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2017 YEAR IN REVIEW

UNITED WAY OF LONG ISLAND

ANNUAL MEETING • DECEMBER 14, 2017


Table of Contents Media Highlights • Broadcast • Print/Online

In-Kind Advertising • Print • Radio

On Channel Media • • • •

Facebook Twitter Instagram Online Presence

Mission Highlights • Grants/Fundraising • Programs

Featured Stories • • • •

Mission United YouthBuild ALICE/Project Warmth DREAMS for Youth


Media Highlights • Broadcast • Print


Broadcast Highlights 2017

Throughout 2017, United Way of Long Island was seen and heard on a multitude of television and radio outlets. In February, United Way of Long Island and Nassau Inter-County Express (NICE Bus) launched “Everyone Rides NICE” – an initiative that provides low and moderate-income Nassau County families and individuals with emergency transportation assistance for bus fares. Broadcast coverage of this launch included News12 Long Island and WPIX. On February 22, United Way held Project Warmth Day events, beginning at the Freeport Recreation Center and concluding at The Rinx at Wyandanch Plaza – opening the doors for the general public to apply for emergency financial assistance in addition to holding a check presentation in coordination with National Grid Foundation. As a result of this day, 164 households were granted over $85,000 to help heat their homes. Broadcast coverage of this day included News12 Long Island, and WABC Radio in addition to an in-studio interview with Island Outlook on Connoisseur Media, as well as PSAs airing on Walk97.5, K98.3, 103.1 MAX FM and 94.3 The Shark.

In April, WLIW21’s Long Island Business Report aired a segment focused on organizations helping low-income residents on Long Island featuring Elizabeth Eberhardt, Vice President of Community Impact at United Way of Long Island who was joined by Laura Cassell, CEO of Catholic Charities, Diocese of Rockville Centre. The BeReadyLI Children’s Workshop has presented to 16,000 since the inception of the program. In July, in coordination with Hurricane Season, the Workshop was invited to the Great South Bay YMCA in Bay Shore to present to 120 of their summer campers. This special session earned broadcast coverage on News12 Long Island and Fios1. In September, recognized as National Preparedness Month, the Long Island Children’s Museum hosted a Workshop for 125 young children from Bayview Avenue School (Freeport), Harbor Child Care Center (Hempstead), and Community Academic Prep (Roosevelt). Representatives from PSEG Long Island and Health & Welfare Council of Long Island attended, resulting in broadcast coverage on Fios1.


VetsBuild Graduation and 40 Depot Road Ribbon Cutting Media & Broadcast Highlights On November 13, United Way of Long Island held a joint VetsBuild graduation ceremony and ribbon cutting event to celebrate being named the Grand Winner in Affordable Homes by the U.S. Department of Energy’s Housing Innovation Awards. At the graduation ceremony held at the Huntington Opportunity Resource Center, 15 VetsBuild students joined program supporters, dignitaries, board members and family members to receive their diplomas and commemorative coins. Immediately following, at 40 Depot Road, guests gathered to cut the ribbon and take tours of the award-winning home which was built in part, by VetsBuild students and will house veterans with special needs. Broadcast coverage of this event included WCBS-TV, WPIX, News12 Long Island, Fios1, and 1010WINS News Radio.

To view all print and broadcast coverage visit: www.unitedwayli.org/healthyhomes


LI BUSINESS

Melissa Coscia of Nesconset, program director of the Family Recovery Center of the Family Service League in Bay Shore, has been promoted to director of the league’s mental health and chemical dependency clinics. Dr. Allen Jeremias of Woodbury has been appointed director of interventional cardiology research and associate director of the cardiac catheterization lab at St. Francis Hospital, The Heart Center in Roslyn. He directed the cardiac catheterization lab and chest pain center at Stony Brook University Medical Center.

EDUCATION Tim McClellan of West Sayville, chief power plant operator in the William Floyd School District, has been appointed the district’s assistant plant facilities administrator.

Gino Veneroso of St. James has been hired as community director of sales at Sunrise of Dix Hills, a Sunrise Senior Living community. He was sales manager for the Hilton Long Island/Huntington in Melville.

BOARDS The United Way of Long Island in Deer Park has elected seven new members to its board of directors. Brandon Ray of Williston Park is regional director of external affairs at AT&T in Huntington. Humera Qazi of Dix Hills is managing director of KPMG property management in Melville. Jennifer Cona of Cold Spring Harbor is managing partner of Genser, Dubow, Genser & Cona in Melville. Lorraine Aycock of Jericho is a senior vice president at Bank of America in Melville. Nancy W. Larson of Kings Park is general manager at Tanger Outlets at the Arches in Deer Park. Shantey Hill of Amityville is assistant vice president and senior director of athletics and recreation at St. Joseph’s College in Patchogue. Victoria Schneps-Yunis of Roslyn Harbor is the founder of Schneps Communications in Bayside, Queens. — DIANE DANIELS

Robin Lufrano of Merrick has been appointed assistant superintendent for business services and technology in the Bellmore school district. She was acting assistant superintendent for business and business administrator in the East Williston school district.

Send submissions and color headshots to peopleonthemove@ newsday.com

From left, top, Ray, and Qazi; second row, Cona and Aycock; third row, Larson and Hill; fourth row, Schneps-Yunis.

READ MORE

See who else has a new position newsday.com/onthemove

NEW YORKERS APPLAUD REFUGEE HIRING BY IVAN PEREIRA

ivan.pereira@amny.com

A political battle is brewing in Starbucks locations across the country — and New Yorkers say they’re standing by their baristas. City customers said yesterday they applauded the coffeehouse chain’s announcement that it would hire 10,000 refugees after President Donald Trump signed a ban Friday on all refugees for 120 days and on citizens from seven majority-Muslim nations for 90 days. And New York customers said they’ll be ordering Frappuccinos from their local shop even more often to defy social media comments calling for a Starbucks boycott. “New York is such a powerful city. So many people have the dream about coming here, and when they succeed it sends a message,” said Emma Silverton, 19, a daily customer

from Brooklyn. Starbucks CEO Howard Schultz made the announcement Sunday night in a letter to his employees that heavily criticized Trump’s controversial moves. In addition to the plan to hire refugees over five years in its shops in 75 countries, Starbucks said it supported “Dreamers” — young people who were brought into the United States illegally and have grown up here — offered health care options to all of its employees and would “build bridges and not walls” with Mexico. “In the face of recent events around the world, let me assure you that we will stay true to our values and do everything we can possibly do to support and invest in every partner’s well-being while taking the actions that are squarely within our ability to control,” Schultz wrote. Several New York Star-

bucks employees declined to comment. Within minutes of Schultz’s announcement, angry Twitter and Facebook users began spreading the hashtag #boycottstarbucks in protest of the chain’s solidarity. By yesterday morning the tag was at the top of the trends on both social media outlets. Starbucks fans like West Sider Khalid Syed, 36, scoffed at the virtual protest, noting that there were many benefits to hiring refugees. The Indian immigrant, who spends time at Starbucks during breaks from his IT consultant job, said the refugees would help boost the economy and aid their families. “They wouldn’t depend on welfare, and they’d be out working instead of staying at home,” he said. “There’s nothing wrong with that.”

First of LI Corp. income up 13.6% BY DAVID REICH-HALE

david.reich-hale@newsday.com

The First of Long Island Corp. said its net income for the fourth quarter rose 13.6 percent to $7.5 million. The Glen Head-based bank also said growth in its residential mortgage business pushed its net income up 19 percent to $30.9 million for the full year. Residential mortgages

grew $213 million to $1.2 billion, said Michael N. Vittorio, president and CEO of First of Long Island, the parent company of First National Bank of Long Island. “About half of the mortgage business increase came from Manhattan,” Vittorio said yesterday. “We reacted to the demand there.” First National Bank has two branches in Manhattan. The bank has 47 branches

overall and plans to open a branch in East Islip next week. Vittorio said two more branches, including a second Brooklyn branch, will open by the end of 2017. First of Long Island closed 2016 with $3.5 billion in assets, a 12 percent yearover-year increase. The bank’s shares closed down 2.3 percent to $27.25. Its shares are up 41 percent in the last year.

NEWSDAY, TUESDAY, JANUARY 31, 2017

president.

James Britz of Sayville, vice president of the Long Island Housing Partnership in Hauppauge, has been promoted to executive vice

In the wake of the Trump travel ban, Starbucks said it will hire 10,000 refugees over five years.

newsday.com

NONPROFITS

YEONG-UNG YANG

HEALTH CARE

SENIOR HOUSING LI BUSINESS

LI People ON THE MOVE

A29


AMITYVILLE RECORD (NYC MARKET AREA)

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Wednesday, February 08, 2017 AMITYVILLE, NY 2,050 (1) Newspaper (W)

AB

Main Long Island United Way

Amityville_ resident joins United Way of LI board of directors United Way of Long Island recently elected Amityville resident Shan­ tey Hill to its board of di­ rectors. As assistant vice president and senior di­ rector of athletics and rec­ reation at St. Joseph's Col­ lege (SJC), she oversees the athletic departments on both the Long Island and Brooklyn campuses. Under her direction, a department policy and procedure · manual was developed as well as a stra-

