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UNITED WAY OF GREATER CLEVELAND

HELPS YOU HELP OUR COMMUNITY 2011-2012 REPORT TO THE COMMUNITY


OUR MISSION United Way of Greater Cleveland is a leader in addressing health and human service needs through convening partnerships, funding programs, generating resources and advocating for public policy to support our community’s priorities.

STRATEGIC AREAS Resource Development Customer Relationship Management Community Investment Communication and Branding Technology


A LETTER FROM THE PRESIDENT AND CHAIRMAN If you ask a United Way volunteer what United Way does to help our community, you will receive a variety of answers based on their individual experiences. • Campaign Cabinet volunteers are dedicated to raising every dollar possible to support the health and human service programs that are funded through United Way. • Community Investment volunteers are passionate about making funding decisions that are grounded in research and target the most important needs of our community, right here in Cuyahoga County.

United Way’s President and CEO Mike Benz will retire after 17 years as one of the most committed leaders in Greater Cleveland. We will miss Mike and we wish him the very best in his next phase of life. On behalf of the United Way Board of Directors, “Thank you, Mike Benz, for a job well done!”

• Finance and Administration volunteers monitor every dollar to ensure that our United Way

–Terry Egger

maintains the highest fiscal integrity. • The Board of Directors focuses on providing sound nonprofit leadership and governance throughout the organization, touching every aspect of United Way. Despite their various points of view, one fact is evident regarding all United Way volunteers.

UNITED WAY OF

They are committed to this community and its well-being, and they are diligently dedicated to

GREATER CLEVELAND

generosity of 84,000 donors last year.

HELPS YOU HELP

Throughout the pages of this report you’ll read about the diverse reach

OUR COMMUNITY

our United Way. You’ll also meet people who have benefited from our

excellence. On this volunteer army’s watch, you can be assured that every donation to United Way is making a difference in our community – more than 450,000 people benefited from the

This is how United Way helps you help our community.

United Way has in our community and the activities of United Way volunteers. You’ll hear from donors who share why they are so committed to funded programs. And you will see the many connections United Way makes in our community to do its important work. But it all comes down to you, our donors, who make it possible for United Way to help those in need. We are grateful to you. Thank you for your continued support of United Way and the Greater Cleveland community.

K. Michael Benz President and CEO United Way of Greater Cleveland

Terrance C. Z. Egger Chairman, Board of Directors United Way of Greater Cleveland Publisher, President and CEO The Plain Dealer

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The good we secure for ourselves is precarious and uncertain until it is secured for all of us and incorporated into our common life. ~ Jane Addams

HOW UNITED WAY CARES FOR OUR COMMUNITY

HOW YOUR CONTRIBUTIONS ARE INVESTED IN OUR COMMMUNITY A. Self-Sufficiency and Basic Needs $3,729,539 – 11%

For nearly 100 years, United Way of Greater Cleveland has cared for our community’s residents, transforming as their needs changed. In 2011, United Way revised its funding strategies again, using information from two research studies – a demographic analysis conducted by the Center on Urban Poverty and Community Development at the Mandel School of Applied Social Sciences at Case Western Reserve University, and a public policy and funding analysis prepared by the

B. Education, Children and Families $3,489,380 – 11% C. Behavioral Health $2,627,630 – 8% D. Community Health $2,472,232 – 7% E. Aging and Special Needs $1,568,102 – 5% F. Capacity Building $240,160 – 1% G. Catholic Charities, Jewish Federation of Cleveland and United Black Fund $4,045,817 – 12% H. Donor-designated to partner and non-United Way agencies and other United Ways $10,393,830 – 31%

Center for Community Solutions. Focus group research and United

I. Various grants, special projects, 211 and regional

Way data gathered from site visits and monitoring of currently funded

contributions $4,480,918 – 14%

programs was used to refine the process. Based on this information, approximately 140 United Way Community Investment volunteers collectively recommended to the Board of Directors an investment of $18.2 million in health and human service

I

A

programs in the following areas: Self-Sufficiency and Basic Needs;

B

Education, Children and Families; Behavioral Health; Community C

Health; Aging and Special Needs; and Capacity Building. These investments provide support to 216 health and human service programs

H D

and three federated agencies. United Way also provided support to regional United Ways in Lake, Geauga and Medina counties, allocated resources to 2 1 1 , funded three special projects and a small grants program. Resources for these activities totalled $4,480,918.

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UNITED WAY OF GREATER CLEVELAND • COMMUNITY INVESTMENT

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F

E


CONNECTING PEOPLE TO SERVICES ALL DAY, EVERY DAY 211 is a free community service that provides information by phone and online about social, health and government resources 24 hours a day, seven days a week. In 2011, 240,000 calls were answered by 211 information and referral specialists and 82,000 visits were made to the 211 website (211neohio.org). Of those calls nearly 40 percent came from suburban communities, clearly illustrating the critical need 211 fulfills throughout our community. While continuing to guide community members to help related to

• New 211 service to Ashland County – United Way of

emergency food, clothing, housing and utility assistance; services

Ashland County was approved to be a 211 service operated

for older adults and people with disabilities; family support,

by United Way of Greater Cleveland’s 211. Ashland, Cuyahoga,

children and youth services and parenting; substance abuse and

Geauga, Holmes, Medina and Wayne counties are now in col-

mental health treatment; employment; tax assistance, budgeting

laboration, serving 1.7 million people.

and credit counseling; volunteerism and donations programs; in 2011, 211 services expanded to include:

• Aged Disability Resource Centers (ADRC) – 211 information and referral staff members answer calls and maintain a data-

• Ohio Lottery problem gambling line – The Ohio Lottery

base for Cuyahoga, Geauga, Medina, Lorain and Lake Counties,

contracted with 211 to take calls from people experiencing

linking seniors and persons with disabilities to one of 13 ADRCs

gambling problems throughout Ohio.

in the region. • Toys for Tots – 211 and the

requests for referrals to tax preparation assistance programs

U.S. Marine Corps collaborated

and made over 4,800 appointments for service as part of the

on the Toys for Tots campaign,

Earned Income Tax Credit Coalition, resulting in $13 million in

linking people from Cuyahoga

tax refunds for Cuyahoga County residents.

and Lorain counties to sites that

2011

2009

distribute toys.

206,000

Cleveland was chosen from forty 211 programs nationally to be the transition line for Bank of America customers who are losing their homes to foreclosure. Nearly 3,000 calls came in from across the country, with United Way information and referral

240,000

• Bank of America – The 211 service of United Way of Greater

2010

230,000

• Earned Income Tax Credit – 211 handled more than 12,000

CALLS FOR ASSISTANCE

staff linking those callers to social services. VISIT 211NEOHIO.ORG

UNITED WAY OF GREATER CLEVELAND • COMMUNITY INVESTMENT

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HELPING OTHERS HELP THEMSELVES Doing what we can to ensure that the most basic needs of our community members are met, thereby helping them to become self-sufficient, is a vital component of working to make our community a better one. Funding dedicated to the investment area of Self-Sufficiency and Basic Needs addresses the challenges faced by the working poor, families and individuals without adequate food, those who cannot otherwise afford legal services, people who are homeless or at risk of becoming homeless, those who were formerly incarcerated and families and individuals in financial distress.

MEET HERMIONE - UNITED WAY DONOR Hermione Malone, Community Outreach Manager, University Hospitals Seidman Cancer Center Though not a native Clevelander, Hermione now calls Northeast Ohio home, and is doing all she can to enhance the community that welcomed her. She views United Way of Greater Cleveland as a trusted adviser, providing valuable insight on the specific needs of our community. Because of that insight, she’s become a member of United Way’s Women’s Leadership Council and has become involved with local programs that help women coming back into our community following periods of incarceration. Hermione has donated new clothing she’s purchased but never worn, and encouraged her friends and colleagues to do the same.

