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Winter 2016 Vol. XXXI, No. 1

Other Features 12 Bull Selection: Built on Basics by Courtney Wesner

18 Crossbreeding Strategies: One Bull Doesn’t Do It All by Hannah Wine

19 In Memoriam: Lewis P. Chandler

Feature Story Doucet Brafords — From 4-H Project to Family Passion

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by Sarah Starr

In Each Issue 6 President’s Notes by Larry Stanberry

8 From the Director’s Desk by Hannah Wine

8 New Member Report

Cover photo: An S5 Farms bull being developed at Graham Feedyard in Gonzales, Texas, for the fall 2016 Advancing the Braford Breed Sale. Photo by Hannah Wine.

10 Know Your Director Shannon Harrington: Advocate for the Breed

20 Industry Update 5380 Old Bullard Rd., Suite 600, Box 358 Tyler, TX 75703 904.563.1816 www.brafords.org • BrafordNews@brafords.org Like the United Braford Breeders on Facebook! UBB Registration Office P.O. Box 14100, Kansas City, MO 64101-4100 816.595.2443 UBB@abraonline.org Braford News is the official publication of the United Braford Breeders (UBB). It is published four times a year and is supported by paid advertisements and subscriptions. Advertising and subscription information can be obtained from the UBB office. We appreciate your letters, comments and any editorial material you would like considered for publication. Editor – Hannah Wine hwine@brafords.org Associate Editor – Sarah Starr Production Hereford Publications Inc./Creative Services Nicole L. Crosson P.O. Box 014059, Kansas City, MO 64101 816.842.8878 • 816.842.6931 fax ncrosson@hereford.org

Zoetis is corporate sponsor of United Braford Breeders.

22 Junior Focus Meet NJBA Directors Annemarie Broussard and Ari Montemayor

24 Show Results East Texas State Fair Braford Show State Fair Of Louisiana Open Show Fort Worth Stock Show and Rodeo

Attention Members: It’s time to update your address books! As of February 1 the UBB will no longer be receiving mail at the Callahan, Florida address. Please use our new address: United Braford Breeders 5380 Old Bullard Rd. Suite 600 Box 358  Tyler, TX 75703 Please note that you’ll still be using the same Kansas City mailing address for all things related to membership, registration, and cattle data.

Events February 15 Houston Livestock Show and Rodeo Open Cattle Late Entry Deadline Dixie National Livestock Show Braford Show, Jackson, MS March 4 UBB Board of Directors Meeting, Crowne Plaza, Houston, TX March 5 UBB Annual Membership Meeting, Houston, TX March 6 National Braford Show, Houston Livestock Show and Rodeo, Houston, TX March 17 Advancing the Braford Breed VI Bull Sale, Burton Coliseum Complex, Lake Charles, LA

Save the date!

July 7-9 – 2016 All American National Junior Braford Show, Laredo, Texas. Stay tuned to www.brafords.org for more info. Winter 2016 l BRAFORD news

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DOUCET BRAFORDS

From 4-H Project to Family Passion by Sarah Starr

D

oucet Brafords is a small family operation based in Sweet Lake, LA, 15 miles south of Lake Charles and about 15 miles from the Gulf of Mexico. Hannah Doucet, now 15, began showing for Kim and Kristie Richard of K&K Brafords six years ago, when her cousins aged out of the Junior Braford program. Hannah, her brother and her parents quickly discovered the excitement of winning buckles and banners.

2 BRAFORD news l Winter 2016

“It started out as a 4-H and FFA hobby for Hannah,” says Corey, her dad, “and it turned into a family passion, something we really enjoyed doing.” The Doucets were not in the cattle business at all as a family before Hannah started showing. “We both grew up around it. Jodie’s family had cattle, and my uncle and grandparents had cattle. But we didn’t own any ourselves until Hannah started showing for my uncle, Kim Richard.”

After a year, the Doucets bought a show animal for Hannah and one for her brother, Christian, and at the same time purchased eight commercial cows, some with Braford genetics, to start a herd. “I’m trying to replace those now,” Corey says with a slightly rueful tone, “and have a completely registered Braford herd. I’m getting there! We finally have enough Brafords that we can keep some of our heifers as replacements.”


Over the next two years, they picked up heifers and cattle from various breeders in the area, all registered Brafords after those first eight. “The majority of my herd, I purchased from Bryan Alleman,” says Corey. “He’s been a real help and has helped me build my herd even beyond the animals I bought from him.” The Doucets’ ultimate goals are to sell show cattle, to raise and show their own 3/8-5/8s, and to push for Braford Bull or Braford Heifer of the Year out of their herd. “We’ve purchased a few good animals that have had a running at that,” Corey says, “but we haven’t reached it yet, and I’d like to win it with an animal I raised.”

Show Champions Miss Daisy, now a favorite among their mama cows, was the first of the Doucet show champions. Corey’s uncle, Kim Richard, helped choose her as Corey is quick to emphasize. “I owe a lot of our success to Kim and Kristie. They taught us how to pick show cattle, how to feed them, how to groom them — everything we know about the business of showing.” The Doucets bought Miss Daisy locally from Scott Nunez, a breeder in Creole. A Cameron Parish animal born and bred, she was the runnerup for Braford Heifer of the Year in 2012-2013. Two years later, the Doucets purchased a bull from the Richards, Gumbo’s Legacy. This was a yearling calf off popular show bull JK MR BDB Gumbo. Purchased for Christian to show, Gumbo’s Legacy was a half-and-half acquisition with Jodie’s brother, Chris Dimas of Purdy Brafords. “Christian showed him for a year and we won National Braford Bull Champion and a few other shows,” says Corey. “We planned to use him as a herd sire, but we took him to Houston…. Though he wasn’t advertised, Braford breeder Hector Romero Gonzalez offered us $8,500 for that bull and took him to Mexico to use on his ranch of Red Angus and registered Brafords. We pulled semen off the bull first and AI bred cattle to him. We have a really nice heifer that we’ve been showing out of him

and we have a couple hundred straws to use in the future.” Artificial insemination, for the Doucets, has proven unpredictable. Corey takes a big part in the AI work for his herd. “I synchronize the group with a shots regimen and CIDRS. A retired ag agent in Cameron, Gary Wicke, comes in and AIs everything. He taught me how to set them up.” Once again Corey’s gratitude is evident. “When it comes to breeding cattle, Gary is my go-to guy. He’s a big part of my success. When I have questions on grass or fertilizers or foot rot, I call him.” In selling Gumbo’s Legacy, the Doucets threw off their breeding plans and had to move more toward AI. “I’ve bought semen from a lot of different breeders to try to make replacement heifers,” Corey says, “Legacy semen from Rodney Roberson of Thunderstorm R; Critical Mass from Rodney as well; Gumbo from K&K Brafords; Master Frederick from Wendell Wilkerson of Broken Diamond Ranch; and Harley and Billy Bob from the Mills, Rock Crest Ranch. We’ve tried to get the best, and some of it has worked well for us. We’ve sold a few animals to people who show Brafords, have put six replacement heifers back in the herd, and got a bull calf that’s now in the bull program to sell in October. But AI is not 100%. For me it’s been 50/50, so I have to use a clean-up bull, and he’s not of the same caliber as the champions I’m AIing from.” Their clean-up bull has recently produced an exciting calf, though, which Corey and Jodie’s godchild Adriana Richard is now showing. 4D MR 430, a son of show champion K&K MS Fancy Lancey, got Reserve Champion Overall Bull at his first show as a six-month calf. “He’s just seven months old now, so I don’t know yet,” says Corey, “but he might end up as a herd sire for us. We have another future herd sire in the showring right now as well, Mr. Watts, purchased as a calf from Bryan Alleman. He won three shows in a row: he was the Louisiana reserve champion bull, the national grand champion bull and he won the East Texas State Fair as well. I’ll still put a few straws in cows that have worked well with particular semen in the past,” says Corey.