Hill is no stranger to service and volunteer work on the national and local levels as she · currently serves as vice-chair of the NCAA management council and pre­ viously served as board vice president and chair of the Grants Review Committee for the Women's Fund of Long Island. In her hometown of Amityville, she teaches a new members orientation class at Holy Trinity Baptist Church. Hill is a published author with written works appearing in Nike Coach of the Year Clinic Football Manual and Athletic Management Magazine. She is also an experienced facilitator and speaker who has shared her expertise with the NCAA Career in Sports Forum, the College Athletic Trainers Society and the National Association for College Admission Counseling Fairs. Shantey Hill

tegic plan that will provide vision and direction for 34 varsity intercollegiate athletic programs boasting over 500 student-athletes, 95 staff members, a 24.8-acre state­ of-the-art outdoor athletic complex on Long Island and a 40,000-sq.-foot recreational facility that is LEED Gold Certified in Brooklyn. "I am inspire4 by the work that United Way of Long Island does on behalf of disadvantaged youth, and I see parallels between their programs and the work that I do to help young people grow to their full potential:' reflect­ ed Hill. "On a daily basis I see first hand the difference that role models can make, and I am honored tq serve on such a distinguished board of directors:' "Shantey is a visionary. She knows how tb connect to a wide range of people from supporters to young athletes, and this is a skill we always need on our board:' added Theresa A. Regnante, president and CEO of United Way of Long Island "f am confident that her talent and expe­ rience will help our organization reach unprecedented levels of success:' Prior to joining SJC, Hill spent more than a decade at LIU Post where she began as head athletic trainer and director of sports medicine and within four short years worked her way up to senior associate director of athlet­ ics and senior woman administrator. Hill was respon­ sible for all internal operations working closely with the director of athletics and various campus administrative offices to ensure the university's athletic department abided by NCAA and Conference office rules and regu­ lations. She also served as sport administrator for several of the Pioneer NCAA Division II National Champion­ ship teams. © 201 7 AMITYVILLE RECORD (NYC MARKET AREA) All Rights Reserved. Account: 2331O (3468) NY-20 For reprints or rights, please contact the publisher

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TIMES HUNTINGTON-NORTHPORT-EAST NORTHPORT

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Thursday,November 16, 2017 SETAUKET,NY 4,500 (1) Newspaper (W)

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Main Long Island United Way

TOWN

Veterans build homes to aid others in need By Sara-Megan WalSh sara@tbrnewspapers.com

Veterans who have served our country are proving in Huntington Station they can also learn the skills to help build a better local community. More than 20 veterans received their certification i n c onstruction a t t he H untington Opportunity Resource Center Nov. 13 after successfully passing through VetsBuild, a program offered by the nonprofit U nited W ay of Long Island, that provides job training in green construction, facility maintenance and technology for veterans and their families. “VetsBuild is not just about teaching home building skills and construction skills, it’s about building your lives,” said Craig Fligstein, vice president of community impact for United Way of LI. “It has accelerated positive changes in your life and allowed you to take a new turn in your career.” Huntington Station resident Jerome Robinson, a 2017 VetsBuild graduate, said he served 11 years in the U.S. Army and as an officer in U.S. Army Reserves. “We have served our country in different ways, but we are all looking for a way to move forward and find a new and exciting career path for ourselves,” Robinson said. “Personally, VetsBuild has opened up a number of doors.” Robinson, 52, said he was previously employed doing overnight custodial work

find a career,” Robinson said. VetsBuild will offer two to three training sessions a year for veterans depending on demand, according to Rick Wertheim, the senior vice president of housing and green initiatives for the United Way of LI. Those enrolled take daily classes in basic construction techniques and earn their Occupational Safety and Health Administration 10-hour certification. Students t hen have t he opportunity to train in specialized disciplines of the trade, from electrical to gas work, based on their interests, Wertheim said. Robinson said he will be moving forward with GasPro, to gain skills in gas appliance installation and repairs. Others in his class will become electrical apprentices and at least one will be going back to college for an associates degree in renewable energy.

The skills the veterans have learned are used to build energy-smart homes throughout Long Island, including some for other veterans in need. The United Way of LI debuted the most recently completed VetsBuild home at 40 Depot Road in Huntington Station. It was specially commissioned by United Veterans Beacon house to become a residence for five veterans with special needs. The more than 3,500-square-foot house was named the 2017 Grand Winner for Innovation in Affordable Homes by the U.S. Department of Energy as part of its Housing Innovation Awards. The Depot Road home earned the recognition by being a “zero energy ready home” because it incorporates specialized innovative green features. These features render the projected annual energy cost at a netgain of $200 per year due to its capability to sell off excess energy produced by its photovoltaic solar panels. Other green technology featured in the home includes a solar thermal water heating system, internet-controlled heating and air conditioning, and 100 percent LED lighting.

for Stony Brook University and struggled to make ends meet after being laid off in September. He learned about the free sixweek construction program through United Veterans Beacon House, a nonprofit organization that provides temporary and permanent residences for U.S. Military veterans in Nassau and Suffolk counties, and started classes Oct. 2. “I knew it was a chance to make myself more marketable to potential employers and

Photo by Sara-Megan Walsh

huntington Station veteran Jerome robinson, ninth from left, stands with the 2017 VetsBuild graduating class at the huntington Opportunity resource Center nov. 13. © 2017 TIMES HUNTINGTON-NORTHPORT-EAST NORTHPORT All Rights Reserved.


Also ran in: New Hyde Park Herald Courier


BUSINESS

LONG ISLAND PRESS

DECEMBER 2017 • LONGISLANDPRESS.COM

33

Bridging the gap

How United Way of Long Island helps fulfill unmet need

By TIMOTHY BOLGER

Reducing poverty in low-income neighborhoods. Offering housing opportunities for people with AIDS. Helping those struggling to make ends meet pay their home heating bill. Building homes for the homeless. Scholarships galore. These are just some of the many health, education and anti-poverty projects underway at the United Way of Long Island, the local chapter of the 130-year-old global nonprofit that’s forged more than 100 partnerships with the goal of increasing impact and

reducing costs. They aim to help entire communities at a time, but they don’t just help “those people.” “The fact of the matter is ‘those people’ are us,” says Theresa Regnante, president and CEO of the United Way of Long Island. “And everybody needs to be treated with the same level of respect.” In nearly a decade of running the group, Regnante has seen requests for assistance come from residents across LI — often those that don’t make enough to survive, but make too much to qualify for govern-

ment assistance. Among their top initiatives of late is helping veterans. Last month, the group held a grand opening for “the house that vets built” in Huntington Station, their third such venture on LI. Veterans who moved into the house won’t have to worry about the electric bill since it’s a zero-energy home — a house so energy efficient it won the group its third consecutive award from the U.S. Department of Energy. “Anybody who goes out and fights for the homeland should have a

house to come home to,” Regnante says, adding that it’s “not sustainable to move them into a house with a big LIPA bill.” But the biggest need on the Island isn’t something that can be calculated as easily as a poverty rate or donation check. “There has got to be more people that have compassion,” Regnante says. “The biggest need is really having more people to have compassion. If you’re lucky enough to walk through life being able to give back, you should. Eighty percent of humanity is not that way.”


FREEPORT LEADER

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Thursday, March 09, 2017 FREEPORT, NY 997 (1) Newspaper (W) 10 Main Theresa A. Regnante

Project Warmth Day helps Long Islanders at risk of losing heat National Grid Foundation Contributes $110,000 to Keep Long Islanders Wann This Winter United Way of Long Island and its part­ ner agencies hosted Project Warmth Day events in Freeport and Wyandanch, cover­ ing both counties across Long Island, grant­ ing over $85,000 to 164 households on this awareness day to help pay their home heat­ ing bills. As Long Island's only non-governmental, Island-wide emergency heating fund, Project Warmth is available all winter as a safety net for individuals and families who are_facing energy insecurity and are unable to pay their heating bill, many of whom have already exhausted all other options for assis­ tance by this point in the season. At the outreach session held at the Free­ port Recreation Center, Robert Keller, presi­ dent of the National Grid Foundation, pre­ sented Project Warmth with a gift of $110,000 to continue their support of the program. ''.Although the temperature outside is consid­ ered higher than average, think about sitting in your home if the thermostat reads 49 degrees and having to go to sleep and eat in your winter coat," Keller said. "That is no way for someone to live. National Grid Foun­ dation is proud to give this gift to United Way of Long Island." Theresa Regnante, president and CEO of United Way of Long Island, added, "There are thousands of people who work hard to provide for their family but still s1ruggle to keep up with their bills. Living in a home without heat is dangerous, especially for the elderly and young children. We are grateful to National Grid Foundation, along with all of our supporters, for their constant generosity in helping ensure that Long Islanders are stay­ ing safe and warm during this winter season." Community outreach continued into Project Warmth Night at The Rinx at Wyan­ danch Plaza, where lines of applicants quickly formed. Families gathetecf fu go ice skating, complete arts and crafts projects and learn about science and technology activities, with the fees generously covered

© 201 7 FREEPORT LEADER All Rights Reserved.

by the Wyandanch Plaza Association. Those helped by Project Warmth include Daryl Lewis, a single father and U.S. Army veteran who is living on a fixed income after he was injured at work. "I need to keep my house warm for my daughter's sake," said Lewis. "There have been times when I had to wait a few days before filling up our oil tank . because I couldn't afford the cost When you can't find romn in your budget to pay your oil bill, it is not ju& a warm home you are missing; you don't have hot water either: You don't real­ ize trn effect an empty oil tank has on your daily life until you can't afford to fill it This grant from Project Warmth helped us immensely, and we are so grateful fur this kindnes.5." More than 267,000 households on Long Island are living just above the poverty line but are struggling to make ends meet This population known as ALICE, which stands for Asset Limited, Income Constrained, Employed, survives living paycheck to paycheck. These families and individuals work hard to make enough money to support their families, but often find themselves behind on bills, including their heating costs. This time of year is especially dangerous for children and seniors - their situation could quickly become perilous if they are forced to choose between heat and food or medication. Since its inception, Project Warmth has pro­ vided more than $10 million in emergency fund­ing to more than 94,CKXl children and adults. To support Project Warmth, please make a contri­bution on United Way of Long Island's website at www.unitedwayli.org/projectwarmth. Project Warmth is available during the winter months, generally opening in Decem­ber, and remains open until the funds are fully allocated. For assistance from Project Warmth, contact United Way of Long Island's 2-1-1 service by dialing 2-1-1, calling toll-free at (888) 774-7633, or visiting their website at www.211longis1and.org.

