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quarterly

INDUSTRY FEATURE

aerospace

REACHING THE #MFG GENERATION

also in this issue •

• • • • •

The Man Who Would Have Us...

the surgeon & the gear maker

A GLIMPSE INTO Manley’S LIFE

A United Grinding Technologies Inc. Publication


quarterly

10

reaching the #mfg generation

Manufacturing is still a tough sell. But the “advanced manufacturing” of today, is rewarding. It’s clean, technical, sophisticated and, dare I say it -- it’s cool.

12

social media optimization:

Make A Quality Decision

It is an excellent idea in 2013 to embrace the concept of social media marketing, but I see a lot of companies “dropping the ball” by not applying some basic optimization techniques.

14

tapping into Generation next

“...I think it’s cultural, too. We’re going to have to make a huge cultural shift in this country to make it desirable to work in manufacturing again…”

18

The man who would have us make things here

“As I travel around the country and see manufacturer after manufacturer devastated by work leaving their plants to China, it’s heart shattering. So, I decided something had to be done, and I did this.”

24

The surgeon & the gear maker

The very best surgeons perform the most difficult procedures, those requiring extreme skill, precision, deftness and experience. The same is true of the very best gear makers — they gravitate toward the most difficult jobs.

30

continuing on a positive flight

The commercial aerospace and UAS markets will lead the industry with significant growth in the coming years, while military aircraft will lag behind. — Matt Grasson, AM&D.

CONTENTS 2

Meister Abrasives www.meister-abrasives-usa.com

International

Meister Abrasives USA Inc. 201 Circuit Drive NORTH KINGSTOWN RI 02852 USA Phone 401 294 2530 Fax 401 294 7326 sales@meister-abrasives-usa.com

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MY THOUGHTS GRINDING IN MOTION

30

A GLIMPSE INTO

looking at the aerospace industry

40

ON TECH

Each segment of the aerospace industry has its unique opportunities and challenges in the near and short term. — Mitch Free.

44

LAST THOUGHT

36


MY THOUGHTS

Of Generation Next “The entire United Grinding Team is Generation Next focused to the benefit to what’s really most important at United Grinding: Our Customers.”

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The study of generations and analyzing how its aspects effect cultural and societal change over time is not a new thing. Generational studies first gained serious traction in the 19th century and have since evolved to a highly developed social science encompassing in-depth examinations of generational theory, generational tension, and demography. A more contemporary outcome has been the categorization of social generations with labels such as Baby Boomers, Generation X, Y or Z, Millennials, and the MTV Generation. Current generation speculation on what role older and younger generations will play in driving future social and economic change has for ages been a favorite generational studies topic. All interesting stuff, but it begs the question, can generational study concepts be applied to the benefit of current and future North America manufacturing industry generations? As the cover page on this edition of the GRIND quarterly implies, United Grinding answer to this question is definitely, “YES”. Consequently the entire United Grinding Team is keenly focused on tapping what we refer to as Generation Next. So exactly what is Generation Next at United Grinding? It’s an important part of a multi-faceted, but simple, strategic business model with Customer Experience Management (CEM) as its primary driving force. CEM basically involves a company structuring its processes from a customer centric perspective. This in turn means each and every touchpoint a customer can potentially have with the company is purposefully designed so a customer’s defined needs are quickly and conveniently met on a highly consistent basis. United Grinding’s CEM model has ten major customer touch points which we know from long experience will all definitely come into play during our customers’ manufacturing solutions life-cycle interactions with us. Our touch-point performance relative to customer expectations is measured through Net Promoter Score (NPS) customer survey analytics for which we will be implementing a Generation Next NPS solution in May of this year. Generationally speaking, United Grinding has historically seen total life-cycles, defined as the time elapsed between a customer purchasing new and replacement manufacturing solutions from us, ranging anywhere between five to fifteen years or more. Of course, this total life-cycle mostly depends on the customer’s specific application and their business philosophy with respect to new technology investment. So, it could be logical for United Grinding to generally conclude that our Generation Next program activities could be implemented over a five to fifteen year time span. As the leading provider of total grinding solutions in North America, we absolutely know doing it at this pace would definitely not be in the best interests of our customers. In fact, United Grinding’s tapping Generation Next is and must be a compilation of CEM related actions simultaneously implemented and refined under varying generationally driven time cycles. This generational adaptation philosophy ensures we are being proactive in helping our customers meet the wide variety of complex challenges they face with respect to global business evolution and competition. For example, United Grinding customer survey responses have emphatically told us they need rapid 24/7/365 access to information about United Grinding, our brands, new technology developments, our manufacturing solutions and experience, technical support data, and parts availability, just to name a few important customer defined touchpoints. United Grinding’s Generation Next program has responded by recently launching a new website already packed with useful information and data for our customers with a lot more to come in the near future including e-commerce functionality. Our Generation

Next initiative also means tapping the vast and rapidly growing world of social media to facilitate and expedite communications with our customers whenever and wherever they want and need to access it. United Grinding’s Generation Next also encompasses activities associated with workforce development, specifically for our Team and United States manufacturing in general. For many reasons, including global competitiveness, our customers must now operate with more leanly staffed organizations. Through our Generation Next initiative, United Grinding is increasing the number of members on our Team with a focus on providing our customers an even broader range of rapid response technical and operational support services. Additionally, Generation Next mandates detailed planning to ensure United Grinding’s future generation Team is always being prepared. It also stipulates continued, very substantial investments in the training of our Team plus equipping them with advanced communications technologies and tablet-based applications to make information sharing, purchasing decisions, and issues resolution fast and convenient for our customers. And yes, United Grinding’s Generation Next program definitely has a critically important advancement in grinding technology aspect. All brands of our international Körber Schleifring Group are consistently working to advance and maintain their grinding technologies to industry leading levels. In this respect, generational grinding technology life cycles have historically been five to seven years, but not now. Grinding technology life cycles are trending downward to between three and five years where overall machine development is concerned and to even much shorter time lines with respect to CNC control systems software evolution. The size and financial strength of the Körber Schleifring Group, plus the innovative grinding technology competencies embodied in its brands’ Team members, ensures United Grinding will always be able to deliver the very best Generation Next manufacturing solutions for our North American customers. Watch our website and social media outlets for some highly important news coming from the Körber Schleifring Group later this year related to and in supportive of United Grinding’s overall Generation Next initiative. At United Grinding, time is of the essence accompanied by a high sense of urgency when it comes to our consistently taking innovative, industry leading actions to meet our customers’ most important Generation Next needs. We have no Plan B….tapping Generation Next at all levels is our only viable strategic and tactical option. The world of North American manufacturing is changing rapidly where generational time lines associated with people, information sharing, communications, and all types of technologies are getting shorter and shorter. United Grinding’s Generation Next strategic initiative and its associated CEM business model will continuously position our Team to meet the challenges of current and future North American manufacturing generations. The entire United Grinding Team is Generation Next focused to the benefit to what’s really most important at United Grinding: Our Customers.

RODGER PINNEY President & CEO United Grinding


in motion

$775 Million Market Projected for Grinding Equipment The 2013 Gardner Research Capital Spending Survey and Forecast results indicate that U.S. manufacturers are forecasting to increase investments in new metalcutting equipment more than 8% in 2013.

$775 Million Market Projected for Grinding Equipment

Automotive Largest Spender on Cylindrical/External Grinding Equipment

Cylindrical/external grinding is the largest projected segment of the grinding equipment market with projected spending of $230.3 million. The table below represents spending inten-

The largest segment of this market is automotive with projected spending of $70.1 million. The table below represents spending intentions for cylindrical/external grinding by industry.

Equipment Type

Grinding, Cylindrical/External - Industry

$ In Millions

Cylindrical/External

$230.3

80,000,000

Gearcutting

$173.9

70,000,000

Flat/Surface

$133.4

60,000,000

ID/OD

$120.2

50,000,000

Centerless

$ 58.3

40,000,000

Grinding, Other

$ 36.3

Internal

$ 22.9

Creep Feed

$ 0.1

Total Projected Market for Grinding Equipment

$775.5

Source: Gardner Research 2013 Capital Spending Survey & Forecast

Gardner Abrasives Vitrified Centerless Grinding Wheels

The name you have trusted for 100 years presents Gardner Abrasive Vitrified Grinding Wheels. Designed to maximize the efficiency of centerless grinding operations, these high performance vitrified wheels are ideal for difficult to grind materials. The vitrified wheels allow for better form retention, contributing to excellent component finish in precision grinding of ferrous and non-ferrous materials and are available in a variety of sizes. Combining years of experience and state-of-the-art technology, Gardner engineers offer dedicated application support and quick delivery of the latest line of Gardner Abrasives Vitrified grinding wheels.

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30,000,000 20,000,000 10,000,000 0

Automotive Metalcutting Job Shops Aerospace Oil, Gas Field & Mining Machinery Military Off Road & Construction Machinery Medical

Norton Abrasives Launches Global Brand Standards

N

Capital Spending Survey Results

tions for grinding equipment.

EVERY generation’s breakthroughs are proven false by the next generation’s technology. DAN BROWN, The Lost Symbol

orton Abrasives, a brand of Saint-Gobain Abrasives, Worcester, Mass., has introduced a new global Norton brand standards program. The standards will unify branding efforts worldwide to facilitate a cohesive, impactful image for the Norton brand and Norton sub-brands, for quicker association to the brand assets and the best products for cutting, grinding, sanding and polishing applications. The new global identity program includes the Norton parallelogram logo that is now endorsed with the Saint-Gobain parent organization and a structure that ties the Norton brand with all of the technology-leading sub brands, including Norton Quantum, Norton Blaze and Norton Paradigm. “With the changing face of communication, it is imperative that we ensure every touch point with our brand is consistent so as we reach people globally, the brand is uniformly identifiable,” said David Long, director of marketing and strategy at Norton Abrasives. “As the industry leader, it is important to maintain this cohesive strategy so that our customers immediately associate our brand with the

high level of product performance and technical expertise they are familiar with, no matter where they are located. With our new brand standards, we have a clear strategy on how we visually present ourselves in our literature, web activities, media, advertising, packaging and all other marketing collateral.” In the new standards, Norton Abrasives is complementing their most valuable visual asset, the Norton brand logo, with the introduction of the Norton “Mark”. The Mark is an iconic element that ties the shape of the Norton logo parallelogram with a contemporary graphic treatment to provide a quick brand reference for packaging, promotional wear, and web sites and apps. The program will roll out globally throughout 2013. Recently, Norton Abrasives debuted an Abrasives App that includes grinding and coolant calculators as well as product selection tools. The app, available through the App Store (iOS) and Google Play (Android), displays the Mark as the icon and welcome page.

Source: Gardner Research 2013 Capital Spending Survey & Forecast

In Stock Standard Dressing Tools CITCO & Gardner Abrasives offers standard diamond dressing tools on the shelf and ready to ship. CITCO standard dressing tools keep up time up with key advantages: boost productivity through faster truing and dressing, extend wheel life with less stock removal per dressing cycle and broader application capabilities for heavier operations. Diamond grit tools eliminate downtime for turning, resetting or other services. CITCO’s exclusive method of pelletizing ensures uniform dispersion of natural diamond throughout the entire diamond section and fresh and uniformly distributed diamond points are continuously exposed until completely consumed. GQ/ Premiere Issue

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Technology feeds on itself. Technology makes more technology possible. ALVIN TOFFLER, Future Shock

the 1,000th s33 from studer STUDER AG announced the production of the 1,000th machine in its best-selling S33 series in the 100th year anniversary of the company’s formation. The Swiss celebrated this event during the 16th Indian Machine Tool Exhibition, IMTEX, which took place between January 24th and 30th, 2013 in Bangalore. A total of 70 customers, press representatives and colleagues from Körber Schleifring India (KSI) were invited. The universal cylindrical grinding machine received appropriate recognition on the exhibition stand of the SCHLEIFRING Group: In the presence of guests and visitors to the KSI stand, Swiss Airbrush Champion Philipp Klopfenstein sprayed a special design onto the body of the 1,000th Studer S33. Studer was the first to succeed in using several grinding wheels on one and the same machine, an “All in One” solution. Thus began the future of more efficient and intelligent machining. The corner stone of today’s S33 was laid in 1996 with the S30leanPRO. This machine also has Studer’s “All in One” invention, and became well known as a compact, easy-tooperate and extremely flexible universal cylindrical grinding machine with two external grinding wheels and one beltdriven internal grinding wheel. An innovation at this time was the creation of grinding and dressing programs using pictogramming. Operator prompting developed and patented by Studer – revolutionary for the industry – allowed the operator to create the process directly, using icons, without ISO codes. In 2000, the eco650 was designed specifically for the American market. It was simple and reasonably priced, an external grinding machine for beginners. The customer could configure and mount his own accessory kits on a standard machine base. Then, in 2003, based on all of their experience with the S30leanPRO and the eco650, the developers designed a new universal machine model, specifically planned for the requirements of job shop operations. The machine was ideal for all those shops that run job order production, do not manufacture their own product, and never know what will have to be machined next on the grinding machine. There are two distances between centers (650 and 1000mm) and external and internal cylindrical grinding on a rotatable grinding head for machining the workpiece in a single clamping. And naturally, all in Studer quality and last but not

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GRINDING IN MOTION

TRADE SHOWS AND EVENTS EASTEC 2013

OMTEC 2013

Join us at the East Coast’s largest annual manufacturing event!

