: a set of health objectives for the nation to achieve over the second decade of the new century. They can be used by many different people, states, communities, professional organizations and others to help develop programs to improve health. Healthy People 2020 identifies nearly 600 objectives with 1,200 measures to improve the health of all Americans. To determine the success of Healthy People, it is important to track and measure progress over time. Healthy People relies on data sources derived from: a national census of events (like the National Vital Statistics System) and nationally representative sample surveys (like the National Health Interview Survey) HEALTHY WEIGHT: percentage of public school students in grades 5, 7, and 9 with body composition falling within or below the Healthy Fitness Zone of the Fitnessgram assessment (e.g., 68.5% of 5th graders in California were at a healthy weight in 2010). In order to meet fitness standards for body fat, children must score in the "Healthy Fitness Zone" based on skinfold measurements, body mass index, or bioelectric impedance analysis. Lean scores for body composition are included in the Healthy Fitness Zone. KOTELCHUCK INDEX: an index of adequacy of prenatal care based on the month prenatal care began and the number of visits attended as recommended by the American College of OB‐GYN Standards of Care. Adequate and adequate plus categories represent care begun by the 4th month of pregnancy, with a total of 12 to 17 visits received. REQUIRED IMMUNIZATIONS: the immunizations required for entry into California child care centers are: at least four doses of the Diphtheria, Tetanus, and Pertussis (DTP) vaccine; at least three doses of the Polio vaccine; at least one dose of the Measles, Mumps, and Rubella (MMR) vaccine; at least one dose of the Haemophilus Influenza Type B (Hib) vaccine; at least three doses of the Hepatitis B vaccine; and at least one dose of the Varicella (Chickenpox) vaccine or physician documentation of having had chickenpox. Entry into California kindergartens requires these immunizations: at least four doses of the Diphtheria, Tetanus, and Pertussis (DTP) vaccine; at least three doses of the Polio vaccine; at least one dose of the Measles, Mumps, and Rubella (MMR) vaccine; at least three doses of the Hepatitis B vaccine; and at least one dose of the Varicella (Chickenpox) vaccine or physician documentation of having had the chickenpox. Exceptions to these requirements include permanent medical exemptions and personal belief exemptions. RETAIL ALCOHOL OUTLETS: includes on‐safe and off‐sale establishments (not wholesale), where alcohol is sold for consumption off premises (supermarkets, liquor stores, etc.) as well as places where alcohol is consumed on the premises (bars, restaurants, etc.).

Public Safety AGGRAVATED ASSAULT: an unlawful attack or attempted attack by one person upon another for the purpose of inflicting severe or aggravated bodily injury. This type of assault is usually accompanied by the use of a weapon or by means likely to produce death or great bodily harm. ARSON: any willful or malicious burning or attempt to burn, with or without intent to defraud, a dwelling house, public building, motor vehicle or aircraft, personal property of another, etc. BURGLARY: the unlawful entry of a structure to commit a felony or a theft. CARETAKER ABSENCE OR INCAPACITY39: [With regard to child abuse] the absence of a child’s caretaker due to hospitalization, incarceration or death; incapacity of the caretaker to provide adequate care for the child due to physical or emotional illness, disabling condition, or compulsive use of alcohol or narcotics. CHILD39: an individual aged 17 years or less.

39 Source: Health and Welfare Agency Annual Statistical Report, 2002.

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EMOTIONAL ABUSE39: [With regard to child abuse] non‐physical mistreatment, the results of which may be characterized by disturbed behavior on the part of the child such as severe withdrawal, regression, bizarre behavior, hyperactivity, or dangerous behavior. Such behavior, in and of itself, is not deemed to be evidence of emotional abuse. Emotional abuse includes, but is not limited to: willfully causing or permitting any child to suffer, inflicting mental suffering, or endangering a child’s emotional well‐being. EXPLOITATION39: [With regard to child abuse] the act of forcing or coercing a child into performing activities for the benefit of the caretaker which are beyond the child’s capabilities or which are illegal or degrading. This term also includes sexual exploitation. GENERAL NEGLECT39: [With regard to child abuse] the negligent failure of a child’s caretaker to provide adequate food, clothing, shelter, or supervision where no physical injury to the child has occurred. HOMICIDE: the willful (non‐negligent) killing of one human being by another. Murder and non‐negligent manslaughter are included in this definition. LARCENY: the unlawful taking, carrying, leading, or riding away of property from the possession of another (except embezzlement, fraud, forgery, and worthless checks). MOTOR VEHICLE THEFT: the theft or attempted theft of a motor vehicle. PHYSICAL ABUSE39: [With regard to child abuse] a bodily injury which has been or is being inflicted by other than accidental means on a child by the child’s caretaker. Physical abuse includes, but is not limited to: willful cruelty, unjustifiable punishment, or corporal punishment/injury to a child. RAPE: the carnal knowledge of a male or female forcibly and against his/her will. ROBBERY: the taking or attempting to take anything of value from the custody, care, or control of a person or persons by force or threat of force or violence and/or by creating fear in the victim. SEVERE NEGLECT39: [With regard to child abuse] the negligent failure of a caretaker to protect a child from severe malnutrition, or medically diagnosed non‐organic failure to thrive. Severe neglect also includes situations where a caretaker willingly causes or allows the child to be placed in a situation where his/her health is endangered. This includes, but is not limited to: intentional failure to provide necessary medical care, adequate food, clothing, or shelter. SEXUAL ABUSE39: [With regard to child abuse] The victimization of a child through sexual activities. These activities include, but are not limited to: molestation, indecent exposure, fondling, rape, and incest.

Social Environment AUTISM: [With regard to students with disabilities] a developmental disability significantly affecting verbal and non‐verbal communication and social interaction, generally evident before age three, that adversely affects educational performance. CHRONICALLY HOMELESS: defined by HUD as an unaccompanied homeless person with a disabling condition who has been homeless for at least one year or 4 times within the past 3 years. DEAF‐BLINDNESS: [With regard to students with disabilities] concomitant hearing and visual impairments, the combination of which causes such severe communication and other developmental and educational problems that they cannot be accommodated in special education programs solely for deaf or blind children. 176

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EMOTIONAL DISTURBANCE: [With regard to students with disabilities] a condition exhibiting one or more of the following characteristics over a long period of time and to a marked degree, which adversely affects educational performance: a) an inability to learn which cannot be explained by intellectual, sensory, or health factors; b) an inability to build or maintain satisfactory interpersonal relationships with peers and teachers; c) inappropriate types of behavior or feeling under normal circumstances; d) a general pervasive mood of unhappiness or depression; or e) a tendency to develop physical symptoms or fears associated with personal or school problems. The term includes children who are schizophrenic. The term does not include children who are socially maladjusted, unless it is determined that they exhibit one or more of the characteristics listed above. FREE OR REDUCED COST MEAL: a federal program administered by the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA). Program participation is by application and is based on the income of the child’s parent or guardian. HARD OF HEARING: [With regard to students with disabilities] a hearing impairment, whether permanent or fluctuating, which adversely affects a child’s educational performance but which is not included under the definition of “deafness” in this section. HATE CRIME: any crime motivated by the victim’s race, ethnicity, religion, sexual orientation, or physical or mental disability. HOMELESS ASSISTANCE: assistance available to CalWORKs eligible families to meet the reasonable costs of securing permanent housing, and for temporary shelter while seeking permanent housing. Families must meet the definition of homelessness, and assistance is restricted to once in a lifetime with few exceptions. THE MCKINNEY‐VENTO ACT: was the first significant federal response to homelessness and provides federal monies for homeless programming and shelter services. The McKinney‐Vento act defines homelessness as: 1) An individual who lacks a fixed, regular and adequate nighttime residence, and 2) An individual who has a primary nighttime residence that is: a) a supervised publicly or privately operated shelter designed to provide temporary living accommodations (including welfare hotels, congregate shelters, and transitional housing for the mentally ill); b) an institution that provides a temporary residence for individuals intended to be institutionalized; or c) a public or private place not designed for, or ordinarily used as, a regular sleeping accommodation for human beings. MENTAL DISABILITY: a physical, mental, or emotional condition lasting 6 months or more that made it difficult to learn, remember, or concentrate. MENTAL RETARDATION: [With regard to students with disabilities] significantly sub‐average general intellectual function existing concurrently with deficits in adaptive behavior, and manifested during the developmental period, which adversely affects a child’s educational performance. MULTIPLE DISABILITY: [With regard to students with disabilities] concomitant impairments (such as mental retardation, blindness, orthopedic impairment, etc.) the combination of which causes such severe educational problems that children cannot be accommodated in special education programs solely for one of the impairments. The term does not include deaf‐blind children.