Courtesy United Wilf of Long Island

NATIONAL GRID FOUNDATION presented United WfJ/ of Long Island with a $110,000 gift sup­ porting Project Warmth. From left were Devera Lynn, vice president of marketing and resource development, United Wey of Long Island; Jacob Dixon, president, Choice For All; Robert Keller, president, National Grid Foundation; Robert Kennedy, mayor, Village of Freeport:; Craig Rigstein, vice president, prowam/�nt development; Daryl Lewis, Project Warmth want recipient; Sandra Mahoney, vice president of community impact, United Wey of Long Island. Account: 2331 0 (3493) NY-229 For reprints or rights, please contact the publisher


BEACON

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Thursday, September 21, 2017 BABYLON.NY 4,125 (1) Newspaper (W) 5 Main Long Island United Way

West Babylon woman is running to help veterans Christine Tamney of West Babylon promised herself that she would run her first marathon be­ fore turning 39. Now, at the age of 51, she pre­ pares to run one of the world's premier marathons for a third time. She looks forward to finally putting her train ing to good use as a member of Team Mission United Nov. 5 during the New York City Mara­ thon. Christine, whose husband is a veteran, was touched by Mission United's goal. "It's a fabulous initiative and a fabulous cause;' she said. "Veter­ ans who are exiting [service] - after everything they've been through - deserve all the help and support they can get." Team Mission United runners will be running for the 100,000 veterans and military families in Nassau and Suffolk counties. Tamney notes running with Team Mission United gives her the chance to make a difference in the lives of those she cares about. Participants have set a goal of raising $35,000 for United Way of Long Island's veterans programs, and need support. Tamney's husband served in Desert Shield and Desert Storm, and was a member of the U.S Army for eight years. T hough the two weren't mar­ ried during his service, they were good friends since high school. Now, Christine's hus­ band works as a Catholic schoolteacher and cheers her on as she prepares to run for a cause close to their hearts. Christine is vice president of Flushing Bank and she became involved with Team Mission United when Chair of United Way of Long Island's Board of Directors, and Flushing Bank Senior Executive VP and COO Maria Grasso shared that the team was looking for members. "Knowing that Christine is an experienced runner put her at the top of the list for a spot on Team Mission United, and her personal connection to the cause made her the perfect pick;' said Grasso. "All

of Flushing Bank looks forward to cheering her on in November as she runs for her husband, and ev­ ery veteran on Long Island who is in need of support:' As she gets ready to run for Team Mission United, Christine intends to leave nothing on the table. She devotes much time and effort to preparing for the big day, all the while, her husband continues to be her biggest supporter. To learn more about Team Mis­ sion United, visit http://www.unitedwayli.org/ real_life_stories_team_mission_united.

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Michael Bingold to ron New York City Marathon to support veterans


/SLIP BULLETIN

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Thursday, September 28, 2017 BAY SHORE, NY 3,200 (1) Newspaper (W)

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Main Team M ission United

Marital mission

Also ran in Suffolk County News

Local couple chosen to run for charity Compiled by RICK CHALIFOUX SAYVILLE-A local couple has been selected as two of 12 participants representing United Way of Long ls­land at the upcoming 47th annual 2017 TCS New York City Marathon on Nov. s. As members of "Team Mjssjon �," Sayville residents Ryan and Kayla Stanton are currently training to tackle the difficult 26.2-mile race in support of Long Island's 100,000 veterans and military families. Mission United focuses on supporting veterans ser­ vices in a variety of areas, including employment readi­ness/training, emergency financial aid/assistance, case management support, health, legal assistance, educa­tion, and housing support. Since Sept. 11, 2001, nearly 5,000 individuals have entered the program. The New York City Marathon is an annual event that courses through the five boroughs of New York City. It is the signature event of the New York Road Runners (NYRR) and the largest marathon in the world. Since its first race in 1970 with only 127 participants and 55 finishers running four laps around Central Park, over 1,100,000 people have completed the race. This year, participants have set a fundraising goal of $35,000 for United Way of Li's veteran programs. Prior to meeting Kayla - an avid runner - Ryan sim­ ply endured the activity of running as part of his Cross­ Fit training, which he joined as part of his passion for weight lifting. However, when he and Kayla began dating, running became a necessity in order to simply spend a day with her. Once they began saving money for their wedding, he gave up CrossFit to focus racing in triathlons instead. "Little did I know triathlons were more expensive than CrossFit!" said Ryan. "But during the process, I fell in love with running and haven't looked back since." In May of 2 017, Ryan finished his fist Iron­man 70.3 in St. Croix - a triathlon that culminated in a halfmarathon this past May. The NYC Marathon will mark his first-ever full marathon. Together with his wife on Team Mission United, he felt that this would be the perfect opportunity to take on the challenge. "Mission United is an extremely noble cause one that is absolutely worthy of support from the community," said Ryan, whose grandfather graduated from the U.S. Naval Academy in Annapolis, Md. "Long Island has one of the largest veteran communities in the nation. I'm supporting my neighbors and folks across Long Island who need these services." Ryan is also running as an advocate of the Long Island Federation of Labor.

"I am so appreciative and honoed to run not only on behalf of Mission United, but alsoon behalf of the labor movement," he said. "This would not be possible with­ out [Long Island labor leaders] John Durso and Roger Clayman opening the door to this opportunity. I just happen to be willing to walk through it." "I work closely with Ryan, and speak with him frequently about the races he completes with his wife," said Durso, president of Local 338 RWDSU/UFCW and the Long Island Federation of Labor, AFL-CIO and Unit­ ed Way of Long Island board member. "Ryan has not only shown an immense dedication to running, but an understanding of the struggles veterans face when they return home. I have complete confidence that he is the perfect person to represent our organization, and vet­ erans, come race day. "Kayla and Ryan are the perfect addition for � Mjssjon Unjted." added Durso. "Sponsoring this power couple as they take on this challenge is a thrill, especial­ly since their efforts benefit the veteran population that so rightfully deserves our full support." For Kayla, running has been a prominent part of her life for many years. She got her initial start in high school, but was sidelined indefinitely after a heavy car crash towards the end of her senior year. At the time, she was unsure if she would ever be able to race again. However, her dedication and love for the sport car-ried her forward on the path to recovery. In 2006, during a time when most of her peers were occupied with prepar­ing for prom and gradua­tion, Kayla spent four weeks in the hospital and several more months in rehabilita­tion programs following her accident. Over the next five years, her enduring injuries prevented her from many basic forms of physical ac­tivity, particularly running. Eventually, she under­went surgery on her back in 2011 and once again com­menced a period of reha­bilitation. Despite having to start from the ground up, Kayla was committed to her longstanding goal of running once again. She ul­ timately prevailed, and has run three marathons and many half-marathons in the years since. Together with Ryan, running stands as a cornerstone of their relationship - a consistent presence since their early days together. Due to their shared love of the sport, they each serve as each other's biggest fans.

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/SLIP BULLETIN

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Thursday, September 28, 2017 BAY SHORE, NY 3,200 (1) Newspaper (W)

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Main Team M ission United

"I love his passion and enthusiasm, even when he's just watching me run," said Kayla. "And now that he's into triathlons, I get so excited for him. We keep each other's passions going." In the past, Ryan has often found himself left behind by his wife, and he now has an opportunity to keep pace with her. "Kayla is so much faster than me," said Ryan. "Our times together are really the races. She runs her race, I run mine, and one day I'm going to catch her." As a nurse, Kayla particularly commiserates with the struggles of veterans returning back home after the tri­ als of combat, and she was instantly captivated by the idea of running in support of such a worthy cause. "Many of my patients are veterans and experience chronic pain stemming from injuries sustained when they were serving our country," she said. "I know how important it is to have love around you when you are going through ·a difficult time. We need to be there for our veterans in their time of need the same way that my loved ones were there for me after my accident ... Run­ning 26 miles in support of those that have dedicated their lives to our country is the least I can do." To learn more about United Way of Long Island and to support Team Mjssion United, visit www .unitedwayli. org/mjssjonunited.•

.A, Sayville residents Ryan and Kayla Stanton are currently training to tackle the upcoming NYC Marathon.

Photos provided by United Way

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September 7, 2017


June 21, 2017


May 11, 2017

United Way of Long Island Luncheon Honors Supporters BY L O N G I S L A N D P R E S S The United Way of Long Island’s Live United Celebration Luncheon at Crest Hollow Country Club in Woodbury on Thursday, May 10, 2017. (Photo by David Goldberg).