The 9th Annual Orthopaedic Manufacturing & Technology Exposition and Conference (OMTEC)

Date/Time Information: May 14-16, 2013 Date/Time Information June 12-13, 2013

Location: West Springfield, Massachusetts Join United Grinding in Booth 1006 in Building 1 See more at: http://www.grinding.com/en/about/ information-center/trade-shows-events.html

“Visit the grind Biergarten for Fun and Excitement” UNITED GRINDING is a proud Sponsor of the Student Challenge on Thursday, May 16, 2013, Helping Raise Awareness to the Machine Tool Industry

Location: Chicago, IL, Stephens Convention Center, Join United Grinding in Booth #513 Visit the site for information, www.omtecexpo.com

Studer produced the 1,000th machine in its best-selling S33 series in the 100th year since the company’s formulation. The Swiss celebrated this event during the 16th Indian Machine Tool Exhibition IMTEX, which took place between January 24th and 30th 2013 in Bangalore.

least: reasonably priced. The machine has been upgraded twice with additional functionality during its life cycle. Over the course of time, market-specific variants of the S33 developed. The so-called derivatives on the S33 platform can well be compared to the product strategy of the automobile world. The S33 as a highly functional universal design: the KC33 specifically for the Chinese market, built by Körber Schleifring Machinery Shanghai, the favoritCNC as a simple variant for the Eastern European and American markets and the ecoGrinder as the best process-accessible version for the Asian continent. Later Studer also specified a part automation device for large batch production, the smartLoad® - due to the relatively confined space conditions a telescopic system had to be developed and patented. Over a thousand S33s have been manufactured and perform their grinding tasks at the highest quality level on a daily basis. The 1,000th anniversary machine is now the star of the KSI showroom, where it will be able to demonstrate its capabilities to customers and interested visitors until its sale in a year’s time.

Not Smoke & Mirrors

Others may try to “razzle dazzle” you, but when you need high-quality, reliable spindle repair, there’s no illusion, rely on Fischer Precise USA. Fischer Precise USA has over 70 years of experience in spindle manufacturing, maintenance and repair. Our legacy has been built on the highest levels of customer service and support. There’s nothing up our sleeves … Fischer Precise USA provides the ultimate in service and repair. Our skilled technicians are familiar with all major brands. We have the capabilities, capacity and expertise to restore your spindle to peak... dare we say it… magical performance. Visit www.fischerprecise.com to learn more about our repair services, technical support and capabilities.

High Performance Spindle Solutions FISCHER PRECISE U.S.A., RACINE, WI 53405 U.S.A. 262.632.6173 800.333.6173 FAX: 262.632.6730 Email:info@fischerprecise.com www.fischerprecise.com


Studer Wins Prodex Award With Radically New Software We are pleased to announce that Fritz Studer AG has won first place in this year’s Prodex Award with a software solution enhancing the man/machine interface, which helps to radically facilitate the operation of cylindrical grinding machines — component quality, unit costs, machining time, energy efficiency – all important production processes benefit enormously. The requirements on industrial production processes are increasingly enormous. Newly designed components are appearing in ever-faster succession, and at the same time the number of component variants is increasing. This has consequences for the machine operator. He must set up the resulting changing production sequences as quickly as possible and without errors. When complex processes such as cylindrical grinding are involved, this task is particularly demanding. More than 300 machine parameters often determine the machining process. Against this background it is no surprise that first place in this year’s Prodex Award went to a software program: “StuderTechnology.” With this new program, the operation of a cylindrical grinding machine is made considerably easier. Many of the usual settings are made for the operator.

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“We are delighted with this award”, says Fred Gaegauf, Chairman of the Management Board at Studer. “On the one hand, it confirms how important this topic is in the view of many experts. And on the other hand it shows that our technology actually represents a huge step forward in the operation of cylindrical grinding machines.” The basic principle of the program, which was developed jointly with the software specialists from MCS AG, can be simply explained: “StuderTechnology” independently determines the necessary central data in cylindrical

grinding. “The principle can be compared to that of modern cameras. They determine many important values, such as focal distance or exposure and auto matically ensure a high quality image,” explains Erhard Kämpf, Head of the Form and Thread Grinding Department. ‘StuderTechnology’ does a similar sort of thing.” How? The Swiss grinding specialists have amassed a large quantity of data – a sort of “Best of Cylindrical Grinding.” The program contains the figures and information from countless grinding tests, in which the best

Specialist for CNC rotary tables

machining strategy has been determined for a wide variety of components. “StuderTechnology” takes advantage of these values depending on the specific application and precisely applies them. The user benefits directly from the machine manufacturer’s extensive know-how. It is also possible to expand this treasure trove of experience at any time. Users can, as it were, expand the database with their own individual “Best of . . .” The direct effect of this approach is quite surprising. First, it reduces the overall machining time by up to 50 percent, because the system operator does not have to try to find the best strategy by “trial and error” for new components. Grinders have little time for this, especially with small batches. The result: The metal removal rate of a grinding wheel is often not fully utilized, and machining time is prolonged. By contrast, “StuderTechnology” ensures the optimal machining time in every respect at the press of a button. In addition, fewer bad parts are produced using this method, and the consumption of energy and auxiliary materials is reduced. That the Swiss cylindrical grinding specialists are more than convinced by this system is also demonstrated by the fact that for over a year they have delivered all machines that are equipped with the StuderWIN operating software with “StuderTechnology” integrated. In this variant it is an integral part of the machine control. In addition, Studer still offers a second variant for users who have their own programming department. This enables customers to optimally program machines, graphically represent simulations, calculate unit costs or generate operation plans with the help of the PC. “The Prodex Award is the validation of this futureoriented software development, which is already successfully used by many customers on a daily basis. Investment in ‘StuderTechnology’ thus not only facilitates grinding tasks, but also helps to optimize the machine investment with this added value,” concludes Fred Gaegauf. “We are confident that ‘StuderTechnology’ will become well established in the market.”

www.lehmann-rotary-tables.com

Using StuderTechnology, it is possible to achieve improved results and simultaneously reduce processing time Erhard Kämpf, head of department Forms & Threads, Fritz Studer AG significantly.

New generation 500: • Modular design: 4 basic modules – over 170 variations • Up to 111 min-1 – clamp and release quickly – short cycle time • High degree of accuracy: concentricity, geometry and positioning • Compact and rigid construction – high spindle clamping torque • Fully impervious to IP67 as standard – IP68 optional (waterproof in bath) • Large workpiece clamp range • Competitive prices General importer for North America

Rotec Tools Ltd. 5 Schuman Road, Millwood, NY 10546 Phone: (914) 941-7311 Fax: (914) 941-0226 Email: info@rotectools.com www.rotectools.com Wanted: local representatives

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E H T G N I EACH

G F #MRATION R

E N E G

W

hen US kids struggle to keep up globally in math and science, trying to engage them on the topic of manufacturing is difficult, let alone convincing them it might be a good place for a long, rewarding career. But manufacturing, specifically the “advanced manufacturing” of today, is rewarding. It’s clean, technical, sophisticated and, dare I say it -- it’s cool. Manufacturing hasn’t told its story very well for itself. But that’s beginning to change. Manufacturing, known as #mfg on the Web, is getting its groove back. And with more stories than ever to tell about sophisticated use of software, new leangreen ways of making things and machines that seem to do everything in just one or a few steps, there’s a lot of interesting news to spread. In the old days, we might have put that message into a magazine or newspaper and waited for the post office or news carrier to deliver it. But those days are as long gone as the dirty, dangerous factories of the past. If you want to get your manufacturing message out these days, to audienc-

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es new or old, you need to push it out digitally or help people pull it in digitally through the various media people have adopted these days with their computers, tablets and smart phones. You really can’t just post it on a Web site and hope people will find it, either. You have to help reach folks with the right search terms, information streams and alert systems. Manufacturing Engineering’s media operation is a perfect example. A few years ago, we sent our printed monthly magazine to our approximately 100,000 qualified subscribers and archived the articles on our Web site for readers to look up, if they were interested. But today, we have to do so much more to reach our existing and younger, future audience than ever before. Today, you can download our monthly magazine through our iPad or iPhone app, where the magazine is also searchable and share-able on Facebook, Twitter or e-mail. Those articles are archived on our Web site, www.MfgEngMedia.com, where you can also see a digital version of the magazine. You can download PDFs of our current and past articles, as well as special reports we never had room for in the standard printed magazine.

Manufacturing is still a tough sell

By Sarah A. Webster

Editor in Chief Manufacturing Engineering Media

Today, we also know folks are often too busy to go browsing around the World Wide Web for the content they want and need to be more informed employees and managers. So we offer the service of alerting you to relevant manufacturing content, from Manufacturing Engineering, as well as other high-value sources, through our Twitter feed, Facebook account and YouTube video channel. You can find links to our social media accounts right on our home page, www.MfgEngMedia.com. The news streams we send out over those social media outlets have value in and of themselves. We know what content our audience cares about and we let you know about it as soon as we can, whether we wrote the article or not. So when news breaks about Boeing’s 787 investigation, we send out Tweets and Facebook updates, just as we do when Siemens holds a manufacturing conference or a high-level executive is making important remarks at an event such as AeroDef, which is hosted by the Society of Manufacturing Engineers. Subscribing to our Twitter feed at SME_ME or liking us on Facebook helps our audience find the content they care about, whether we create it or a competi-

tor does. Our goal is to keep our audience informed with the information they need to do business in a competitive global field, where information is still power. Very soon, our followers will begin to appreciate how subscribing to our service makes them more informed. It’s incredibly convenient to be notified of, say, a new regulation in aerospace or automotive manufacturing in your Facebook news updates, right alongside the photo of your relatives or friends talking about the latest sports scores. Maybe that’s why our number of followers is growing by leaps and bounds. For now, younger people prefer to get their information in this alert-me manner. I say “for now” because getting your message out to many people is ever-changing in this digital age. And as much as digital tools have made communication easier, they’ve also made it more complicated by expanding the number of places and platforms one needs to use to get the message out. According to Tim Fausch, Group Publisher, Manufacturing Engineering Media, the ranking of the social media tools, as measured by usefulness to manufacturers, looks something like this: At the top is Twitter due to its current use and its

likelihood of continued use. When it initially came out, Tim viewed it as mostly a consumer fun-type device. But then it hit him that 140 characters is a headline. These are free headlines that you can put out into the market place, and they get a message across in a very effective manner. You can schedule them throughout the day, and they can be a very strong part of your marketing. The key, though, with Twitter is that you need to follow the three “E’s”: You need to educate, to engage, and to entertain. If you can make the content you’re posting useful, containing valuable information, you can engage people by leading them onto a Web site or to another source, and it’s important to be a little bit entertaining, creative, to grab people’s attention and to make it fun, if at all possible. You Tube appears to be second. In a business setting, You Tube has the power of two dimensions. You’re not only hearing, but you’re also seeing. We’re finding that often You Tube is doing the job of a salesman and a brochure, and in many cases it does this more efficiently — which is not to say that those other tools are not important, but the two or three minute video can be a very powerful social media tool to get people to

engage with your product. LinkedIn has great value if you can set up a community. If you can create an organized community, then dialogue takes place, networking takes place and trust takes place. Last, according to Fausch Facebook seems to be the “sleeper” of all of the big four social media platforms. People still see Facebook as a social network, more for personal use. However, that seems to be getting blended continuously. And in some cases a lot of the traffic that we’re generating via the ME Media Web site is actually coming to us through Facebook — not an individual page, but a company page. This does lead to engagement with your audience. Be sure to give our social media services is a try. They’re all available in the upper left corner of our home page, at www.MfgEngMedia.com.

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By Rob Bunting

Social Media a s social media channels like Twitter, Facebook, YouTube and LinkedIn have gained popularity in recent years many manufacturing firms have begun to use these sites as a way to gain additional exposure, reach potential customers and to drive more people to their main corporate website. It is an excellent idea in 2013 to fully embrace the concept of social media marketing and while I admire the initiative shown by firms posting videos to YouTube or starting a blog, I see a lot of companies “dropping the ball” in their efforts by not applying some basic optimization techniques to the effort and, as a result, not getting nearly the impact they should be getting from their efforts. So in this article I’m going to provide tips for making sure that the social media content you’ve created gets seen by your prospects, drives more people to your company website, and ultimately produces more sales leads. Let’s quickly review the concept and process of “Search Engine Optimization” or “SEO” and how you can apply them to your social media program. SEO is the process of trying to optimize your web content so that it is found by and shown in the results on search engines like Google or Bing. The field of SEO has been around about as long as the Internet and search engines themselves, and most companies have tried to optimize their websites since the late 90’s. In the past few years Internet users have begun to spend more time and do a lot of their product research on social media sites, and social media content has been making up more of the search engine results pages or “SERPs”. As a result, companies today should optimize their social media content in much the same way as their

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main website, or in other words do “social media optimization”. I like to call this “SMO”. The first step in the SMO process is to choose the search terms or “keywords” on which you’re going to focus. To do this, you can start by answering the questions, “What terms do we most want to come up for in a search engine?” or “What are our prospects looking for?” You’ll want to develop a list of 2-4 word phrases that are both very relevant to your business and are searched by a significant number of people. There are a number of ways you can do research to strategically build your keyword list including: • Brainstorming by the sales and marketing staff • Asking current customers what terms they would use in a search engine • Looking at competitor and industry sites to see what terms they use frequently • Looking at your website data in Google Analytics or similar web stats programs • Using the Google AdWords Keyword Tool which displays the average number of people searching a term in a month Once you have decided on your list of top keywords, the next step is to include those terms in all of your content, including your corporate website and all of the social media you produce, like blog posts, tweets and YouTube videos. My advice is to print out your top keyword list and refer to it often as you write your content and plan future content, so that you can be sure you are “hitting your marks”.