How the Breed Has Improved Corey also plans to purchase a bull at the March sale, but he’ll be basing his decisions on different criteria than he would have five years ago. “We’ve been blessed. When I first started, I didn’t even know what EPD meant, but my uncle and the Bryan Allemans and the Rodney Robersons, the Grangers, Leslie Griffith of Lazy Acre Cattle, all the people I’ve bought from and talked to, all those people really helped us along the way. They’ve taught me about EPDs and marbling and milk. When I started with show animals, I’d pick an animal because I liked the way it looked — the bone, the femininity of the females, the correctness of it. The last year or two, now that I’m trying to build my herd, I’m really trying to learn about the EPDs.” He looks first at the milk numbers, he says. “If I’m going to buy a bull or raise a bull to put on my cattle, I care about the milk numbers more than anything. I want my birth weight to be average so my cows will have easy calves, and weaning weight and milk numbers to be definitely above continued on page 4...

Winter 2016 l BRAFORD news

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...Doucet Brafords continued from page 3

average to where I know I’ll have good mamas that’ll do what they’re supposed to. When their calves are weaned, I want stout, good calves. “I’m also looking for something a little more massive. My brother-in-law with the Purdy Braford Ranch and I were talking about that today. We run some Brafords together on the family property and we’re going to pair up for the purchase… . Our cow herd is a moderate-framed herd; we don’t have many big stout Brahmanlooking animals. We want to pick a bull with a little more height, maybe a little more spine, and extension throughout, a heavier boned animal.” This, he says, is an example of how the Braford breed has become better in the last several years: “We can find a bull who will throw us just a 65-lb. calf whose weaning weights will end up being higher than average because of his superior genetics. The breed is producing better animals than a few years ago, and the numbers are getting better. If the marbling and ribeye and everything else line up, if the bull came from good genetics and I fix him with a cow with good numbers and good genetics, everything else will fall into place. “I’ve learned over the last couple of years that if you don’t have a bull you’re proud of, you won’t get good animals. If you’re in this for the long haul, you need superior genetics. I really like the bull program because it gives not only Braford breeders but commercial breeders access to the top genetics in our breed.” He plans to continue to sell bulls in the program himself and is enthusiastic about the large, diverse pool of buyers that the sale attracts. “I hope I get to the point where I have enough bulls where I can send quite a few to the program and see those bulls travel across the country and make good herd sires somewhere else.”

A Great Breed for the Marshes The Doucets run their cattle in two locations — near their home in Sweet Lake, LA, and in Creole, LA. “It’s all undivided family property, some in the marshes of Creole on my wife’s family’s property and some on my family’s property. We raise our show cattle and a Jersey cow — a backup in case we have trouble with a calf — on eight acres next to the house, but most of the cattle we raise in Creole. 4 BRAFORD news l Winter 2016

“Here, I plant a hybrid Bermuda grass and rye grass in the winter. I’ll hit the bit of rye grass with urea once, maybe. The hay field, I usually fertilize in the summer months two or three times after cutting. I cut just 80 to 100 bales of hay a year. We don’t feed a lot of hay down in Creole because there’s such a lot of grass there along the coast. The show cattle stay here year-round and get hay and Purina feed in the winter, but the other cattle spend the majority of their time in the marshes of Creole. There it’s Bermuda and joint grass, which thrives in the water. We don’t get a whole lot of frost in these parts, but when we do, the joint grass holds up better than the grass in the pasture.” The Brafords are a great breed for the marshes, Corey says, with the mosquitoes and other bugs there. The Gulf Coast hurricanes were before the Doucets’ time in the cattle business, but Rita and Ike still affect their operation today. “The hurricanes devastated that area, it took the trees and shade away. Our Brafords are okay there most of the time, but we have about 30 acres up here where we bring them in the summer if it gets too hot.” Corey has worked in the oil industry since 1996. He’s a dockside manager for a company called EPS Logistics, overseeing the loading and unloading of shipments, supplies and equipment that go to the Gulf of Mexico. He spends most of his time in Cameron, 30 minutes south of his house, but travels all along the Gulf Coast from Venice, LA, all the way to Cameron. Jodie, self-described as “not the talker in the family,” stayed in the background for most of this interview, but is a vital part of the Doucet operation, raising their show cattle along with their kids. After graduating college, she worked for an oil field supply company until their kids were old enough to attend school. “That’s when we were financially stable enough for me to stay at home and raise them,” she says. “Now I follow the kids around to sports and raise the cattle. Hannah plays basketball. Christian does track, cross country and swimming. We stay busy! And of course, we also travel quite a bit to shows. This is Christian’s last year showing cattle. He plans to attend LSU in the fall — pre-veterinary with a minor in business.”

A Remarkable Number of Awards in Just a Few Years Doucet Brafords became an official entity last year. The kids were members of the junior association before that and the initial cattle were in their names. In the last few years, though, it became clear that the Doucets’ involvement in the breed would outlast Hannah and Christian’s Junior Braford years. “When we started showing cattle,” says Corey, “my uncle helped me pick that really good heifer, and we won almost every show we went to. At that time, the only thing I cared about, the only thing we cared about as a family, was winning shows. Over the years, that has changed. Yes, we want award-winning show cattle, but we also want to raise, breed and promote superior genetics in the Braford breed. “Here’s one thing we talk about all the time: A few years ago you could walk into a cattle barn at a Braford show and you could pick two or three animals that might win the whole show. Nowadays there might be 20 animals that you think might win. You never know now who’s going to win because the animals are that much better than they used to be, both in terms of EPDs and in terms of show appeal.” Plaques, banners and buckles cover the walls in Hannah and Christian Doucet’s bedrooms, and above Hannah’s dresser, blue ribbons hang from five rows of leather “barbed wire” — a remarkable number of awards won in just a few years. The Doucets are proud of their show successes and they are clearly very grateful to the ranchers who’ve helped them and advised them. “We are blessed to have done as well as we have,” Corey says, “and we’ve had a lot of help along the way. We’ve made some great friends and we’re glad to be part of the Braford family. The UBB is not a breed; it’s a family, from the older ranchers sharing their knowledge and experience to the young kids just starting to show. We’ve been fortunate to be a part of it. We look forward to continuing in the showring with Hannah and then with nieces and godkids, but our goal is no longer just to win banners and buckles. It’s also to build a herd of superior Braford cattle.”