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ORTHOPEDIC IMPAIRMENT: [With regard to students with disabilities] a severe orthopedic impairment, which adversely affects a child’s educational performance. The term includes impairments caused by congenital anomaly (e.g., clubfoot, absence of some member, etc.), impairments caused by disease (e.g., poliomyelitis, bone tuberculosis, etc.), and impairments from other causes (e.g., cerebral palsy, amputations, and fractures or burns which cause contractures). OTHER HEATH IMPAIRMENT: [With regard to students with disabilities] having limited strength, vitality or alertness, due to chronic or acute health problems such as a heart condition, tuberculosis, rheumatic fever, nephritis, asthma, sickle cell anemia, hemophilia, epilepsy, lead poisoning, leukemia, or diabetes, which adversely affects a child’s educational performance. PHYSICAL DISABILITY: a long‐lasting condition that substantially limits one or more basic physical activity such as walking, climbing stairs, reaching, lifting, or carrying. SAN ANDREAS REGIONAL CENTER (SARC): community‐based, private nonprofit corporation that is funded by the State of California to serve people with developmental disabilities. San Andreas is one of 21 Regional Centers throughout California serving individuals and their families who reside within Monterey, San Benito, Santa Clara, and Santa Cruz Counties. SENSORY DISABILITY: a long‐lasting condition of blindness, deafness, or severe vision or hearing impairment. SPECIFIC LEARNING DISABILITY: [With regard to students with disabilities] a disorder in one or more of the basic psychological processes involved in understanding or in using language, spoken or written, which may manifest itself in an imperfect ability to listen, think, speak, read, write, spell, or to do mathematical calculations. The term includes such conditions as perceptual handicaps, brain injury, minimal brain dysfunction, dyslexia, and developmental aphasia. The term does not include children who have leaning problems that are primarily the result of visual, hearing, or motor handicaps, of mental retardation, of emotional disturbance or of environmental, cultural, or economic disadvantage. SPEECH OR LANGUAGE IMPAIRMENT: [With regard to students with disabilities] a communication disorder such as stuttering, impaired articulation, language impairment, or a voice impairment, which adversely affects a child’s educational performance. TRAUMATIC BRAIN INJURY: [With regard to students with disabilities] an injury to the brain caused by an external physical force or by an internal occurrence such as stroke or aneurysm, resulting in total or partial functional disability or psychosocial maladjustment that adversely affects educational performance. The term includes open or closed head injuries resulting in mild, moderate, or severe impairments in one or more areas, including cognition; language memory; attention; reasoning; abstract thinking; judgment; problem‐solving; sensory, perceptual and motor abilities; psychosocial behavior; physical functions; information processing; and speech. The term does not include brain injuries that are congenital or degenerative, or brain injuries induced by birth trauma. VISUAL IMPAIRMENT: [With regard to students with disabilities] a visual impairment that, even with correction, adversely affects a child’s educational performance. The term includes both partially seeing and blind children.

Natural Environment FARMLAND OF LOCAL IMPORTANCE: either currently producing crops or has the capability of production. This is land other than Prime Farmland, Farmland of Statewide Importance, or Unique Farmland. FARMLAND OF STATEWIDE IMPORTANCE: land other than Prime Farmland that has a good combination of physical and chemical characteristics for the production of crops.

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GRAZING LAND: land on which vegetation, whether naturally occurring or grown through human management, is suitable for grazing or browsing of livestock. The minimum mapping unit of grazing land is 40 acres. LAND TRUST: local organization working with private parties and public agencies to permanently protect land through purchase and/or donation. OPEN SPACE EASEMENT: restrict the use of privately owned property to a particular use (generally, undeveloped) under the Open Space Easement Act of 1974. Property owners receive a property tax reduction as an incentive to preserve their property in an undeveloped condition. The Williamson Act of 1965 offered property tax reductions to private landowners contracting to preserve farmland. Each year, the county is reimbursed by the state for a portion of the tax revenue lost through Williamson Act and Open Space Easement contracts. OZONE: a colorless, odorless reactive gas comprised of three oxygen atoms. It is naturally found in the upper level stratosphere, but low level tropospheric ozone is a component of air pollution. Exposure to unhealthful levels of ozone can result in chest pain, coughing, nausea, shortness of breath, headaches, congestion, and throat irritation. PARTICULATE MATTER (PM10): the mixture of solid particles and liquid droplets found in the air that are less than 10 microns in size. Studies have linked high levels of particulate matter to aggravated asthma and acute respiratory symptoms, chronic bronchitis, decreased lung function, and premature death. The largest sources of PM10 are dust from vehicles driving on paved roads, grinding operations, fuel combustion, agricultural burning, and wood stoves. PRIME FARMLAND: land that has the best combination of physical and chemical characteristics for the production of crops. It has the soil quality, growing season, and moisture supply needed to produce sustained high yields of crops when treated and managed, including water management, according to current farming methods. RECREATION TRAILS: trails set aside for non‐motorized recreation activities such as hiking, biking, and horseback riding. UNIQUE FARMLAND: land which does not meet the criteria for Prime Farmland or Farmland of Statewide Importance, and that has been used for the production of specific high economic value crops. WATERWAY IMPAIRMENT: contamination based on the containment of different pollutants. Pathogenic pollutants can come from urban runoff, storm sewers, agriculture, septic tanks, wildlife, homeless camps, and private laterals. Sedimentation is caused by unsurfaced roads, bare soil, and as the result of hydromodification. Nutrients come from septic systems, sewer systems, laterals, pesticides/agricultural runoff, wildlife, and natural sources. The state uses three categories to assess the health of waterways: “Good” waterways support and enhance designated use with minor or no known impairment of water quality; “Intermediate” waterways support designated use with minor or moderate impairment; “Impaired” waterways do not support designated uses and have moderate to severe impairment of water quality.

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APPENDIX III: SANTA CRUZ COUNTY TELEPHONE SURVEY RESULTS, 2011 1. Which of the following areas do you live in or live closest to? RESPONSE

FREQUENCY

PERCENT

City of Santa Cruz City of Watsonville San Lorenzo Valley Aptos Capitola Scotts Valley Live Oak Soquel Corralitos Freedom La Selva Pajaro Davenport/Bonny Doon

232 142 91 56 40 36 35 30 23 20 11 5 2

32.1% 19.6% 12.6% 7.7% 5.5% 5.0% 4.8% 4.1% 3.2% 2.8% 1.5% 0.7% 0.2%

Total

722

100.0%

2. What is your zip code? RESPONSE

4a. How many children do you have in the following age groups: birth to 5 years old RESPONSE

FREQUENCY

PERCENT

1

79

70.7%

2

25

22.7%

3 Total

7

6.6%

111

100.0%

4b. How many children do you have in the following age groups: 6-17 years old RESPONSE

FREQUENCY

PERCENT

1

89

51.0%

2

61

34.9%

3

20

11.5%

4

3

1.5%

5

2

0.9%

6

0

0.2%

173

100.0%

Total FREQUENCY

PERCENT

95003

55

7.6%

95005

19

2.6%

RESPONSE

FREQUENCY

PERCENT

95006

34

4.7%

Public school

157

72.4%

95007

2

0.2%

Private school

24

11.3%

95010

25

3.5%

Not of school age

47

21.8%

95018

41

5.6%

95019

12

1.7%

95060

158

21.9%

95062

5. Are your children in:

Multiple response question with 217 respondents offering 229 responses.

6a. Are they in elementary School? RESPONSE

FREQUENCY

PERCENT

Yes

121

67.8%

No

57

32.2%

178

100.0%

FREQUENCY

PERCENT

Yes

64

36.0%

No

113

64.0%

Total

177

100.0%

FREQUENCY

PERCENT

93

12.9%

95064

3

0.4%

95065

26

3.6%

95066

36

5.0%

Total

95073

30

4.1%

95076

188

26.1%

95077 Total

1

0.1%

722

100.0%

3. Are you a parent or guardian of a child (or children) under the age of 18? RESPONSE

6b. Are they in middle School? RESPONSE

6c. Are they in high school?

FREQUENCY

PERCENT

Yes

220

30.5%

RESPONSE

No

502

69.5%

Yes

57

32.1%

Total

722

100.0%

No

120

67.9%

Total

177

100.0%

180

Š 2011 Applied Survey Research


Santa Cruz County Community Assessment Project, Year 17, 2011

Appendices

8c. How satisfied are you with your child (children)'s high school education?