Hundreds of people attended the United Way of Long Island’s Live United Celebration Luncheon, where honors were bestowed upon supporters at Crest Hollow Country Club in Woodbury on Thursday. Hosted by Linda Armyn, senior vice president of corporate affairs for Bethpage Federal Credit Union, which sponsored the event, and Paul Fleishman, vice president of public affairs for Newsday, the luncheon celebrated the dedication and support of the organizations and individuals that share the nonprofit group’s vision. “By Living United as one community, we have the power to make dreams possible, and transform the lives of Long Islanders of all ages,” the United Way of Long Island said on its website. “From giving the youngest among us the tools to succeed in school, to helping our hardworking neighbors achieve financial independence, and encouraging everyone to lead a healthy lifestyle—we are energizing the future of our region for generations to come.” The event began with a networking hour and the opportunity to win top-tier items and experiences before a formal lunch and program highlighting the work of their honorees and partners. Honorees included Katherine Heaviside, president of Epoch 5 Public Relations, who was named the Anthony J. Stupore Memorial Live United Volunteer Champion, awarded to those with a “distinguished history of volunteer service and a profound commitment to fulfilling United Way of Long Island’s mission of advancing the common good.” PSEG Long Island was named Corporate Champion for “their ability to mobilize and enhance the community. They embody the action of give, advocate and volunteer.” Also honored was TWU 252, which received the Elena M. Perez Memorial Live United Pioneer Vision award for demonstrating “an innovative approach to philanthropy and long-term commitment to creating a better future for all Long Islanders.” The event was sponsored by Astoria Bank, Bank of America, Brooklyn Sports & Entertainment, Citi Community Development, Fortunoff, Island Outreach Foundation, Magnacare, NawrockiSmith, Newsday, Deloitte, IBEW Local 25, IBEW Local 1049, Leviton Manufacturing Co., Inc., Main Street Financial Group, Northwell Health, Safelite Autoglass, Santander Bank, Thomas & Liza GIlmartin, Thomas N. Gilmartin, President/TriState Capital Bank and Wells Fargo Bank, N.A.


From left to right: Elizabeth August, Howard Dickstein, Stephanie Verdone, Dillon Topal and Sara Pace, all of GEICO (Photo by David Goldberg)

From left to right: Humera Qazi and Caitlin Ziegler, both of KPMG LLC (Photo by David Goldberg).

From left to right: Kathleen Caputi, Epoch 5 Public Relations, Cathy DeAngelo, Jefferson’s Ferry and Lynn Bishop, Epoch 5 Public Relations (Photo by David Goldberg).


From left to right: Diane Traynor, YMCA of Long Island, Theresa Regnante, United Way of Long Island, Anne Brigis, YMCA of Lon g Island and Juan Vides, Tech ACS/Bethpage Federal Credit Union (Photo by David Goldberg).

From left to right: Howard Dickstein, GEICO, Eric Schonhoff, Enterprise and Todd Stockton, Enterprise (Photo by David Goldberg).

From left to right: Lauren Tschinckel, Deloitte, Rosemary Muscali, LIVE and Sandra Viola, Deloitte (Photo by David Goldberg)


. From left to right: Brian O’Sullivan, Jessica Larsen-Abate, Neal Galloway, Luis Mercado, TWU, Robert Itchcow and Tom Callogy of TWU Local 252 (Photo by David Goldberg).

From left to right: Cathy de Pasquale, Flushing Bank and Patricia Tiffany, Flushing Bank (Photo by David Goldberg).

From left to right: Dave Daly, Karen Kemp Smith and Jeff Weir of PSEG Long Island (Photo by David Goldberg).


From left to right: Mary Flaiban, TWU 252, Michael Riordan, Suffolk Transportation Service, Terry Hind, TWU 252 and Terry O’Halloran, Suffolk Transportation Service (Photo by David Goldberg).

From left to right: Kevin Harvey, IBEW Local 25, Victoria Schneps-Yunis, Schneps Communications, Dr. Kishore Kuncham, Freeport Public Schools and John Guadagno, IBEW Local 25 (Photo by David Goldberg).

From left to right: Nancy Leghart, Long Island Alzheimer’s Foundation, Tor Cohen, Long Island Alzheimer’s Foundation, Jenifer Cona, Esq., Genser Dubow Genser & Cona LLP and Melissa Negrin-Wiener, Esq., Genser Dubow Genser & Cona LLP (Photo by David Goldberg).


From left to right: Rosemary Olsen, Village of Hempstead Housing Authority, Ellen Redmond, IBEW, Third District and Cara Longworth, Empire State Development Corp. (Photo by David Goldberg).

From left to right: Anne Buda, Angels for Warriors, David Calone, Jove Equity Partners LLC and Rogerlyn Velez Esq., Angels for Warriors (Photo by David Goldberg)

From left to right: Epoch 5, Katherine Heaviside, Pat Edwards, Citi Community Development an d Merrill Zorn, Zorn’s of Bethpage (Photo by David Goldberg).


Also ran in:

Mineola American New Hyde Park Illustrated News Syosset-Jericho Tribune Farmingdale Observer


SOUTH SHORE RECORD (NYC MARKET AREA)

Date: Location: Circulation (OMA): Type (Frequency): Page: Section: Keyword:

Thursday, August 10, 2017 HEWLETT, NY 4,781 (1) Newspaper (W) 5 Main Theresa A. Regnante

Stuffing the buses with school supplies Collaboration helps children in need

provided "hundreds of thousands" of school supplies to students. The pro­ gram also partners with East End Bus Through Aug. 20, Burger Kings across Lines, Educational Bus Transportation, Long Island, including the one on Rocka­ Huntington Coach Corporation and Suf­ way Turnpike in Lawrence, are serving as folk Transportation Service Inc. for the the collection points for a Stuff-A-Bus cam­ buses that are "stuffed." paign spearheaded by the United Way of "The Long Island Nets are honored to Long Island that also partner with United Way involves the Long Island of Long Island to uplift Nets. our youth and give back to School supplies such as l\hildren represent the region we're proud to backpacks, binders, cray­ \lttie future of Long be a part of," Alton Byrd, ons, erasers, glue sticks, vice president of the Long lunch boxes, notebooks, Island, so it is critical Island Nets, said in the pencils, pens, and scissors same release. "The expan­ will be distributed to fami­ that we give them the sion of Stuff- A-Bus to lies in need. The campaign support they need Nassau County is an culminates with what offi­ example of how we can all cials are calling a "sort-a­ to be successful in play a role in growing our thon" at NYCB Live, home community." of the Nassau Veterans their early years of The United Way of Memorial Coliseum from education. Long Island is part of a 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Aug. 23. g l oba l n e t w o r k that "Children represent the stretches across 41 coun­ THERESA REGNANTE future of Long Island, so it tries and territories, is critical that we give President and CEO, including more than them the support they United Way of Long Island 1,200 local organizations need to be successful in in the U.S. their early years of educa­ A National Basketball tion," Theresa Regnante, president and League G League affiliate of the Brooklyn CEO of United Way of Long Island, said in Nets, the Long Island Nets played home a news release. "Working with the Long games in their inaugural season - 2016-'17 Island Nets allows us to expand our Stuff­ - at Barclays Center and practiced at HSS A-Bus program even further, reaching Training Center in Brooklyn. NYCB Live more young students and giving them the will be their permanent home beginning tools they need to thrive." this season. Through the past eight years, the To contribute to the Stuff-A-Bus pro­ United Way's Stuff-A-Bus program has gram, go to http://bitJy/2vssidT. By JEFFREY BESSEN

jbessen@liherald.com

WWf THE LONG ISLAND Nets and Burger King have joined forces to support the United Way of Long Island's Stuff-A-Bus campaign that collects school supplies for children in need.

Courtesy United

Page 1 of 2

© 201 7 SOUTH SHORE RECORD (NYC MARKET AREA) All Rights Reserved.

Account: 23310 (3604) NY-285 For reprints or rights, please contact the publisher


Also ran in:

Syosset-Jericho Tribune Port Washington News Plainview-Old Bethpage Herald Oyster Bay Enterprise-Pilot New Hyde Park Illustrated Mineola American Massapequa Observer Manhasset Press Levittown Tribune Hicksville News Great Neck Record Glen Cove Record Pilot Garden City Life Farmingdale Observer Rosyln News


BALDWIN HERALD

Date: Location: Circulation (OMA): Type (Frequency): Page: Section: Keyword:

Thursday, September 28, 2017 GARDEN CITY, NY 3,419 (1) Newspaper (W) 17 Main Long Island United Way

National Preparedness Month BeReadyLI Helps Long Islanders of All Ages Prepare for Emergencies

September is National Preparedness Month, and in the wake of the devasta­ tion left behind by Hurricanes Harvey and Irma, as well the approaching Hurri­ cane Jose, the importance of being ready before a disaster is gaining national atten­ tion Since its launch in 2016, BeReadyLl. org, a collaboration between United Way of Long Island, PSEG Foundation, PSEG Long Island and 2-1-1 Long Island, has worked to help Long Islanders prepare before, during and after disasters by encouraging families to take simple steps that help ensure their safety. In an effort to educate family mem­ bers of all ages, BeReadyLI expanded their reach with the launch of their Chil­ dren's Workshop, an interactive lesson for classrooms and assemblies offered to stu­ dents in preschool through second grade teaching them the basics of emergency preparedness in a fun and approachable way. In less than a year, the BeReadyLI Children's Workshop has helped more than 10,000 young children learn the importance of knowing their whole names, and the whole names of their caregivers, how to recognize who can help them in an emergency and what they should put in their emergency 'go packs'. Children are sent home with an activity booklet and flyer so that their caregivers can continue educating the entire family about the importance of preparedness. "It is crucial that Long Islanders across every generation are ready for emergencies of any size or severity -

from Superstorms like Sandy to a heat­ wave or blizzard," said Theresa A. Reg­ nante, President and CEO of United Way of Long Island. "BeReadyLl has reached thousands of families through the web­ site and the Children's Workshop, giving them all the tools they need to be ready and stay safe." "When teaching children about emer­ gencies, it is important that they under­ stand the severity of the situation with­ out being scared," said Dan Eichhorn, PSEG Long Island's incoming President and COO. "The BeReadyLI Children's Workshop uses videos developed through a PSEG Foundation and Sesame Work­ shop partnership that are effective in a comforting way. By using characters that students already love and trust, we have the ability to present lessons that reso­ nate with both the children and their families." Beginning September 19 through Sep­ tember 30, to further encourage families to prepare together, BeReadyLl is asking Long Islanders to post an image on the BeReadyLl Facebook page showing how they prepare with their families, friends or even pets in preparation of an emer­ gency, with an opportunity to win tickets to Sesame Street Live and a gift card. For more information on the Chil­ dren's Workshop, and how to request it at your school visit bereadyliorg/bereadyli­ childrens-workshop. To learn more on how you can prepare for an emergency, visit BeReadyLI.org or 211liorg.