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President’s Notes

by Larry Stanberry

B

y the time you receive this edition of the Braford News, hopefully you will be making your plans to attend many of the upcoming events we have scheduled. The UBB is off to a fast start for 2016. Our new Executive Director, Hannah Wine, has officially started with the association. The board of directors worked many hours searching for our new director and were pleased to have Hannah join our association. She comes to us from another breed association and brings her recent experiences there to provide a fresh look at the UBB as we continue to grow. Please take the opportunity to meet Hannah, talk with her about your cattle and wish her a warm welcome. Take a minute to read Hannah’s column in this issue to learn more about her. We have a very busy schedule of events in the first quarter of 2016. We have just completed the activities at the Fort Worth Stock Show. The Brafords were well received with an outstanding group of show animals. Congratulations to all of our exhibitors for their hard work in preparing and presenting their animals. Our next event will be the Dixie Nationals

6 BRAFORD news l Winter 2016

UBB Board of Directors in Jackson, Mississippi, a new open show in 2016 for the UBB. The Dixie Nationals has a strong reputation for putting on a first class event, as well as being known for their hospitality. We look forward to showing Braford cattle in a new venue and I am looking forward to seeing you there! The Dixie Nationals show will be the final determining event for the 2016 Braford Show Bull and Female of the Year awards. This year’s contest is the closest in recent memory and will be a photo finish for both awards. Be sure and mark your calendars for the upcoming UBB activities at the Houston Livestock Show. The schedule for our events can be viewed on our UBB website, at www.brafords. org. This show has been designated as the National Braford Show and is also an international event for the Braford breed. It provides members with the opportunity to showcase their cattle to a large audience and discuss how Brafords contribute in today’s market. We have been fortunate to watch the rise in recognition for our Braford cattle and what they contribute to the industry. Braford has been featured and represented at many major industry conventions/tradeshows though out this year. I believe we have a compelling story to tell about the way our cattle perform in the pasture, which is where it really counts. This story can be backed up with EPDs based on data collected and reported for 17 years. We have a growing database of nationally CUP certified ultrasound data

on our cattle. Both of these sources are considered the industry standard in evaluating quality cattle and demonstrate our place in today’s cattle market. I am always intrigued by the large and varied audience in attendance at Houston. You may run into a neighbor, meet a new large commercial operator or a cattleman from another country. The common goal we all share is the interest in cattle and how to make our operations better. Be sure to share with the people you meet about the positive changes in the Braford breed and make them aware of the improvements you are making in your cattle. Don’t miss this chance to visit with old friends and make new ones. I hope you have an enjoyable and productive Houston. A new event we have added to the Braford Calendar this year is the expansion of the successful Advancing the Breed Sale. We have added a new Spring Sale scheduled for March 17 at Burton Coliseum in Lake Charles. This spring sale will offer 33 registered females and 70+ bulls. For performance updates on the bulls, go to our website at www. brafords.org and pull down the genetics tab to “Bull Development Program 2015-2016 Spring.” These are both outstanding groups with animals in great condition ready to go home and go to work for you. Don’t miss out on this opportunity. We have a full schedule to start off 2016. Our breed is gaining recognition, but only because of the great people that we have in this association. Keep up the good work!

President – Larry Stanberry 966 VZ C.R 1805 Grand Saline, TX 75140 Home: 903.962.7219 Mobile: 214.924.9202 Email: lstanberry@earthlink.net Vice President – Danny Boudreaux 3475 Grand Chenier Hwy. Grand Chenier, LA 70643 Home: 337.905.2330 Mobile: 337.249.9066 Email: boudreauxandson@camtel.net Secretary – Jim Smith P.O. Box 487 Magnolia, MS 39652 Home: 601.783.7045 Mobile: 601.551.7045 Fax: 601.276.7675 Email: jsmith@southerntractor.com Treasurer – Robert Mills 15535 C.R. 1123 Athens, TX 75751 Home: 903.489.0869 Mobile: 903.676.8930 Email: robert@rockcrestranch.com Region 1 Director – John Adams P.O. Box 12909 Fort Pierce, FL 34979 Fax: 772.461.6874 Email: alto7981@live.com Region 1 Director – Jim Harvey 2949 Hwy. 70 West Okeechobee, FL 34972 Mobile: 863.697.6624 Fax: 863.763.7524 Email: jimharveybrafords@ embarqmail.com Region 1 Director – Will Moncrief 10006 Journeys End Tallahassee, FL 32312-3710 Mobile: 850.566.6070 Fax: 850.566.6070 Email: w69cracker@hotmail.com Region 2 Director – Shannon Harrington 7068 North Harrington Rd. Iowa, LA 70647 Home: 337.478.7637 Mobile: 337.485.2442 Email: sjhfarm@aol.com Region 2 Director – Chris Herpin 20102 Herpin Circle Kaplan, LA 70548 Mobile: 337.643.3382 Email: aherpin@sfbcic.com Region 3 Director – Darrell Denison 3402 C.R. 160 Alvin, TX 77511 Home: 281.968.3398 Mobile: 281.831.9823 Email: Darrell4D@aol.com Region 4 Director – Paul Harris 334 K-Ville Rd. Screven, GA 31560 Mobile: 912.294.2472 Fax: 912.586.6991 Email: greenviewpaul@yahoo.com Region 4 Director – Bill Rainer P.O. Box 243 Union Springs, AL 36089 Mobile: 903.780.6455 Email: bpfnstx@yahoo.com


Winter 2016 l BRAFORD news

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From the Director’s Desk

Together, We Can Achieve Many More Successes by Hannah Wine UBB Executive Director

M

onday, January 4, was my first day with the United Braford breeders (UBB). After finishing up a Bull Development Conference call that evening, I jumped for joy. Among the many people I spoke with on my first day were a

commercial cowman who runs more than 2,500head and uses Braford bulls, a junior show family excited about the summer 2016 junior activities and a Braford breeder who explained why the Braford cow is the queen of cow country and the only breed he will ever have. All of these people are UBB members. In a time when the cattle industry is embracing the scientific benefits of hybrid vigor, the Braford breed is sitting in a particularly good spot. Your diverse membership and the power of Braford cattle, plus my respect for the beef industry, makes me realize how lucky I am to have been selected to help take this Association to new heights. During the past five years I have worked as the Director of Youth Activities, Media and National Shows at the American Simmental Association. However, my breed association involvement began long before my professional time. Coming from a

long line of commercial Hereford breeders, I became an American Hereford Association member at an early age. I grew up on a purebred Hereford cow-calf operation in the Piedmont of Virginia, just 45 miles west of Washington, D.C., marketing feeder calves, fixing a lot of fence and showing. While I attended school at Kansas State University and Virginia Tech, I served on the National Junior Hereford Association Board of Directors. Today, I continue to raise Herefords. There was one particular email on my first day with UBB that will always stand out to me. As I typed away to Nancy Thomas at Hereford headquarters in Kansas City to let her know I would be her new contact for all things UBB, I nervously squirmed in my chair. I’d talked with Nancy plenty over the years, but a little part of me hoped she’d forgotten who I was. You see, from the day I got

New Member Report August 2015 Caitlin Reed, Diana, TX, Junior Carson Click, Diana, TX, Junior Christopher Ryan McLain, Abbeville, LA, Junior Garrett Lee Dooley, Jackson, LA, Junior Neches Valley Ranch, Edom, TX S2 Cattle Company, Abbeville, LA Ty Mitchell Detraz, Abbeville, LA, Junior William E. Rainer III, New Summerfield, TX Zoie Boudreaux, Creole, LA, Junior September 2015 Cayden James Harrington, Bell City, AL, Junior French Farms of Marion Co. LLC, Buena Vista, GA Kailey M. Cormier, Iowa, LA, Junior Kelsey Fontenot, Ethel, LA Live Oak Pastures, Abbeville, LA Madison Shove, Hackberry, LA, Junior Raegan Jolie Istre, Gueydan, LA, Junior Slade Shove, Hackberry, LA, Junior Walter Greene, Kaplan, LA