7a. Does your child (children)'s elementary school provide a safe environment for learning? RESPONSE Yes No Total

FREQUENCY

PERCENT

115

96.8%

4

3.2%

119

100.0%

7b. Does your child (children)'s middle school provide a safe environment for learning? RESPONSE

FREQUENCY

PERCENT

Yes

57

92.8%

No

4

7.2%

62

100.0%

Total

7c. Does your child (children)'s high school provide a safe environment for learning? RESPONSE

FREQUENCY

PERCENT

Yes

51

92.3%

No

4

7.7%

55

100.0%

Total

8a. How satisfied are you with your child (children)'s elementary school education? RESPONSE

FREQUENCY

PERCENT

Very satisfied

91

75.1%

Somewhat satisfied

28

23.3%

2

1.6%

121

100.0%

Not at all satisfied Total

8b. How satisfied are you with your child (children)'s middle school education? RESPONSE

FREQUENCY

PERCENT

Very satisfied

35

55.4%

Somewhat satisfied

26

40.9%

2

3.7%

63

100.0%

Not at all satisfied Total

© 2011 Applied Survey Research

RESPONSE

FREQUENCY

PERCENT

Very satisfied

27

49.3%

Somewhat satisfied

25

44.8%

3

5.9%

55

100.0%

Not at all satisfied Total

9. Does your child have enough activities after school and on weekends? RESPONSE

FREQUENCY

PERCENT

Yes

134

75.3%

No

44

24.7%

178

100.0%

Total

10. How important do you think attending a quality preschool is to a child’s success in school? RESPONSE

FREQUENCY

PERCENT

Very important

508

72.2%

Somewhat important

171

24.3%

Not at all important Total

25

3.5%

704

100.0%

11. Overall, how satisfied are you with our local system of education? RESPONSE

FREQUENCY

PERCENT

Very satisfied

177

28.2%

Somewhat satisfied

361

57.4%

91

14.4%

629

100.0%

Not at all satisfied Total

12. Do you feel you are better off financially this year than last year? RESPONSE

FREQUENCY

PERCENT

Yes

215

30.6%

No

487

69.4%

Total

702

100.0%

181


Appendices

Santa Cruz County Community Assessment Project, Year 17, 2011

12a. If you do not feel you are better off financially this year than last year, or you don’t know why, why do you feel this way? RESPONSE

15. In any given month in the last 12 months, did you find yourself having to go without basic needs such as child care, health care, food, or housing?

FREQUENCY

PERCENT

FREQUENCY

PERCENT

118

23.7%

Yes

101

14.0%

Less income

99

19.8%

No

620

86.0%

Unemployed

83

16.7%

Total

722

100.0%

On a fixed income/retired

63

12.6%

The same, doing OK

61

12.3%

61

12.3%

38

7.5%

Wages stagnant

27

5.3%

Additional expenses/Debt

23

4.6%

Less employment opportunities

16

3.3%

Stock market/Investments

12

2.5%

Businesses are closing/Lay offs

11 11

2.1% 2.1%

Cost of living increased

Overall economy has dropped/Recession Gas prices

Working less than last year/ underemployed Increased taxes

RESPONSE

15a. If you had to go without basic needs, what did you go without? RESPONSE

FREQUENCY

PERCENT

Health care

57

57.2%

Food/Limited food choices

31

30.5%

Child care

16

16.2%

Rent/housing

14

14.0%

Dental Care

5

5.1%

Other

1

0.5%

Multiple response question with 100 respondents offering 124 responses.

10

2.0%

Decreased real estate value

9

1.8%

Utility costs/Energy crisis

8

1.6%

Governmental control

8

1.6%

RESPONSE

Personal tragedy/health problems

4

0.8%

3 26

Foreclosure Other

15b. If you had to go without basic needs, did you get help from any social service program? FREQUENCY

PERCENT

Yes

37

38.2%

0.6%

No

61

61.8%

5.3%

Total

98

100.0%

Multiple response question with 499 respondents offering 690 responses.

13. Are you saving money for the future through any of the following savings options?

15c. If you did not get help from a social service program, why didn’t you get help?, FREQUENCY

PERCENT

I applied for public assistance

24

40.8%

50.5%

I didn't want to

14

22.9%

318

45.2%

I didn't know where to get help

9

15.1%

Stocks

26

3.7%

Didn't think I qualified

7

12.2%

Other

48

6.9%

Other

6

10.5%

229

32.6%

RESPONSE

FREQUENCY

PERCENT

Savings account

355

Retirement

Not saving

Multiple response question with 704 respondents offering 977 responses.

14. Do you feel you have opportunities to work in the Santa Cruz area? RESPONSE

RESPONSE

Multiple response question with 59 respondents offering 60 responses.

16. How much of your total household take-home pay (income after taxes) goes to rent or housing costs? RESPONSE

FREQUENCY

PERCENT

30% or less

282

44.1%

57.2%

Between 31% & 49%

147

23.0%

284

42.8%

Between 50% & 74%

146

22.8%

662

100.0%

FREQUENCY

PERCENT

Yes

379

No Total

75% or more Total

182

65

10.1%

641

100.0%

© 2011 Applied Survey Research


Santa Cruz County Community Assessment Project, Year 17, 2011

Appendices

17. Due to the cost of housing, have you or anyone living with you needed to do any of the following? RESPONSE

FREQUENCY

PERCENT

Live temporarily with family/friends

429 169

62.1% 24.4%

Share housing with other families

None of the above

151

21.9%

Rent out rooms in your house

86

12.4%

Move when you didn't want to

70

10.1%

Live in an overcrowded unit

44

6.3%

Experience foreclosure

40 18

5.8% 2.6%

8

1.2%

Live in a housing unit without adequate plumbing, heat, or electricity Other

RESPONSE

FREQUENCY

PERCENT

Yes

7

34.8%

No

14

65.2%

Total

21

100.0%

20. Have you been without housing in Santa Cruz County during the past year? (Homeless, in a shelter, on the street, or living in your vehicle)? RESPONSE Yes

Multiple response question with 691 respondents offering 1,015 responses.

17a. Has any of the previous had to do with the economic downturn? RESPONSE

19a. Are you in danger of losing your housing in the next 14 days?

FREQUENCY

PERCENT

5

0.7%

No

717

99.3%

Total

722

100.0%

21. Is anyone staying at your address on a temporary basis who otherwise might be considered homeless?

FREQUENCY

PERCENT

Yes

186

72.3%

Yes

No

30

4.2%

71

27.7%

No

689

95.8%

257

100.0%

Total

719

100.0%

Total

18. How many times have you moved in the past 12 months? RESPONSE

FREQUENCY

PERCENT

0

618

85.9%

1

59

8.2%

2

33

3

RESPONSE

FREQUENCY

PERCENT

21a. How many people staying at this address might be considered homeless? FREQUENCY

PERCENT

1

24

78.9%

2

4.6%

5

17.1%

3

5

0.6%

0

1.5%

4

4

3

0.4%

1

2.5%

5

1

0.2%

Total

30

100.0%

6

1

0.1%

720

100.0%

Total

18a. Have you moved 3 or more times in the past two months? RESPONSE

FREQUENCY

PERCENT

Yes

0

4.0%

No

9

96.0%

Total

9

100.0%

19. Are you in danger of losing your housing in the next 90 days? RESPONSE

FREQUENCY

21b. What is the relationship of this person or persons to the owner, leaseholder, or primary renter of this property? RESPONSE

FREQUENCY

PERCENT

Immediate family - mother, father, son, daughter, sister, brother Friend

14

47.3%

10

32.6%

Extended family - grandparent, aunt, uncle, cousin or other relative Non-family member - including inlaws

5

16.1%

4

14.7%

Multiple response question with 30 respondents offering 33 responses.