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UNITED WAY FUNDED PROGRAMS HELP MAKE GREATER CLEVELANDERS SELF-SUFFICIENT THROUGH: • • •

Credit counseling for low-income families Financial literacy education Emergency food and assistance enrolling in food programs

• •

Homelessness prevention services Assistance to families and individuals in maintaining housing stability

• •

Legal mediation and dispute resolution Services for formerly incarcerated individuals to help with re-entry into the community and employment

Education and training to help overcome barriers to employment for our working poor

Stay-in-school strategies for our youth

MEET SCOTT - CREATIVE ARTIST Assisted by Emerald Development and Economic Network, Homeless Prevention Rapid Re-Housing Program Scott, who suffers with anxiety, lives in special housing for people with disabilities. A few months ago, his landlord discussed concerns he had with Scott’s lease compliance. The Emerald Development and Economic Network (EDEN) Homeless Prevention Rapid Re-Housing Program stepped in. Their Housing Retention Specialists helped him develop a routine to keep his apartment clean. As an artist, Scott works with many different mediums including paint. He used his bathroom as a studio but unfortunately the paint was staining the sink. After working with the specialists, he began lining his bathroom wall and sink with plastic to protect the finishes. His apartment is now clean and organized, and Scott is more secure, knowing he has a comfortable place to call home. Care Navigation Program, Hospice of the Western Reserve

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A STRONG FOUNDATION ON WHICH TO BUILD Nelson Mandela said that education is the most powerful weapon you can use to change the world. As evidenced by an investment of nearly $3.5 million in programs that support education, children and families, United Way of Greater Cleveland volunteers agree. United Way funded programs focus on supporting our children as they travel on a positive academic journey and strengthening the family by helping to increase home stability and the relationships within the family.

MEET STEVE - UNITED WAY DONOR Steve Brazie, Commercial Branch Manager, The Sherwin-Williams Company As a youngster, Steve was taught to help others. Employed by Sherwin-Williams for 23 years, he has been a strong supporter of United Way for all of those years, contributing financially, and assisting during the United Way Paint Day events, when groups of volunteers from area businesses and organizations come together to make a visible difference in our community (Steve provides instruction, Sherwin-Williams provides materials). Steve likes to be personally involved, because rather than admiring from afar, he gets to see the impact, and know that he contributed to it.

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HOW YOUR CONTRIBUTIONS HELP EDUCATE CHILDREN AND STRENGTHEN FAMILIES • • • • • • • •

Adult / child mentoring services Youth development activities High quality early childhood education programs Child care referral and assistance to low-income families Family support centers Parent education programs Post adoption services Academic enrichment for preschool - 6th grade children who are educationally disadvantaged

MEET AALIYAH - CONFIDENT YOUTH Assisted by West Side Community House, Youth Services – Sisterhood Program 13-year-old Aaliyah has been participating in the Sisterhood program at West Side Community House for two years. She heard about the program from a friend, told her mom about it, and has been actively involved ever since. Aaliyah is proud of how the program has taught her self-control, and how to deal with difficult people. Her mom is amazed by the “sisterhood cycles” that are transforming her daughter and the other girls in the program into young ladies, teaching them social skills and self-esteem, outreach and family support, education and arts, financial literacy, and health and wellness.

Care Navigation Program, Hospice of the Western Reserve

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WHEN YOU HAVE YOUR HEALTH, YOU HAVE EVERYTHING Funding to Community Health and Behavioral Health programs help those who are chronically or terminally ill and those with physically disabling conditions, individuals with or at risk of chemical dependency or mental illness, and families and individuals experiencing violence and abuse. Programs provide intervention and support, offer education and information, help individuals and families identify the health and community services available to find the care they need, and provide medical assistance to the uninsured.

MEET MARY JO - UNITED WAY DONOR Mary Jo Lahiff Casey, Senior Vice President, Operations Excellence, PNC Bank Years ago, Mary Jo gave to United Way without giving it much thought. But when her middle son experienced speech problems, Cleveland Hearing and Speech Center, which receives funding from United Way, was there to help. Since then, she has been a huge advocate for United Way. But since everyone doesn’t have such a personal connection to an individual agency, she’s grateful that United Way has the expertise to identify programs our community members need and allocate funds to enable those programs to make a difference.

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HOW UNITED WAY HELPS IMPROVE THE HEALTH OF OUR COMMUNITY • • • • • • •

Information, education and support on health issues Care coordination Home-based services Medical expense assistance Hospice and palliative care Drug prevention education for youth Outpatient and residential treatment for individuals with chemical and alcohol dependency

Outpatient care, case management and psychiatric day treatment for individuals with or at risk for mental illness

Early intervention mental illness programs for children from birth to age 5

Training for professionals and paraprofessionals to identify people at risk for violence and abuse

Emergency and transitional shelter

MEET TEVIN - EARNEST STUDENT Assisted by United Cerebral Palsy of Greater Cleveland, Children’s Services Case Management Program As an infant, Tevin was ahead in terms of developmental milestones. At 16 months, a virus and high temperature changed things dramatically. He became non-responsive to sounds, did not talk, and was hypersensitive to some clothing items. Tevin’s mom Miriam sought help everywhere, and after much frustration, found the United Cerebral Palsy of Greater Cleveland (UCP) Children’s Services Case Management Program, where Tevin was diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorder. Years of therapy and loving care helped Tevin and his mom. “When we got here, Tevin could not talk or recognize himself in a photo, and he was sensitive to some items of clothing. Today, he can do those things and more, and he’s more open and accepting. Tevin deserves the same opportunities in life as any child, and thanks to the skilled and caring staff and incredible programs at UCP, he’s well on his way,” said mom.

Care Navigation Program, Hospice of the Western Reserve

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AID FOR THOSE DEALING WITH LIFE’S CHANGES AND CHALLENGES More than 260,000 senior citizens live in Cuyahoga County, along with hundreds of immigrants who are new to our community. Nearly $1.57 million of United Way funding provides assistance to these individuals, as well as aid to disaster victims. Several funded programs focus on maintaining independence for seniors as well as people living with disabilities. Support to refugees and immigrants includes assistance with housing, mastering English, employment and health care and introductions to the Northeast Ohio community that is now home.

MEET DIANA - UNITED WAY DONOR Diana Habbouche, Teller, KeyBank Diana is determined to do whatever she can to help those in need. A young working mother, her time and finances are stretched quite thin, but her desire to help is huge. From children to senior citizens, she knows the needs of many in our community are great, and that even the limited amount of time and money she can afford to spare now can help make their lives better. And she’s looking forward to the future, when she is able to share more of her time and resources.

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HOW UNITED WAY HELPS SENIOR CITIZENS AND OTHERS WITH SPECIAL NEEDS •

Services that help low income seniors and/or those with disabilities remain independent.

Case management services that work to identify individual issues and needs

Programs that provide a wide spectrum of services such as meals, socialization and other supportive services

• • •

Transportation services Disaster relief services Support to refugees, immigrants and repatriated individuals to help them adjust to our community, including English as a Second Language classes and assistance with entering the workforce

MEET JEANNE - ACTIVE SENIOR Assisted by Senior Citizen Resources, Senior Transportation Jeanne has no family in the area, and for many years, her friends and colleagues at work were her family. But when she retired, she lost touch with them. Today, Jeanne depends on the Senior Transportation program of Senior Citizen Resources (SCR) for many things. The friendly drivers of the free van service take her to doctor’s appointments, drive Jeanne and other area seniors on fun trips to local museums and places of interest, and also transport her to SCR daily. While at SCR, Jeanne spends time with friends, enjoys a hot meal, participates in activities, and serves as a volunteer in support of various programs. Thanks to the van service and SCR, Jeanne has a very active social life and a large, extended family.

Care Navigation Program, Hospice of the Western Reserve

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In 2011, United Way of Greater Cleveland invested $750,000 in three projects to address three specific areas of need in our community. United Way’s investment has leveraged an additional $1.3 million in investments from public and private sources for these projects. And United Way plays an active role in the ongoing implementation of these programs, bringing together people and resources to improve our community. GREATER CLEVELAND COORDINATED RE-ENTRY PROJECT In collaboration with the Cuyahoga County Office of Re-entry, United Way provided $250,000 in support and additional evaluation funding to the Center for Families and Children for the third year of the Re-Entry Project. It provides case management and treatment services to formerly incarcerated individuals and their

SPECIAL PROJECTS, FUNDED AND MANAGED

families to enable their successful adjustment to life outside of prison.