Courtesy United way of Long Island

FROM LEFT, REBECCA Sanin, President and CEO of The Health &Welfare Council of Long Island, Suzanne LeBlanc, President of the Long Island Children's Museum, David Lyons, VP of Business Services at PSEG Long Island and Theresa A. Regnante, President and CEO of UnitedWay of Long Island join 1st graders from Bayview Avenue School in Freeport at a BeReadyU Children'sWorkshop at the Long Island Children's Museum, helping them learn how to be prepared for an emergency.

Page 1 of 2

© 2017 BALDWIN HERALD All Rights Reserved.

Account: 2331O (3646) NY-36

For reprints or rights, please contact the publisher


In-Kind Advertising • Print • Radio


United Way of Long Island received 12 Full Page advertisments pro bono from Newsday 2107 In-Kind Ad Space Contributions

Ad Date

Ad Page

Monday 2/27 pg A36

$14,250

Monday 3/20 pg BC Explore

$14,250

April (Volunterism)

Monday 4/10 pg B5

$14,250

May (Mission United)

Tuesday 5/16 pg A9

$14,250

June (YouthBuild)

Monday June 19 pg B5

$14,250

July (Scholarships)

Monday, July 24 pg BC Explore

$14,250

August (Stuff A Bus)

Tuesday August 16 pA23

$20,065

Sept. (BeReady LI)

Monday September 18 pg BC Explore

$14,250

Oct. (VetsBuild)

Monday October 16 pg A26

$14,250

Nov. (Veterans Day)

Friday November 10 pg A35

$ 20,065

Dec. (Project Warmth)

Monday December 11 pg B5

$ 14,250

TBD

$ TBD

February (Community Impact) March (Project Warmth)

Dec. (Long Island Impact Fund)

Ad Value Over $180,000 Weekly Readership: 989,000


A36

because of you...

Donte of Wyandanch with his family

Last year, United Way, along with our community partners, assisted 325,000 individuals...that’s 1 person out of 10 on Long Island. Together, we are transforming lives. To contribute, volunteer or for more information: www.unitedwayli.org

Visit 211LongIsland.org or call 2-1-1 or 888-774-7633 to be connected to health and human services and programs.

newsday.com NEWSDAY SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 2017

United Way of Long Island has been able to provide Donte with lifechanging opportunities, including education and hands-on career training that will ensure a brighter future for him and his family.


B20

newsday.com NEWSDAY MONDAY, MARCH 20, 2017

because of you...

Deaconess Annie of Freeport

Deaconess Annie, and over 1,800 other Long Islanders received emergency heating assistance this winter season through United Way of Long Island’s Project Warmth. United Way helps individuals and families better their lives through our network of over 100 partner agencies. When we work together, we can make a difference. To contribute, volunteer or for more information: www.unitedwayli.org

Visit 211LongIsland.org or call 2-1-1 or 888-774-7633 to be connected to Project Warmth and other health and human services and programs.


B5

because of you...

United Way of Long Island Volunteers

newsday.com NEWSDAY MONDAY, APRIL 10, 2017

United Way of Long Island and its partner agencies impact the lives of 325,000 of our neighbors with the support of dedicated volunteers. National Volunteer Week, April 23 – 29, is a time to recognize and thank all of you who donate your time throughout the year to better the lives of Long Islanders, and welcome those who want to join our efforts as volunteers. Together, we can build a strong community.

To contribute, volunteer or for more information: www.unitedwayli.org

Visit 211LongIsland.org or call 2-1-1 or 888-774-7633 to be connected to health and human services and programs.


A9

because of you...

U.S. Air Force Veteran Ed and his daughter Starlette

United Way of Long Island’s Mission United provides access to critical programs and services available to the over 100,000 veterans living in our communities.

newsday.com NEWSDAY TUESDAY, MAY 16, 2017

This includes assistance with education, career training, emergency financial assistance, and case management. As we recognize Armed Forces Day and Memorial Day this month, United Way of Long Island encourages everyone to show their appreciation for our active military members and veterans, who have selflessly served our country. We salute you.

To contribute, volunteer or for more information on supporting veterans: www.unitedwayli.org/missionunited Visit 211LongIsland.org or call 2-1-1 or 888-774-7633 to be connected to health and human services and programs.


newsday.com NEWSDAY MONDAY JUNE 19, 2017

B5


B20

Valley Stream South High School graduate and Princeton University Sophomore Kierra, with her sister Regina

because of you...

newsday.com NEWSDAY MONDAY, JULY 24, 2017

Kierra is thriving at Princeton University after receiving a scholarship* from United Way of Long Island. Before she graduated Valley Stream South High School, she experienced the loss of her parents. Kierra was able to persevere in her studies with determination and diligence and did not let this tragedy prevent her from accomplishing her dreams. Financial need stemming from life’s challenges should not stand in the way of achieving academic success. More than $1,000,000 in academic and enrichment scholarships have been awarded to students like Kierra who demonstrate a commitment to community service and the drive to achieve higher education. For more information on United Way scholarship programs or how to develop a scholarship program visit www.unitedwayli.org/education. Read Kierra’s story and see her video at www.unitedway.org/Kierra. * Created in memory of United Way of Long Island board member and Deloitte partner, The Anthony J. Stupore Memorial Scholarship Fund provides a pathway to success for students who have shown a passion for giving back to their community and demonstrating a commitment to excellence in academics.

To contribute, volunteer or for more information: www.unitedwayli.org

Visit 211LongIsland.org or call 2-1-1 or 888-774-7633 to be connected to health and human services and programs.


A23

because of you...

Loretta Park Elementary School students Brentwood, NY

For nearly a decade United Way of Long Island’s Stuff-A-Bus program has been able to help thousands of children across Long Island. This essential program provides kids with supplies, giving them the confidence they need to start the school year off right.

newsday.com NEWSDAY TUESDAY, AUGUST 16, 2017

Join us in filling the desks of students by dropping off new school supplies at United Way of Long Island,* or to find a drop-off location near you visit www.unitedwayli.org/StuffABus. To support the Stuff-A-Bus program contact Barbara at 631.940.3731 or visit www.unitedwayli.org/HelpStuffABus *United Way of Long Island, 819 Grand Boulevard, Deer Park. Drop-off hours are Monday - Friday, 9am-4pm.

To contribute, volunteer or for more information: www.unitedwayli.org

Visit 211LongIsland.org or call 2-1-1 or 888-774-7633 to be connected to health and human services and programs. Principal Honor Roll Partner: Baker Tilly Virchow Krause, LLP Honor Roll Partners: Suffolk Transportation Service, Inc. • East End Bus Lines • Educational Bus Transportation Inc. • Huntington Coach, LLC • Make It Count Foundation • Long Island Nets


B20

because of you...

Fifth Avenue Elementary School, Bay Shore

Thousands of children across Long Island have the knowledge they need to stay safe in an emergency after participating in the BeReadyLI Children’s Workshop. Following recent events, and as we observe National Preparedness Month, we are reminded of how important it is for every family member to be ready for possible disaster.

To learn more, or to request the BeReadyLI Children’s Workshop at your school or organization, visit bereadyli.org/bereadyli-childrens-workshop.

To contribute, volunteer or for more information: www.unitedwayli.org

Visit 211LongIsland.org or call 2-1-1 or 888-774-7633 to be connected to health and human services and programs.

S E P T E M B E R I S N AT I O N A L P R E P A R E D N E S S M O N T H v i s i t B e R e a d y L I . o r g

newsday.com NEWSDAY MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 18, 2017

BeReadyLI is a collaboration between PSEG Foundation, PSEG Long Island, United Way of Long Island and 2-1-1 Long Island. The Children’s Workshop helps the youngest students retain important preparedness information through the use of engaging videos and interactive activities. Children are sent home with a special ‘go pack’ so they can continue the lessons with their entire family.


A26

because of you...

VetsBuild graduate and SunPower by EmPower Solar employee, Englebert

P U RC H AS

EY

OU

R

H T-S

U.S. Army veteran Englebert is just one of the many Long Island veterans who have been provided the opportunity to train for a successful career in the green energyhealthy homes industry through United Way of Long Island’s VetsBuild.

newsday.com NEWSDAY MONDAY, OCTOBER 16, 2017

VetsBuild has been made possible in part by a grant from Prudential Insurance of America

To contribute, volunteer or for more information: www.unitedwayli.org

Visit 211LongIsland.org or call 2-1-1 or 888-774-7633 to be connected to resources for veterans or health and human services and programs.

For more information on the next VetsBuild semester visit www.unitedwayli.org/vetsbuild

TODAY

Show your support of local veterans by wearing a Mission United t-shirt. Your support benefits VetsBuild, as well as other United Way veteran partner agencies and programs. For more information visit www.unitedwayli.org/missionunitedtshirt.

IRT

After graduating, he quickly found himself with a new career as a Solar Installation professional and the means to support himself and his two young sons. Read Englebert’s story at www.unitedwayli.org/englebert.


B32

because of you...