PERCENT

Yes

21

3.0%

No

693

97.0%

Total

714

100.0%

Š 2011 Applied Survey Research

RESPONSE

183


Appendices

Santa Cruz County Community Assessment Project, Year 17, 2011

22. How would you describe, in general, your overall health? RESPONSE

FREQUENCY

PERCENT

Excellent

165

22.9%

Very good

246

34.1%

Good

185

25.7%

Fair

94

13.1%

Poor

30

4.1%

Total

719

100.0%

23. Do you have a regular source of health care? RESPONSE

FREQUENCY

PERCENT

Yes

612

85.2%

No

106

14.8%

Total

719

100.0%

23a. If you have a regular source of health care, where do you go? RESPONSE

FREQUENCY

PERCENT

Private practice - includes Santa Cruz Medical Clinic & private doctors Urgent care clinics - Doctors on Duty, 24 hour urgent care Emergency room

493

81.2%

176

29.0%

145

23.9%

Community clinics

103

17.0%

Alternative care practices

86

14.1%

Out of county

80

13.2%

2

0.4%

Other

Private practice - includes Santa Cruz Medical Clinic & private doctors Urgent care clinics - Doctors on Duty, 24 hour urgent care Emergency room Alternative care practices Out of county

FREQUENCY

PERCENT

No insurance

16

29.8%

Insurance wouldn't cover it

4

7.1%

Couldn't afford Co-pay

2

3.6%

Couldn't afford the premium

1

1.5%

19

35.2%

Too expensive Medi-Cal/MediCruz problems

3

5.4%

Other

10

17.3%

Total

55

100.0%

25. Do you currently have health insurance? RESPONSE

FREQUENCY

PERCENT

Yes

577

80.3%

No

142

19.7%

Total

719

100.0%

26a. Does your health insurance cover prescriptions? RESPONSE Yes Total

FREQUENCY

PERCENT

493

88.6%

63

11.4%

556

100.0%

26b. Does your health insurance cover mental health? RESPONSE Yes No Total

FREQUENCY

PERCENT

312

82.3%

67

17.7%

380

100.0%

26c. Does your health insurance cover your dependents?

23b. If no, where do you go? Community clinics

RESPONSE

No

Multiple response question with 606 respondents offering 1,084 responses.

RESPONSE

24a. If you needed health care and were unable to receive it, why couldn’t you receive it?

FREQUENCY

PERCENT

44 33

47.0% 35.2%

32

33.6%

25

27.0%

7

7.1%

4

4.5%

Multiple response question with 94 respondents offering 145 responses.

RESPONSE

FREQUENCY

PERCENT

Yes

261

66.0%

No

135

34.0%

Total

396

100.0%

26d. Does your health insurance cover dental care? RESPONSE

FREQUENCY

PERCENT

Yes

326

57.1%

No

245

42.9%

Total

571

100.0%

24. Have you needed health care in the past year and been unable to receive it? RESPONSE

FREQUENCY

PERCENT

Yes

55

7.7%

No

661

92.3%

Total

716

100.0%

184

© 2011 Applied Survey Research


Santa Cruz County Community Assessment Project, Year 17, 2011

Appendices

27.01 How many of your children aged birth to 5 years old have health insurance? RESPONSE

FREQUENCY

PERCENT

0

6

5.8%

1

67

60.4%

2

31

27.9%

3

6

5.9%

110

100.0%

Total

27.02 How many of your children aged 6 to 17 years old have health insurance? RESPONSE

FREQUENCY

PERCENT

0

10

6.0%

1

80

46.2%

2

62

36.1%

3

17

9.6%

4

3

1.5%

5

1

0.6%

173

100.0%

Total

28.01 How many of your children aged birth to 5 years old have dental insurance? RESPONSE

FREQUENCY

PERCENT

0

17

15.9%

1

56

52.2%

2

31

29.0%

3

3

2.9%

107

100.0%

Total

28.02 How many of your children aged 6 to 17 years old have dental insurance? RESPONSE

29a. If you needed dental care and were unable to receive it, why couldn’t you receive it? RESPONSE

FREQUENCY

PERCENT

Too expensive

38

41.1%

No insurance

25

26.4%

Insurance wouldn't cover it

12

12.5%

Couldn't afford co-pay

9

10.0%

Couldn't afford premiums

7

7.9%

Other

2

2.2%

Total

93

100.0%

30. Other than during pregnancy, has a doctor ever told you that you have diabetes or pre- diabetes? RESPONSE

FREQUENCY

PERCENT

Yes

84

11.8%

No

632

88.2%

Total

716

100.0%

30a. If a doctor has told you that you have diabetes or pre-diabetes, were you told it was: RESPONSE

FREQUENCY

PERCENT

Diabetes

51

62.4%

Pre-diabetes

31

37.6%

Total

82

100.0%

31. During the past 12 months, did you ever feel so sad or hopeless almost every day for two weeks or more in a row that you stopped doing some usual activities? RESPONSE

FREQUENCY

PERCENT

Yes

97

13.5%

No

623

86.5%

Total

720

100.0%

FREQUENCY

PERCENT

0

23

13.8%

1

71

42.0%

2

56

33.1%

3

16

9.2%

RESPONSE

4

2

1.3%

Yes

15

2.1%

5

1

0.6%

No

707

97.9%

169

100.0%

Total

722

100.0%

Total

32. Thinking about physical activity and nutrition, do you know what the 5210 campaign stands for? FREQUENCY

PERCENT

29. Have you needed dental care in the past year and been unable to receive it? RESPONSE

FREQUENCY

PERCENT

Yes

95

13.2%

No

623

86.8%

Total

717

100.0%

© 2011 Applied Survey Research

185


Appendices

Santa Cruz County Community Assessment Project, Year 17, 2011

36-37. Body Mass Index in adults

32a. If yes, please briefly describe what the 52-10 campaign stands for. RESPONSE

RESPONSE

FREQUENCY

PERCENT

Knows all four of the 5210 definitions Knows three of the four definitions

1

8.8%

1

7.0%

Knows two of the four definitions

3

16.7%

Knows one of the four definitions

2 8

12.8% 54.7%

15

100.0%

Has general knowledge of 5210 but not specific definitions Total

33. How many days per week do you engage in physical activity (such as brisk walking, bicycling, dancing, swimming, or gardening) for a combined total of 30 minutes or more? RESPONSE None

FREQUENCY

PERCENT

Low BMI (Less than 18.5)

11

1.7%

Normal BMI (18.5 -24.9)

268

41.2%

Overweight (BMI 25.0 -29.9)

233

35.8%

Obese (BMI 30.0 or more)

138

21.3%

Total

650

100.0%

38. Considering all types of alcoholic beverages, during the past 30 days about how many times did you have 5 or more drinks on an occasion? RESPONSE None

FREQUENCY

PERCENT

626

87.1%

1

39

5.4%

2

11

1.5%

3

10

1.4%

6

0.8%

FREQUENCY

PERCENT

4

63

8.7%

5

11

1.5%

2

0.2%

1 - 2 days

131

18.3%

6

3 - 4 days

227

31.6%

10

6

0.9%

41.4%

20

4

0.6%

100.0%

25

1

0.1%

5 or more days Total

298 720

30 Total

34. How many times in the past 7 days did you eat fast food? Include fast food meals eaten at work, at home, or at fast-food restaurants, carryout or drive thru. RESPONSE

FREQUENCY

PERCENT

0

439

61.2%

1

157

21.9%

2

58

8.1%

3

20

2.8%

4

10

1.4%

5

14

2.0%

6

2

0.3%

7

10

1.5%

8

0

0.1%

10

3

0.4%

21

2

0.3%

717

100.0%

Total

RESPONSE

PERCENT

Yes

396

55.7%

No

315

44.3%

Total

711

100.0%

186

RESPONSE

FREQUENCY

PERCENT

705

97.8%

1

8

1.1%

2

3

0.4%

3

1

0.2%

4

1

0.1%

6

1

0.2%

None

30 Total

1

0.1%

720

100.0%

40. How acceptable do you think it is for adults to provide alcohol to underage youth in their home? FREQUENCY

PERCENT

23

3.2%

Somewhat acceptable

126

18.0%

Not at all acceptable

551

78.7%

Total

700

100.0%

Very acceptable

FREQUENCY

0.4% 100.0%

39. During the past 30 days, on how many days have you taken a prescription drug without a doctor's prescription?

RESPONSE

35. Do you eat 5 or more servings of fruits and vegetables a day?

3 719

Š 2011 Applied Survey Research


Santa Cruz County Community Assessment Project, Year 17, 2011

Appendices

41. How acceptable do you find the use of marijuana for recreational or non-medicinal use? RESPONSE

47. Does your family or household have an emergency supply kit set aside for immediate use that could sustain all members of the family or household for 72 hours?