SUPPORTING PARTNERSHIPS TO ASSURE READY KIDS (SPARK) The SPARK program, currently in its second year, is coordinated by the Literacy Cooperative of Greater Cleveland with assistance from Family Connections, and provides interventions with 3- and 4-year-old children and their parents in the Garfield Heights, Maple Heights, Cleveland Heights and Cleveland Metropolitan

BY UNITED WAY, ADDRESS SPECIFIC COMMUNITY ISSUES

school districts to identify and remediate barriers to academic success. In 2011, United Way provided $250,000 to support this program, and to fund an evaluation of the program by the University of Akron.

FAMILY STABILITY INITIATIVE In collaboration with the Siemer Family Foundation and the Cleveland Foundation, United Way provided $250,000 to support the United Way of Greater Cleveland Family Stability Initiative in partnership with Community Housing Solutions. The program is designed to assist qualified families with school-age children who own their homes and are at risk of losing their homes to foreclosure, with the goal of enabling them to maintain housing stability and keep their children in the same school they’ve been attending.

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UNITED WAY OF GREATER CLEVELAND • COMMUNITY INVESTMENT


We cannot live only for ourselves. a thousand fibers connect us to our fellow men. ~ Herman Melville

CAPACITY BUILDING AND ORGANIZATIONAL ASSESSMENT

COMMUNITY INVESTMENT DIVISION CHAIR Steven R. Borstein

The Capacity Building Investment Committee focuses on programs that support the health and strength of our entire social service system. Programs funded to support the recruitment, training and placement of volunteers to aid the local nonprofit community include BVU: The Center for Nonprofit Excellence, Greater Cleveland Volunteers, HandsOn Northeast Ohio and the Neighborhood Leadership Institute. Funding also supports the Center for Community Solutions specific to health and social service research and advocacy, and Voices for Ohio’s Children for public policy advocacy for children. Part of the United Way promise to donors is the assurance that their generous donations are invested in sound programs provided by agencies that have the necessary tools to do this critical work. The Organizational Assessment (OA) Committee members are charged with keeping this promise. For a nonprofit organization to be successful, it needs a strong Board of Directors, appropriate systems and procedures, adequate funding, unquestionable financial management, qualified staff members and current technology. The OA Committee monitors the agencies that provide United Way funded programs annually to make sure these tools are in place. If problems are uncovered, the OA Committee works with the agency to help resolve them.

COUNCIL OF AGENCY EXECUTIVES

THE JOHN K. MOTT YOUTH FUND DISTRIBUTION COMMITTEE The John K. Mott Youth Fund Distribution Committee (YFDC),

tives from all of United Way’s

founded in 1990 by John Mott, a former United Way staff member

partner and funded agencies,

who was interested in supporting youth philanthropy, is one of

collaborates on common issues

the leading youth allocation programs in the country. In 2011, 26

including leadership develop-

student volunteers from 11 schools throughout Cuyahoga County

ment and advocacy to positively

participated in the program. The students were introduced to

impact public policy. Carol

grant making by actually making funding decisions. Students

Rivchun, President of Youth

award $50,000 to programs focused on children and youth,

Opportunities Unlimited, serves

including prevention programs for girls only, violence prevention,

as President of the CAE.

self-esteem, education support and safe recreation.

AGING AND SPECIAL NEEDS INVESTMENT COMMITTEE CO-CHAIRS Nancy G. Rome Eleanor B. Steigman BEHAVIORAL HEALTH INVESTMENT COMMITTEE CO-CHAIRS Terry Stoller Luis Vazquez CAPACITY BUILDING INVESTMENT COMMITTEE CO-CHAIRS David M. Gusman Mary Ogden

EDUCATION, CHILDREN AND FAMILIES INVESTMENT COMMITTEE CO-CHAIRS Sondra J. Hardis William R. Joseph SELF-SUFFICIENCY AND BASIC NEEDS INVESTMENT COMMITTEE CO-CHAIRS Virginia D. Benjamin Robert E. Paponetti YFDC member Shareena Johnson at the 2011 awards ceremony.

Additionally YFDC partnered again this year with the MyCOM initiative (MyCOM stands for My Commitment, My Community and is a network of organizations preparing Greater Cleveland’s young people to reach their full potential) to award an additional $16,000 to support seven youth-originated and youth-implemented projects in the eight MyCom neighborhoods (Central, Cudell-Midwest, Mt. Pleasant, Parma, St. Clair-Superior, Shaker Heights, Slavic Village, and West Park).

COMMUNITY INVESTMENT COMMITTEE CHAIR Robin C. Cottingham

COMMUNITY HEALTH INVESTMENT COMMITTEE CO-CHAIRS Sandra Byrd Chappelle C. Larry Watson

The Council of Agency Executives (CAE), made up of representa-

2011 COMMUNITY INVESTMENT COMMITTEES

ORGANIZATIONAL ASSESSMENT COMMITTEE CHAIR Susan D. Krantz COUNCIL OF AGENCY EXECUTIVES PRESIDENT Carol Rivchun JOHN K. MOTT YOUTH FUND DISTRIBUTION COMMITTEE ADVISERS Matthew Lentini Monica Orlando

VISIT UNITEDWAYCLEVELAND.ORG/YFDC UNITED WAY OF GREATER CLEVELAND • COMMUNITY INVESTMENT

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A MESSAGE FROM THE 2011/2012 CAMPAIGN CO-CHAIRS It has been an honor to lead the 2011 United Way of Greater Cleveland Campaign. Our work this past year will help fund 216 health and human service programs that will help more than 450,000 Greater Cleveland residents in the coming year. As we’ve led this campaign we have been able to get a better, up-close glimpse at many of the programs United Way funds. This personal look reinforces why we have worked so hard to continue our current level of funding to our community programs, while at the same time, trying to increase it. As Greater Clevelanders, we are fortunate to have a strong, solid network of services to pull from in these trying times. Many of the people we have met throughout this campaign have shared their stories of triumph, joy and pain as well as the promise of a better future United Way funded programs provided for their families. Your generosity has enabled United Way to fulfill that promise. Every donor is critically important to the health of our community. Although we have had the privilege to lead this effort, we could not have done it without the help of our campaign cabinet, a group of 150 volunteers who motivate more than 1,700 workplaces to participate in the campaign resulting in support from nearly 84,000 donors. What an impressive feat that could not have been accomplished without YOU. Thank you for your belief in Greater Cleveland. United Way helps you help our community.

Jerry L. Kelsheimer President and Chief Executive Officer Fifth Third Bank, Northeastern Ohio

Zev Weiss Chief Executive Officer American Greetings Corporation

Jerry Kelsheimer is the President and CEO of Fifth Third Bank, Northeastern Ohio. He has been serving on the United Way of Greater Cleveland Board of Directors since 2005. He also chairs United Way’s Pledge Collection Committee. Jerry made Northeast Ohio his home in 2001. About Northeast Ohio he says, “This is our home, and where we plan to stay.”

Zev Weiss and Jerry Kelsheimer

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UNITED WAY OF GREATER CLEVELAND • CAMPAIGN

Zev Weiss is the Chief Executive Officer of American Greetings Corporation. He has been serving on the United Way of Greater Cleveland Board of Directors since 2009. Zev returned to Northeast Ohio from New York 16 years ago and he says, “There is no better place to raise a family.”


HOW YOU GIVE

PACESETTERS Each year, Pacesetters get the annual United Way campaign off to a strong start by beginning their campaigns early (Pacesetter campaigns run from June – September), and setting ambitious goals of a minimum five percent increase in funds raised over the previous year. Pacesetters are dedicated to strengthening our community by setting the pace for the annual campaign. The 2011 Pacesetters were overachievers with 118 companies and organizations raising nearly $6.5 million, realizing 101 percent of their goal. Christopher M. Gorman, KeyBank Vice Chair, and Randall J. Korach, Tremco, Inc. President, served as co-chairs of the 2011 Pacesetter campaign.

LOANED EXECUTIVES Each year, area companies and organizations loan their employees or provide financial sponsorships to United Way’s Loaned Executive program. These Loaned Executives help increase awareness and manage all aspects of workplace campaigns including assisting with kickoffs and training sessions with workplace campaign volunteers. In 2011, 32 companies and organizations did their part to help make our community better, providing personnel in the form of 16 Loaned Executives and sponsorship support totaling $110,500. An additional 12 Loaned Executives worked on the Combined Federal Campaign. Stephen L. Buffo, Ernst & Young LLP Principal, and Gena C. Lovett, ALCOA Inc. Chief Diversity Officer, provided leadership as co-chairs of the Loaned Executive program.