U.S. Army veteran Jaime of Bay Shore and his family

newsday.com NEWSDAY FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 10, 2017

U.S. Army veteran, Jaime, is able to build a better life for his family with the help of United Way of Long Island’s Mission United. This initiative supports critical programs and services for the men and women who served our country in the armed forces. Together with our community partners, we are helping veterans rebuild their lives, creating a stronger future for themselves and Long Island. This Veterans Day, we proudly offer our sincere gratitude to Long Island’s heroes for their service and sacrifice. To contribute, volunteer or for more information: www.unitedwayli.org

Visit 211LongIsland.org or call 2-1-1 or 888-774-7633 to be connected to resources for veterans or other health and human service programs.


B5

because of you...

Daryl of Freeport

Daryl and his daughter, along with 1,100 other Long Island families, were able to stay safe and warm in their home after receiving emergency heating assistance last winter through United Way of Long Island’s Project Warmth.

Emergency Fuel Fund

Helping Long Islanders Afford Home Energy

Project Warmth opens December 4. For more information about the program visit www.unitedwayli.org/projectwarmth. Project Warmth has been made possible in part by a grant from National Grid Foundation.

To contribute, volunteer or for more information: www.unitedwayli.org

Visit 211LongIsland.org or call 2-1-1 or 888-774-7633 to be connected to a Project Warmth intake agency for emergency heating assistance.

newsday.com NEWSDAY MONDAY, DECEMBER 11, 2017

Together with our community partner agencies, Project Warmth provides a critical safety net for families having to make tough choices between heat and other essentials like food or medication. When we live as one community, we can make a difference.


because of you... United Way of Long Island and our community partner agencies are tackling the everyday issues and personal crises to give help and hope to our neighbors across the region. Year round, United Way’s Long Island Impact Fund supports critical programs and services that are helping families and individuals rebuild their lives. On behalf of the thousands of people you’ve positively impacted in 2017, thank you for your generous and continued support. Learn how the Long Island Impact Fund is helping our neighbors, read their success stories visit: www.unitedwayli.org/LIIF.

To contribute, volunteer or for more information: www.unitedwayli.org

Visit 211LongIsland.org or call 2-1-1 or 888-774-7633 to be connected to resources for health and human service programs. Pictured above, left to right: Donte & family of Wyandanch; Annie of Freeport; Long Island Youth Volunteers; Starlette & Ed of Hauppauge; Gabe of Copiague; Loretta Park Elementary School students, Brentwood; John of Mastic Beach; Fifth Avenue Elementary School students, Bay Shore; Englebert of Wyandanch; Kierra of Valley Stream; Jaime and family of Bay Shore and Daryl of Freeport.


Long Island Business News 2 Full Page Advertisments pro bono 2107 In-Kind Ad Space Contributions (VetsBuild) (Mission United)

Ad Value Over $2,350 Weekly Readership 18,750

Ad Date

Ad Page

October 27- November 2 pg 48

$1,175

December 1-7, 2017 pg 24

$ 1,175


48 | LONG ISLAND BUSINESS NEWS | October 27 -- November 2, 2017

because of you...

VetsBuild graduate and SunPower by EmPower Solar employee, Englebert

P U RC H AS

OU

R

IRT TODAY

After graduating, he quickly found himself with a new career as a Solar Installation professional and the means to support himself and his two young sons. Read Englebert’s story at www.unitedwayli.org/englebert.

EY

H T-S

U.S. Army veteran Englebert is just one of the many Long Island veterans who have been provided the opportunity to train for a successful career in the green energy-healthy homes industry through United Way of Long Island’s VetsBuild.

Show your support of local veterans by wearing a Mission United t-shirt. Your support benefits VetsBuild, as well as other United Way veteran partner agencies and programs. For more information visit www.unitedwayli.org/missionunitedtshirt. VetsBuild has been made possible in part by a grant from Prudential Insurance of America

To contribute, volunteer or for more information: www.unitedwayli.org

Visit 211LongIsland.org or call 2-1-1 or 888-774-7633 to be connected to resources for veterans or health and human services and programs.

For more information on the next VetsBuild semester visit www.unitedwayli.org/vetsbuild


24 | LONG ISLAND BUSINESS NEWS | December 1-7, 2017

because of you...

U.S. Army veteran Jaime of Bay Shore and his family

U.S. Army veteran, Jaime, is able to build a better life for his family with the help of United Way of Long Island’s Mission United. This initiative supports critical programs and services for the men and women who served our country in the armed forces. Together with our community partners, we are helping veterans rebuild their lives, creating a stronger future for themselves and Long Island. We proudly offer our sincere gratitude to Long Island’s heroes for their service and sacrifice. To contribute, volunteer or for more information: www.unitedwayli.org

Visit 211LongIsland.org or call 2-1-1 or 888-774-7633 to be connected to resources for veterans or other health and human service programs.


In-Kind Radio Advertising

United Way of Long Island received pro-bono advertising on stations owned by Connoisseur Media Long Island throughout 2017: Project Warmth - January, February, March Interview on Island Outlook 325 PSAs on WALK97.5, K-98.3, 103.1 MAX FM, 94.3 The Shark and WHLI 1100/1370

Islip Arts Council Concert in the Park – June, July 75 PSAs on WALK97.5, K-98.3, 103.1 MAX FM, 94.3 The Shark and WHLI 1100/1370

Paddle Battle – July

15 PSAs on WALK97.5, K-98.3, 103.1 MAX FM, 94.3 The Shark and WHLI 1100/1370

Year-round

Throughout the year, general PSAs about United Way and the mission ran on WALK97.5, K-98.3, 103.1 MAX FM, 94.3 The Shark and WHLI 1100/1370

Video PSA

Connoisseur’s Digital Team created a video PSA with Alana, a veteran helped through Mission United

Total Advertising Value: $80,950


On Channel Highlights • • • •

Facebook Twitter Instagram Online Presence


Facebook Highlights


Year-To-Date Page Likes


    

3,493 People Reached 1,373 Video Views 97 Likes 16 Shares 7 Comments

    

5,342 People Reached 47 Likes 14 Comments 13 Shares 352 Clicks on Post


   

1,634 People Reached 69 Likes 9 Shares 4 Comments

 713 People Reached  18 Likes  3 Shares


   

1,264 People Reached 450 Video Views 37 Likes 9 Comments

 945 People Reached  19 Likes  7 Shares


 1,180 People Reached  16 Likes  2 Shares

 1.196 People Reached  39 Likes, 2 Loves  3 Shares


 1,789 People Reached  79 Likes  19 Comments


Who’s Talking About Us?


Who’s Talking About Us?


Twitter Highlights


Oct 1 – Dec 4: 12,100 *truncated

July 1 – Sept 30: 33,000

Total Impressions: 84,900

April 1 – June 30: 15,100

Jan 1 – Mar 31: 24,700

Quarterly Impressions


Who’s Talking About Us?


Who’s Talking About Us?


Instagram Highlights


United Way’s Digital Presence


In addition to UnitedWayLI.org, United Way of Long Island manages the design and content of four distinct websites, constantly ensuring that information is up-to-date, and representing the organization in a clear and appealing way to the general public.


Mission Highlights • Grants/Fundraising • Programs


Grants/Fundraising


Grant Highlights United Way of Long Island was awarded 29 grants throughout the year that were $25,000 or more.

Prudential Insurance Company of America’s grant of $100,000 helps to fund VetsBuild – providing 50 veterans with training in green construction and information technology, allowing them to advance their careers and build a better life for themselves and their families.

PSEG Long Island’s $150,000 grant provides resources to educate the public on how to prepare for emergencies through BeReadyLI. In 2017, the BeReadyLI Children’s Workshop expanded to reach a total of 16,000 children since it’s inception.

National Grid Foundation provides $110,000 in support of Project Warmth, which helps Long Islanders facing heating emergencies due to inability to pay their bills stay warm during the frigid winter months.


LIVE UNITED 2017 Celebration Luncheon

United Way of Long Island raised over $675,000 at the annual LIVE UNITED Celebration Luncheon hosted by Linda Armyn, Senior Vice President

of

Corporate

Affairs at Bethpage Federal Credit

Union

and

Paul

Fleishman, Newsday’s Vice President of Public Affairs. Honorees: Katherine Heaviside, PSEG Long Island and TWU Local 252 Nassau & Suffolk County, NY

POWERING DREAMS TRANSFORMING LIVES


Bethpage Federal Credit Union AirShow

Memorial Day Weekend AirShow Together in just one weekend, United Way of Long Island along with Bethpage Federal Credit Union raised over $10,000 in support of Mission United, which offers assistance to local Long Island veterans. It was inspirational to meet so many people who care about our hometown heroes as much as we do. We are grateful to everyone who left the beach with t-shirt and backpack – showing their pride for our country and those who served.


Long Island Insurance Community Gala

The Long Island Insurance Company (LLIC) held its annual Gala on September 18th at Carlyle on the Green in Bethpage raising over $213,000 for United Way of Long Island and other deserving causes on Long Island. More than 375 LIIC members joined together for the cause, participating in raffles and bidding on high end live auction items in support of Long Islanders in need. The LIIC Gala annually honors industry and business leaders who have demonstrated a commitment to the community that has improved the quality of life for their neighbors. This year the LIIC was thrilled to honor longtime friend and supporter Peter N. Resnick, President at Interboro Insurance Company, NE Region Sales Director of UPC Insurance Company. The Long Island Insurance Community established the Camilla G. Belser Memorial Scholarship Fund through United Way of Long Island in memory of Cammy, and her commitment to education and the insurance industry. Astrid, who spoke at the Gala, is a Camila G. Belser recipient who has just graduated from Suffolk Community College with a degree in Nursing.