FREQUENCY

PERCENT

92

13.3%

RESPONSE

FREQUENCY

PERCENT

Somewhat acceptable

252

36.6%

Yes

410

57.0%

Not at all acceptable

346

50.1%

No

309

43.0%

Total

690

100.0%

Total

719

100.0%

Very acceptable

42. Do you have your end-of-life wishes for medical treatment in a written document? RESPONSE

48. How concerned are you about family violence in our community? (including domestic violence, child abuse, and senior abuse)

FREQUENCY

PERCENT

Yes

288

40.0%

No

RESPONSE

FREQUENCY

PERCENT

422

58.5%

11

1.6%

Very concerned

265

37.4%

Somewhat concerned

316

44.7%

722

100.0%

Not at all concerned

127

17.9%

Total

707

100.0%

Don't Know Total

43. How effective do you think law enforcement is in our community? RESPONSE

FREQUENCY

PERCENT

Very effective

253

36.0%

Somewhat effective

419

59.6%

31

4.4%

704

100.0%

Not at all effective Total

44. How concerned are you about crime in Santa Cruz County? RESPONSE

FREQUENCY

PERCENT

Very concerned

259

36.1%

Somewhat concerned

357

49.7%

Not at all concerned

102

14.2%

Total

718

100.0%

45. How safe would you say you feel in your neighborhood? RESPONSE

49. Have any family members or friends in Santa Cruz County experienced any of the following types of abuse in the last year? RESPONSE

74

10.4%

No

631

89.6%

Total Respondents

705

100.0%

b. Child abuse or neglect Yes

17

2.4%

No

690

97.6%

Total Respondents

707

100.0%

Yes

22

3.2%

No

686

96.8%

Total Respondents

708

100.0%

c. Elder abuse or neglect

50a. Please tell me how much of an impact has had drug and alcohol abuse in your neighborhood?

PERCENT

Very safe

470

65.2%

Somewhat safe

237

32.8%

RESPONSE

14

2.0%

A big impact

721

100.0%

Total

46. Do you feel children have a safe place to play in your neighborhood? RESPONSE

FREQUENCY

PERCENT

Yes

524

73.8%

No

154

21.7%

32

4.5%

710

100.0%

Don't Know Total Š 2011 Applied Survey Research

PERCENT

Yes

FREQUENCY

Not at all safe

FREQUENCY

a. Domestic Violence or intimate partner violence

FREQUENCY

PERCENT

98

14.4%

Somewhat

212

31.2%

Very little

132

19.4%

Not at all

238

35.0%

Total

680

100.0%

187


Appendices

Santa Cruz County Community Assessment Project, Year 17, 2011

50b. Please tell me, how much of an impact has had methamphetamine use in your neighborhood?

52. How often do you shop at farmers markets or local produce stands? RESPONSE

RESPONSE

FREQUENCY

PERCENT

A big impact

91

14.2%

Daily

FREQUENCY

PERCENT

13

1.8%

183

25.6%

72

10.1%

Somewhat

130

20.3%

Once a week

Very little

100

15.7%

Not at all

318

49.8%

Total

639

100.0%

More than once a week but not daily More than once a month but not every week Once a month

96

13.4%

124

17.3%

Less than once a month

111

15.5%

Never

117

16.4%

Total

717

100.0%

50c. Please tell me, how much of an impact has had gangs in your neighborhood? RESPONSE

FREQUENCY

PERCENT

A big impact

98

13.8%

Somewhat

182

25.6%

Very little

117

16.6%

Not at all

311

44.0%

Total

708

100.0%

51. What one thing concerns you the most about the natural environment in Santa Cruz County? RESPONSE Water pollution - ocean/river/bay Litter

53. What prevents you from shopping at farmers markets or local produce stands? RESPONSE

FREQUENCY

PERCENT

Times are not convenient

189

27.5%

Nothing prevents me

186

27.1%

Cost

97

14.2%

Location

91

13.3%

50

7.3%

FREQUENCY

PERCENT

126

22.3%

58

10.4%

Don't want to shop at more than one store Transportation

17

2.5%

Grow my own vegetables

11

1.7%

Variety

10

1.5%

Lazy

10

1.4%

Weather

5

0.7%

Parking

4

0.6%

60

8.7%

Water availability/Salt water intrusion No preservation of natural environment/wildlife Drinking Water quality

56

10.0%

46

8.1%

45

7.9%

General pollution

38 34

6.8% 6.0%

31

5.5%

Air pollution - car emissions

26

4.5%

Overpopulation

23

4.0%

Fire protection/ prevention

18

3.2%

Global warming/ climate change

18

3.2%

RESPONSE

Closures of state parks

16

2.8% 2.3% 2.2%

Development of open space/Agricultural land Traffic/Too many cars

Lack of recycling Homeless encampments/ panhandling Cutting down trees/Commercial logging Pesticides/Herbicides

13 12

1.9%

9

1.6%

Lack of water/ water conservation

9

1.6%

Over regulation, protection/ rules

4

0.7%

64

11.4%

Multiple response question with 563 respondents offering 655 responses.

188

Multiple response question with 685 respondents offering 730 responses.

54. How satisfied are you with what is being done in Santa Cruz County to preserve open space such as wildlife habitat and farmland? FREQUENCY

PERCENT

Very satisfied

288

42.2%

Somewhat satisfied

353

51.8%

Not at all satisfied Total

10

Other

Other

41

6.0%

682

100.0%

55. Should stronger regulations be imposed to provide greater protection for open space? RESPONSE

FREQUENCY

PERCENT

Yes

425

65.4%

No

224

34.6%

Total

649

100.0%

Š 2011 Applied Survey Research


Santa Cruz County Community Assessment Project, Year 17, 2011

Appendices

56. Are you taking steps to reduce your household water consumption? RESPONSE Yes No Total

FREQUENCY

PERCENT

631

88.7%

RESPONSE

81

11.3%

712

100.0%

56a. If you are taking steps to reduce your household water consumption, have you done any of the following? RESPONSE

FREQUENCY

PERCENT

493 458

79.9% 74.3%

438

71.0%

Modify your landscape to reduce irrigation water Installed a front loading washing machine Installed a low flow dishwasher

413

67.0%

270

43.8%

213

34.5%

Reuse rain water, shower water, etc. Other

25

4.0%

Installed a low-flow showerhead Used a hose end nozzle or used timers to water Installed a low-flow toilet

45

7.3%

Multiple response question with 616 respondents offering 2,354 responses.

57. Are you taking steps to reduce water pollution at home or work? RESPONSE

FREQUENCY

PERCENT

Yes

474

72.1%

No

183

27.9%

Total

657

100.0%

57a. If you are taking steps to reduce water pollution, have you done any of the following? RESPONSE Kept paints & chemicals out of storm drains Washed cars at car washes rather than on the street Used less toxic fertilizers & pesticides Reduced runoff from irrigation of landscaping Used appropriate amounts of fertilizers & outdoor pesticides Collected pet waste Use grey water Other

58. How often do you use alternative forms of transportation - carpooling, bus, bicycle, etc. - rather than driving alone?

FREQUENCY

PERCENT

412

89.1%

322

69.7%

320

69.2%

302

65.5%

300

64.9%

276

59.9%

7

1.5%

30

6.6%

FREQUENCY

PERCENT

Never

266

37.1%

Every day

95 165

13.3% 23.0%

117

16.3%

65

9.1%

At least once a week, but not every day A couple times a month A couple times a year Other

9

1.3%

Total

716

100.0%

59. What would encourage you to use alternative forms of transportation? RESPONSE More frequent bus schedule/Convenience Nothing/wouldn't use it

FREQUENCY

PERCENT

140

26.7%

109

20.8%

Easier access

49

9.4%

Expense of gasoline

28

5.3%

More/safer/better bike paths

25

4.8%

Already use it

24

4.6%

Reduce carbon footprint

14

2.6%

Free transit

13

2.6%

Access/ knowledge of carpooling

13

2.6%

If car broke down

11

2.1%

Light rail/Train

10

2.0%

Job closer to home

10

1.9%

More rural bus routes

9

1.7%

Rapid transit

8

1.4%

Unable to drive

6 2

1.1% 0.3%

54

10.2%

526

100.0%

More accessibility for seniors & people with disabilities Other Total

60. How satisfied are you with your overall quality of life? RESPONSE

FREQUENCY

PERCENT

Very Satisfied

481

66.6%

Somewhat Satisfied

227

31.4%

14

2.0%

722

100.0%

Not at all Satisfied Total

Multiple response question with 462 respondents offering 1,969 responses.