THE NORTH COAST COMBINED FEDERAL CAMPAIGN The theme of the 2011 North Coast Combined Federal Campaign was “Step Up!” to let donors know they can personally bring about positive change by doing their part to help build a stronger community. More than 100 federal departments and agencies located throughout 21 counties participated in the North Coast Combined Federal Campaign that raised $2,195,000 in 2011. Our thanks to Todd S. Hawkins, USPS District Manager, for serving as the 2011 NCCFC Chairman.

CHALLENGE GRANTS

COMPANY

AMOUNT

TARGET AREA

Five Greater Cleveland companies challenged area

Medical Mutual of Ohio

$100,000

Small Business

businesses, organizations and individuals to increase

Eaton Corporation

$50,000

Community-Wide Needs

their support of and contributions to the 2011 United

Fifth Third Bank

$30,000

Small Business

Way campaign by providing $220,000 in Challenge

The Lubrizol Corporation

$25,000

Community-Wide Needs

Grants. Companies providing Challenge Grants commit-

Baker Hostetler

$15,000

New Midsize Companies

ted to matching dollar for dollar (up to the grant total) all new and/or increased donations to the 2011 campaign in targeted areas.

UNITED WAY OF GREATER CLEVELAND • CAMPAIGN

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2011/2012 EXECUTIVE CAMPAIGN CABINET

PHILANTHROPIST SOCIETY

CAMPAIGN CO-CHAIRS

Philanthropist Society co-chairs Thomas W. Adler, PlayhouseSquare Real

Jerry L. Kelsheimer

Estate Services Senior Advisor; Alexander (Sandy) M. Cutler, Eaton Cor-

Zev Weiss

poration Chairman and Chief Executive Officer; R. Steven Kestner, Baker

EXECUTIVE CAMPAIGN

Hostetler Executive Partner; and Robert S. Reitman, Riverbend Advisors

CABINET MEMBERS

Principal, along with thirty-one other volunteer solicitors, actively contact,

Thomas W. Adler

recognize and thank individual Philanthropist Society donors (donors of

Harriet Applegate Anne E. Bomar

$10,000 - $99,999). The 2011/2012 campaign received nearly $6.9 million*

Stephen L. Buffo

in donations from Philanthropist Society members.

Rick Chiricosta Alexander M. Cutler

YOUR UNITED

HUMANITARIAN SOCIETY

Christopher Gorman Jerome P. Grisko Jr. Kevin M. Grobelny

In the past 10 years, Humanitarian Society donors (donors of $1,000 - $9,999) have donated nearly $100 million

Michael W. Hawkins

to help those in need in our community. Led by co-chairs Lisa J. Oliver, Cleveland District, KeyBank President;

Sharon Sobol-Jordan

Richard W. Pogue, Esq., Jones Day Advisor; and Kurt C. Treu, U.S. Bank Executive Vice President of Enterprise

Ira C. Kaplan

Revenue Office, in 2011 Humanitarian Society volunteers focused on donor retention and securing new prospects.

R. Steven Kestner

Encouraging donors to give $1,000 or above, or to consider moving to an even higher level of giving was another

Barbara L. Kimbrew Randall J. Korach

key objective, along with ensuring that current donors know they are appreciated. These targeted efforts resulted

Allan C. Krulak

in Humanitarian Society donors contributing over $9.2 million* to the 2011/2012 campaign.

Daniel K. Lewis Gena C. Lovett James L. Mason Lisa J. Oliver Joseph M. Patrnchak James C. Petsock

YOUNG LEADERS

Richard W. Pogue, Esq. Robert S. Reitman

The mission of Young Leaders is to connect, serve and lead – connecting young

Robert D. Saada

professionals who are committed to their community to one another; providing

Beverly J. Schneider

opportunities for them to serve their community through volunteerism; and

Kenneth G. Silliman

providing educational opportunities to empower them to lead.

Loree K. Soggs Shirley D. Stineman Joseph Sweeney

In 2011, Young Leaders held four Speaker Series events and three networking

Kurt C. Treu

events. Monthly Days of Caring were held at the West Side Ecumenical Ministry,

Daniel P. Walsh

along with an additional volunteer event at Hiram House Camp where Young

Jean F. Young

Leaders built their annual Haunted Hay Maze. More than 200 people also danced the night away at the 4th Annual Fall Ball “Broadway Bash” event that raised over $38,000. Attendees at a Young Leaders Networking event hosted by KeyBank.

VISIT UNITEDWAYCLEVELAND.ORG/YOUNGLEADERS

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UNITED WAY OF GREATER CLEVELAND • CAMPAIGN

There is no power for change greater than a community discovering what it cares about. ~ Margaret J. Wheatley * Reported as of 2/17/12


WOMEN’S LEADERSHIP COUNCIL Since being formally organized in early 2011, the Women’s

among audience members and panelists. The June event focused on

Leadership Council (WLC) has been building momentum

the mentor’s role and the January event focused on the mentee.

with events and activities. Membership interest is currently at over 650 individuals with over 80 active members on the

WAY

Volunteer, Membership, Speaker Series and Special Event Committees giving of their time and talent to make our community better.

WLC members also supported the SPARK (Supporting Partnerships to Assure Ready Kids) project, which focuses on providing kindergarten readiness education, by volunteering at group lessons conducted with children and parents/guardians at elementary schools in the Cleveland, Cleveland Heights and Maple Heights school districts, donating toys

In 2011, the WLC took significant steps toward fulfilling its

and school supplies, serving meals and distributing gift bags. WLC rep-

purpose of inspiring, educating and engaging women to

resentatives also began monthly Days of Caring at Transitional Housing

become actively involved in leader-

Inc., a United Way partner agency, working with residents on mock job

ship, philanthropy, volunteerism and

interviews, résumé development and enhancement, and providing

advocacy in support of United Way of

assistance with job leads, etiquette training and professional attire.

Greater Cleveland’s health and human service priorities. Two Speaker Series events, “The Mentor/Mentee Relationship: Navigating for Success,”

In addition, a team of 41 volunteers began planning efforts related to the WLC’s first signature fundraising event, “Rock the CATWALK,” a fashion show to be held at the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum on March 29, 2012.

were held in June and January. Each event featured a panel discussion VISIT UNITEDWAYCLEVELAND.ORG/WLC June Speaker Series panelists (L to R) Barbara Snyder, President of Case Western Reserve University; WLC Chair Beth Mooney, Chairman and CEO of KeyCorp; Debra Adams Simmons, Editor of The Plain Dealer; and Virginia Albanese, President and CEO of FedEx Custom Critical.

RETIREES AND LOYAL CONTRIBUTORS In 2011, the Loyal Contributor and Retiree Cabinet was established under the leadership of Henry Meyer, Retired Chairman and CEO of KeyBank, and Bill Calfee, Retired Executive Vice President, Commercial, Cliffs Natural Resources Inc. Members

MEET PHILIP - UNITED WAY DONOR Philip Schauer, M.D., Director, Cleveland Clinic Bariatric & Metabolic Institute

of the cabinet include Employee Campaign Managers, human

A busy physician at the Cleveland Clinic, Dr. Schauer

resource professionals and other members of the business

feels so strongly about how United Way of Greater

community.

Cleveland helps us help our community that he takes

The cabinet identified top companies that currently run Retiree and Loyal Contributor programs and are using them as a model to formulate a Best Practice manual to guide approaches to prospect companies to begin soliciting retirees and loyal donors. The cabinet will also begin contacting their human resources professional and business leader networks to introduce them to the importance of committed donors.

the time to send personal emails to his colleagues and members of the clinical staff encouraging them to donate to the annual campaign. In addition, he and his wife lead by example. Keenly aware of how fortunate they are to be educated, employed and financially stable, which is not the case for so many of our neighbors, they give generously to support the programs and services funded by United Way.