8 BRAFORD news l Winter 2016

October 2015 Austin J. Vincent, Cameron, LA, Junior Bailee O’Brien, Fort Worth, TX, Junior Jacob Dufrene Cattle Company, Cut Off, LA Megan Clifton, Gilmer, TX, Junior November 2015 Adam Joseph Manuel, Cameron, LA, Junior Hunter Kade Leboeuf, Cameron, LA, Junior KCM Farms LLC, Bell City, LA Lane Fontenot, Ethel, LA Westin Cobb, Pine Grove, LA, Junior December 2015 Gary P. Noel, Abbeville, LA January Gerard Portelance, Midway, TX Gracey Tesch, Normangee, TX, Junior Grady Richard, Grand Chenier, LA, Junior James and Shellie Rayburn, Texarkana, AR Malori Broussard, Grand Chenier, LA, Junior Scott McCullough, Greenville, TX

my first Hereford cow when I was five, until I was about 14 my dad took care of reporting data to the American Hereford Association. You could find those inventory sheets scattered all over his office with illegible notes all along the sides, calf names scratched out and scribbled over, birthweights written on the back of a car registration, you name it. Often the registration applications would lay around until the umpteenth hour, when my dad would say, “I’ll call Nancy, she’ll take care of it.” My mom and I would cringe as soon as he said it, knowing that whoever this Nancy lady was, she had to be sick of always dealing with his paperwork chaos. As soon as I clicked send on my email to Nancy, she replied, “When you were a young girl, I used to help your dad with your registrations.” I couldn’t help but laugh. (I report all of my data online nowadays to try and make up for all of those years of headache.) We are so lucky to have Nancy on our side! A special thank you to our outgoing Executive Director Grace Nyhuis and UBB President Larry Stanberry and his board of directors for making this a smooth transition and clearing the path for me to forge ahead. I trust that as I delve into our UBB programs and activities, I can count on UBB members and directors to help me understand your perspective—what works for you and what you need in your operation. Together, we can achieve many more successes.


Winter 2016 l BRAFORD news

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Know Your Director

Shannon Harrington: Advocate for the Breed by Sarah Starr

S

hannon Harrington, a Louisiana director operating in Holmwood, 15 miles southeast of Lake Charles, is well known to most Braford breeders. He has been a director for several years and has served a term as president, stepping down in March of 2014. “As president I had the opportunity to bring in Grace Parker when Rodney retired, and now Larry Stanberry has the opportunity to bring in Hannah Wine. There have been a lot of changes in the last few years; it’s been

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a challenge, but our breed has been moving ahead.” Harrington has three memberships in the UBB. As Harrington Brothers Farms Inc., he and his brother Blaine farm 2,000 acres of rice, operate a trucking business and run some registered Braford bulls on a large Brahmancross herd. “We had been using mostly Charolais bulls on them until the last three or four years,” he says. “I’m pleased to be shifting that emphasis to Brafords.” He began his purebred operation, operating simply as Shannon Harrington Brafords, when his niece and his own children started showing Braford cattle around 2003. “Whenever I was looking to buy show animals for them, I’d buy five or six extras for myself and in no time I had a herd built,” Harrington says. Soon he started seeing a need for new genetics. “My neighbor Aaron Natali was interested in bringing in new genetics as well, and we decided one day to go into partnership to create new highquality Braford lines.” As Holmwood Brafords, the two men started in 2007 with the purchase of six F-1 heifers and began creating ¾ Brahman cows, using primarily Hudgins

semen on the Brahman side. “We’re then AIing the ¾ Brahman females to various Hereford bulls to create registered pureblood Brafords,” says Harrington. “We and a few other Braford breeders are trying to get new genetics in. It’s so important to our breed and there are so many possibilities! The Hereford and Brahman breeds are such big gene pools that we can capitalize on to benefit everyone.” His children, Evan and Shawna, now in their twenties, had successful UBB show careers, winning several championships. “My kids still have cattle and UBB memberships, but are not showing now,” Harrington says “I have some children showing my animals for me – neighbors and friends and other family members.” His family still attends Braford shows and events. Monica, his wife, is well known for cooking Cajun food for UBB functions. Shannon Harrington is active in leadership roles in both the cattle and rice industries. He is a director for the USA Rice Council and sits on the local board of directors of the Farm Bureau and of the Louisiana Rice Growers Association. He is also a member of the USA Rice Federation, the Calcasieu Parish Cattlemen’s Association and the Louisiana Cattlemen’s Association. In 2009 he was chosen to participate in a prestigious rice leadership program. He traveled around the country and to Washington D.C. to learn about other farmers’ experiences and the legislation issues surrounding the rice industry. This, he says, improved his leadership skills and strengthened

his belief that everyone in any specific field or breed needs to work together. Harrington has been a member of the UBB’s Sale and Bull Development Program committee since it began, and he continues to be an active, vocal advocate for the bull development program. “I’m optimistic that a spring sale in the southwest Louisiana area will be a good thing,” he says. He doesn’t have any bulls in this upcoming sale, but he will be attending as a possible buyer. “I’ll be looking for new genetics, something that would outcross and improve the genetics in my herd.” He’s making slightly different decisions than he used to, he says, when choosing animals or semen to use in his program. “It’s getting more and more toward where all the EPDs are important. I used to look more at milk and growth, and of course, birth weight, but your ribeye area and IMF and pretty much all your EPDs’ importance have grown over the past few years. The cattle industry as a whole has become more educated as to the use of EPDs, and the EPDs have become more accurate, and therefore more beneficial as a tool to use in purchasing new animals, whether they be bulls or females. “I’ve seen a definite growth in the demand for our Braford bulls to be used on black Angus and Brangus cattle in the last fifteen years,” Harrington says with satisfaction. “I relate that growth to the increase in quality in the breed, as well as to the bull sale, where people with predominantly black cattle are seeing the benefits of Braford bulls.”


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Bull Selection: Built on Basics

by Courtney Wesner, Freelance Writer

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he raw mechanics of buying a bull are easy enough: a checkbook and a buyer’s number will do the trick. However, buying the right bull for your program is a significant and often stressful event for many producers. In an environment where producing a value added product has become very important to the bottom line, the decision of which bull to buy can not only prove difficult but also of vital importance to the future success of your operation.

Assessment of Need Although complicated by the amount of capital at stake today, the basics remain the same, and the first step to any successful bull purchase, perhaps often the most overlooked, is simply identifying what it is that you need. This step should be done at the ranch, long before you hop in the truck to head to the sale. We are only human and the excitement of a sale atmosphere can cloud decision making. Are you selecting a sire for heifers or for mature cows? What level of heterosis is ideal for your environment? Which traits are you trying to improve in your cow herd? Do you retain your own replacements or run a strictly terminal scenario? You get the picture. In order to get the answer to those questions, it is important to: • Recognize your market. Ask yourself what it is that you can sell. You may focus on both your current market and what you foresee as your future marketplace. 12 BRAFORD news l Winter 2016

The answers to this are oftentimes derived from looking at your customer base and your customer’s individual needs. • Be honest. In order to determine what you need out of a sire, you need to accurately and honestly evaluate your current scenario. With the technology available today, there is an assistant to your naked eye in carrying this out. Whether it be through herd management software, other herd recordkeeping methods or the EPD averages of your cow herd, it is important to use current technology to determine accurately where your herd’s genotypic and phenotypic values could use beefing up. After you have identified what it is that you need, you are well on your way to then being able to identify potential sires to help your outfit achieve its goals. No matter what goals or areas of improvement you are trying to find a sire to match, there is still a set of basics that should apply to all herd bull purposes.