Driving Website Traffic from Your Social Media Content

Optimization: The most important place to include your keywords is in the title of your content, particularly for blog posts and YouTube videos. Search engines (and also the search functions of social media sites) place a lot of emphasis on the title of content when ranking results, so having the keywords you want your content to be found for in the title is critical. In addition to the title, be sure to include your keywords in either the body of your blog post (or article) and the “Description” field of your YouTube videos along with links to the page most relevant for each video on your website. It blows my mind when I see businesses upload videos to YouTube and leave the description field blank – what a missed opportunity! Not only are they missing out on a chance to provide context to the story they were trying to convey with the video, but they also could have included keywords to raise the chances of their video being included in YouTube or Google search results (keep in mind that Google owns YouTube). Also, providing links the video viewer can click drives them to your website where you can continue the story and possibly persuade them to take further action and become a qualified sales lead. Recently I instructed a manufacturing client of mine to include links to her website in the descriptions of her YouTube videos and a month later she told me this simple act led to her videos being viewed on YouTube much more often than before and traffic to her website from YouTube had increased by over 50%. Another great place for your keywords is the “Tags” field of YouTube videos and blog posts. On Twitter you can apply the same principle by including a keyword as a “hashtag” by placing the hashtag symbol (#) before it in your tweets. This

will enable anyone searching for or following that hashtag to find your tweet, even if they are not currently following you on Twitter. Once your keyword-rich social media content is out on the web be sure to track your results and refine your strategy on a regular basis. You can do this by watching trends appearing in your Google Analytics results for key performance metrics. These key metrics would include the level of incoming Google, Twitter, YouTube or blog website referrals and how many of those referrals resulted in site visitors taking the desired action on your website such as downloading a whitepaper, using your distributor locator or submitting an information request form. You can easily track these types of actions by setting up goals in the Goals section of Google Analytics. If you don’t know how to do that, I suggest you check out the Help section of Google Analytics, or consult your webmaster or someone familiar with Google Analytics. Taking a few basic steps of carefully selecting your keywords, including those keywords in your social media content, and tracking your results so you can refine your strategy over time will have you well on your way to having an effective social media program that drives high quality traffic to your website, and ultimately, lots of future customers. Rob Bunting is Czar of the Cincinnati I-marketing Group, an Internet marketing agency in Ohio serving manufacturing, B2B & B2C clients. Learn more at http://CallTheCzar.com or contact Rob at 937-312-1400.

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COVER STORY

Generation Next

An Interview with Greg Jones Vice President, Smartforce Development, AMT — The Association For Manufacturing Technology

By Robin Yale Bergstrom

GQ: What’s been the impetus behind reaching out to the younger generation of technically literate students and others, exposing them to today’s manufacturing environment? Jones:

AMT coined the term Smartforce as a way of describing in one word the manufacturing industry’s need in attracting more young people to post-secondary education programs in science, technology, engineering and math — or STEM subjects — and then further, to attract those students to careers in manufacturing. I used to be with ToolingU, so I worked with a lot of vocational high schools all over the country and with a group of community colleges called the National Coalition of Advanced Technologies Centers (NCATC.org). When I came over to AMT, I quickly got reconnected with that organization in an effort to bring more young people into U.S. manufacturing.

GQ:

What are some of the hurdles you’ve encountered?

Jones: Most young kids today think of Boeing and Caterpillar and the big 3 automotive companies, and they don’t really know the companies that we represent, that are AMT members, that make and sell the machine tools, tooling, automation systems and software that allow those companies to make the products they make. I’m in the camp with those who think that if we want more kids to be interested in math and science, we have to provide some education that’s more real world-learning and not just learning the new math and formulas and doing things by rote. If we can make math and science more relatable to young kids, we would have a good chance of keeping them more focused on seeking a career in this area as well. And, there’s actually some really neat stuff out there. There is an organization called mathsnacks.org, which was started at New Mexico State University that produces really cool videos to make math relatable to kids in a very real-world way.

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GQ: What about using social media to reach out to these young candidates? Jones: We are probably not as up to speed as we’d like to be in communicating with these young people through the various media they are using today, especially in the area of social media, but we’re getting better. After all, we represent engineering companies, and we don’t really think about marketing like consumer organizations do, and I think we need to do a little more of that. But I think it’s cultural, too. We’re going to have to make a huge cultural shift in this country to make it desirable to work in manufacturing again, and you do that through parents and educators and hopefully that trickles down to students. I met a young 25-year-old teacher at Penn High School in Mishawaka, Indiana, where we did our first Making College Work Night. That event is designed to reacquaint families with U.S. manufacturing while having them learn more about going to college more affordably by choosing an advanced manufacturing technology program at a community college. The young man I met had graduated from Penn High School, then went on and received a master’s degree from Indiana University, and decided he wanted to come back to teach in the STEM Academy at Penn. He had a really great outlook on the contribution he could make to young people by going back to teach at his alma mater. Young people like this make really good ambassadors for us. And I think we need more of those.

GQ: Tell us a little something about the Student Summits at IMTS. Jones: One of the things that we did at this past year’s IMTS was to have companies like Sandvik, Mazak, and others, who normally exhibit at IMTS, as well as at the Student Summit, bring their young engineers in their twenties to talk to the young people that were coming through the Student Summit. Our thought was that the students would relate better to

younger engineers. Young kids, especially in middle school and high school, don’t want to talk to people who look like their parents. They want to talk to someone who is closer to their own age. They see their peers as experts. So we actually badged young engineers as MTAmbassadors, and the students knew they could walk up to somebody with that badge and have a conversation about how much they enjoyed their career in manufacturing. They were more relatable when they explained their company’s products, and it worked. Sandvik, a primary exhibiting partner at the Student Summit, said that this was the best Student Summit ever. The kids seemed like they wanted to approach the booth as opposed to hanging back three or four feet to just look at tools and parts on display.

GQ: We note that one of your most powerful tools in reaching out is talking wages and career potential. Talk a little about that. Jones: One of the things we do in our Making College Work Night program is to present the actual dollar figures that one can look forward to making in manufacturing as opposed to other kinds of occupations. We do this for both the parents and the students and frankly it’s really quite impressive. We’re hitting parents and students right over the head with real dollar figures. The fact is that manufacturing pays higher than any other industry — by as much as 26% higher. During Making College Work Night we pull together numbers by job titles and functions directly off the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) Web site and show them, “If you want to be a manufacturing engineer, this is what you can expect to make, this is how many job openings BLS says are open from now until the year 2020, so here’s your opportunity.” We also show compensation information for mechanical, electrical and industrial engineering, as well as for CNC machinists, welders, computer programmers and more. Also, we’re trying very hard to attract more young women to engineering. We still have a male dominated industry, so we show the female students that

other females are going into biomed — which is great, because they’re still in manufacturing at medical device manufacturing companies for the most part. And you should see the salaries in biomed; it’s not uncommon to see $91,000 a year in that industry, or medical device manufacturing, and the potential for being hired between now and 2020 is dramatically higher than most other manufacturing engineer titles. We do a program for Pratt & Whitney, and when I talk to newly recruited manufacturing engineers about where they went to school, what their programs were like and what the gender mix was like, most of them tell me that the manufacturing engineering or mechanical engineering or industrial engineering programs are about 15% to 20% female. The biomed programs are about 80% female. So they are getting it, but we just need to communicate with more young women more often.

GQ: You’ve often spoken about the misunderstanding in the U.S. about where things are manufactured and which nation has the largest manufacturing economy. In your opinion, why is that? Jones: Culturally in the U.S. we have forgotten where things come from. Sadly, too many Americans assume that the consumer products they use — parts of all sorts, electronic devices, and so on come from China. So I start my Making College Work Night presentations with a little audience participation. I throw out the question – “Which country has the largest manufacturing economy by GDP in the world?” I throw out country names and ask parents and students to tell me if they think each country that I list, one at a time, is the number one global manufacturer. And I go through a bunch of countries, while everybody is sitting there waiting for me to say, “China.” I list Japan, Germany, Great Britain, India, Brazil, and at this point they’re actually beginning to think that I am asking a trick question. And I say, “You’re right, it is a trick question. The answer is that the number one manufacturing economy today is GQ/ Premiere Issue

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Tapping INTO

Generation Next

Jones: We are developing a video campaign to post on

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and hire directly out of the pool of military people coming off their military service, who had knowledge and skills that are in demand in our industry. Over the last decade or so, the flow of individuals has sort of dried up. After doing a little research on the subject, I’ve come to find that manufacturing has a lot of competition from the telecom industry and other industry for Field Service Techs. There are going to be one million service personnel returning from the Middle East over the next four years, and no administration wants those kinds of numbers falling into the ranks of unemployment, so we’re doing whatever we can to help veterans get jobs in our industry. NIMS has been working with the Administration for a couple of years, and the White House has directed the Pentagon to provide a NIMS credential for machinists coming out of the military so that they have an identifiable and portable credential to get a job in U.S. manufacturing. Now, once we get this field service technician standard updated, we’re going to go back to the administration and ask them to direct the Pentagon to provide this credential to mechanics as well. There are three times as many mechanics in the military as there are machinists, so we want to get that pipeline of individuals flowing into our industry. To me, that’s all about the next generation in U.S. manufacturing, too. These people may be older and have experience, but in all practicality they will be the next generation enjoying a long, fruitful career in our industry. So we’re trying to reach out at every level that we possibly can.

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Jones: In the past, our industry used to be able to recruit

The high school student challenge will take place on Thursday, May 16, 2013. Invitations will be sent to schools that have curricula that meet specific science, technology, engineering and mathematics criteria. Teachers will submit an abstract on behalf of the students that provides the name of the challenge, contact information, and the name of the manufacturer the team/individual student is partnering with. The submissions will be reviewed by a committee. Based on the review, up to 350 students will be invited to participate in the challenge. Student teams can be no less than three and no more than six students (not including a teacher).

ENV

YouTube, and other sites online around the MTAmbassadors strategy. That goes back to our efforts to reach this audience through social media so that the students can see younger people already engaged in manufacturing. We’re also encouraging MTAmbassadors to create their own Twitter profiles, and if we can just get more of them out there, driving the message, then I think we can affect some improvements in bringing this next generation to our industry. We’re also doing a lot of work with Gardner Business Media (Cincinnati), and the SME Education Foundation (Dearborn, MI) in distributing video DVDs and collateral material to Project Lead The Way (PLTW) schools. The next video we’re doing in this Next Generation series involves a quality control engineer at GE aviation in Evendale, Ohio focusing on her work and her passion for her career. I am also on the board of directors of the National Institute for Metalworking Skills (NIMS). NIMS accredits schools and provides credentials to machinists and to field service techs

attraction for those individuals exiting military service. How fertile is that source for you today?

T

he EASTEC Dream It Do It Manufacturing Student Challenge event is a one-of-a-kind opportunity for students, educators, school administrators and guidance counselors to see first-hand the cutting-edge technology displays at the show while reinforcing the importance of increased STEM education in schools. The visit to EASTEC is not just a technology show; it is a chance to stimulate technical interests in young people. It is an opportunity to eliminate the antiquated stereotype of manufacturing and STEM–related careers, and to bridge the gap between education and industry.

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organizations to try to reach these younger students and engineers. Can you address these efforts?

GQ: Manufacturing has long been an arena of strong

EASTEC STUDENT CHALLENGE

MEN

SIB

GQ: We understand that AMT is collaborating with other

and currently, we are updating the NIMS standard for Machine Repair Level II & III which is for field service technicians, people who repair and install machine tools. The industry is in desperate need for service technicians, not just machinists, welders, and engineers. Over the past few years, the sales of manufacturing technology equipment have been at a record pace. The collective demand in our industry for Field Service Technicians to install equipment is off the charts, so we’re doing a lot of work in that particular area.

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still the United States.” We make the important stuff here and the numbers bear that out. Another misunderstanding stems from the fact that economists a year or two ago were saying there would be a tipping point in 2014, that the U.S. would lose its number one position as the top manufacturing economy in the world to China for about a year. Interestingly, over the past year or so, China’s economy has slowed significantly, and now these same economists are saying that maybe that tipping point is not even going to happen, and the U.S. will remain the number one manufacturing economy in the world. I try to relate to the industries that are close by in their neighborhood, and when I spoke in Indiana, for example, I focused on medical device manufacturing companies, and these parents didn’t even know that Indiana is a huge player in the medical device manufacturing industry. It’s just so strange to me that, as a country, we don’t get the fact that things are manufactured here. We have to change that mindset.