Š 2011 Applied Survey Research

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Appendices

Santa Cruz County Community Assessment Project, Year 17, 2011

61. How much do you enjoy your life? RESPONSE Not At All

63a. If you contribute money, will you give:

FREQUENCY

PERCENT

8

1.1%

RESPONSE Less than last year More than last year

FREQUENCY

PERCENT

103

22.4%

Very Little

33

4.7%

60

13.2%

Somewhat

159

22.2%

About the same as last year

295

64.4%

To a Great Extent

516

72.0%

Total

457

100.0%

Total

716

100.0%

62. Do you regularly do volunteer work in the community? RESPONSE

64. Have you felt discriminated against or treated unfairly in Santa Cruz County in the last 12 months? RESPONSE

FREQUENCY

PERCENT

FREQUENCY

PERCENT

Yes

85

11.8%

Yes

295

41.1%

No

634

88.2%

No

423

58.9%

Total

720

100.0%

Total

719

100.0%

62a. If you volunteer, where do you volunteer? RESPONSE

64a. If you felt discriminated against or treated unfairly, for what reason?

FREQUENCY

PERCENT

FREQUENCY

PERCENT

Church

63

21.9%

Ethnicity/race

42

51.1%

School

58 29

20.2% 10.1%

Age

12

14.7%

Socioeconomic status

Community Centers/Recreation Centers/Sports Environmental organization/Activities Youth organizations

28

9.6%

RESPONSE

11

13.4%

Language

9

10.7%

Gender

8

9.5%

Appearance

5

5.8%

A disability

5

6.0%

Sexual orientation

4

4.9%

Religion

1

1.6%

Other

9

11.4%

28

9.8%

Health organizations

27

9.4%

Service organizations

26

9.1%

Poverty/Homeless assistance

25

8.8%

Senior organizations

23

8.1%

Political organizations

16

5.4%

Multiple response question with 82 respondents offering 106 responses.

8 8

2.8% 2.7%

65. How much of a problem is racism in Santa Cruz County?

7

2.4%

RESPONSE

4

1.3%

A big problem

28

9.8%

Arts/Culture organizations Emergency services (fire, police, etc.) Library Alcohol/drug/counseling groups Other

Multiple response question with 288 respondents offering 379 responses.

63. Do you regularly contribute money to charitable organizations? RESPONSE

FREQUENCY

PERCENT

71

10.6%

Somewhat of a problem

400

59.8%

Not at all a problem

198

29.6%

Total

669

100.0%

66. How often do you feel that people in your neighborhood help each other?

FREQUENCY

PERCENT

Yes

466

64.8%

RESPONSE

No

253

35.2%

Total

719

100.0%

190

FREQUENCY

PERCENT

Often

323

45.4%

Sometimes

330

46.4%

Never

58

8.2%

Total

711

100.0%

Š 2011 Applied Survey Research


Santa Cruz County Community Assessment Project, Year 17, 2011

Appendices

67. Have you or a member of your household, been diagnosed by a physician with a disability that significantly limits one or more major life activities? RESPONSE

67b1. If the person(s) with a disability is not participating in community life at the levels he or she desires, in what areas would you /they like to increase their involvement?

FREQUENCY

PERCENT

Yes

135

18.9%

RESPONSE

No

579

81.1%

Social events/activities

Total

714

100.0%

67a1. How many people in your household have been diagnosed as having a disability? RESPONSE

FREQUENCY

PERCENT

One

113

84.0%

Two

22

16.0%

Total

135

100.0%

PERCENT

5 years or less

4

2.8%

6 - 18 years

6

4.5%

19 - 24 years

5

3.8%

25 - 34 years

11

7.9%

35 - 44 years

9

6.4%

45 - 54 years

15

10.9%

55 - 64 years

44

32.6%

65 - 74 years

23

16.9%

75 - 84 years

20

14.7%

85 years & over

14

10.5%

Multiple response question with 135 respondents offering 150 responses.

67b. Is the person(s) with a disability participating in community life at the levels he or she desires? Yes No Don't Know Total

Š 2011 Applied Survey Research

Continued Education

15 13

26.4% 23.0%

6

10.0%

6

9.7%

2

3.3%

Other

13

23.0%

Don't Know

12

21.5%

Multiple response question with 57 respondents offering 66 responses.

RESPONSE

FREQUENCY

RESPONSE

All aspects of life

PERCENT

67b2. What types of additional services are needed to allow you/them to increase involvement?

67a2. What is/are the age/ages of the person(s) diagnosed as having a disability? RESPONSE

Would like to get out more but have limited mobility Work/donating time

FREQUENCY

FREQUENCY

PERCENT

Specialized transportation or mobility device Social or recreational services or supports Job development, employment training, or coaching Financial planning or management

15

38.3%

13

34.1%

13

33.6%

12

30.3%

Personal Attendants

10

26.6%

9 7

22.2% 19.1%

2

6.4%

Academic Counseling or Tutoring Remove barriers to access safe travel on sidewalks & in crosswalks Don't Know

Multiple response question with 39 respondents offering 82 responses.

68. In general, how knowledgeable are you about local government issues and decisions?

FREQUENCY

PERCENT

90

58.3%

RESPONSE

FREQUENCY

PERCENT

59

38.2%

Very knowledgeable

112

15.8%

5

3.5%

Somewhat knowledgeable

455

63.7%

Not at all knowledgeable

146

20.5%

Total

713

100.0%

154

100.0%

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Appendices

Santa Cruz County Community Assessment Project, Year 17, 2011

69. In the last 12 months, have you done any of the following?

71. What do you think takes away from your quality of life?

FREQUENCY

PERCENT

FREQUENCY

PERCENT

309 236

71.2% 54.4%

Nothing takes away from quality of life Traffic

129

19.3%

105

15.7%

199

46.0%

Gangs/Crime

102

15.2%

Cost of living/Housing

96

14.4%

128

29.4%

Overcrowding/unplanned growth

60

9.0%

78

18.1%

33

5.0%

Other Political Action

19

4.4%

Lack of jobs/ employment opportunities Homelessness

32

4.7%

Joined a political advocacy group

18

4.2%

Local politics

28

4.2%

Vote

11

2.6%

Road conditions

18

2.7%

Multiple response question with 434 respondents offering 998 responses.

Weather

12

1.9%

70. Generally speaking, what contributes most to your quality of life in Santa Cruz County?

Government rules/ regulations

12

1.8%

Too liberal

10

1.5%

9

1.4%

9

1.4%

RESPONSE Signed a petition Met with, e-mailed, called or sent a letter to any local politician Attended a town meeting, public hearing or public affair Joined an on-line political advocacy group Joined a protest or demonstration

RESPONSE

FREQUENCY

PERCENT

Scenery/Geography/Climate

523

75.2%

Family/Friends/Friendly people

145

20.9%

Community/Low population/Slow pace Social climate

RESPONSE

Poor transportation options Lack of restaurants, shopping, social activities, etc. Police

8

1.2%

Drugs

8

1.1%

Immigrant/ illegal immigrants

7

1.0%

126

18.0%

101

14.4%

Racism/ discrimination

5

0.7%

Quiet/Peaceful

47

6.8%

Don't feel safe

5

0.8%

Variety of physical activity options

12 9

1.7% 1.3%

Not racially diverse enough

3

0.5%

Tourists

2

0.3%

UCSC/ college students

1

0.2%

Local restaurants, entertainment, activities, cultural events, shopping Cultural diversity

8

1.2%

Good food/ organic food

7

1.0%

Work opportunities

4

0.6%

Local university

2

0.2%

Location

1

0.1%

Schools

0

0.0%

26

3.8%

Other

Multiple response question with 696 respondents offering 1,011 responses.

High taxes Other

0.1% 11.7%

Multiple response question with 666 respondents offering 771 responses.