Structural Soundness In a world of advanced EPDs and genotypic understanding, the phenotypic trait of structural soundness still ranks as paramount. In the rough ranch environments of the southern United States, it falls even higher on the list. • Bulls should study at the ground with plenty of foot circumference and substance. They should read with good skeletal angles and plenty of reach off of both ends of their skeleton. Remember an unsound bull cannot cover cows. • Keep in mind, many of the other desired phenotypic traits pose as antagonistic to structural soundness. Ultra-heavy muscled, high-growth cattle oftentimes sacrifice structural integrity in the process. It is important to find a balance.

• Structural soundness and longevity go hand-in-hand. The list of benefits to longevity in a sire is long. One of the more obvious would be that the longer a sire can cover cows, the more you can spread your initial cost. This allows breeders the ability to spend more upfront on a higher quality bull.

Genotypic Progress Phenotypic selection can only get a producer so far. Selection of a new herd sire purely based upon phenotypic appraisal and actual data is similar to a good game of pin the tail on the donkey; most of the time you miss the mark and it is only with a bit of pure luck that you get it right. It is of the utmost importance in minimizing risk in selection that EPDs be utilized. EPDs are still our best baseline for the production/ terminal potential of a sire’s offspring. When utilizing EPDs it is important to remember the following: • Highest is not always best. The first way to look at this could be from the very simple standpoint that optimum EPDs for some measured traits are the lower the better. What we are getting at here though is more complicated than just that. The math is easy enough; a Milk EPD of +4 is higher than that of +2. However, it is important to keep in mind that EPDs are measuring purely an output. They are not a measurement of profitability, the exception being some multi-line indexes. More outputs usually mean more inputs. Cattle that milk harder usually require more groceries to maintain body condition and breed back. It is important to select for the EPD levels that maximize profit in your particular environment; this not necessarily being the highest. • Select for a balance of traits. Understanding that many times a sire is selected to correct and improve a very specific trait within your herd, it is still important to avoid extremes. EPDs run in


antagonistic pairs; selecting for an extreme outlier in terms of Marbling EPD can very negatively affect Ribeye Area, etc. Terminal traits normally run against the course of maternally oriented traits. Bulls that excel in terms of both terminal and maternal EPDs do exist, however, these sires normally come at a steep price. This is where your assessment of need comes into play. Select the sire that excels at the traits most important to your marketing scheme, while maintaining some sort of balance in other traits if at all possible. • Relying on actual data is not good enough anymore. Adjusted weights, adjusted ultrasound data and ratios can all prove to be a valuable piece of the puzzle when selecting your next herd sire. This is where contemporary groups come into play. It can be very valuable to select bulls from breeders with decent-sized contemporary groups if at all possible; this is also the underlying principal to bull test programs. They allow you as the customer the ability to compare numerous potential sires on an

even playing field. Remember that EPDs are also giving you this even playing field as well, removing environmental factors that would normally inhibit it. • Pay attention to accuracy. Realizing that most young herd sires do not allow the buyer this luxury, it is important to know the flux in EPDs that could potentially happen as progeny are reported. This also brings us to the importance of reporting data. It is only through data reporting that buyers can ensure a more stable platform for sire selection for the next generation. Selecting your next herd sire should be an exciting and enjoyable time. The sire has as much impact on your herd as any animal and offers you the chance to build on current, acceptable traits and to correct those traits that need to be changed. Selecting a bull is as simple as building on basics, while adding as many bells and whistles as possible within your budget. Happy hunting for that optimum blend between phenotypic and genotypic brilliance for your program.

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Industry Update WOTUS SURVIVES After bipartisan passage in the Senate and the House of Senate Joint Resolution 22, disapproval of the EPA’s “waters of the United States” rule, President Obama sided with the EPA and vetoed the resolution. Public Lands Council President Brenda Richardson said, “Once again the regulatory train wreck has landed squarely on America’s rural economy.” The PLC and the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association began pursuing litigation in July 2015 and a stay on implementation of the WOTUS rule remains in effect.

BULL BREEDING SOUNDNESS Lew Strickland of Tennessee Extension estimates that only 10 percent of beef bulls in the U.S. undergo breeding soundness evaluations. Failure to evaluate bulls before and during breeding season can result in huge economic losses, he writes in Drovers magazine. A bull’s fertility can be considered fertile, sub-fertile or sterile. Strickland cites four components of

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the breeding soundness evaluation (BSE): physical exam, scrotal circumference, sperm motility and sperm morphology. Based on the results, a bull is then assigned one of three classifications: satisfactory potential breeder, unsatisfactory potential breeder or deferred. Strickland says the extra pounds of beef per exposed cow will more than pay for the BSE.

SOME DRUG PURCHASES WILL REQUIRE VET’S ORDER Starting in 2017, livestock producers will need to get a written order from their vet before buying certain antibiotics for their animals, according to the North Dakota State University Extension Service vet and livestock stewardship specialist. In 1996 the Animal Drug Availability Act created a new category of products called veterinary feed directive (VFD) drugs. These are antibiotics intended for use in or on animal feed. The purpose of the rule is to limit the use of antibiotics in

livestock to those necessary for ensuring animal health. They are for treatment, control and prevention, not food production purposes.

REPLACEMENT HEIFER MARKET CRASH According to Wyatt Bechtel, writing in AgWeb.com, as America’s cow herd dropped to 60-year lows two years ago, ranchers saw economic incentives to save and breed replacement heifers. Demand spiked, creating a profitable niche market, which now appears to have burned out. The past year saw bred and open heifer markets spiral downward, following similar beef market trends in 2015 and heading into 2016 as fat cattle and calf prices fell back to prices last seen in 2013. Bechtel quotes Stephen Koontz, an economist with Colorado State University Extension, who believes the downward trend will continue for quite some time until calf prices discourage producers from holding back more replacement heifers.