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The Man Who Would Have Us...

Note to the reader: Not so long ago, the term “United States manufacturing” was considered an oxymoron. Many so called “industry experts” were boldly saying United States manufacturing was on a fast track to nonexistence and that off-shoring was the ultimate answer to being globally competitive and more profitable. However, what these experts failed to recognize was that unit costs of labor were already rising dramatically in Europe and all of Asia which was rapidly making it more attractive to manufacture things in the United States than ever before. They did not consider the fact that United States manufacturing companies were quietly going about making new technology investments which would directly translate to competitiveness enhancing productivity improvements. Plus, they neglected to take into account the flexibility, adaptability, and solutions oriented creativity of United States workers and how that would play against foreign based workforces typically ruled by increasingly more restrictive and inflexible

MAKE THINGS HERE He’s been called any number of things (The Pied Piper of Manufacturing, Crazy, Possessed, Driven, Passionate, a Pit Bull) yet he doesn’t shy away from his admitted obsession with bringing manufacturing jobs back to the U.S. And not because he’s an Über Patriot (something he probably has not been called) but because of a strong belief that U.S. multinational companies/corporations ought to maintain a strong manufacturing presence in their country of origin and will be more profitable by doing so By Robin Yale Bergstrom

labor regulations. Yes, these experts were professing all of this and much more except for one strong United States manufacturing proponent: Harry Moser. Harry refused to go with the flow. He knew from experience that United States manufacturing was cost effective and globally competitive. He also instinctively recognized that off-shoring was not the ultimate solution for United States companies to achieve higher profitability because he envisioned the manufacturing and economic difficulties that would soon be manifested in other areas of the world. And to bring this point home to the United States in a huge way, Harry founded the Reshoring Initiative. Harry’s reshoring message is being heard loudly and clearly, and readily accepted, by the biggest manufacturing corporations, the smallest job shops, and at all levels of the United States government, including a personal meeting with President Obama. United Grinding is very proud to be associated with Harry Moser and to provide this article for your reading enjoyment.

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— Rodger Pinney, President & CEO, United Grinding Technologies Inc,

Harry Moser knows his stuff. And his stuff is manufacturing — these days, specifically, the reshoring of U.S. manufacturing jobs that have, for whatever intention or gain, been sent offshore to save costs (primarily or solely labor cost-related) to countries once thought to be Third World contenders. “Five or six years ago I came up with the general idea that someone should do something about bringing manufacturing jobs once thought lost to offshoring back to the U.S.,” Moser says. “It took me a couple years to get trade associations and manufactur-

ers interested in supporting the effort, and by that time I was phasing out of being president of GF AgieCharmilles (Lincolnshire, IL) and therefore had the time and money to commit to what became the Reshoring Initiative®. So it really got started at the beginning of 2010 and became a full-time pursuit at the end of the year.” Moser adds, “I approached AMT — Association for Manufacturing Technology and pointed out that most of their member companies were multinationals with headquarters in the U.S. and their overriding purpose was to sell into the U.S. market, and so it

was in AMT’s best interest and that of the U.S. that we bring work back from overseas. “The other thing that drove the idea was that my family has been in manufacturing for over 100 years. My grandfather and my father worked in the Singer Sewing Machine factory in Elizabeth, New Jersey, which at one time was the largest building of its kind in the world and employed thousands. Now it’s all gone, all offshored. The plant closed in 1982. So, when I speak to audiences today they can relate to that story. And as I travel around the country and see manufacturer after GQ/ Premiere Issue

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manufacturer devastated by work leaving their plants to China, it’s heart shattering. So, based on my background and experience I decided something had to be done, and I did this.”

A little about Moser Moser has been passionate about manufacturing all his life. He graduated from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology with a bachelor’s degree in mechanical engineering and a master’s in engineering in 1967, and received his MBA from the University of Chicago in 1981. He started his career at GE, went back to M.I.T. for a position in their liaison office, then to DISAMATIC Inc. in Burr Ridge, IL; Acme-Cleveland Corp. in OH; and RotoFinish Company in Kalamazoo, MI. From there he went to Charmilles Technologies Corp. in Mount Prospect, IL (since moved to Lincolnshire, IL) and also led the factory in Ann Arbor, MI. Eventually he led all of GF AgieCharmilles North America. He oversaw a 500% increase in sales, taking the company to the number-one position (from sixth) in the North American EDM market.

Total Cost of Ownership Moser’s argument is that if U.S. manufacturers take into consideration the “total cost of ownership” (TCO) for products made offshore but destined to be sold in the U.S. — transportation costs, reject rates, foreign wage inflation, potential/ probable intellectual-property theft, travel cost and so on — the U.S. compares favorably with China and other so-called low-cost countries. To help quantify his argument, Moser has developed a software tool, TCO Estimator, that compares the costs of manufacturing parts and tools in 17 countries,

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“We estimate that approximately 50,000 jobs have come back to the U.S. in the last three years, and that’s about 10% of the growth in manufacturing jobs during that period. “ based on 29 factors — many of which are not even considered by sourcing managers. Additionally, the software can project TCO five years into the future. “At the moment the Estimator calculates the micro impact on a firm — the P&L or cash flow impact,” says Moser. “However, companies are also starting to think about externalities, or their impact on the society beyond their own P&L. Right now they’re beginning to look at their carbon footprint — how much junk they throw into a landfill and how much of a carbon footprint they create. We are working on an extension to the TCO Estimator to help the companies recognize how many OEM and contract manufacturing jobs would be lost by offshoring and how many the U.S. would gain by reshoring. The Estimator would calculate the total number of jobs cre-

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ated, the taxes that those individuals and their companies would pay, and the unemployment, welfare and stimulus program dollars that would no longer be needed, and come up with a value-added figure for society in general. In short, the Estimator would indicate how much it would hurt society if jobs were offshored and how much it would benefit society if they were reshored.”

The argument According to Moser, the ethical argument — whether multinationals have a duty to maintain a strong presence in their countries of origin — skirts the fact that globally we are not playing on a level field, but one in which the currencies are manipulated as well as a multiplicity of other factors, including different regulatory rules concerning environmental pollution. Thus, one could make the argument, for example, that by letting work go to China we are accelerating world pollution because manufacturing done in China is under significantly less stringent environmental regulations than here; so, offshoring really is not even in the better interests of the Chinese people. Such a relocation of jobs to China only aggravates their already severe pollution problem. (Perhaps we should offshore face masks with manufacturing jobs?) Further, wages in China are rising faster (about 18% per year) than productivity, making China an ever-less appealing option. There are other low-wage countries that could step in, including Vietnam and Thailand, but their wages are also rising and they lack the infrastructure and the strategic value of the huge Chinese market. Though it is easy to measure the cost of labor, which might be only a small cost, it is more difficult to

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measure the costs for quality, transportation, intellectual property risks, the lag time of producing something that will be on the water for weeks, and so on. For products in development, it helps to have production near the research and development team, and a far-flung supply chain is more vulnerable to interruption. “It was hard to figure these costs into decision-making models, whether to offshore or not. Back in the late ‘90s, companies couldn’t or didn’t have a good way of measuring them,” Moser says. “Today, reshoring must rise to be a part of an overall strategy of U.S. trade that is essential in the long run and more than helpful in the short run regarding creating jobs.”

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panies we are the most visible force in making reshoring happen,” Moser says, “but in the broader national community President Obama has taken an important role and the Boston Consulting Group (Chicago, IL) has been repeatedly published in the New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, the places where it is hard for my one-man Initiative to get continued presence or exposure. We tend to get attention at the Manufacturing Engineering, IndustryWeek and Modern Machine Shop level. We get very good press coverage with the audience that actually does the work. “Unfortunately, the people who make the decisions about reshoring and offshoring tend to read The Wall Street Journal, the New York Times and the Washington Post.”

Gaining steam Moser’s Reshoring Initiative is gaining notice and support: 45 manufacturing companies and trade associations have become paying sponsors of the Initiative, including United Grinding Technologies (Miamisburg, OH). Further, it is achieving quantifiable results: “We estimate that approximately 50,000 jobs have come back to the U.S. in the last three years, and that’s about 10% of the growth in manufacturing jobs during that period. Some people say this is just a trickle, but we say it’s more than just a trickle (but less than a flood),” says Moser. Among the trickle: Peerless Industries, a U.S.-based maker of audio-visual mounting solutions, recently moved back to Illinois. Outdoor Greatroom, which makes outdoor furniture, moved its manufacturing back to Eagan, Minnesota. Otis Elevator Company has returned to South Carolina, Buck Knives came back to Idaho, Karen Kane relocated to Southern California and GE is regenerat-

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POTUS and more ing Appliance Park, Kentucky. Caterpillar reshored to Texas, Ford has expanded operations in Michigan and Coleman has moved back to Kansas. BMW, Nissan and Union Pacific have recently built factories or expanded production in the U.S., and Apple said it would start making a line of its Mac computers in the U.S. later this year. Plus the Initiative has begun to grab the attention of the media. Moser has been inducted into IndustryWeek’s Manufacturing Hall of Fame, joining such manufacturing luminaries as Jack Welch and Steve Jobs. He has also been named Quality magazine’s Professional of the Year. The Wall Street Journal, Bloomberg and USA Today as well as Le Monde and Japanese radio have interviewed him. “Within typical manufacturing com-

In February of 2012, Moser was among 25 participants in a White House meeting to discuss how to bring offshored jobs back home. Essentially, this is what Moser told Obama: The costs of going overseas have been significantly underestimated, and many U.S. firms are beginning to realize that the total costs of going abroad don’t justify offshoring in the first place. “Looking at price alone, which is what most companies do, all the work would stay offshore,” Moser told the President of the United States. “But if you look at total cost of ownership, that’s no longer true.” In January of this year Moser was invited to present the Pro side of an online written debate in the Economist. The proposition was: “Do multinational corporations have a duty to maintain a strong presence in their countries of origin?” A Columbia University economist GQ/ Premiere Issue

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was taking the Con side of the argument, which momentarily gave Moser pause, thinking he might be in over his head despite — or precisely because of — the fact that he had written extensively and made hundreds of presentations on the “practical” aspects of reshoring without getting into the deeper drift of the ethics of reshoring. “However,” Moser says, “the Economist selected me over a Harvard University professor.” A nod to, if nothing else, his exhaustive pursuit of a pernicious, perplexing problem. Fortunately, Moser won the debate 54% to 46%, partially because so many manufacturing companies turned out to vote.

Reshoring…where? Sixty-four percent of the reported reshoring cases are reshored from China. So China got most of the offshored work, and now China is losing most of the reshored work. Some of that work may go to Vietnam, some to India, Malaysia or elsewhere where labor is still cheap but experience in supply chain development is rudimentary to non-existent. And some of the reshored work will go to Mexico. But a significant portion will come to the U.S. “My first choice is that the work all comes back to the U.S.,” Moser says. “Second choice is that it comes back to a team of the U.S. and Mexico — laborintensive work goes to Mexico, the more skilled or technology intensive work goes to the U.S. After all, it’s better to be part of the winning team than all of the losing team. “My third choice is that it all comes back to Mexico and none to the U.S. Why is that better? Say you do stamping in Mexico. It’s more likely that you will buy

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the stamping die in the U.S. than if you do the same stamping in China. Further, if you have an assembly plant in the U.S., and all of the components are sourced somewhere in North America, including Mexico, you are more likely to keep the assembly and the engineering here in the U.S. than if all of the components were coming from China. If all the components are coming from China, eventually you will do the assembly in China and then you will do the engineering there, and we will have lost the whole thing. “Also, the stronger Mexico is economically, the more generally they will buy from the U.S., whereas China buys almost nothing from us. “My fourth choice is that everything stays exactly as it is, which as a choice is a non-starter, period.”

Eclectic sponsors If one looks at the collection of sponsors of the Reshoring Initiative (see www. reshorenow.org), they are machine tool builders, machine tool distributors, marketers, trade associations and the like, but noticeably absent are large U.S. manufacturing companies, like automotive, aerospace, off-road — companies like John Deere, Caterpillar, Boeing and GM. Why are they not supporters? Moser thinks there are a number of reasons, not the least of which is that they don’t want to appear too nationalistic to their foreign markets. “Many of these companies,” Moser says, “have a large percentage of their sales in foreign markets. So, naturally, out of self-preservation they wouldn’t want to upset those marketplaces by suggesting that all their work should be coming back to the US.