72. Which of the following age groups are you in? RESPONSE

FREQUENCY

PERCENT

18 years or less

8

1.2%

19 to 24 years

47

6.6%

25 to 34 years

92

12.9%

35 to 44 years

91

12.7%

45 to 54 years

116

16.1%

55 to 64 years

167

23.3%

65 to 74 years

97

13.5%

75 to 84 years

76

10.6%

85 years & over

23

3.2%

719

100.0%

Total

192

0 78

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Santa Cruz County Community Assessment Project, Year 17, 2011

Appendices

73. Which of the following best describes your racial or ethnic group? RESPONSE Caucasian Latino/Hispanic Multi-racial/multi-ethnic

76. What is your employment status? RESPONSE

FREQUENCY

PERCENT

Employed full-time

230

32.3%

FREQUENCY

PERCENT

511

71.8%

Employed part-time

74

10.4%

164

23.0%

Self-employed

85

11.9%

20

2.7%

Unemployed

75

10.5%

207

29.0%

Asian

9

1.3%

Retired

Native American

3

0.4%

Student

17

2.4%

Filipino

2

0.3%

Homemaker, parent or caregiver

25

3.6%

African American

1

0.2%

Total

713

100.0%

Pacific Islander

1

0.2%

712

100.0%

Total

74. Which income range best describes your family income for the year? RESPONSE

FREQUENCY

PERCENT

76a. If unemployed, what prevents you from finding employment? RESPONSE

FREQUENCY

PERCENT

Lack of available jobs

38

52.0%

Health problems/disability

20

27.2%

Less than $10,000 per year

53

8.0%

Lack of required education

10

14.4%

$10,000 - $14,999 per year

50

7.6%

Not looking

9

13.0%

8

11.1%

$15,000 - $24,999 per year

95

14.3%

Lack of specific job skills

$25,000 - $34,999 per year

79

12.0%

Childcare/being mother

6

7.9%

Transportation issues

5

6.9%

$35,000 - $49,999 per year

71

10.8%

$50,000 - $65,499 per year

65

9.9%

Age

4

5.4%

$65,500 - $74,999 per year

52

7.8%

Other

3

3.5%

$75,000 - $99,999

69

10.4%

$100,000 - $149,999

74

11.2%

$150,000 - $199,999

30

4.6%

$200,000 or more

22

3.3%

659

100.0%

Total

Multiple response question with 73 respondents offering 103 responses.

76b. If employed, where are you currently employed? RESPONSE In Santa Cruz County Outside of Santa Cruz County

75. How long have you lived in Santa Cruz County? RESPONSE

FREQUENCY

PERCENT

Under 1 year

12

1.7%

1 - 2 years

19

2.7%

3 - 5 years

45

6.2%

Both in & out of Santa Cruz County Total

FREQUENCY

PERCENT

266

69.3%

75 43

19.5% 11.1%

383

100.0%

77. What is your gender? RESPONSE

FREQUENCY

PERCENT

357

49.4%

6 - 10 years

81

11.3%

Male

11 - 15 years

90

12.5%

Female

365

50.6%

Total

722

100.0%

16 - 20 years

66

9.2%

Over 20 years

406

56.4%

Total

720

100.0%

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APPENDIX IV: PAST COMMUNITY HEROES 1996-2010 Year 16, 2010 Michael Paul, Santa Cruz Goodwill Industries Cynthia Wells, Santa Cruz Community Counseling Center Cork Cherk, WPENS Teacher Jeanne Carrier, WPENS Teacher Kim Woodland, Soquel PENS Teacher Nancy Samsel, Soquel PENS Teacher Dara Thronton, Santa Cruz PENS Teacher Wendy Wyckoff, Santa Cruz PENS Teacher Maggie Klepp, Santa Cruz PENS Teacher

Patty McFarland, Central California Alliance for Health Dave McNutt Paul Bellerjeau, Second Harvest Food Bank Willy Elliot‐McCrea, Second Harvest Food Bank Deborah Elston, Santa Cruz Neighbors Nancy Sherrod, Court Appointed Special Advocates (CASA) Javier G. Diaz, Community Restoration Project Bob Katz, Katz & Lapides Law Office Leola Lapides, Katz & Lapides Law Office

Leticia Mendoza, YWCA Watsonville Dr. Satish Chandra, Dominican Medical Foundation Richard Crowe, St. Francis Soup Kitchen Maria Rodriguez Castillo Carol McMillen Kris Beall, Watsonville Wetlands Watch Julie Barrett Heffington, Seymour Center at Long Marine Lab Berri Michel, Bicycle Trip Dick Wilson, Lifetime Achievement Award Winner

Dr. Larry deGhetaldi, Palo Alto Medical Foundation, Santa Cruz Division Pola Espinoza, Children’s Education Community Leader Kathy Fahl, Make Your Wishes Known Community Education Initiative Families Together Staff Jeanne Wakatsuki Houston, Author & Public Speaker (Lifetime Achievement Award Winner) Roberta McPherson, San Lorenzo Valley Equity Committee Dr. Nanette Mickiewicz, Dominican Hospital

Maggie Muir, Sutter Maternity & Surgery Center Michelle LaBerge, Volunteer Attorney Coach, Mock Trial School Competition Steve LaBerge, Volunteer Attorney Coach, Mock Trial School Competition Linda Proudfoot, Make Your Wishes Known Community Education Initiative Raquel Ramirez Ruiz, Diabetes Health Center Surfrider, Santa Cruz Chapter

Bernie Klum, MD, Watsonville Community Hospital Emergency Department Kristi Locatelli, Animal Evacuation Team, SCC Horsemen’s Association Sandy Lydon Salem Magariam, MD, Dominican Pediatric Clinic Larry Markey Anthony Musielewicz, MD, Dominican Emergency Department Carmen Perez

Micah Posner, People Power Pablo Reguerin, Educational Partnership Center Ginny Solari Mazry, Hospice of Santa Cruz County Volunteer Rachel Spencer Todd Stosuy, Animal Evacuation Team, SCC Animal Services Authority Mary Sullivan‐White, Animal Evacuation Team, SCC Horsemen’s Association Michele Violich, MD, Watsonville Health Center

Year 15, 2009 Bay Federal Credit Union Preston “Boom” Boomer, Chemistry & Physics Teacher, San Lorenzo Valley High School Sherry Lee Bryan, Ecology Action Terry Corwin, Santa Cruz County Land Trust Carolyn Coleman, Santa Cruz Community Counseling Center Jody Cramer, Assisted Living Project Caroline Currie, Court Appointed Special Advocate (CASA) Volunteer Crystal Dunniway, Assisted Living Project

Year 14, 2008 Veronica Camberos Henry Carter Dana Cox, RN Peggy Downes Baskin First 5 SEEDS Quality Coaches Curt Gabrielson, Watsonville Community Science Workshop Dr. Gary Griggs, Ph.D. Lyn Hood, Animal Evacuation Team, SCC Equine Evacuation Unit Hospice of Santa Cruz County

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Appendices

Year 13, 2007 Mary Boyd David Brown, Coastal Community Preschool Meg Campbell, COPA Leader Michael Chavez Ginny Clark, Hospice Caring Project/ Friends of Hospice Kim Clary, The Core Cleaner Beaches Coalition Yvette Cook, Amesti Elementary School Christina Cuevas, Program Officer, Community Foundation of Santa Cruz County Bob Culbertson, Watsonville Wetlands Watch

Doriz Downs, Healthy Start Program of PVUSD Georgette Dufresne, Women’s Crisis Support‐ Defensa de Mujeres Jennifer Hastings, Medical Director, Planned Parenthood Mar Monte/ Westside Health Maria Carmen Hernandez, Healthy Start Program of PVUSD Rama Khalsa, Ph.D., Director of the Santa Cruz County Health Services Agency Katie LeBaron, Santa Cruz County Health Services Agency Ruth Leon, Healthy Start Program of PVUSD Robert Montague, Loaves and Fishes

Manuel Osorio, Cabrillo College Rock Pfotenhauer, Dean of Career Education and Economic Development at Cabrillo College Cece Pinheiro, Special Parents Information Network Stuart Rosenstein, Queer Youth Task Force of Santa Cruz County Santa Cruz Neighbors Jorge Savala, Healthy Start Program of PVUSD David True, Community Action Board UC Santa Cruz Transportation and Parking Services Department (TAPS)

Nancy Gimmons, Watsonville Farmer’s Market Jim Howes, Santa Cruz Police Department Public Services Department Suzanne Koebler Jennifer Laskin, Teacher at Renaissance High School Judy Leguillon, Coastal Community Preschool Paul McGrath Lee Mercer, Second Harvest Food Bank Rob Mullens, Coastal Community Preschool Jim Naragon, Families in Transition Nell Newman, Newman’s Organics Terri Noto, Santa Cruz Family & Children’s Services Charles Paulden, Community Volunteer

Elise Perlin, Santa Cruz Family & Children’s Services Bob Rittenhouse, Community Volunteer Eddie Rittenhouse, Community Volunteer Linda Robinson, Ombudsman Program Francisco Rodriguez, Pajaro Valley Unified School District Robert Rodriquez Marcia Soler, Coastal Community Preschool Chris Tracy, Santa Cruz Family & Children’s Services Victoria Williams, Santa Cruz Family & Children’s Services Mardi Wormhoudt