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Crossbreeding Strategies: One Bull Doesn’t Do It All by Hannah Wine Reprinted with permission from Santa Gertrudis-USA

With the volatility of today’s beef industry pricing structure, looking for ways to enhance your profitability is a logical focus. The benefits of crossbreeding work like magic when it comes to increasing profitability. You’ve heard it time and time again, and as Braford breeders, you know the benefits of composite breeds to your bottom line first hand. A crossbreeding program is more than just mating two animals of different breeds. It’s the development of a breeding program that blends the strengths from different breeds to meet production goals and fit within the production environment, exactly as the Braford breed was developed. “Successful crossbreeding programs focus on optimums, not maximums or minimums,” Dr. Bob Weaber, geneticist at Kansas State University, explains in his Crossbreeding Strategies proceedings for the 2015 Range Beef Cow Symposium. “The value of heterosis effects every cow in your outfit, and it is a value you can capture every year, no matter how you sell your calves.” The power of crossbreeding comes from 1) Heterosis 2) Breed complementarity

Heterosis Heterosis generates the largest improvement in lowly heritable traits, like reproduction and longevity. These traits respond very slowly to selection, but that can be significantly improved with heterosis. Improving on critical traits like reproduction and longevity means more calves for more years and thus more profit. With that said, the largest economic benefit of crossbreeding comes from having crossbred cows, as crossbreeding has been proved to be an efficient method to improve reproductive efficiency and productivity. “In general, Bos Indicus crosses have higher levels of heterosis than the British-British, BritishCongenital, or Continental-Continental crosses,” Weaber explained,

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Breed Complementarity Breed complementarity, more simply put, is combining the strengths of the parent breeds. It is the utilization of breed combinations that have different core strengths to get the best of both breeds to build a calf that is more complete in its genetic profile across a broad range of traits, just as Brahman and Hereford complemented each other in the development of Braford. Weaber, one of the industry’s leading geneticists, challenges producers to reevaluate the bull buying process in the coming months. Rather than flipping through catalogs and watching videos to find the bull to buy, Weaber advocates for buyers to add a critical step beforehand. Step one, often overlooked each year, should be evaluating your breeding system and breeding objective. What do you need to do to improve your system and enhance profitability?

What are you building? Feeder calves or replacement heifers? Crossbreeding doesn’t counteract the need for quality parent stock. Crossbreeding and sire selection should be used together to create the ideal breeding system. Strategically selecting sires for enhancement of specific traits is essential for success. The same goes for using terminal trait EPDs or indices to select bulls to sire calves with optimum terminal traits and utilizing maternal trait EPDs or indices to select bulls to build you maternal replacement heifers.

Building feeder calves AND retaining replacement heifers? Searching for a bull that will sire both terminal calves that excel and desirable replacement heifers is nearly impossible, and when you find that sire, it often comes with a hard hit on your check book. Weaber acknowledges that due to the antagonisms in the terminal and maternal objectives, it’s becoming increasingly difficult to find bulls that will do everything you want, but he also offers a solution: separate this

into two distinct breeding decisions, selecting sires with optimum terminal traits to sire terminal calves and selecting sires with optimum maternal traits to sire replacement heifers. This separation increases the selection intensity of both sire groups as they can now be more narrowly focused on specific traits. Although this strategy is new for the beef industry, it has been hugely successful in the pork and poultry industries. “I think it’s long overdue in our industry,” he said. Weaber acknowledges that the downfall to this system are the steers from the group aimed at producing replacement heifers but, it’s avoidable with the use of sexed semen. Keys to successful crossbreeding systems 1) Selecting a system that is simplistic enough for your operation 2) Construction of a plan 3) Sticking to the plan Crossbreeding systems vary dramatically from herd to herd and are influenced by many different factors such as herd size, market target, existing breeds, labor availability, grazing systems, and handling facilities. One of the most critical factors in implementing a crossbreeding system is the operator’s decision whether or not to select and raise replacements from the herd or purchase replacement females. Weaber offers that purchasing healthy, welldeveloped replacement females of appropriate breed composition can be the simplest and quickest way for operators (particularly small herds) to maximize maternal heterosis in the cowherd. As operators determine the system best for them, it’s critical that they make their choice simple when it comes to using a two-or-threebreed rotation, terminal cross with F1 females, or composite breeds.

Two-or-Three-Breed Rotation Two breeds are mated and the resulting female offspring are kept as replacements and mated back


to one of the breeds. In following generations, females are bred to the opposite breed of their sire. For their entire lives, females would be mated to the bull breed opposite their sire. (For example Hereford and Brahman were crossed to make ½ Hereford x ½ Brahman females, who were then bred to Hereford. The resulting calves would be ¾ Hereford x ¼ Brahman. These females would then be mated to Brahman bulls.) Breeds used in this system should be of similar type to avoid large swings in progeny phenotype. Pros • Simplicity • After several generations the amount of retained heterosis in two-breed rotation stabilizes at 67% of the max calf and dam heterosis, three-breed rotation maximizes at 86% Cons • If natural service is used, this system requires at least two breeding pastures • Minimum herd size of approximately 50 • Replacement females are mated to herd bulls, consideration must be given to calving ease • Number of pastures and cows increases as the number of breeds in the rotation increases

Terminal cross with F1 females Utilizes crossbred cows and bulls of a third breed. Pros • Simplest system to implement • Achieves highest use of heterosis and breed complementarity • All calves marketed will have the same breed composition • One breeding pasture required • No special identification of cows or groups required Cons • Replacement females will need to be purchased/produced separately

Composite Breed Comprised of a population made up of two or more component breeds, designed to retain heterosis in future generations without crossbreeding and maintained like a straight bred (For example, Braford) Pros • As easy to manage as straight breds once composite is formed • Easy to implement in small or large herds Cons • In closed populations inbreeding must be avoided as it will decrease heterosis • Inclusion of a third or fourth breed in the system takes more expertise and management

In Memoriam

Lewis P. Chandler Longtime Braford breeder Lewis P. Chandler of Kennard, Texas, passed away January 8 in the Houston Methodist Hospital. A graduate of Texas Tech, Baylor University and SMU, Lewis Chandler was a retired attorney. He is survived by his wife, Marry Chandler of Kennard. Lewis Chandler was a true gentleman and as honest as any person ever involved in the purebred cattle industry. He was unusually kind and calm with his cattle as well as with the numerous stray pets that he sheltered. Lewis Chandler was a friend of all who knew him. In the early 90s, Lewis and Mary Chandler purchased their Houston County ranch from Braford breeder Pat Carroll. The Chandlers quickly acquired Carroll’s appreciation and

Despite the advantages, challenges do exist in crossbreeding systems. According to Dr. Harlan Ritchie of Michigan State University, the five leading challenges are 1) More difficult in small herds 2) Requires more breeding pasture and breeds of bulls 3) Requires more record keeping and identification of cows 4) Matching biological types of cows and sires 5) System continuity “While these possibilities are exciting, the fundamentals still hold. Pair breeds to take advantage of breed complementarity when possible, utilize heterosis, and select animals within the chosen breeds using EPD and Bio-economic index values. Without these fundamentals, advancing technology has no chance of success,” Weaber said. Braford producers are no strangers to crossbreeding programs. With that said, many cattlemen reach the optimum heterosis for their program in different ways that are best for their programs. Fortunately there is room for all programs used by your fellow breeders and customers in the beef industry. Despite the differences, it’s hard to find a cattleman that doesn’t want to maximize the profitability of his or her breeding program.