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“Also these companies have been fairly consistent in sending work to China, so to support openly this Initiative would probably run counter to their overriding business model or strategy or be inconsistent with their philosophy.” Perhaps the strongest reason for their nonappearance is that Moser simply has not asked them for support. “There are, after all,” he notes, “very few companies that come to mind that are asking, ‘Gee, where can I send some money?’ Then, too, when one of these companies that has aggressively been sending work overseas suddenly brings work back, they spend a great deal of money promoting the fact that that’s what they’ve done – it’s been estimated that GE, for example, has spent something like $100 million in advertising the regeneration of Alliance Park in Louisville.” Having said that, there are ways that these American companies can jump on board. One, they could actually bring more jobs back. Two, they can promote the fact that they’re bringing jobs back to the U.S. Either way it would help their U.S. brand image. And a third way would be to become a sponsor of the Initiative. Moser says he’d be delighted if they just did the first or second. “The reason I’ve done so well with the companies who are supporting the Initiative is because I’ve known these companies for 25 years or more when I was president of GF AgieCharmilles, so I had ‘street cred’ with these companies and groups,” Moser explains. “If I show up at their company door or at their booth at a trade show, they will talk to me, but if I were to show up at GM’s booth at the auto show, I’m not

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sure my welcome would be quite the same. My street cred doesn’t really carry over very well in their world.”

How Some Are Reshoring...

Hardball

to Brook Park and moving heavy-truck production to Avon Lake from Mexico. The

Moser: “There is a hierarchy of priorities in the Reshoring Initiative that people can relate to, and I try not to be flagrantly nationalistic about it, but I want people to understand that my first priority is the U.S, and they as U.S. citizens should be supportive of reshoring.” Companies/sponsors like UGT sell into the growing Mexican market and Canada. I believe those sponsors generally prefer that I include “nearshoring” as an acceptable alternative,” Moser says. “This is, after all, playing hardball and trying to get people to change their mind about where they make things. And this is not an easy thing — yet it’s truly important and at the same instance exciting, watching the trickle gradually turn into a stream. It’s what keeps me going, that and banging the reshoring drum and speaking to anyone, anywhere, any time who will listen.” For more information, contact: United Grinding Technologies, (937) 847-1229, www.grinding.com The Reshoring Initiative, (706) 867-1144, www.reshorenow.org

Ford is in the midst of two massive projects -- moving engine production from Spain automaker announced plans last month to move its 2-liter EcoBoost engine to its Cleveland Engine Plant No. 1 in Brook Park by the end of next year. At about that time, it plans to bring F-650 and F-750 large-truck production to Avon Lake. In Louisville, for example, General Electric has moved some appliance production back to the United States from overseas because of concessions from unions. Last summer, Colosimo announced plans to shift some production of his Cleveland Cyclewerks motorcycles to Cleveland’s Gordon Square neighborhood from China. Sales of the small bikes have been booming worldwide, and he wanted more control over production than he was getting at the Chinese contract manufacturers he was using. Chinese labor rates are getting closer to half of U.S. rates. So the cost advantage has eroded.

What Sponsors Are Saying... “The world is constantly changing. It makes sense to re-evaluate the costs of overseas production. The Reshoring Initiative’s Total Cost of Ownership system is a great tool that could yield some unexpected results. Reshoring cannot only save manufacturers money, but it creates American jobs, promotes economic growth and strengthens national security as well.” - Doug Woods, President, AMT—Association of Manufacturing Technology

Tools You Can Use... • Use the TCO Estimator for sourcing decisions and when selling against offshore competitors. • Use the Case Studies feature to report reshoring successes by OEM or contract manufacturer. • Use the Library to find companies that are reshoring.

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...The same is true of the very best gear makers — they gravitate toward the most difficult jobs, those requiring the very best technology, extreme skill, precision and experience

the surgeon & the gear maker One might think that these two highly skilled professionals would have little in common. One would be wrong, however. The very best surgeons perform the most difficult procedures, those requiring extreme skill, precision, deftness and experience...

By Robin Yale Bergstrom 24

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TIFCO Gage & Gear, a maker of master gears, spline gages, aerospace gears and automotive prototype gears since 1964, was bought by Delta Gear in 2004. In 2005, Delta Gear joined forces with Delta Research Corp., which since its inception more than a half century ago has earned a reputation as the leader in prototype transmission and engine components and assemblies. Together the two employ more than 110.

Delta Research Delta Research started in 1952 as a supplier of prototype transmission and engine components for the Big Three automotive companies, and they continued to expand on that front. Then they went into aerospace work, designing engine test stands and other types of components for aerospace and defense. The company has done transmission components for Chrysler, and back in the 1990s they designed many of their dual clutch transmissions. They would prototype the Chrysler designs start to finish. Most jobs are small run, pre-production launches. After that the job then gets

handed off to a production supplier. The key at Research is their knowledge in design for manufacturing (DFM) and manufacturing feasibility. They help engineers define the right way to design a part to make it manufacturable for production. The company also does gears as well as 3-, 4- and 5-axis machining of housings from castings, forgings or from solid. They also do cylindrical grinding, honing and other applications. The breadth of what’s being done in Research is a lot wider than what’s being done at Delta Gear, where the focus is almost entirely on aerospace gears and shafts. Last year Delta Research undertook a unique assignment: three completely new design transmissions for the tractortrailer industry. These were complete transmissions for 18 wheel, big heavy duty trucks and long-haul tractor trailers. The three prototype transmissions were completed, from design to build, in 26 weeks, which is a pretty quick undertaking. “The industries each company addresses are entirely different,” says Tony Werschky, Delta partner, “and we

are set up this way, between automotive, aerospace and defense, so that our businesses maintain a certain amount of stability regardless of market conditions. At Research it’s pretty much automotive, truck, and defense work, while Delta Gear is nearly all aerospace, jet engines and rocket components. When we bought TIFCO Gage & Gear in 2004, it was a small shop, just a fraction of what we see today at 12 employees. Now, there are nearly 50 employees at that particular location alone.”

Delta Gear “Bob Sakuta, my father-in-law, and son of the initial owner, Alex, came to work here in 1976 and has been here ever since,” says Werschky. “He was running machines out on the floor back then. Now he oversees the companies and manages the growth strategies, while Scott Sakuta and I do more of the tactics.” Delta Gear (aka TIFCO Gage & Gear) was started in 1964 and has had an impressive history of making some very difficult gears. At one point, they made a wrench for NASA that would work in

zero gravity. It was used to modify the Hubble Space Telescope. That was a highlight during the 1980s for TIFCO. And today Delta does a lot of different components for NASA as well as many of the OEMs in the aerospace industry. Recently Delta Gear purchased the local newspaper’s old, forgotten building and turned it into a state-of-the-art, 72,000 ft.² facility completely devoted to gear production, gear inspection and metrology. Many of the materials ground are exotic, including super hardened materials that are very difficult to machine. They do all the work on gears and shafts in-house, other than heat treatment and specialty coatings. All of the rough cutting of the gears, turning, any special milling in the part finishing process after case hardening, where they are cutting gear teeth and working the journals and faces is done in-house. “It depends on the complexity of the part, but we may send a part out a number of times for selective heat treating of certain features and plating,” notes Werschky. “The typical gear, we turn it, rough it, send it out for heat treatment GQ/ Premiere Issue

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Panoramic view of the spotless Delta Gear facility. Line of Studers on left. Center and right, KAPP and Höfler gear cutting and hobbing machines. “The place is so clean,” says Tony Werschky, Delta partner, “that you could eat off the proverbial floor.” and then finish it. Some parts, however, require more than just heat treating. They may require copper plating or silver plating at different times, and that makes for a longer process or progression from start to finish. We really like the more difficult jobs because there’s more opportunity for failure, which limits the amount of competition that can make that part. There is more risk involved, of course. It’s kind of like the surgeon who gets all really tough procedures because he’s the best. High risk, high reward. If you’re good, then you do well. If you’re the very best, then you do very well.” Delta Gear weathered the turbulent economy of 2008 and 2009 really quite well. Some of the weaker companies folded during this time, and Delta Gear benefited by taking over some of the jobs of their competitors, as unfortunate as that might be. They bought several machines in 2008 and 2009 because the deals were too good to pass up. For example, the S40 was purchased in 2009 along with the German KAPP VUS 50 CNC gear grinder. Additional gear grinding, gear cutting and five-axis CNC machines were bought in 2008 for Delta Research as well. “Our growth for Delta Gear will be in expanding our relationships with OEMs in the industry on precision gears in jet engines and other aircraft components.

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There has been considerable outsourcing of OEM components recently which has benefited us in our growth. The way Delta Gear is positioned right now, we’re in a good place to handle more growth. So we feel we can handle a significant amount of expansion with the OEMs in the aerospace industry,” says Werschky. The amount of precision on the gears that Delta makes limits the number of companies that can do what Delta does, so Werschky’s not worried about being underbid by a foreign competitor. More than likely they’re not going to be able to do what Delta does, and if they can, they probably have the same machines and the same type of costs that Delta has, so in this case Delta would be competing pretty closely with them. However, Delta rarely finds itself in that position. “What I’m starting to see more and more,” says Werschky, “is that Chinese aircraft are made in China for Chinese customers, European aircraft are made in Europe for European customers, and the same applies in the US. Most of what we make stays in the US. We really haven’t gone after the European market yet because we see a significant amount of growth opportunity in the United States. We view the market cautiously because if we were to take on too many new customers it could actually prove detrimental to the company. We have a

balancing act in keeping the right amount of engineering staff on hand for parts that are being given to us by our customers. For the size of our company, bringing in a new major OEM every year or two is a very good way to continue our growth organically.”

A Studer Showroom “Our facility looks like a showroom for Studer,” says Werschky. “There is a stable of six Studers (United Grinding Technologies, Miamisburg, OH) in a new facility. Although the plant is generally closed to outsiders, we do give tours on occasion. Our customers are welcome in our shop, and when they see the facility, their first impression is, ‘Wow.’ It’s just very impressive — so clean you could eat off the proverbial floor — which isn’t the norm in most gear manufacturing companies, certainly not those of the past which tended to be oily, smelly and slippery under foot. Our facility is ultra-clean, bright and orderly. Seeing the Studers is also impressive.They’re lined up, one right beside the other, and they all look brand-new even though one or two may be five years old and older. Studer has an excellent reputation in the industry, and people who know grinding understand this very well. “The Studers that we have range over the last two decades, and the old-

er Studers still hold the tolerancing and produce the results that we are looking for. And what we’re looking for is very high precision, tightly toleranced parts with a superior surface finish. We have very difficult-to-machine materials that are exceptionally hard after their final heat treatment, so we use special grinding techniques to finish these parts, and United Grinding is very helpful in interacting with us and helping us to maximize our efficiencies and the output of the machines and getting the right results consistently. “The reason we buy Studers is because Studer continues to push the envelope on leading edge technology, from the way their Granitan® machine beds are designed to the technology in their drive systems. We recognize that they continue to push the envelope and refine their products and that’s why we prefer to buy their products. “We have an S20 CNC and an S21. These can handle parts up to 10” in diameter,” continues Werschky. “The S33 and the S31 go up to 13.8” and the S40 goes up to 17.7” in diameter. Their center distances range from 16” to 40”. “The S40, our newest Studer, was purchased on 2009 and has opened some doors to new clients due to its versatility,” says Werschky. “It has a Y-axis that allows us to install an ID spindle in a

vertical orientation so that we can grind slots and keyways. It’s very important for grinding our most complex parts. It also has C-axis for out-of-round grinding. This is essential for grinding cams and lobes, applications in which we really couldn’t compete in the past because we didn’t have the capability. We are able to grind these down to within 0.0002” of a degree. The C-axis also provides thread grinding. We used to outsource that application because there’s so much thread grinding in aerospace. Now we do all of that in-house. It can also do spline grinding as well, but we don’t really use it due to our wide assortment of dedicated gear and spline grinding machines. The turret wheelhead can be swiveled automatically and up to four grinding wheels can be used. The S40 also has a high-resolution B-axis.”

Working in tight “We consider ourselves the leader in precision grinding technologies,” says Werschky. “We are not the largest, nor are we the smallest. We are a precision gear facility and not only are our precision gears important, but the journals and faces that ride next to them are in many ways just as important if not more important. We buy the best machines for the applications that we do, and we tend to gravitate toward the more difficult appli-

cations, and having the right equipment and the right tools, it becomes obvious why we are sought out for those kinds of jobs.” When tolerances are so tight, and the expectations of aerospace customers are so demanding, one can’t afford to take chances or cut corners on diameters that have to be 50 millionths in roundness. Some parts that Delta Gear produces require a super finish to under two micro inches. The Studers are capable of grinding down to a four micro inch. A light polish afterward gets the surface down to under two micro inches. So the Studers really help Delta optimize its processes to eliminate time and more rapidly get parts to their destination. “The master gears that we make are made out of tool steel,” Werschky adds, “so these parts are very hard, and they require tight-tolerance cylindrical grinding. When you have diameters that have to be held very tightly, the Studer is exemplary in its ability to meet and to exceed the requirements and our expectations. For example, 20 millionths in roundness, 50 millionths in flatness and 0.0001” or 0.0002” typical run out. “The materials we grind are nearly all exotics with a hardness of over 60 Rc, some over 70 Rc. These are very brittle and susceptible to burning and cracking, so we need machines that are not only GQ/ Premiere Issue

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Scott Sakuta, Delta partner, left, and Tony Werschky, Delta partner, stand before the Studer S40 .