Year 12, 2006 Sybil Anderson‐Adams, Santa Cruz Family & Children’s Services Carmelita Austin‐Schreher, ABC Health Group Deborah Blumberg, Community Volunteer Roberta Bristol, Community Volunteer Maria Callejas, Coastal Community Preschool Karina Cervantez, Community Action Board Linda Clevenger Jimmy Cook, Santa Cruz Family & Children’s Services Gail Cosby, Coastal Community Preschool Roberta DePiana, Coastal Community Preschool Patrick J. Fitz, Community Volunteer Veronica Foos, Santa Cruz Family & Children’s Services

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Santa Cruz County Community Assessment Project, Year 17, 2011

Year 11, 2005 Foster Anderson, Shared Adventures Austin Armstrong, Community Volunteer Brenda Armstrong, Santa Cruz County Health Services Agency Dave Bartlett, Court Appointed Special Advocates (CASA) Kay Bartlett, Court Appointed Special Advocates (CASA) Catherine Cooper, UCSC Department of Psychology Tamara Doan, Coastal Watershed Council Lisa Dobbins, Action Pajaro Valley

Elizabeth Dominguez, Cabrillo College Juan Gomez, Reclaiming Futures and Friday Night Live Clay Kempf, Regional Diabetes Collaborative Lynda Lewit, Santa Cruz County Health Services Agency Scott MacDonald, Santa Cruz County Probation Department Leslyn McCallum, Train of Consciousness Ryan McNamara, Team Member with Quest4aCure

Maria Cristina Negrete, Community Volunteer Matt O’Brien, Team Member with Quest4aCure Wells Shoemaker, M.D., Physicians’ Medical Group Judy Webster, Community Volunteer Tom Webster, Community Volunteer Carol Whitehill, Watsonville Wetlands Watch Danielle Winkler, Team Member with Quest4aCure Joya Winwood, Mothersong

Selby Drake, Suicide Prevention Center Volunteers Ecology Action Marcia “Duffy” Grant, Community Volunteer Anita Ibarra, Community Action Board Gail Levine, Branciforte Elementary Elnora Lewis, Community Volunteer

Jaime Molina, County Mental Health Services Phil Reader, Community Volunteer Ride a Wave and Balance 4 Kids Jerri Ross, Santa Cruz County Health Care Outreach Coalition Patricia Schroeder, Student Health Services Judy Williams, Community Volunteer

Dean Lundholm, Pleasant Acres Tenant Association Marcia Meyer, Childcare Ventures Omega Nu Yolanda Perez‐Logan, Probation Department Amy Pine, Survivors Healing Center R.E.A.L. Randy Repass, West Marine

Joseph Rivers, Dragonslayers Ann Ruper, Volunteer Book Buddy Theresa Thomae, Small Business Development Center Phyllis and Dick Wasserstrom, Community Volunteers George Wolfe, Community Volunteer

Jena Collier, Health Families Daniel Dodge, Community Activist Heather Hite Deutron Kebebew, UCSC Marq Lipton, Seaside Company Ellen Moir, New Teacher Center Jorge Sanchez, Si Se Puede

Paul Tutwiler, Volunteer Jim Van Houten, Community Volunteer Linda Wilshusen, Live Oak Neighborhood Organization Martina Zamilpa, Catholic Charities

Year 10, 2004 Luis Alejo, CRLA/Watsonville Schools Piet Canin, Bike to Work Program Cathy Cavanaugh, Community Bridges WIC Program Karen Christensen, Santa Cruz County Resource Conservation District Jinny Corneliussen, Jack Farr, and Theresa Kramer, Alzheimer’s Association of Santa Cruz Volunteers Melissa Cowles, Community Volunteer

Year 9, 2003 Dan Cope, Special Education Local Planning Area Don Eggleston, New School Jill Gallo, Community Volunteer Mary Hammer, Community Volunteer Mas Hashimoto, Japanese American Citizens League Roland and Violetta Law, Community Volunteers

Year 8, 2002 Mary Balzer, SPIN Ruth Barker, We Care Program David Beaudry, Community Builder Michael Bethke, Community Volunteer Toni Campbell Angie Christmann, Land Trust of Santa Cruz County 196

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Appendices

Year 7, 2001 Jane Barr, Mid Peninsula Housing Jess Brown, Santa Cruz County Farm Bureau Virginia Butz Alie Carey, Y.E.S. School Destiny Castillo, Y.E.S. School Amy Christey, Santa Cruz County Sheriff’s Department Aurelie Clivas, San Lorenzo Valley Healthy Start

Diane Cooley, Community Volunteer Jonathan Cornejo, Head Start Blanca Corrales LaRue Foster, Ombudsman Scott Kennedy, Santa Cruz City Council Ken Meshke Carrol Moran, UCSC Education Partner CTR Chrissie Morrison, Y.E.S. School

Theresa Ontiveros, Planned Parenthood Sally Smith, Surfrider Foundation Barbara Sprenger, San Lorenzo Valley Teen Board Jonas Stanley, San Lorenzo Valley Healthy Start Lillian Westerman, Santa Cruz County Office of Education Mike Wilker, CCIC Lutheran Church

Pam Elders, Head Start Aranda Guillermo, c/o Don Eggleston Francisco Jimenez, Student/Magic Apple Janice Jimenez, Student/Magic Apple Rama Khalsa, Health Services Agency Bryan Loehr, Redwood Elementary Vickie Morales, Santa Cruz County Probation Department

Bob Munsey, Crow’s Nest Dee O’Brian, Walnut Avenue Women’s Center Dennis Osmer, Energy Services Laura Segura‐Gallardo, Watsonville Parks and Recreation Larry Tierney, Park Maintenance Siri Vaeth, Big Brothers/Big Sisters

Girl Scouts of the Monterey Bay Volunteers John Janzen, Silicon Systems Majel Jordan, Elderday Irvin Lindsey, Outdoor Science Experience Mary Jo May Jack O’Neill, O’Neill Sea Odyssey

Jane Scherich Michael Schmidt, Santa Cruz Chamber Tim Siemsen Erica Terence Arcadio Viveros, Salud Para La Gente Elisabeth Vogel, Mercy Charities Housing

Maria Roman, Community for Violence Reduction Manny Solano, Watsonville Police Department Triangle Speakers Bill Watt, Families in Transition

Sue Wilson, Grandma Sue’s Bruce Woolpert, Granite Rock

Year 6, 2000 Jay Balzar, Dientes Steve Beedle, Santa Cruz Tech Alliance Kathy Bernard, Pajaro Valley Housing Corporation Janet Boss, Boys and Girls Club of Santa Cruz County Noah Brown, Youth Services Judy Cox, Santa Cruz County Probation Department

Year 5,1999 Steve Belcher, Santa Cruz Chief of Police Pat Clark, NAACP Karen Delaney, Volunteer Center Pam Falke Lisa Fraser, Principal Aptos Junior High

Year 4,1998 Patricia Arana, ALTO Edison Jensen, Attorney Susan Olsen, El Pajaro Community Development Linda Perez, Pajaro Valley Prevention and Student Assistance

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Appendices

Santa Cruz County Community Assessment Project, Year 17, 2011

Year 3, 1997 Ciel Benedetto, Santa Cruz Women’s Health Center Dana Blumrosen, Street Youth Program Kimberly Carter, Above the Line Sharon Kinsey, Volunteer

Erik Larsen, Resource Center for Nonviolence Norm Lezin, Delta School Mark Ligon, Every Fifteen Minutes Paula Mahoney, Every Fifteen Minutes Maria Martinez, Head Start Volunteer

Bob McKinley, Every Fifteen Minutes Michael Pruger, Every Fifteen Minutes Maggie Reynolds, Children’s Alliance Patty Sapone, Every Fifteen Minutes Ray Shurson, Every Fifteen Minutes

Alan McCay, SCCHO Terry Medina, Watsonville Police Chief Michael Molesky, El Comite/Esperanza Mónica Morales, Brown Berets Harvey Nickelson, Coast Commercial Bank

Juana Ortiz‐Gomez, El Comite/Esperanza Leonard Smith, Pros for Youth Marion Taylor, League of Women Voters Marisa Villalon‐Chapman, El Comite/Esperanz

Year 2, 1996 Paul Brindel, Community Action Board Judy Darnell, Volunteer Linda Fawcett, League of Women Voters Andrea Garcia, El Comite/Esperanza Fred Keeley, SCCHO Nancy Macy, Volunteer

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© 2011 Applied Survey Research


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