(1946-2016)

enthusiasm for registered Brafords and started their own herd, operating as Chandler Rocking L Ranch. Lewis Chandler’s first career was as an oil and gas attorney in Houston. For many years he worked in Houston during the week and hurried to the ranch in Kennard every weekend. The pull of the ranch continuously grew and he gradually spent more time at the ranch and less in Houston each year. He likely used up several fax machines as he steadily conducted more and more of the law work from the ranch. In 2005, he retired from his law duties and moved to the ranch permanently. Lewis Chandler was a strong supporter of the IBA that became the UBB. He served as a UBB director, representing the Texas region and

actively served on several of the association’s committees. He built a strong market for commercial Braford bulls and often sold more Braford bulls annually than any other Texas breeder. Chandler Rockling L Ranch was a faithful supporter of Braford youth programs. Lewis Chandler was a regular sponsor of state and national youth events and especially well known for his kindhearted sharing of his top show heifer prospects with young enthusiasts, especially those who needed a little extra help. Graveside funeral services were held January 13 at the Helton Cemetery, located just down the road from Rocking L Ranch. Memorial contributions may be made to the Animal Shelter, 1300 South 4th St., Crockett, TX 75835. Winter 2016 l BRAFORD news

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Let Rock Crest Ranch Genetics bring you to the spotlight in the showring or your pasture

RCM 9182 Harlie 4875

RCM 9182 Classified 5145

Champion Yearling Heifer • Reserve Grand Champion Female Owned by Jesse Marett

Champion Bull Calf • Reserve Grand Champion Bull

RCM 9182 Gidget Champion Heifer Calf

RCM 9182 Maybeline 4827 Reserve Yearling Heifer Owned by Clayton Owens

OTHER “DAVIDSON” CLASS WINNERS INCLUDED CK Southern Gypsy-owned by Jamie Davis RCM 9182 Chaynee 5146-owned by Pepper Townsend GPN Miss Athena-Reserve Calf Champion, owned by Joesph Natali RCM 9182 Stealth 5139 • RCM 9182 Online Sportster

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Robert and Carol Mills Trey Abney 15535 C.R. 1123 • Athens, TX 75751 903.489.0869 • 903.489.0837 info@rockcrestranch.com Heifers, Bulls And Semen Available


BD 1527 Lot 104 Heifers, Low Birth Weight Bulls and Semen Available

BW BWM WW YW Milk TM CW FAT REA MARB 0.8 1.1 +16 21 2 10 20 0.160 0.23 0.08

Advance your breeding program with BD Braford genetics offered at the Advancing the Breed VI Sale, March 17 in Lake Charles. Danny Boudreaux 337-905-2330 Cell 337-249-9066 3475 Grand Chenier Hwy. Grand Chenier, LA 70643 boudreauxandson@camtel.net

BUBBIE and JADE DUPONT

Michael Boudreaux Cell 337-303-4167 162 Eugene Rd. Lake Charles, LA 70607 mlbbrafords@yahoo.com

O nly breede r in Baton Rouge area

20340 Sallie Dr. Plaquemine, LA 70764 225.687.7891 Home 225.413.5511 Cell bubbiedupontcoc@bellsouth.net Farm located 12 miles south of Baton Rouge, La.

Join us for the spring Advancing the Braford Breed Sale, March 17.

Lot 135

Lot 176

Special thanks to those from TX, LA, FL, and GA buying our bulls at Lake Charles: Danny Boudreaux and Larry Stanberry, Dr. Jim Harvey, Bryan Alleman, James Henson, Robert Mhire, Francesta Teal, McFaddin Enterprises-Bob McCan, D&D Brafords-Vince Desotel, Trey Kirkpatrick, Don Blacketer, Rick George, Gary Byargeon,J. R. Moneyham and Allan Heard.

Bill Rainer Cattle Co. REGISTERED BRAFORD CATTLE

P.O. Box 243 Union Springs, AL 36089 Alabama: 334-738-2205

New Summerfield, Texas Cell: 903-780-6455 Texas Home: 903-683-1086

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Junior Focus

Meet NJBA Director Annemarie Broussard I’m Annemarie Broussard, the 16-year-old daughter of Timothy and Gwen Broussard. I am a sophomore at Abbeville High School in Abbeville, Louisiana. Currently I serve as a Director for the National Junior Braford Association (NJBA) and the Louisiana Junior Braford Breeders (LJBB). This is my eighth year of showing and promoting Braford cattle through my local 4-H Beef Project, the Louisiana Cattlemen’s Association, LJBB and NJBA. I have been attending livestock shows since I was an infant. I got involved with the Braford breed because the members of my family raise and show Brafords. It just seemed natural to follow in their footsteps. I have been in 4-H for eight years, participating in the beef project, food and nutrition project, environment project and the leadership project. I stay very busy with these projects and also make

time for Record Books, Demonstration Day, Achievement Day and 4-H University. I am also active in the Vermilion Parish 4-H Junior Leader Club where I serve as reporter. Our club focuses on community service projects each year that wraps up with an educational trip. Our project this year is safe driving; we will be traveling to Atlanta in the spring to participate in the Alive at 25 educational program. Over the

last couple of years I’ve also helped with environmental awareness and hunger awareness projects. This year I am serving as the queen for the Vermilion Parish Cattlemen and Cattlewomen Associations. In early January, I participated in the Queen’s Contest in Houma at the Louisiana Cattlemen’s Convention. The experience was one for my memory book. When I’m not busy with the beef industry, I am an avid pole vaulter. I jump for Abbeville High School and New Heights Gym in New Iberia. In the past I’ve travelled around the United States participating in the USA Track and Field Junior Olympics. After high school I plan to attend McNeese State University to pole vault and pursue a degree in Health and Human Performance. See ya’ll this summer!

Meet NJBA Director, Ari Montemayor Being an avid Braford breeder (and feeder), as well as local Laredoan, I am proud to say that this year’s All American National Junior Braford Association show will be held at the Laredo International Fair and Exposition Center in Laredo, Texas, July 7-9, 2016. As this exciting event draws closer, my days as a high schooler are quickly coming to an end. Although I haven’t chosen a university, I have chosen a career path: medicine. Always a dream 22 BRAFORD news l Winter 2016

of mine, a white coat and a stethoscope are only a small incentive compared to my determination and commitment to improving the lives of

others. In addition to being a supporter of the Braford breed and a devoted student, I am a passionate competitive shotgun shooter. Recently selected to be a part of this year’s Texas Shotgun Team, I look forward to representing my state at the National Championships. Having briefly introduced myself and our upcoming Junior National show, I have only one more thing to say. See you in Laredo!

NATIONAL JUNIOR BRAFORD ASSOCIATION

2015-16 OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS OFFICERS President Maeleigh Conner Grand Lake, Louisiana Vice President Jade Herpin Kaplan, Louisiana Secretary Ari Montemayor Laredo, Texas Treasurer Ryan Danos Iowa, Louisiana Reporter Jamie Davis Pearland, Texas DIRECTORS Annemarie Broussard Abbeville, Louisiana Christian Doucet Lake Charles, Louisiana Dylan Comeaux Abbeville, Louisiana Garrett Wood Zachary, Louisiana Gene Natali Lake Charles, Louisiana Logan Vest Iowa, Louisiana Paige Comeaux Abbeville, Louisiana UBB AMBASSADORS Ari Montemayor Laredo, Texas Lena Darby Buna, Texas Maeleigh Conner Grand Lake, Louisiana Gene Natali Lake Charles, Louisiana Jamie Davis Pearland, Texas

NJBA Ambassadors, Gene Natali, Ari Montemayor, Jamie Davis and Texas Junior Braford Queen, Lena Darby helping at the 2016 Fort Worth Stock Show and Rodeo.


Running

Ranch

Advancing the Breed 6 Sale March 17 • Lake Charles, LA We are selling three outstanding herdsire prospects — all sired by our performance leader, “Critical Mass” and out of daughters of maternal giant, “Legacy.”

Lot 126

TR CM BIG DEAL 509P TR CRITICAL MASS TOO 228S Birth BW Weaning Yearling Total Carc. Weight Maternal Weight Weight Milk Maternal Wt. Fat REA Marbling 0.0 2.5 19 43 6 15 44 0.110 0.45 0.21

• We have a few yearling sons of “Too” available now. Call for details.