View from the lobby. Glass wall at end looks directly into the plant. Note the brightness and cleanliness. Studer S33 set up for grinding

we move them into that department to help it expand. So we do significant internal growth of our people. You can’t just send them to gear school and have them come back a week later with everything they need to know about making gears. We make a considerable investment in our employees, which is a necessity if you are looking to grow over the longterm.”

Still new at the game centricity over 24.” In aerospace, 0.002” over 10 inches. Typically there are three different diameters per shaft.” capable and reliable but also extremely accurate and repeatable. Studer delivers what we need to handle these materials. We use rotary diamond dressing tools, allowing us to use different grinding wheels. This helps us with hardened materials, over 60 Rc, and it also aids in surface finish control. Further, we do considerable shaft grinding in both automotive and aerospace. In automotive, it’s common for these shafts to have multiple diameters. The Studers are very capable of handling multiple diameters in one operation. We do a shaft where the largest diameter might be 6”, but most are 3” to 4” in diameter. In aerospace, they’ll go down to 0.500” in diameter depending upon which shaft we’re talking about. In automotive shafts, the concentricity might be 0.001” to 0.002”, and in aerospace it might be one-quarter to one-half of that, depending on the length. If it’s a longer part, you’re looking at 0.002” con-

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First, take care of the parts Werschky says it’s very hard to find the right people you need in this business. You can’t just take a guy off street and have him run a million-dollar machine on the floor. Delta has an internal training program where they take some of the younger guys who are working in different aspects of the company, and they put them through a training regiment that teaches them how to, first of all, take care of the parts, to appreciate the parts because if you damage the parts they’re no good to Delta or to a customer. So the first thing always is to take care of the parts. The next thing is to take care of the machines because if the machines don’t work you can’t make parts. There’s a level of respect that Delta teaches these employees, so that they come in and act professionally, and they respect the parts and machinery.

From there Delta teaches them how to inspect the parts, teaches them how to use micrometers and the different gauges and such, so that they know what they’re looking at when they’re making a part. “I think we have more gear inspection equipment here than any other private company our size in the world. We have nine gear checking machines, CMM’s and optical gear checking equipment, roundness testers and surface profilameters and much more. So there’s a lot of inspection to learn,” says Werschky. From there, Delta teaches them how to run the machines. “This program takes a couple of years,” says Werschky. “These guys start out in hobbing or gear cutting. They will cut gears first, and then they’ll move over to another department, maybe do some inspection for a while to learn how to inspect parts properly, and then they will move over to grinding. As we go through this process management talks with the leaders of those departments to check on the progress of these guys, see where they’re flourishing and where they are not. By the end of the program we know where they’re going to fit and

Delta has been servicing the OEM market for decades; however, they have significantly grown their OEM business over the past three years due to their AS 9100 certification. If you want to approach a new OEM in today’s day and age, you have to be AS 9100 certified. Because OEMs want to make sure you have the controls, systems and processes in place to ensure you make the part consistently, right every time.That’s what AS 9100 helps guarantee. “This didn’t take us long,” Werschky says. “We were already compliant. We just had to spend the money and have the auditors come in and see what we were doing to confirm that we were compliant. We’re also NADCAP certified for nondestructive testing, magnetic particle inspection which checks for cracks, as well as nital/temper etching, which is like an acid bath where you check for grinding burns. Those processes are done in-house, under our control, because whenever you grind a part, there is an opportunity that you might crack the material or burn the material, and you can’t have that on flight critical aerospace parts that are going to be moving a plane through the air.”

Samples of finished aerospace gears.

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Continuing on a Positive Flight The commercial aerospace and UAS markets will lead the industry with significant growth in the coming years, while military aircraft will lag behind. By Matt Grasson, Senior Editor Aerospace Manufacturing & Design

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any items go into determining the amount of growth the aerospace industry will see during the coming years. For example, many companies are expecting a declining workforce during the next decade as baby boomers retire. According to Seattle, WA-based Boeing officials, half of their workforce is eligible for retirement within five years, which may cause problems trying to fill the vacant positions they leave. Currently, workforce estimates show hundreds of thousands of high-level manufacturing jobs are going unfilled due to a lack of qualified employees. Another contributing factor is The Budget Control Act of 2011, which cuts $492 billion in automatic defense spending during the next 10 years, beginning with $55 billion in January 2013. All of these factors, as well as the economic unrest in Europe and the United States, affect the future of the aerospace industry, coinciding with a high demand for new aircraft during the next 20 years.

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Commercial Aviation
 According to a recent study by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), more than one billion commercial passengers will fly per year after 2024, and will continue to grow at an annual rate of 3.1% through 2032. In order to accommodate the increasing number of passengers while replacing older aircraft, Boeing officials predict the industry will need nearly 34,000 new aircraft by 2031, with an estimated value of $4.5 trillion. More than 12,000 of those aircraft will go to the Asian market, as countries such as China and India continue to see robust growth. While the Asian market is responsible for approximately a third of all aircraft production during the next 20 years, many of the components for those aircraft will be manufactured in the United States, as Airbus plans to double the $12 billion it currently spends with U.S.-based suppliers. A large share of the production increase will come in Ohio and California. The increase in Ohio is due in part to an agreement between Airbus and a Dayton-

area business group, while the company plans to double the more than $1 billion it currently spends in Southern California. Airbus Americas Chairman, Allen McArtor, made that announcement in front of more than 100 local manufacturers at an educational summit in Los Angeles, trying to attract new supplier companies for Airbus’ first U.S. facility in Mobile, AL. When at full capacity, employees at the facility will be able to produce eight aircraft a month starting in 2016. Another positive sign was from the 2012 Farnborough International Air Show, where aircraft manufacturers such as Airbus, Boeing, and Bombardier signed more than $72 billion worth of deals for 758 aircraft. The deal is a 53% increase from the 2010 show, with Boeing responsible for more than 50% of the aircraft sales. Regarding commercial aircraft, Nicolas Boutin, partner and managing director, The Boston Consulting Group, Boston, MA, says the large accumulation of unfilled orders, built up during the past few years, should offset declining demand for the next three to five years. Be-

yond this period, there is a possibility that future orders will drop off. Boutin does note that one distinctive characteristic of this economic crisis is that backlogs are larger than ever, therefore, the severity of the downturn will largely depend on how these backlogs hold up. “There is no doubt that current economic conditions will affect the aerospace and defense sector, even if most of the impact will occur one or two years after the drop in demand in the air transportation industry,” Boutin notes. In that respect, the ability of aircraft manufacturers and export-credit agencies to compensate for the decline of financing from banks and leasing companies will be a critical factor. In the longer run, China (currently responsible for 15% of the production) should remain the largest market for new Boeing and Airbus commercial aircraft. Military 
 Although Congress has signed into law a bill to avoid the fiscal cliff, sequestra-

tion was not included, pushing Marion C. Blakey, president and CEO, Aerospace Industries Association (AIA) to make a statement on the failure to fix sequestration in the fiscal cliff deal. In the statement, Blakey states, “While we are pleased Congress made some headway on tax elements of a deal to avert the fiscal cliff, we are concerned that they could not agree to a long term solution to fix a problem no serious person wants – sequestration. We are relieved that the heavy axe of sequestration will not fall today and we expect Congress will use the next two months to find thoughtful alternatives to ill-conceived, indiscriminate budget slashing. More than 2 million Americans across all sectors of the economy will lose their jobs if our political leaders fail to fix the self-inflicted wound of sequestration and the dangers it poses to our war-fighters and national security.” Since the sequestration plan is still in place, there are currently several Department of Defense (DOD) programs slated for termination during the upcoming year,

including the RQ-4 Global Hawk Block 30, C-27J Spartan Joint Cargo Aircraft, C-130 Avionics Modernization Program (AMP), and the Medium Range Maritime UAS. Elimination of these programs will save nearly $10 billion through 2017. In addition, the restructuring of the F-35 Lightning II and other programs will provide a savings of more than $41 billion. All told, terminations and restructurings of these programs will provide more than $50 billion in DOD savings through 2017, helping offset nearly $13 billion of the required $50 billion in reductions through the next four years. Current numbers show more than 3,150 aircraft currently on order through the next 10 years, totaling more than $210 billion. 


• Fighters: 1,104

$102.8 billion

• Trainers: 170

$1.6 billion

• Transports/

Special Purpose: 500 $70.0 billion $210.4 billion GQ/ Premiere Issue

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Currently, workforce estimates show hundreds of thousands of high-level manufacturing jobs are going unfilled due to a lack of qualified employees.

Aircraft funding will decrease from $54.2 billion in FY2012 to $47.6 billion in FY2013, reflecting a new defense strategy, as noted in The United States Department of Defense Fiscal Year 2013 Budget Request.
 Unmanned Aircraft 
 According to most organizations, UAVs or UASs, depending on how you refer to unmanned aircraft, continue to be the sector with the largest area of growth. According to “World Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Systems, Market Profile and Forecast 2012”, from the Teal Group, UAS spending will almost double during the next decade from current worldwide UAS expenditures of $6.6 billion annually to $11.4 billion, totaling more than $89 billion in the next 10 years. Philip Finnegan, Teal Group’s director of corporate analysis and an author of the study explains that, “The UAS market will continue to be strong despite cuts in defense spending. UASs have proved their value in Iraq, Afghanistan, and Pakistan, and will continue to be a high priority for militaries around the world.” Steve Zaloga, senior analyst, Teal Group says, “The study predicts that the United States will account for 62% of the worldwide spending on UAS technology during the next decade, and 55% of the procurement.”

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The study also projects that the U.S. military UAS market will grow at 12% during the next five years, reaching $18.7 billion in 2018 and generating $86.5 billion in revenues through 2018. In order to help improve the UAS market the industry is currently waiting for the approval of six test sites for experimental UAS aircraft. “Our target was to have six test sites by the end of 2012, however, increasing the use of UAS in our airspace also raises privacy issues, and these issues will need to be addressed as unmanned aircraft are safely integrated,” says FAA Administrator, Michael Huerta. Under current aviation rules, the FAA allows no UAS into civil airspace without an explicit certificate of authorization. Such authorizations to date have included cumbersome requirements, including dedicated air traffic controllers and required chase aircraft. Manufacturing While Airbus prepares to break ground on its manufacturing facility, the company must prepare to find qualified employees. This problem is not limited to Airbus or the Mobile, AL, area. There are currently more than 600,000 unfilled, highskilled manufacturing positions within the United States. According to a recent Manpower­

Group survey, 34% of worldwide employers are experiencing difficulty in filling high-tech manufacturing positions. However, the difficulty of hiring qualified high-tech employees is most evident in the United States where 49% of U.S. employers report difficulty in meeting staffing needs. Broken down by job role, the largest gaps are in professions requiring a high degree of technical proficiency. Noted from the survey is that engineering positions are the hardest to fill in the United States, followed by technicians, skilled trades workers, and production operators, all of which are imperative to the aerospace industry. The inability to fill these roles has a negative effect on customers and investors, with 41% of employers reporting a medium or high impact on stakeholders. The reason for the majority of these job openings is that businesses are very lean today and do not have the resources to provide extensive on-the-job training. Therefore, job candidates need to be well qualified before they are hired – which means having basic computer skills, with the knowledge and experience to set up and run today’s complex CNC machinery. Technical and vocational schools are finding it difficult to recruit high school students because manufacturing is perceived as a dirty workplace with limited

prospects. The reality is that lean manufacturing has cleaned up the workplace and students are entering employment earning a decent wage. The current skill-gap number is a substantial one, and will continue to grow with the upcoming retirement of many baby boomers. Without addressing this problem, it is suggested that the number of unfilled, high-tech manufacturing jobs could grow by 10 times the current number by the end of the decade. A Positive Future 
 Although there are some negative factors involved – the number of unfilled, high-skilled manufacturing jobs, and the sequestration – the overall aerospace market is poised for growth through the next decade and beyond, with commercial and UAS markets looking to carry the industry. © 2013 GIE Media, Inc. All Rights Reserved. Home TES Magazine TMD Magazine MD Contractor Subscribe RSS Privacy Policy Terms of Use

Why Manufacture in the U.S.? Adam M. Pilarski, Ph.D., Senior Vice President, AVITAS