TWUTWU LocalBETS 252 FOR BetsVETS For Vets Casino Casino NightNight

For the third consecutive year, the Transport Workers Union (TWU) Local 252 hosted a Casino Night event, raising $15,844.00 in support of United Way’s Mission United. More than 350 attendees enjoyed an evening of fun, excitement and entertainment while honoring our local veterans.


TCS 2017 New York City Marathon

TEAM

MISSION

UNITED

Team Mission United raised over $30,000 to benefit local Long Island veterans United Way of Long Island was chosen as an official charity partner of the 2017 TCS NYC Marathon held on Sunday, November 5th bringing together eleven talented runners to represent us as Team Mission United. The runners raised over $30,000 in support of Long Island military, veterans and their families through the Mission United program. Over 300 individuals, companies, organizations and groups supported Team Mission United in achieving their fundraising goals. Sponsors: Capital One • Flushing Bank • IUOE Local 138 • Local 338 RWDSU/ UFCW • Long Island Federation of Labor, AFL-CIO • Long Island Insurance Community • Gregory May, Commissioner, Nassau County Taxi & Limousine Commission • Suffolk Transportation Service, Inc. / Suffolk Bus • Changing Times Pub, Farmingdale, NY


Programs


U.S. DOE 2017 Housing Innovation Grand Winner

For the third year in a row, United Way of Long Island’s Housing Development Corp. has been recognized as one of the nation’s top builders, being named Grand Winner in the Affordable Home category from the U.S. Department of Energy as part of its Housing Innovation Awards. The Awards recognize forward-thinking builders across the country who lead the evolution in the housing industry toward zero energy ready homes (ZERH) that are high performance, energy efficient homes with systems that offset all, or most, of its annual energy consumption.

“The ZERH will provide these vets with much needed comfort, health, and a better living experience while saving taxpayers with very low operational expenses. United Way of Long Island runs a program called “VetsBuild.” Veterans learn … building science, energy retrofit, and weatherization, as well as green and high-performance home building. Each class works on a real ZER home; the class of 2016/17 helped build this house for fellow veterans in need.” - Rick Wertheim, senior vice-president of the Housing Development Corporation and Housing and Green Initiatives, United Way of Long Island Supporting Sponsors: Albanese Organization, The Bank of America Charitable Foundation, Bethpage Federal Credit Union, Composite Prototyping Center Fusion Architecture, Grainger, Knapp Swezey Foundation, Long Island Board of Realtors (LIBOR), Long Island Green Homes,LI Regional Economic Development Center MSC Industrial, National Grid, NYSERDA, Small Business Development Center, Town of Huntington, Town of Islip CDA, United Veterans Beacon House


Stuff-A-Bus

The Stuff-A-Bus program was developed with a mission to provide children from low-income families with new school supplies to help prepare them for their academic studies. As part of lead sponsor Baker Tilly’s contribution, team members also volunteered at United Way’s Deer Park office location on September 1st to fill new backpacks with lunch boxes, notebooks, pencils, crayons and scissors. The supplies were delivered to schools within seven school districts across Long Island by yellow bus on Community Service Day September 11, 2017.

NEW TEAMMATES. United Way of Long Island partnered with the Long Island Nets to expand the collection of Stuff-A-Bus school supplies. The Long Island Nets placed collection boxes in local libraries and business offices, allowing the general public to drop off school supplies. On August 23rd, a massive sorting event was held at NYCB LIVE, home of the Nassau Veterans Memorial Coliseum, with volunteers from Target, Local 338 RWDSU/UFCW, and the Long Island Nets sorting and boxing up thousands of supplies that were collected throughout the month. Principal’s Honor Roll:

Baker Tilly Virchow Krause, LLP

Honor Roll:

Suffolk Transportation Service, Inc. • East End Bus Lines • Educational Bus Transportation Inc.Huntington Coach, LLC • Make It Count Foundation Long Island Nets • J-Power USA • AllState Insurance Helping Hands • Oerlikon Metco (US) Inc. • THE BOXERY

A+:

MSC Industrial Supply Co. • Newsday Media Group • Power Resources International • Verizon Wireless • Target • Capital One Bank

Generous Supporters and Participants:

Alba Wheels Up International Inc. • AllState Insurance • Beal Family • Berry Fresh C alico Cottage, Inc. • Capital One Auto Finance Division • Carey Family Child Care Council of Nassau C learVision Optical • CNA Insurance • Corrado Family • Creative Foods - Burger King, D isc Graphics, Inc. • Display Components MFG INC. Empire National Bank • Five Below • Flushing Bank • Franciscovich Family • Garfunkel Wild • GEICO • GKN Aerospace • Hedgehog Development, LLC. Hempstead Works • Hocker Family • InterDigital Communications • KPMG • Meenan Oil • Merchants Insurance • New Vitality • NAC Marketing Co. • National Grid Paychex • Petro • Posillico • randstad USA • Ruskin, Moscou & Faltischek, PC • RWDSU Local 338 • RXR • Building Uniondale • Sales Master Associates Sartorius Group North America • Scorpion • Senator Kemp Hannon’s Office • Senator Elaine Phillip’s Office • Singh Family • Star Gas T elephonics The Garden City Group • The Vineyard Church • Travelers • Tristate Office Products • UPS Supply Chain Solutions • USIC • Vicon Industries • White Family


BeReady Children’s Program September was National Preparedness Month, and in the wake of this year’s hurricane season the importance of being ready before a disaster gained national attention. Since its launch in 2016, BeReadyLI.org, a collaboration between United Way of Long Island, PSEG Foundation, PSEG Long Island and 2-1-1 Long Island, has worked to help Long Islanders prepare before, during and after disasters by encouraging families to take simple steps that help ensure their safety.

BeReadyLI.org/ChildrensWorkshop

In an effort to educate family members of all ages, BeReadyLI expanded their reach with the launch of their Children’s Workshop, an interactive lesson for classrooms and assemblies offered to students in preschool through second grade teaching them the basics of emergency preparedness in a fun and approachable way. In the last year, the BeReadyLI Children’s Workshop has helped more than 16,000 young children learn the importance of knowing their whole names, and the whole names of their caregivers, how to recognize who can help them in an emergency and what they should put in their emergency ‘go packs’. Children are sent home with an activity booklet and flyer so that their caregivers can continue educating the entire family about the importance of preparedness.


Healthy Homes United Way of Long Island’s “Healthy Homes Long Island” initiative works to build homes that are both good for the environment outside and promotes the well-being of those living inside the home itself. When retrofitting existing homes, or building new ones, United Way’s Housing and Green Building department puts a strong emphasis on using sustainable materials that do not deteriorate or cause chronic health concerns like asthma. According to the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development’s Office of Lead Hazard Control and Healthy Homes, almost 6 million U.S. homes have moderate to severe physical infastructure problems - such as water leaks and intrusion; injury hazards; pests; and heating, plumbing and electrical deficiencies. In addition, an estimated 30 million homes have indoor environmental hazards, including physical safety hazards, lead-based paint hazards, and pests.

There are eight basic principles to help ensure that a home is healthy: Keep Your Home Dry Mold and moisture increase allergens and asthma triggers, and can cause deterioration of your home Keep Your Home Clean Clean homes help reduce pets infestations, dust, and explosure to contaminants

Keep Your Home Pest-Free Many pest treatments pose risks for families with health problems or expose young children and pets to poisonous residue. Non-pesticide treatments are best for a first line of defense Keep Your Home Safe A majority of injuries among children occur in the home. Falls are the most frequent cause of residential injuries to children, followed by injuries from objects in the home, burns, and poisonings. Keep Your Home Contaminant-Free Chemical explosures include lead, radon, pesticides, and environmental tobacco smoke. Explosures to radon gas, carbon monoxide, and second-hand tobacco smoke are far higher indoors than outside Keep Your Home Ventilated Studies show that increasing the fresh air supply in a home improves respiratory health. Air filters in HVAC units collect and protect families from many particulates found in the air Keep Your Home Maintained Poorly maintained homes increase the risk for deteriorated lead-based paint in older housing which is the primary cause of lead poisoning in children less than 6 years of age Keep Your Home Temperature Controlled Houses that do not maintain adequate temperatures may place the safety of residents at increased risk from exposure to extreme heat or cold


World AIDS Day Dinner This day serves to focus global attention on the devastating impact of HIV/AIDS. Observance of this day provides an opportunity for governments, national AIDS programs, churches, community organizations and individuals to demonstrate the importance of the fight against HIV/AIDS. Presently it is estimated that 36.7 million people worldwide are living with HIV/AIDS, with 1.2 million Americans living with HIV/AIDS. With a goal of reducing the number of new HIV cases to 750 by 2020. New York State is in the forefront of ending the AIDS epidemic. The red ribbon is an international symbol of AIDS awareness and is worn as a sign of support for people living with HIV. It is a simple way to challenge the stigma and prejudice surrounding HIV and AIDS. Accept the Call to Action and wear a red ribbon for the entire month of December to remember those who have gone before us and celebrate the lives of those who are living with HIV/AIDS.

AN AIDS FREE GENERATION

RAISINGH PE

FOR THE FUTURE

Each year, the Consumer Involvement Committee of the Nassau-Suffolk HIV Health Services Planning Council and United Way of Long Island recognizes individuals for their work with HIV/AIDS. The 2017 World AIDS Day Award Recipients are: Dr. Rosenthal - Medical Director for the Center for Young Adult Adolescent and Pediatric HIV at Northwell Health Theresa A Regnante - President and CEO of United Way of Long Island Marci Egel - Community leader and outreach worker at Thursday’s Child Robert Santamaria - Community leader and peer worker at Options for Community Living


ESPRI

The Village of Hempstead is one of 16 communities in New York State chosen to be part of Governor Andrew Cuomo’s Empire State Poverty Reduction Initiative (ESPRI). This initiative empowers community members to work together in an effort to reduce the number of households residing in poverty and increase the number of households with earned income above poverty. As an information portal for residents and to encourage community leaders to get involved, the Village has launched www.VillageofHempsteadESPRI.org. ESPRI’s main goal is to promote community-led change through a task force consisting of individuals impacted by or living in poverty, various services and organizations, county and state governments, public safety officials, and other entities. ESPRI in its first phase of implementation has developed several committees that are working together to review the underlying causes of poverty within various facets of the community, which includes education and child development, workforce development, the justice system, and health and wellness.