17


LEADING CAMPAIGNS Nearly 84,000 individuals and 1,700 organizations in Greater Cleveland generously supported United Way throughout the year, showing our community the way to LIVE UNITED. These outstanding organizations raised $100,000* or more in 2011:

$2,743,000+

$300,000+

$150,000+

KeyCorp

ArcelorMittal Steel USA and

Cargill Deicing Technology –

United Steel Workers

North Olmsted and Cleveland Mine

$2,042,000+

AT&T Inc., CWA & IBEW

Defense Finance and Accounting

Eaton Corporation

City of Cleveland

Fifth Third Bank, Northeastern Ohio

The Huntington National Bank

$1,851,000+

GE Lighting

The Helen D. Newcomb Trust

Cleveland Clinic Health System

Giant Eagle

Oatey Company

Louis Stokes VA Medical Center

Parkland Management Company

$1,145,000+

The Lubrizol Corporation

Parkwood Corporation

The Plain Dealer

PwC

The Scott Fetzer Company

RPM International Incorporated

Adalet

The State of Ohio, Cleveland

Cleveland Wood Products

Headquarters

Corporate Office

The Halex Company

$100,000+

The Kirby Company

Akzo Nobel Paints LLC

Meriam Process Technologies

Applied Industrial Technologies

PNC

$800,000+ Forest City Enterprises, Inc. The Sherwin-Williams Company

$700,000+ Rockwell Automation

$600,000+ Baker Hostetler Er nst & Young LLP FirstEnergy Foundation and The Illuminating Company Parker Hannifin Corporation

$500,000+ American Greetings Corporation University Hospitals

$400,000+ Deloitte Jones Day NASA Glenn Research Center

Service Center – Cleveland

ScottCare

Bank of America

United Consumer Financial Services

Case Western Reserve University

Western Enterprises

Enterprise Rent-A-Car

$200,000+

Ferro Corporation Graftech International Holdings, Inc. -

Calfee, Halter & Griswold LLP

Cliffs Natural Resources Inc.

Mandel Family Foundation -

Lakewood and Parma Facilities

Dominion East Ohio Gas

Fairmount Minerals**

Materion Corporation

Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland

Moen Incorporated

IBM Corporation

Oswald Companies

The Lincoln Electric Company

The Siemer Family Foundation

Medical Mutual of Ohio

Social Security Administration

Squire Sanders (US) LLP

Tremco Incorporated

Thompson Hine LLP

United Way of Greater Cleveland

Jack, Joe and Mort

U.S. Bank

The United States Postal Service –

The Northern Ohio

Performance Cluster

UPS

* Reported as of 2/17/12

18

UNITED WAY OF GREATER CLEVELAND • CAMPAIGN

** United Way Services of Geauga County Campaign


2011/2012 CAMPAIGN EVENTS Thanks to all of the organizations who organized and ran United Way campaigns. Below are just a few examples of the creative events that help to support our community. 1. Oswald Companies and Barley House hosted Rock United to raise funds for the United Way campaign.

1.

2. Forest City held a thank you luncheon to wrap up their United Way campaign (left to right) Charles A. Ratner, Chairman; Teju Sanusi and sons; David J. LaRue, President and CEO; and Adetayo Sanusi, Senior Financial Analyst. 3. The St. Edward’s Trash Talkers energized the crowd at the Campaign Kickoff and Pancake Flip on Public Square. 4. Ohio Savings Bank employees get into costume for a United Way event.

2.

5. Pacesetter Co-Chair Randall J. Korach, President, Tremco, Inc. (left) and Campaign Co-Chair Fifth Third Bank President and CEO Jerry Kelsheimer (far right) thank Sandra Boing and Nolan Carver, Northeast Ohio Regional Sewer District, for participating as Pacesetters in this year’s campaign. 6. United Way thanked Humanitarian Society donors at an appreciation event hosted by The Cleveland Indians at Progressive Field. Pictured: Roy and Carla Wainwright. 7. Employees at NASA Glenn Research Center held a raffle to support the North Coast Combined Federal Campaign.

3.

4.

5.

6.

7.

19


HOW GREATER CLEVELAND’S SPORTS TEAMS HELP OUR COMMUNITY Special thanks to the Cleveland professional sports teams, The Cleveland Browns, The Cleveland Cavaliers, The Cleveland Indians and the World Golf ChampionshipsBridgestone Invitational for their generous support and participation in United Way of Greater Cleveland activities.

UNITED WAY’S 14TH ANNUAL GOLF TOURNAMENT AT HEMLOCK SPRINGS GOLF CLUB

CLEVELAND BROWNS HOMETOWN HUDDLE This year marked the 13th annual partnership of the Cleveland Browns and United Way of Greater Cleveland for the Hometown Huddle when more than 200 volunteers from the Cleveland Browns, United Way of Greater Cleveland, Cleveland Clinic, along with United Way partners American Greetings Corp. and Fifth Third Bank, built a new ADA friendly playground at the Cleveland Clinic Children’s Hospital for Rehabilitation. The Hometown Huddle is part of United Way’s National NFL Day of Caring. The local Cleveland effort is one of the most extensive hands-on volunteer projects in the country.

20

United Way of Greater Cleveland’s 14th Annual Celebrity Golf Tournament presented by the Cleveland Browns and United Airlines and hosted by Hemlock Springs Golf Club raised $107,700 to help support United Way’s 216 health and human service programs and more than $1.24 million over the past 14 years. Participants played with Cleveland Browns alumni at beautiful Hemlock Springs Golf Club in Geneva. Thank you to Hemlock Springs Golf Club for donating the course for the past 14 years.

UNITED WAY/BRIDGESTONE INVITATIONAL PRO-AM United Way, Northern Ohio Golf Charities, The PGA and the World Golf Championships-Bridgestone Invitational partnered to offer golfers three tournaments: playing in the United Way/Bridgestone Invitational Pro-Am on the Firestone South Course, a discounted package to attend the World Golf Championships-Bridgestone Invitational tournament and participation in the United Way of Greater Cleveland Celebrity Golf Tournament. The Pro-Am raised $7,500 to support United Way’s 216 health and human service programs.

Dr. Michael McHugh (pictured far left) and Dr. Ricardo Rodriguez of the Cleveland Clinic along with an eager playground user listen as Cleveland Brown Josh Cribbs expresses his feelings about giving back to our community and the importance of the Browns United Way partnership and our annual Hometown Huddle.


RideUNITED United Way hosted its first bike tour, RideUNITED, June 5, 2011. More than 300 cyclists participated in the event, pedaling from Cleveland State University to the University of Akron and back, raising nearly $50,000 to support United Way. The event was a true regional collaboration between Cleveland State University, United Way of Greater Cleveland, United Way of Summit County, the University of Akron, the City of Cleveland, the City of Akron, the National Park Service and the Metroparks systems in both Cuyahoga and Summit counties, the Ohio Canal Corridor and The Ohio and Erie Canalway Coalition. Thank you to our founding sponsor Kaiser Permanente.

INDIANS HELP UNITED WAY

SPORTS AUCTION ON WTAM

The Cleveland Indians “Fill the House” promotion raised more than $39,000 to help fund United Way’s 216 health and human service programs. Thank you, Tribe.

Greater Cleveland’s professional sports teams, the Browns, Cavs, Indians and Monsters, donated autographed sports memorabilia and experiences, including trips and tickets to away games, for the 2011 Sports Auction on WTAM. Items were auctioned on WTAM on air and online to generate $21,000.

PACK THE Q The Cleveland Cavaliers offered discount tickets to see the Cavs with a portion of ticket proceeds benefiting United Way. Plus 25 lucky children were selected to participate in the High Five Tunnel.

UNITED WAY DAY AT CLEVELAND BROWNS STADIUM

HUMANITARIAN RECEPTION HOSTED BY THE CLEVELAND INDIANS On September 14, more than 300 Humanitarian Society members enjoyed a reception in appreciation of their generosity compliments of the Cleveland Indians.

The Cleveland Browns hosted United Way for a day at Cleveland Browns Stadium. United Way volunteers were on the field pre-game to high five the Browns players as they ran out on the field.

Slider greets Cleveland Indians Fans at Fill the House.