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lobalization has been changing the world for the last few decades. Reading popular press and listening to people on the street it seems that all manufacturing jobs are moving to China. This is not the case. High tech jobs are not moving to Haiti. Germany and Switzerland, despite high wages, are doing quite well. The same reality exists in aviation. Airbus and Boeing are by far the largest aircraft manufacturers in the world and are located in the highest income/highest wage regions. Turns out that low wages are good enough to acquire a semi-monopoly position in the production of simple toys. However, what matters in aircraft manufacturing is a different set of skills where the hourly wage is just one of the components. Productivity is most relevant and is a skill acquired through experience. In the mid 1980s, I was involved in setting up manufacturing of MD80s in Shanghai, China. I remember our president being very impressed that workers were making less than a dollar a day. As everybody knows we did not transfer all manufacturing to China but rather painfully produced in Shanghai the units bought by Chinese airlines. In fact, during my annual visits to China, I observe a continuous increase in standards of living and wage rates so that Chinese labor is no longer very cheap. So why did we produce those aircraft in China? Obviously, these were marketing/strategic considerations. “If we provide high tech jobs there, they will buy more of our products,” was the thinking. This is how it usually works. Embraer established a facility in Harbin, China, and all OEMs are buying parts from China. This follows the long established principle of offsets, which mandate purchases in the country buying aircraft by the sellers. The principle of offsets still applies, especially in government contracts. Therefore, when Airbus was actively pursuing the tanker replacement program of the U.S. Air Force (KC-X), serious attempts were made to guarantee sizeable employment opportunities in the United States, specifically in Alabama. That program was awarded upon appeal to Boeing, but Airbus still pursued its Alabama interest and announced it will open a manufacturing facility to produce some of its narrow body aircraft. The question is why Airbus continues on that path even if the KC-X program is a ship that has sailed. Obviously, the U.S. Congress may be motivated by local jobs in the United States, but a U.S. airline in Chicago, IL, will not be impressed at all by having its aircraft produced in Alabama. U.S. labor is quite efficient and by some European standards fairly cheap. Establishing the facility in the South with weak unions, similar to Boeing’s plant in Charleston, SC, may also provide less risk of labor trouble. Producing aircraft close to the customer base also has advantages. The major reason for the Airbus Alabama facility, in my view, is the current bubble in worldwide aircraft orders. Laying off employees in Europe is very difficult. Airbus now will have two facilities in Europe (Hamburg, Germany and Toulouse, France), one in China (Tianjin), and one in Mobile, AL. They can oversell, knowing full well, that if the bubble bursts they can easily reduce capacity by cutting expansion plans in the United States and also shutting Tianjin down. If the current large-scale orders are justified the four plants will be able to produce them all. If I am right and the bubble bursts, there is spare capacity that can easily be cut. GQ/ Premiere Issue

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Looking at the

Each segment of the aerospace industry has its unique opportunities and challenges in the near and short term. By Mitch Free I think about the aerospace industry in terms of three broad segments, categorizing them as defense, commercial, and general aviation. I am personally bullish on the aerospace industry and excited to see what unfolds during the next few years. The U.S. defense budget for 2012 is more than $700 billion, nearly seven times what China spends on defense and 10 times the Russian defense budget. We cannot afford this level of spending going forward, and I have no doubt the Department of Defense (DOD) budget will be impacted significantly in the coming years. What will this mean for the aerodefense industry? For certain, funding for the development of new weapon systems will be severely limited. As such, there will be an intense focus on supporting and upgrading our aging weapon sys-

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tems. This will entail rethinking sourcing systems and logistical infrastructure. We will also need to engage more of the U.S. industrial base in order to facilitate rapid sourcing, and in many cases, reverse engineering of parts that are no longer in production. The maintenance and repair supply chain will have to work at hyperspeed in order to keep our aging weapon systems up and running in support of our war-fighters. The commercial aircraft sector will be in strong demand during the next 20 years, thanks to the rise of relative wealth in the Asia Pacific region, as well as technology advancements, relating to materials and manufacturing techniques that serve to reduce aircraft maintenance costs while improving fuel efficiency. This is the justification for replacing older aircraft. Boeing officials estimate that there

will be demand for 34,000 new commercial aircraft during the next 20 years valued at $4.5 trillion, with only about 20% of that demand coming from North America. Not surprisingly, the bulk of the demand will be from the Asia Pacific region, China and India in particular. While Boeing, Airbus, Bombardier, Embraer, and BAE will be competing hard for their share of the business, new entrants in Asia such as China’s Commercial Aircraft Corporation (COMAC http:// english.comac.cc/) will pose a significant competitive challenge in the Asian market and most likely create downward pricing pressure. The stakes are high, and it would not be out of character for the Chinese government to try to tilt the playing field to its advantage. However, I believe it will take some time for the Chinese to match the critical turbine engine and avionics technology

AEROSPACE INDUSTRY

Mitch Free has appeared on Fox News, CNBC, Fox Business News, in Fortune Small Business, Business 2.0, and more. He is the Founder and Executive Chairman of MFG.com, Atlanta, GA, www.mfg.com from the west, leading me to believe that they will take an aggressive approach to make strategic acquisitions or joint ventures with companies in North America, Europe, and Russia in order to gain access to the technology. The general aviation sector in North America will continue to remain sluggish as private aviation is a luxury that ebbs and flows with the broader economy. As such, during the recent lean economic times there has been a significant consolidation among manufacturers of general aviation aircraft, and I suspect more will come. If the U.S. government decides to impose new taxes and user fees on general aviation, as has been proposed, it will accelerate the erosion of the general aviation industry in America. There is a lot of excitement in the general aviation industry about a new market segment, referred to as Very

Light Jet (VLJ). A number of manufacturers have completed or are racing to complete the development and certification of their VLJs, including Honda’s HondaJet, Diamond’s DJET, Cirrus’ Vision SF50, Cessna’s Mustang, and Embraer’s Phenom. This could be the shot in the arm that general aviation needs, though the VLJ will need global adoption and acceptance in order for the market to be financially viable. China and India will be very large general aviation markets in the future, but right now their infrastructure is nonexistent in terms of general aviation airports, air traffic control systems, and flight training. A few general aircraft manufacturers have begun producing training aircraft in China and shipping them abroad. They are hoping to build good will and awareness in the market early, in order to capitalize on the market when it

further develops. For example, Cessna is already producing a training aircraft, Skycatcher, in China. The Asia Pacific region will become a big consumer of general aviation aircraft during the next 20 years; it will be like a gold rush. The question that remains is whether or not it will be the established general aviation aircraft manufacturers that will reap the benefits or if it will be an Asian upstart. The global aviation market is promising and the demand for it will be strong, but as the United States deals with budget constraints and Asia Pacific drives new aircraft demand, the market is going to look very different than it has during the past 20 years. Excerpted from Aerospace Manufacturing & Design.

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A GLIMPSE INTO

manley’S LIFE John Manley President Machine Tool Systems Inc. Toronto, Ontario Canada By Robin Yale Bergstrom

Hiking in

Northern

Heather & John at top of Mt. Kilimingaro

Ontario

John and Nelson, Maisai Warrior, Ngorongoro Crater, Tanzania

John Manley is Canadian-born and received his mechanical engineering degree from The University of Toronto in 1986. He decided he just didn’t want to follow the role of a traditional engineer, so he was kind of wandering the school halls and saw a job posting in his hometown for a sales engineer of machine tools. “I wasn’t quite sure what that meant,” he says, “so I thought, it’s in my hometown, it has to do with engineering, let’s give it a go.” By 1998 he had opened his own distributorship and was representing the entire United Grinding line. “It’s kind of magical, the way these things come together,” he says. “I had no dreams of being an entrepreneur. I had not thought it through, one way or the other. It’s funny how these things fall into your lap and come together.” ”I’m fortunate to have a great wife, Heather, and two little boys, Griffin and Charlie, who are just turning ten and six. As a family we love our sports. As part of our wedding vows, my wife and I actually encouraged each other to pursue sports, so it’s always been part of our family values.” ”When my wife and I got married we went to Mount Kilimanjaro in Africa, and we climbed the summit together, which I would never call a great feat. It’s just high-altitude, and your body either likes high-altitude or it doesn’t. It really has nothing to do with your fitness. Climbing Mount Kilimanjaro was just a

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Heather, Griffi

n, Charlie an

d John

they will venture out to do some outdoor rock climbing, like my wife and I have done, and maybe a little ice climbing in winter as well. We’ve got to wait until they are old enough and mature enough to handle the outdoor climbing rigors. After all, there’s a little higher risk climbing outdoors.” cool place to go, it’s really beautiful. And while we were there we spent another week touring Tanzania and Kenya and some of the wildlife preserves.” ”I personally spent a lot of time doing white-water kayaking. We have this little 100-year-old cabin up north, and we do some sports there. We have a canoe and a 40-year-old Sunfish sailboat, so we do a little bit of sailing. My wife and I do some running, cycling and mountain biking as well. And with my boys we do some rock climbing together, mostly indoor for them today because they are young, but soon enough I think

”When my wife and I first met, we were trying to figure something fun to do for a weekend, so we went up to Northern Ontario to Sault Ste. Marie, which is quite a hike, and we ice climbed for two days with renowned ice climber Sean Parent. He has mapped out most Northern Ontario While ice climbing routes. So this was one of our first dates.” ”Probably not long after our next date, my wife was on the East Coast of Canada, in Newfoundland, on business, and we met up and sea kayaked for three days out in the open water,

in the

Caribb

ean, C

harlie,

John a

nd Gri

ffin wi

th a se

a turtl

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featured social media page of the quarter

A GLIMPSE INTO MANLEY’S LIFE

handory in Steffisburg, Switzerland Employees at Studer’s fact e products tiat eren diff to said is that scrape ways, an activity tion to the company, providing Mo from competitors. According production the at look d -han first a Meeting attendees with their ity to advocate for Studer in process improves their abil respective markets.

John,

”Our real passion as a family is squash. My wife and I both grew up playing competitive squash, we both played varsity squash, and now our older son is enjoying the sport just as much, and he plays competitively here in Canada. We just got back from the US National Junior Open in Boston. That was really fun. It’s really nice to see our son really taking to the sport.” ”I’ve always kidded that sleep is totally overrated. Now my wife might argue that because she enjoys a good solid sleep. But at the end of the day, I’m operating a business, and she’s running a business, and my theory is to try and get home at a reasonable time so we can enjoy family life for a few hours, and once the boys are asleep, my wife and I usually chill out, watch the news together, and then once she’s asleep I usually head back to the office. If it’s a Friday or Saturday night and the weather is nice, we try to sneak in a late-night run. It’s hard running a business. You don’t have much free time. And that’s just the reality of it. Balancing it all out is never simple.

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Kayaking White Water

watching icebergs go by, and it was pretty cool. So this stuff is all part of our roots going back to when we were first dating. And I don’t want to portray us as being great athletes, believe me, we just enjoy the outdoors.”

as the worldwide sales partners, year’s gathering of Studer’s this for title apt . A few arly icul part ecially in the United States) Motion Meeting” seemed a s is certainly on the move (esp hine mac ding grin land, a cal tzer ndri of cyli rs facility in Steffisburg, Swi 100-year-old manufacturer at the company’s headquarte nt eve ual ann the nd ns. atte ditio nity to uncertain economic con weeks ago, I had the opportu the past half-decade despite range invested significantly during has y pan com the ed as vitally important by a re tout whe n location s are good or bad has bee time ther whe ng to rovi ilar imp sim p That willingness to kee s approach that struck me as few other aspects of Studer’ a are e Her S. MM in d appeare of manufacturers that have panies: com sful ces suc r that of othe to inventory by the company’s approach but I was particularly struck s, erou num e wer es e mpl ses. Exa stored in containers with forc • Streamlining proces rced by outside suppliers are sou s part re spa ed by and s own is tool y embly — technically, the inventor management. Smaller ass is a purchase order initiated then y Onl d. ove rem is n an item sensors that detect whe ld be done loyee retrieves it. emp an l unti r plie s by hand. Although this cou the sup ws employees scraping way sho ve abo to pho extra The ls. goa is more than willing to take • Prioritizing competing itself as a premium brand and bills der Stu , ders grin ace r on surf faster and with less labo Dixi DHP y. urac acc ure nt investments is a massive ens to care ificant of the company’s rece sign t mos the of One . fully inies on petenc bringing spindle producti • Controlling core com em. This machine will enable syst ion mat auto s this work. tem of Fas e t alle previously performed som 80 II boring mill with a 29-p ion with the company that fact atis diss no n bee l. had tota e that ther early 10 percent of the house, despite the fact loyees, 75 are apprentices—n emp l tota 800 s der’ tial Stu Of . stan rce ment, but Studer’s sub • Investing in the workfo ly from our workforce develop apprenticeship differs marked of ure cult e’s le resources. urop E , eab nted Gra its most valuable and irreplac but a recognition that people are ores ersc und rt longer order just machines, effo no ers ning trai f commented that custom gau Gae Fred l CEO der iona Stu rnat ctively. roving collaboration with inte • Communicating effe this years’ meeting was imp of e them ther key a whe on, l, goa reas that shop could relate to that application solutions. For some level, even a small job On ds. nee t eren in rs diff rato with kets munication between ope sales partners serving mar ign or even streamlining com tomer on a new product des cus a with king wor of s in term different departments.

John at Jr. W

orlds Hockey

Game at Stud

er Motion

It’s all about sleep deprivation. That’s my theory. If you consciously just ignore it, it goes away.” ”My wife runs a speakers bureau, and she represents a few hundred motivational speakers. Financial institutions, Fortune 500 companies and even government institutions — when they are hosting an event or a series of events, they contact her and she gets the right speaker for the right event. It’s called prospeakers.com. She represents the likes of Wayne Gretzky, Scotty Bowman, the winningest coach in hockey history, Don Drummond a well-known Canadian economist, and a lot of key personalities.”

”One thing about me is that I’m really passionate about what I do. You better love what you do, because if you don’t, it gets very old very fast, and you’re going to do it for a long time. You don’t do it just for the income stream. You have to be passionate about what you’re doing.”