New Scholarship Funds SAL LAFONTE MEMORIAL FUND

Maria A. Grasso, United Way of Long Island Board of Directors Chair, has established a memorial fund in honor of her father, Sal LaFonte. It has been five years since his passing, and there is no better way to honor his memory and service than by supporting veterans. Mr. LaFonte was a proud veteran who served in the U.S. Navy from 1961 to 1965. The Sal LaFonte Memorial Fund provides financial assistance to veterans who wish to participate in a vocational training program.

SCOTT MARTELLA MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP FUND

The Scott Martella Memorial Scholarship Fund was established by Stacy and Stephen Martella in honor of their son Scott. He was a devoted fiancÊ, loving son, caring brother, loyal friend, remarkable mentor, dedicated public servant and brightened so many lives in our community. The Fund provides scholarships to students who will be attending college whose studies may include international relations or public service. In addition, a yearly community service project in coordination with Smithtown Central School District will be held in Scott’s memory.


Featured Stories • • • •

YouthBuild VetsBuild DREAMS for Youth Project Warmth


An Ecuadarian native, John spent much of the prior year familiarizing himself with a new land and language. He committed himself to making the most of his new start and pursuing higher learning by whatever means possible. However, when he started YouthBuild in February 2017, he couldn’t help but feel that his efforts weren’t paying off quick enough. “I was nervous. Some people had already taken their TASC test, and I felt like I had

At the time, John was determined to go to college, but first had to get his high school equivalency diploma. After taking the time to learn more about YouthBuild and its mission to assist young men and women with career preparation – including the attainment of their high school equivalency diplomas – he recognized the program as the perfect opportunity to meet his goal. Though, even for all his determination, the path to success was still an uphill battle.

caught his eye as he made his way to an English group conversation – a staple in his routine since he had dedicated himself to becoming fluent in English.

For John, a usual trip to the local library took a turn from the ordinary when he stumbled across a flier that would change his life. An advertisement for YouthBuild Long Island

Going forward, John has no intention of slowing down anytime soon. With his history of determination, his next move comes as no surprise: “Now, I plan on going to college.”

In the past, he didn’t always feel that he earned his grades, as he often struggled to retain what he learned from one year to the next. “If you can’t recover what you learned, can you really say that you’re educated?” he asks. As he completed YouthBuild, however, there was no question that he was walking away with a new lease on learning. “What I didn’t learn in ten years, I was able to learn in one,” he says. “I’m really happy because I feel like I truly deserve this. I put everything into it.” According to John, his experience with YouthBuild was made even more valuable by the extensive effort it required.

When the time came, he passed his TASC test – much to his own surprise. “I didn’t finish the Math section, and I didn’t think I passed. I was so anxious about getting my score,” he remembers. When he simply couldn’t wait any longer, he called for the results and got the good news. “I wanted to scream or cry,” he says. “I was so happy that everything paid off.”

done awful just on the placement test, alone,” he admits. The challenge of keeping up with his subjects was made even more difficult by trying to keep up with his classmates. “People would raise their hands to answer questions, and I didn’t understand them. I felt like for every hour they spent studying, I spent two,” he recalls.

THE PROMISE OF A NEW LIFE


I was out of work with no way to support my family – my wife and two children. My daughter is 17 years old and suffers from severe depression. She’s graduating from high school this year, and wants to go to college. We do everything we can to keep her healthy and safe, but my loss of income was making life stressful for everyone in my house.

Beyond the training, certification and career connections, VetsBuild offered my hope – a light at the end of the tunnel. Being part of VetsBuild allowed me to be surrounded by people who were like me. Everyone is fighting a battle, or trying to help someone else that needs them. I fight every day for my family, for my daughter. I now see the light at the end of the dark tunnel I’ve been living in for months. I stay active, every day I find ways to keep myself relevant and attractive to employers. I now have connections and access to resources that I wasn’t even aware existed. I wish I would have joined earlier.

"I served in the U.S. Army Reserve from 1990-98. Recently, I had a steady job that I had held for many years working in the healthcare field. Unfortunately, I was laid off when the contract with my company was not renewed. New York state now requires a certification that was not mandatory when I began in the position. It’s hard to compete with todays workforce that have college degrees and advanced certifications. I didn’t have any of those things. I had been employed for so long, that I got comfortable, Because I didn’t have this certification, I was passed up for advancement opportunities and it eventually ended up costing me my job.

Since passing the certification test, I am now a proud member of 1199SEIU United Healthcare Workers East, employed with Northwell Health. I am grateful to VetsBuild and United Way for helping me, and other veterans, get back on our feet."

Following my time in VetsBuild, I found a class to help me study and earn the certification needed to get a job as a central sterile processing technician. I was fortunate to have been the recipient of a grant from the Sal LaFonte Fund that covered the cost of this class, as money was tight. I completed the class, took the certification test and am proud to say that I passed.

I found out about VetsBuild through Hempstead Works at the local labor department. I completed the program, and decided to take it one step further by enrolling in the advanced GasPro training. I had to expand my horizons on the type of opportunities available to me if I could not re-enter the medical field. I did not want to give up on the job I truly wanted.

When U.S. Army Reserve Veteran Oswaldo lost his job, he found much needed support from United Way's VetsBuildprogram to help get him back on his feet. Here is his story in his own words:

FINDING THE LIGHT IN DARKNESS


“Raised in a working class family, I became aware of the financial burden of buying eyeglasses every year,” Epiphany recalls. It was then that she realized that if her family, which was financially stable, was struggling, what about the kids whose parents couldn’t afford a simple pair of eyeglasses? This realization led Epiphany to found her own nonprofit called Eye Partners Inspire (EPI). “My parents taught me to always help people, be kind to others and open your arms to those in need,” she explains. “We have a problem, right here on Long Island, with a severe income gap. I want to help people where I live.” Together with her sister, the organization has collected and distributed nearly 1,500 eyeglass frames to Long Islanders in need since 2014.

A bright and accomplished young woman, Epiphany has learned to take life’s challenges and turn them into opportunity. At the age of three, Epiphany was diagnosed with Ocular Albinism – a rare genetic condition that affects the pigmentation of her eyes – as well as Nystagmus or involuntary eye movements. At the age of four, diagnosed as legally blind, she underwent an intense eye surgery that helped her see better, but she still struggled. She needed extra-large fonts when reading, and had to use memorization to take notes in class.

Epiphany is now a freshman at George Washington University, studying political science. She has dreams of one day becoming a local politician. “I always think ‘start small to go big’. I’ve seen the change that my nonprofit has made locally, and I want to continue to make a difference in the lives of my own neighbors as a career. I’m so grateful for this scholarship – it gives me the opportunity to focus on my studies and future goals without having to worry about the expenses of achieving them.”

Not only did Epiphany commit herself to helping her nonprofit achieve success, she was also an impressive student inside and outside of the classroom. During her time at Walt Whitman High School in Huntington Station, earning a 96% weighted average and graduating in the top 10 percent of her class. She served as president of the Debate Club, and Editor in Chief of the school newspaper, while being part of the girls varsity soccer and track teams. Newsday recognized her as a ‘Student to Watch’, and she was awarded the ‘Hispanic Student Achievement Award’ by the Town of Huntingon.

CREATING A BRIGHTER FUTURE


Living on a fixed income has been a challenge for Daryl and his daughter. “My daughter plays soccer, and the team families often get together for dinner to celebrate big wins. I’m always reluctant to go because I don’t have the extra money to pay for a fun night out,” Daryl explains. “Life becomes a constant comparison – do I spend $60 on dinner or do I fill half of my oil tank? Parents offer to cover our tab because they know about our situation but I don’t want to depend on friends for my daughters’ happiness.”

In 2013, he was involved in another accident less serious than the first but it aggravated his already sensitive lingering injuries. He underwent surgery to repair the torn ligaments in his hip but he found himself unable to continue to perform the duties required of him as a bus driver so he applied for permanent disability.

Daryl is a U.S. Army veteran and a single father raising his 14-yearold daughter in Freeport, doing the best he can to provide her with a happy life. He had been working as an MTA bus driver in Brooklyn for over 10 years, when in 2009 the bus he was driving rolled over a loose construction plate and was dropped into a hole in the street. His hip and back were injured, forcing him to leave work and undergo extensive physical therapy to alieve his pain.

Daryl’s positive outlook on life hasn’t wavered, despite the challenges he faces. “There are a lot of people who have it worse than I do - I have a roof over my head, clothes on my back and the love of my daughter. I am thankful, appreciative and grateful for the assistance I got through Project Warmth. I am so glad that United Way and Choice For All offer this help to those of us who just need a small bit of assistance to make it through tough times.”

The winter months have been a source of constant stress for Daryl, as the expense of heating his home meant he couldn’t afford to pay his other bills. He learned about Project Warmth through United Way partner agency Choice For All, and knew that it would relieve his worrying. “While I was working, I never thought that I would be in the position I’m in now. I had seen other people struggling but you don’t think about how unpredictable life can be, that what happened to them to cause their struggle could happen to anyone, to you.”

WARMING HIS HEART AND HOME


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Year in review book 2017  
Year in review book 2017  
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