We were born to unite with our fellow men, and to join in our community with the human race. ~ Cicero

UNITED WAY OF GREATER CLEVELAND • SPORTS AND MEDIA PARTNERS

21


THANK YOU GREATER CLEVELAND MEDIA

Classic Teleproductions for creating our RideUNITED PSA. Clear Channel Radio and its local stations, WGAR, WMJI, WMMS,

Your coverage, generous donations of creative talent and advertising space throughout the year has helped build awareness that Living United will make Greater Cleveland even greater.

WMVX and WTAM, for coverage and support of our special events,

Gratefully, we thank:

Cleveland Campaign video. The creative work was extraordinary.

The Plain Dealer for its excellent coverage and support all year

Television stations WKYC-TV3, WEWS-TV5, WJW FOX 8 and WOIO

long and sponsorship of events. The PD also supported the

CBS 19 for their coverage and promotion of United Way news and

campaign through 35 ads and eight “Profiles in Caring” success

events.

including Andre Knott from the Wills and Snyder Show who was emcee for the 2011 Campaign Kickoff and Pancake Flip. Ideastream for collaboration with United Way’s 211 and informing our community members that help is available by dialing 211. Glazen Creative for producing the 2011 United Way of Greater

stories that demonstrate the impact United Way programs have on individuals and families in our community.

WDOK and Dollar Bank for the Mega Money Machine at the 2011 Campaign Kickoff and Pancake Flip.

cleveland.com for promoting United Way and its events. Also for ongoing coverage and support of special events thank Point to Point Communications for their donation of creative tal-

you Cleveland Magazine, CoolCleveland.com, Crain’s Cleveland

ent and guidance throughout the year to produce beautiful and

Business, Kaleidoscope Magazine, Cleveland Jewish News and

effective print and radio ads and posters for the ninth consecu-

CBS Radio.

tive year to support the campaign. Also, thank you Point to Point for your guidance in creating our social media strategies.

And thank you, The News Herald, Northern Ohio Live, Ohio Magazine, Smart Business Network, Currents, Inside Business and The

Cuyahoga County Community College Media Television and Video Services for creating our RideUNITED videos and all the photography on the day of RideUNITED.

22

UNITED WAY OF GREATER CLEVELAND • SPORTS AND MEDIA PARTNERS

Sun Newspapers for their coverage of United Way news.


1. Rockwell Automation employees help The Music Settlement with a fall clean-up of their grounds. 2. GE employees gave over 5,290 hours of service at Achievement Center’s Camp Cheerful for GE Lighting’s 2011 Global Community Day. 3. Volunteers from Fifth Third Bank participate in ‘Fifth Third Day’ Thursday, May 5, at Murtis H. Taylor Youth Center lending a hand to paint and landscape.

1.

2.

DAYS OF CARING

5. United Way’s Women’s Leadership Council members volunteered at Transitional Housing’s Job Readiness program conducting mock interviews and providing résumé preparation advice. 6. Over 75 employees from Momentive Performance Materials volunteered at Camp Cheerful to help with painting, construction projects and sprucing up the camp grounds. 7. FedEx employees helped with landscaping, wood chipping and assembling a fence on the campus of the Hospice of the Western Reserve. 8. More than 20 members of Young Leaders volunteered at Hiram House Camp to set up and decorate a Halloween hay maze for their annual fall festival.

Nearly 3,000 volunteers from 46 companies and organizations participated in the 2011

3.

4. Baldwin-Wallace College students gave up a Saturday to help paint the interior of the temporary facility for the Cleveland Sight Center.

9. Employees from Global Prairie volunteered with the ladies of Transitional Housing to help with holiday cookie decorating and wrapping gifts for a holiday party.

Days of Caring program. Thank you!

5.

4.

6.

6.

7.

8.

9.

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OUR REGIONAL PARTNERS United Way Services of Geauga County is part of, and United Way of Medina operates in close cooperation with, United Way of Greater Cleveland. Their 2011 highlights follow:

UNITED WAY SERVICES OF GEAUGA COUNTY

UNITED WAY OF MEDINA COUNTY

The Community Fund Partnership, a collaboration between the faith-

through United Way funded programs, accounting for roughly 10

financial resources for Geauga County households in need, provided

percent of Medina County residents.

a total of $40,020 in financial assistance to 191 households. •

cial Stability Partnership program in conjunction with Job & Family

cial assistance from the Senior Discretionary Fund.

Services and the Medina County Financial Stability Partnership with tax returns totaling $64,833.

Free Tax Preparation Services were provided to 109 clients by 13 •

nearly $300 in cash donations and collected 9,170 packets of school

were given to them, totaling nearly $164,000.

supplies and 335 backpacks which were distributed to more than 1,425 students in five school districts.

For the fifth consecutive year, United Way Services of Geauga County •

hosted by Fairmount Minerals. The event raised $85,000.

Grace Baptist Church Youth Group with the Society for Handicapped

In collaboration with Geauga Metropolitan Housing Authority,

Citizens, Rea and Associates with Goodwill Industries, and UPS with The Kidney Foundation of Medina County.

Ninety-three volunteers gave 536 hours of their time over a threeday building process. Funds for the project were secured via public

Committee continued moving toward an RFP (Request for Proposals)

Foundation.

allocations process by successfully completing its first Community Impact Grant process, distributing nearly $25,000 among five pro-

Children involved with the Geauga County Juvenile Court volunteered

grams. Allocations and designations totaled nearly $750,000 for the year.

County Pleasant Hill Home. The garden’s harvest was distributed to the Geauga Hunger Task Force food pantries.

AgrAbility Program. Both events were held at the Miller family farm in Burton. The Geauga Youth Activity Fund was launched to support children who have been or are at risk of being removed from their biological homes. Funding for the program, aimed at providing financial resources to give these children the opportunity to participate in activities which help empower, encourage and engage them in reaching their greatest potential, was provided by an anonymous donor.

24

UNITED WAY OF GREATER CLEVELAND • REGIONAL PARTNERS

More than 30 community organizations selected United Way of Medina County to represent the county as the 2012 Living Well

Two Health, Safety and Fun programs were held in the Amish

Medina County Needs Assessment lead signatory and fiscal agent.

community in partnership with the Arthritis Foundation and the Ohio

United Way of Medina County’s volunteer-led Community Investment

and private donations, including a $10,000 grant from the Pentair

to develop a LIVE UNITED Garden on land donated by the Geauga

Local businesses and organizations participated in various Days of Caring including KeyBank with the Salvation Army of Medina,

a playground was built in Scranton Woods, located in Newbury.

The annual Stuff the Bus Rally, held at 45 collection sites, raised

preparation fees and ensured that all refunds owed to recipients

was the beneficiary of the Bill Conway Founder’s Classic golf outing,

Three Earned Income Tax Clinics were organized as part of the Finan-

Eighty-one senior households received $10,672 in emergency finan-

volunteer tax preparers. The program saved consumers $27,250 in

United Way of Medina County directly served 17,551 local residents

based community and civic organizations to coordinate emergency

Increased attendance at the 21st Annual Taste of Medina County event resulted in more than $26,000 being raised for the community campaign. For the first time ever, event raffle tickets sold out.


STRATEGIC PLAN UPDATE The 2010 – 2013 Strategic Plan is in the third year of implementation. David Whitehead, Community Volunteer, leads the Strategic Planning Committee.

RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT Early in 2011, the Board of Directors approved $750,000 from the reserve account over the next three years to support the 27-page work plan developed under the leadership of Marc Byrnes, United Way Officer of the Board and Donor Relations Committee Chair and Oswald Companies Chairman and CEO. The plan is designed

that generated 312 proposals from United Way partner agencies and organizations specially invited to apply. Based on Organizational Assessment and Community Investment Committee reviews, United Way invested $18,172,860 in 216 programs at 109 health and human service organizations as well as three federated agencies throughout Cuyahoga County.

to increase workplace campaign participation by two percent and funds raised in the annual campaign and program support by several million dollars over the next three years. Strategies include enhanced cultivation of affinity groups and a planned giving program; a concentrated effort to engage midsize businesses; and boosting funds raised and campaign participation within current workplace campaigns.