CONNECT WITH UNITED GRINDING - Social - @UnitedGrinding

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MÄGERLE l

BLOHM l

JUNG l

ON TECH

STUDER l

SCHAUDT l

MIKROSA l

WALTER l

The new S33

state-of-the-art Fanuc 00i-TD digital control and axis drive components grinding length is either 650 mm or 1,000 mm. OD wheel size: ø 500 mm x 63 mm x ø 203 mm. Chuck capacity between centers is 80 kg to 120 kg • The new Studer S33 grinder is now equipped with latest generation of high frequency internal grinding spindles. The spindles turn this universal

SCHAUDT l

MIKROSA l

WALTER l

EWAG

• Linear resolution is 0.0001 mm. Distance between slideways is 280 mm. Z-axis slide travel is up to 1,150 mm • Speed and linear resolution are respectively 20,000 mm/min and 0.0001 mm. Z-axis distance between slideways is 200 mm. Z-axis table tilts up to 8.5º for high-precision grinding of tapers • Guaranteed tolerance precision: 0.0004 mm on roundness and 0.0025 mm straightness deviation over a length of 650 mm or 1,000 mm

Control & Programming The new S33 features state-of-the-art Fanuc 00i-TD digital control and axis drive components. Machine operation, setup, changeover, dressing and programming of even complex parts are easily accomplished through the innovative, step-by-step Windows-based StuderWin software which allows operators simply to connect grinding cycles to one another and add necessary numerical values. The control then generates the machine program automatically. Advanced manual programming in G code is of course also possible. Programming is done directly at the machine or off-line and then downloaded to the machine control. Process parameters can be changed on the fly, while the machine runs, without affecting the workpiece program.

The S33 control package features proven application-specific Studer grinding

ing machine with high torque over a large speed

contours.

120,000 RPM, thus allowing the grinding of bores down to 0.625.” A “flat” torque curve on this type of spindle will mean fewer spindles over a

GQ/ Premiere Issue

STUDER l

cycles for diameters, shoulders (left and right), tapers (negative and positive) and

• The machine can now grind with speeds up to

40

JUNG l

cylindrical grinder into an effective internal grindrange

The cylindrical division of UGT announces the introduction of a new and advanced addition to its Studer line of high-performance CNC universal ID/OD cylindrical grinders, the new S33. Modular design for quick setup and changeover, state-of-the-art digital control and drive systems and user-friendly step-by-step programming make the new S33 a remarkably flexible solution to a wide variety of internal and external cylindrical grinding applications. From high throughput OD production lines to small-scale job shops, the new S33 has the ability to reduce changeover times, speed up grinding processes and deliver consistent precision at an affordable cost. The S33 has been enhanced and designed to take into account the specific needs of the North American market (automotive OEMs and Tier One suppliers), in that the new S33 reflects the expressed desire for a machine to address internal and external applications in a single platform. According to Hans Ueltschi, vice president, “The level of versatility and flexibility increasingly requested by this important market is significantly and uniquely addressed in design and capabilities of this new machine. The S33 clearly demonstrates our full commitment to tailor products around the explicit requirements of our customers.”

BLOHM l

features

• Center height is 175 mm. Between-centers

New S33 Offers Versatility, Precision, Flexibility

MÄGERLE l

EWAG

larger speed range. This reduces setup time and investment costs • The basic wheelhead can be indexed at 0º or 30º for straight and angular plunge grinding. A universal turret wheelhead swivels manually or automatically, permitting external, internal and face grinding of workpieces in a single setup • V and flat guideways are coated with abrasionproof Granitan® S200 and provide high vibration dampening and superior rigidity • Digital direct-drive, three-phase servomotors with 40-mm diameter prestressed, precision ballscrews power the X- and Z-axes. Cross slide X-axis travel is 285 mm at speeds ranging to 10,000 mm/min


MÄGERLE l

BLOHM l

JUNG l

STUDER l

SCHAUDT l

Introducing the New AEROMAT by Blohm

MIKROSA l

WALTER l

Aerospace

EWAG

MÄGERLE l

BLOHM l

JUNG l

STUDER l

SCHAUDT l

FEATURES

Grinding

with Maximum Efficiency

lead ballscrews, gears, motor bearings or backlash. Incredible acceleration for minimal

• Up to 30% more productive than machines with

non-grinding time

conventional lead ballscrews

• Accuracy (+/- 5 microns) and smooth perfor-

• Up to 50% better surface finishes

mance, plus the machine’s dampening characteristics, result in unsurpassed surface finishes

• No wear parts

and contour tolerances — up to two times more accurate than other CNC grinding machines

• 1,181 inch/minute travel speed

• For the ultimate in flexible automation, the

• Excellent vibration dampening qualities

Helitronic Vision Long with Loader & Wheel Changer

Linear Motors The patented 3D gantry with a 14,000 pound mineral casting upon which the machine is built provides the ultimate in thermal stability and vibration dampening, yielding consistent quality parts and exceptional surface finish. The X, Y and Z axes utilize linear motor technology that produce linear travel speeds up to 1,181 inches/minute--5 times faster than the competition. With direct glass scale feedback and no ballscrew, the linear system provides smooth and accurate positioning with .000004” resolution. The rotary A- and C-axes feature gearless drive systems that minimize backlash and chatter.

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GQ/ Premiere Issue

• HSK-50 taper system • Change time of 10 seconds for wheel and nozzle set

Include:

• The X, Y and Z axes use linear motors — no

celeration and speed

• 6” OD wheels

EWAG

drive systems

to an absolute minimum due to incredible ac-

• 12-position tool and nozzle changer

WALTER l

• The rotary A and C axes feature gearless direct

• Linear drive technology cuts non-grinding time

The Blohm AEROMAT has been configured as a 5-axis production grinding system for the aerospace market. Applying the latest technology in machine design including linear drives, CNC technology, and automatic tool changing, the AEROMAT provides a flexible manufacturing solution for complex grinding applications. Central to the AEROMAT’s design is the 12-position tool and nozzle changer that provides the optimum abrasive and coolant nozzle design for each grind feature. Coupled with a 33.5 hp direct drive spindle and integrated disk dresser the AEROMAT is the right machine for complex aero-engine parts.

MIKROSA l

UGT’S Walter group announces the Helitronic Vision Long, which expands production capabilities on tools up to 700 mm total length. This is made possible without exceeding the work envelope of the classic Helitronic Vision by means of cleverly designed kinematics, a new wheel changer for a maximum of 24 stations, and wheels up to 10” in diameter. The application range includes the efficient production of milling cutters, drills, step tools, woodworking tools, profile cutters or profile tools from all standard materials. The typical Walter gantry design, polymer bed and torque-/linear drives provide the highest precision and performance. Helitronic Vision highlights Walter’s patented 3D gantry is set in a 14,000 lb. mineral casting developed using finite element analysis (FEA) to simulate every conceivable mechanical stress in the casting, assuring optimum vibration-free, thermal stability. The Vision Long offers unsurpassed dampening properties for optimum grinding precision and surface finish, particularly when trying to achieve the fastest possible grinds. The machine is unaffected by temperature fluctuations, which improves precision and increases productivity by almost completely eliminating the need for a warm-up cycle.

grinding wheel changer switches from up to 12 wheels in under 10 seconds, including the coolant manifold. The result is longer untended grinding • Maximum tool dimensions: 200 mm in diameter; 580 mm tool length when peripheral grinding; 550 mm length when end face grinding • Control: Fanuc 31iB5 • Maximum number of wheel sets: 12. Maximum number of wheels per set: 3. Maximum total wheels in one setup: 36 • The optional integrated loader automatically loads and unloads tools, paving the way for multiple-shift operation with minimal operator tending

• Utilizes all abrasive types and mill/drill tools

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43


LAST THOUGHT

There are 24 hours in a day. Are you using all of them ?

The Changing Pace of Jet Engine Development The methodology of jet engine development is one of calculated and cautious progression of technology improvements in small and highly calculated steps forward, the prefect model of continuous improvement. The typical jet engine manufacturer will develop an engine core concept (historically funded by a military application) then aggressively test the concept and slowly grow this engine core over time into multiple applications for various airframes and customer specific missions. This model worked to perfection since the beginning of the jet age yielding successful engine families like the Pratt & Whitney PW4000, the GE CF6 and the Rolls Royce Trent. As we enter the 21st century with a globally linked economy and hyper competition at every level, the playbook for jet engine development has been radically re-written to optimize “speed to market” and “game changing technologies.” At present each of the major engine manufactures (P&W, GE-Snecma, Rolls Royce) has a completely new and unique engine concept under aggressive development, each sporting record backlogs of sold units ready for production ramp up. These include the Pratt & Whitney Geared Turbofan, GTF-(four versions), the GE and Snecma joint venture, CFM LEAP-X, and the Rolls Royce, XWB — each pushing to begin service and to provide the advancements in performance, emissions and noise limits promised to the airlines. These engines incorporate advanced technologies with names like 3-D Aero design, Composite Matrix materials, and Additive Machining processes that are racing through the certification process in preparation for deployment. This accelerated pace of engine development creates a very dynamic environment for the manufacturing shops responsible to produce these complex components at full volume rates. Many of these new alloys and configurations are just emerging from the prototype phase of development and are being thrust into full production. Suppliers have to be fast, flexible and willing to take risks and forego the conventional progression of product development. United Grinding is partnering with several of these suppliers to provide prototype development, process consulting, and turnkey solutions to meet the surging demand for new and advanced grinding processes. Utilizing our partnership with parent companies Blohm (Germany) and Mägerle (Switzerland) we are able to combine the synergies of our global companies to meet the needs of 21st century jet engine development.

Lights-Out Manufacturing brings down piece-part costs and enables you to compete with low-cost countries.

Larry Marchand Vice President, Sales Profile Division, United Grinding Technologies

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1525 Holmes Rd. Elgin, IL 60123 -- tel.847.841.8260 -- fax.847.841.8264 -- http://www.getmatrixed.com -- info@getmatrixed.com


United Grinding Technologies Inc. 510 Earl Blvd. Miamisburg, OH 45342 USA info@grinding.com

THE SCHLEIFRING GROUP WORLDWIDE Körber Schleifring Machinery (Shanghai) Co. Ltd. 1128, Tai Shun Road Anting Town Shanghai Jiading District 201814, China Phone +86-21-395873-33 Fax +86-21-395873-38 info@schleifring.cn Körber Schleifring Machinery (Shanghai) Co. Ltd. Beijing Branch Office Room 202, Building 18 Tower B, Universal Business Park No.10 Jiuxianqiao Road Chaoyang District Beijing 100015, China Phone +86-10-659318-31 Fax +86-10-659318-35 info@schleifring.cn Körber Schleifring Machinery (Shanghai) Co. Ltd. Wuxi Branch Office A-096 Yangming Hi-Tech Industrial Park Wuxi Jiangsu 214024, China Phone +86-510-854206-66 Fax +86-510-854248-38 info@schleifring.cn

Körber Schleifring Machinery (Shanghai) Co. Ltd. Chongqing Branch Office Room 17-03 A Metropolitan Tower 68 Zou Rong Lu, Central District Chongqing 400010, China Phone +86-23-63 70-36 00 Fax +86 23 637 4-10 55 info@schleifring.cn Körber Schleifring Machinery (Shanghai) Co. Ltd. Guangzhou Branch Office Room 2003, 20/F Center Plaza Tower B 161 Linhexi Rd. Tianhe District Guangzhou Guangdong Province 510620, China Phone +86-20-38 62-12 41 Fax +86-20-38 62-12 70 info@schleifring.cn

Körber Schleifring GmbH India Branch Office 99 Spencer Road, 1st Floor Frazer Town Bangalore 560 005, India Phone +91-80-41554-601/602 Fax +91-80-41554-603 sales@schleifring.in United Grinding Technologies Inc. 510 Earl Blvd. Miamisburg OH 45342, USA Phone +1-937-859-1975 Fax +1-937-859-1115 info@grinding.com United Grinding Technologies Inc. 5160 Lad Land Drive Frederiksburg VA 22407, USA Phone +1-540-898-3700 Fax +1-540-898-6819 info@grinding.com

CYLINDRICAL GRINDING Hans Ueltschi Vice President, Sales United Grinding Technologies Inc. 510 Earl Blvd. Miamisburg OH 45342, USA Phone +1-937-859-1975 Fax +1-937-859-1115 info@grinding.com

SURFACE & PROFILE GRINDING Larry Marchand Vice President, Sales United Grinding Technologies Inc. 510 Earl Blvd. Miamisburg OH 45342, USA Phone +1-937-859-1975 Fax +1-937-859-1115 info@grinding.com

TOOL GRINDING United Grinding Technologies Inc. 5160 Lad Land Drive Frederiksburg VA 22407, USA Phone +1-540-898-3700 Fax +1-540-898-6819 info@grinding.com

the GRIND Publisher TED NECKEL Director of Corporate Marketing ted.neckel@grinding.com Editorial Content/ Layout & Design RYB Communications © 2013. All Rights Reserved.


the grind quarterly - Premiere Issue