COMMUNICATION AND BRANDING All United Way communications transitioned to reflect the new value proposition, “United Way of Greater Cleveland helps you help our community.” The major shift in the message is the focus moved from United Way (you should give to United Way because it helps people in need), to the donor (United Way is a trusted source that can help you help our community). Addition-

CUSTOMER RELATIONSHIP MANAGEMENT The transition of our business model from a transactional model to a Relationship Management model gained great momentum

ally, United Way continued to make great strides in social media marketing resulting in over 700 Facebook friends and more than 2,300 followers on Twitter.

and realized many successes for the United Ways of Greater Cleveland, Geauga and Medina. Of the five focus areas, four had notable achievements. These include Organization and Culture, Operations and Process, Data, and Technology. The fifth area, which received limited attention during this second year of transition, is Engagement. This will be the primary focus throughout the third year.

TECHNOLOGY In conjunction with the Operations Technology Review Committee, United Way reviewed its alternatives relative to implementation of software to support the Relationship Management initiative and chose the Enterprise CRM module in conjunction with our current Enterprise application. Also, the Telephone System Subcommittee is conducting an RFP process to select and implement a new

COMMUNITY INVESTMENT In preparation for the first year of the new funding cycle, Commu-

phone system to support United Way, including the 211 information and referral service.

nity Investment volunteers and staff members reviewed relevant data on changing community characteristics, anticipated policy change and adjusted funding priorities to reflect contemporary community need. They managed a Request for Proposals process

UNITED WAY OF GREATER CLEVELAND • STRATEGIC PLAN

25


FINANCIAL REPORT

UNITED WAY OF GREATER CLEVELAND AND THE CLEVELAND COMMUNITY FUND COMBINED STATEMENTS OF FINANCIAL POSITION – DECEMBER 31, 2011 AND 2010

ASSETS Cash Custodial cash Campaign receivables: Prior campaign Current campaign

2011

2010

$5,358,671 $8,202,334 954,399 1,232,919 5,208,445 20,423,719

5,533,831 18,562,974

Total campaign receivables 25,632,164 24,096,805 Less allowance for uncollectible campaign receivables -3,780,741 -3,888,184 Net campaign receivables 21,851,423 20,208,621 Accounts receivable: Agencies 114,495 89,041 Other 1,023,079 678,816 Marketable securities 27,224,845 25,885,162 Prepaid expenses and other assets 373,967 332,632 Loan receivable 10,363 Land, building and equipment – net 5,700,057 5,687,121 Total Assets

$62,600,936 $62,327,009

LIABILITIES AND NET ASSETS Liabilities: Due to designated agencies Accounts payable: Agencies Other Other liabilities Custodial funds Deferred grants and program income Deferred compensation Total liabilities Net assets: Unrestricted: General Board designated Total unrestricted net assets Temporarily restricted Permanently restricted Total net assets Total Liabilities and Net Assets

$9,845,499

$9,439,971

11,551,426 12,104,622 72,648 196,348 6,046,788 2,813,340 954,399 1,232,919 981,947 718,527 785,056 737,351 30,237,763 27,243,078

11,903,600 14,828,370 11,384,593 11,767,864 23,288,193 26,596,234 8,824,980

250,000 250,000 32,363,173 35,083,931 $62,600,936 $62,327,009

Prepared prior to the annual audit by certified public accountants. The report will be completed on or about June 30, 2012 and will be available for inspection at the United Way offices thereafter.

26

UNITED WAY OF GREATER CLEVELAND • FINANCIAL REPORT

8,237,697


COMBINED STATEMENTS OF ACTIVITIES – YEARS ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2011 AND 2010

2011 Unrestricted

Temporarily Restricted

2010 Permanently Restricted

Combined Total

Total

REVENUES, GAINS AND OTHER SUPPORT Contributions applicable to the current period: Campaign contributions received Other contributions received Contributions received in prior periods (released from restriction) Less donor designations Less allocations to agencies recognized in prior period paid in current year Gross contributions Less donor designations – current Allowance for uncollectible pledges Total contributions for current period

$13,585,528 $13,482,238 $13,482,238 $13,585,528 $12,945,983 119,345 119,345 64,832 26,530,717 -7,155,017

-26,530,717 7,155,017

-9,870,372 9,870,372 23,210,201 -9,505,328 13,704,873 13,010,815 -3,238,813 -3,238,813 -2,250,610 -1,143,092 1,512,250 369,158 365,982 18,828,296 -7,993,078 10,835,218 11,126,187

Contributions applicable to next allocation period: Campaign revenue received for next allocation period 27,540,762 27,540,762 26,530,717 Less donor designations -7,449,094 -7,449,094 -7,155,017 Less allowance for uncollectible pledges -1,570,000 -1,570,000 -1,512,250 Less allocations to agencies to be distributed next allocation period 9,941,307 -9,941,307 Total contributions for next allocation period 9,941,307 8,580,361 18,521,668 17,863,450 Total contributions 28,769,603 587,283 29,356,886 28,989,637 Gains and other support: Program fees Grants Investment income Realized gain (loss) on investment transactions, net Unrealized gain (loss) on investment transactions, net Rental income Total revenues

3,188,147 3,188,147 3,052,215 367,226 367,226 721,323 423,170 423,170 416,328 -40,560 -40,560 70,695 -640,545 -640,545 1,800,481 77,096 77,096 78,447 32,144,137 587,283 32,731,420 35,129,126

ALLOCATIONS, CONTRIBUTIONS AND FUNCTIONAL EXPENSES Funds allocated to agencies Contribution of earnings Total allocations and contributions

21,538,715 21,538,715 22,171,199 74,722 74,722 77,077 21,613,437 21,613,437 22,248,276

Functional expenses: Educational development programs Planning and agency relations Fundraising Management and general Total functional expenses

2,056,726 2,056,726 1,790,047 1,446,654 1,446,654 1,449,847 3,047,244 3,047,244 2,803,399 4,592,986 4,592,986 4,519,320 11,143,610 11,143,610 10,562,613

Loss on disposal of building equipment

91,125

Total allocations, contributions and functional expenses

32,757,047 32,757,047 32,902,014

Change in net assets before additional pension adjustment Pension adjustment

-612,910 587,283 -25,627 2,227,112 -2,695,131 -2,695,131 -174,105

Change in net assets

-3,308,041

Net assets, beginning of year

26,596,234

Net assets, end of year

587,283 8,237,697

$23,288,193 $8,824,980

250,000

-2,720,758 2,053,007 35,083,931

33,030,924

$250,000 $32,363,173 $35,083,931

27


BOARD OF DIRECTORS OFFICERS OF THE BOARD

BOARD OF DIRECTORS

CHAIRMAN OF THE BOARD AND

Monte Ahuja

CHIEF VOLUNTEER OFFICER

Bruce H. Akers

Terrance C. Z. Egger

Cynthia H. Andrews

CHAIR, PLANNED GIVING COMMITTEE

Thomas W. Adler

K. Michael Benz Ronald M. Berkman, Ph.D. Joseph A. Calabrese

CHAIR, COMMUNITY INVESTMENT DIVISION

Joseph L. Carballada

Steven R. Borstein

Ann E. Cavanaugh

CHAIR, DONOR RELATIONS COMMITTEE

Marc S. Byrnes

Rick Chiricosta Joseph M. Cimperman Todd F. Clossin

CHAIR, MARKETING COMMITTEE

Jeanne Halladay Coughlin

Trent Smith

Donald Joseph Dailey

CHAIR, BOARD DEVELOPMENT COMMITTEE

Steve Davis, M.D.

Paul Clark 2011 CAMPAIGN CO-CHAIR

Jerry L. Kelsheimer

Craig A. Donnan Carmen E. Edgehouse Steven A. Eisenbrown David J. Enzerra

CHAIR, HUMAN RESOURCES COMMITTEE

Heather R. Ettinger

Robert C. Smith

Rhonda S. Ferguson

Michael W. Goin

Mark J. Moran

David S. Goodman

Patrick S. Mullin

Howard W. “Hoby” Hanna IV

James B. Niehaus

Mike Holmgren

Denise Polverine

A.J. Hyland

David L. Pugh

Frank G. Jackson

Robert S. Reitman

Kathryn P. Jensen

John M. Saada Jr.

Elliott A. Kellman

Shelley J. Seifert

Patricia D. Kennedy-Scott

Baiju R. Shah

Thomas S. Kilbane (deceased)

Trent A. Smith

Robert J. King Jr.

Barbara R. Snyder

Evan Koppel

Brooke Spectorsky

Randall J. Korach

Sally Stewart

Joe Lopez

Maryrose T. Sylvester

Gena C. Lovett

Jerry Sue Thornton, Ph.D.

Dwayne C. Meeks

Kurt C. Treu

Sarah K. Melamed

Senator Nina Turner

W. Scott Merk

Daniel P. Walsh

Steve Millard

Eliza Wing

Stanley R. Miller

Scott A. Wolstein

Katherine M. Mlakar Beth E. Mooney

CHAIR, ADMINISTRATION COMMITTEE

Richard P. Stovsky

LIFE DIRECTORS

DIRECTORS EMERITI

MANAGEMENT STAFF

2011 CAMPAIGN CO-CHAIR

Edward F. Bell

William E. Butler

PRESIDENT AND CHIEF

Alexander M. Cutler

Preston B. Heller Jr.

EXECUTIVE OFFICER

CHAIR, STRATEGIC PLANNING COMMITTEE

E. Mandell de Windt

Julien L. McCall

K. Michael Benz

David W. Whitehead

Robert W. Gillespie Jr.

Zev Weiss

Henry J. Goodman

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE

William F. Hauserman Louise I. Humphrey

CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER

INVITED GUESTS

Michael E. Headen

John A. Begala

VICE PRESIDENT,

Mary-Alice Frank

COMMUNITY INVESTMENT/

Jane E. Fumich

GOVERNMENT RELATIONS

Patrick Gareau

Judith G. Simpson

Stephen H. Hoffman

VICE PRESIDENT,

Ruby L. Terry

RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT

Harriet Applegate

Jerry V. Jarrett

Christopher M. Connor

William E. MacDonald

Robin C. Cottingham

Alex Machaskee

Robert W. Gillespie Jr.

Morton L. Mandel

David J. Hooker

Henry L. Meyer III

Keith J. Libman

Sandra Pianalto

Kathleen G. Vorobel

Robert E. Paponetti

Richard W. Pogue, Esq.

DIRECTOR, HUMAN RESOURCES/

Charles A. Ratner

Robert S. Reitman

EQUAL OPPORTUNITY

Deborah Z. Read

William R. Robertson

Suzanne Bloomfield

Carol E. Rivchun

Cheryle A. Wills-Matthews

Eleanor B. Steigman

DIRECTOR, OPERATIONS Mary T. Sedlacek DIRECTOR, MARKETING, COMMUNICATIONS & STRATEGIC PLANNING Jenna Snyder

28

UNITED WAY OF GREATER CLEVELAND • BOARD OF DIRECTORS


COMMUNITY PARTNERS UNITED WAY PARTNER AGENCIES Achievement Centers for Children AIDS Taskforce of Greater Cleveland Alta House American Cancer Society American Heart Association, Cleveland Metro Division American Red Cross, Greater Cleveland Chapter American Sickle Cell Anemia Association Applewood Centers, Inc. The Arc of Greater Cleveland Arthritis Foundation - Northeastern Ohio Chapter Beech Brook/Family Health Program Big Brothers Big Sisters of Greater Cleveland Boy Scouts of America, Greater Cleveland Council Boys and Girls Clubs of Cleveland Bridgeway, Inc. BVU: The Center for Nonprofit Excellence Care Alliance Health Center Catholic Charities Health and Human Services* Bishop William M. Cosgrove Center Catholic Charities Chemical Dependency Services Catholic Charities Services of Cuyahoga County Early Learning Center at the Quadrangle Employment and Training Fatima Family Center Hispanic Senior Center La Providencia Family Center Matt Talbot Inn Mental Health Services Parmadale Rose-Mary Center St. Martin de Porres Family Center The Center for Community Solutions Center for Families and Children Center for Health Affairs Euclid Hospital Hillcrest Hospital Parma Community General Hospital South Pointe Hospital Southwest General Hospital University Hospitals City Year Cleveland Cleveland Clinic Children’s Hospital for Rehabilitation Cleveland Hearing & Speech Center Cleveland Mediation Center Cleveland Rape Crisis Center Cleveland Sight Center Cleveland Tenants Organization Community Housing Solutions Community Re-Entry Program Consumer Protection Association

The Covenant Cystic Fibrosis Foundation Diabetes Partnership of Cleveland Domestic Violence & Child Advocacy Center East Domestic Violence & Child Advocacy Center West Early Childhood Enrichment Center East Cleveland Neighborhood Center East End Neighborhood House Empowerment Center of Greater Cleveland Epilepsy Association Esperanza, Inc. Far West Center 211/First Call For Help Friendly Inn Settlement, Inc. Girl Scouts of Northeast Ohio – North Region Golden Age Centers of Greater Cleveland, Inc. Goodrich-Gannett Neighborhood Center Goodwill Industries of Greater Cleveland and East Central Ohio, Inc. Greater Cleveland Volunteers Hanna Perkins Center Harvard Community Services Center Hiram House Camp Hitchcock Center for Women Hospice of the Western Reserve, Inc. International Services Center Jewish Federation of Cleveland* Bellefaire JCB Jewish Family Services Association Mandel Jewish Community Center Karamu House, Inc. Kathryn R. Tyler Neighborhood Center Kidney Foundation of Ohio, Inc. LEAP (Linking Employment Abilities and Potential) Legal Aid Society of Cleveland Lexington-Bell Community Center Long Term Care Ombudsman Lutheran Metropolitan Ministry Magnolia Club House Mental Health Services for Homeless Persons, Inc. Merrick House Murtis Taylor Human Services System The Music Settlement Neighborhood Centers Association Neighborhood Leadership Institute New Directions, Inc. North Coast Health Ministry Northern Ohio Hemophilia Foundation ORCA House Phillis Wheatley Association Positive Education Program Project Learn Rainey Institute Recovery Resources

Salvation Army Senior Citizen Resources, Inc. Services for Independent Living Spanish American Committee Starting Point Towards Employment Transitional Housing, Inc. United Black Fund of Greater Cleveland, Inc.* United Cerebral Palsy Association of Greater Cleveland United Labor Agency, Inc. University Settlement Urban League of Greater Cleveland Visiting Nurse Association of Ohio Vocational Guidance Services Voices for Ohio’s Children West Side Catholic Center West Side Community House West Side Ecumenical Ministry YMCA of Greater Cleveland Youth Opportunities Unlimited YWCA of Greater Cleveland

FUNDED AGENCIES Adoption Network Asian Services In Action, Inc. Cleveland Housing Network Cleveland UMADAOP Eliza Bryant Village Emerald Development & Economic Network Enterprise Community Partners, Inc Fairhill Partners Famicos Foundation, Inc. Family Connections Family Promise of Greater Cleveland Free Clinic HandsOn Northeast Ohio Hard Hatted Women The Intergenerational School Lakewood Community Service Center Neighborhood Family Practice Nueva Luz Urban Resource Center Senior Outreach Services Senior Transportation Connection WECO Fund, Inc. Women’s Recovery Center

UNITED WAY SERVICES OF GEAUGA COUNTY COMMUNITY PARTNERS United Way Services of Geauga County American Cancer Society - Geauga** American Heart Association, Northeast Ohio Affiliate** Arthritis Foundation Big Brothers Big Sisters of Northeast Ohio Boy Scouts of America, Greater Western Reserve Council Camp Sue Osborn Catholic Charities Community Services of Geauga County Chagrin Falls Park Community Center Chardon Community Day Care DDC Clinic - Center for Special Needs Children 2-1-1 First Call For Help Girl Scouts of North East Ohio Lake-Geauga Recovery Centers, Inc. Ravenwood Mental Health Center The Salvation Army Geauga County Service Unit Starting Point** WomenSafe, Inc. * Federated agencies make decisions regarding the distribution of United Way funds within their respective networks. ** Denotes regional operations through United Way of Greater Cleveland.


1331 Euclid Avenue Cleveland, Ohio 44115 unitedwaycleveland.org

Thank you to Consolidated Graphics for donating the printing of this Annual Report. 111110/2.6M

United Way of Greater Cleveland 2011/2012 Report to the Community  

Please view our annual report to learn more about how United Way is strengthening Greater Cleveland and how contributions are distributed.

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