Birth BW Weaning Yearling Total Carc. Weight Maternal Weight Weight Milk Maternal Wt. Fat REA Marbling 1.7 2.4 28 51 4 18 52 0.130 0.48 0.29

• Lot 126 is a remarkable high growth bull. His 51 YW EPD ranks him at the very top of the breed. He is polled and Hereford marked. This is a complete herd bull package.

We want to extend a big THANK YOU to the buyers of our bull consignments in the Advancing the Breed V Sale Pam Burns, Collinsville, MS 1 Bull, The sale topper

Burnie Benoit, Gueydan, LA 1 Bull

Lot 132

TR CM OVERDRIVE 522P Birth BW Weaning Yearling Total Carc. Weight Maternal Weight Weight Milk Maternal Wt. Fat REA Marbling 3.9 2.0 27 46 5 19 41 0.080 0.30 0.20

McFaddin Enterprises, Victoria, TX

• Lot 132 is a moderate-framed scurred bull and he was one of the highest gaining bulls in the program. He is square-hipped and thick from end-toend. He is out of a top producing, very consistent Legacy daughter.

1 Bull

Lot 131

Bill Rainer, Union Springs, AL

TR CM AFFIRMED 520S

1 Bull

Birth BW Weaning Yearling Total Carc. Weight Maternal Weight Weight Milk Maternal Wt. Fat REA Marbling 1.8 2.7 24 44 7 19 38 0.170 0.40 0.38

Don Blacketer, Flint, TX 2 Bulls

Running

Ranch

Call for information

Payne Midyette Will Moncrief Kit Storey 850.566.6070 850.544.5195 229.269.0951 Ranch Address 4686 N.W. C.R. 150, Greenville, FL 32331

• Lot 131 is another scurred herdsire prospect that is Hereford marked with great numbers across the spectrum. This bull is out of our top Legacy daughter, Ugly Betty 933, and offers the strongest maternal genetics and most marbling of our offering. We will also be selling 7 registered yearling heifers in Lake Charles.

Wayne Boozer Brafords Douglass, Texas 936.569.6062

Thunderstorm R Cattle Co.

Nacogdoches, Texas 936.569.4872

Call or see our Website for more information www.thunderstormrcattle.com rlr@thunderstormrcattle.com

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Show Results

East Texas State Fair Braford Show October 6, 2015 • Judge: Dean Fuchs, Burton, TX

Braford Heifer Show Results:

Class 1: RCM 9182 CHAYNEE 5146, Pepper Townsend, WA Class 2: RCM 9182 HARLEY CHICK 573, Dixon Baird, TX Class 3: HNH MUSCLES 1054 MS SUG, Hayden Hyman, AR Champion Heifer Calf: HNH MUSCLES 1054 MS SUG, Hayden Hyman, AR Reserve Champion Heifer Calf: RCM 9182 CHAYNEE 5146, Pepper Townsend, WA Class 6: BD 13, Danny Boudreaux, LA Class 7: S5 GO MS 378, Gene Natali, LA Champion Fall Heifer Calf: S5 GO MS 378, Gene Natali, LA Reserve Champion Fall Heifer Calf: BD 13, Danny Boudreaux, LA Class 10: LV LEGACY MS SASSY 42, Logan Vest, LA Class 11: MISS WLG BUBBLES 14038, Granger Cattle Co., LA Class 12: RCM 9182 STELLA 4107, Lainey McCullough, TX Class 13: TR LG CHRISTINA 473P, Hannah Doucet, LA Champion Yearling Heifer: RCM 9182 STELLA 4107, Lainey McCullough, TX

Reserve Champion Yearling Heifer: TR LG CHRISTINA 473P, Hannah Doucet, LA Class 17: HPH MUSCLES 1054 MS DOTTI, Hayden Hyman, AR Champion Senior Yearling Female: HPH MUSCLES 1054 MS DOTTI, Hayden Hyman, AR Reserve Champion Senior Yearling Female: NPH MUSCLES 1054 MS 305, Danny Boudreaux, LA Grand Champion Female: RCM 9182 STELLA 4107, Lainey McCullough, TX Reserve Grand Champion Female: HPH MUSCLES 1054 MS DOTTI, Hayden Hyman, AR

Braford Bull Show Results:

Class 22: LEM 1703 FLOYD 5001, Laney McCullough, TX Class 23: RCM 9182 STEALTH 5139, Rock Crest Ranch, TX Champion Bull Calf: RCM 9182 STEALTH 5139, Rock Crest Ranch, TX Reserve Champion Bull Calf: LEM 1703 FLOYD 5001, Lainey McCullough, TX Class 27: GB MR BUCKLES, Will Boudreaux, LA Champion Fall Bull Calf: GB MR BUCKLES, Will Boudreaux , LA

Reserve Champion Fall Bull Calf: LEM 1703 AXEL ROSE 4002, Lainey McCullough, TX Class 32: RCM 9182 ONLINE SPORTSTER, Rock Crest Ranch, TX Class 34: ACC X810 MR WATTS 517, Hannah Doucet, LA Champion Yearling Bull: ACC X810 MR WATTS 517, Hannah Doucet, LA Reserve Champion Yearling Bull: TR RB DARK KNIGHT, Will Boudreaux, LA Class 39: LA 111 HLK HARD LUCK 0913, Lazy Acre Cattle Ranch, LA Champion Senior Bull: LA 111 HLK HARD LUCK 0913, Lazy Acre Cattle Ranch, LA Reserve Champion Senior Bull: MR WIDH BANDIT 13020, Granger Cattle, LA Grand Champion Bull: ACC X810 MR WATTS 517, Hannah Doucet, LA Reserve Grand Champion Bull: LA 111 HLK HARD LUCK 0913, Lazy Acre Cattle Ranch, LA Produce-of-Dam: Rock Crest Ranch, TX Get-of-Sire: Rock Crest Ranch, TX Best-Six-Head: Rock Crest Ranch, TX

State Fair Of Louisiana Open Show

October 30, 2015 • Shreveport, LA • Judge: Tommy Brandenberger, Hallettsville, TX

Class 1 – Spring Heifer Calf calved March 2015 and after RCM 9182 CHAYNEE 5146, Pepper Townsend, TX Class 2 – Junior Heifer Calf 1/1-2/28, 2015 4D MISS 21, Christian Doucet, LA Class 3 – Early Junior Heifer 1/1-1/31. 2015 HNH MUSCLES 1054 Ms, Hayden Hyman, AR Champion Heifer Calf RCM 9182 CHAYNEE 5146, Pepper Townsend, TX Reserve Champion Heifer Calf 4D MISS 21, Christian Doucet, LA Class 6 – Winter Heifer Calf 10/l-12/31, 2014 AG MS 1024 SPECKLED, Destiny Doxey, LA Class 7 – Senior Heifer Calf 8/1-9/31, 2014 S5 CM MS 389, Ryan Danos, LA Champion Fall Heifer Calf AG MS 1024 SPECKLED, Destiny Doxey, LA

Reserve Champion Fall Heifer Calf S5 CM MS 389, Ryan Danos, LA Class 10 – Summer Yearling Heifer 5/1-7/31, 2014 LV LEGACY MS SASSY 42, Logan Vest, LA Class 11 – Late Spring Yearling Heifer 4/1-4/30, 2014 MO 135 LADY K, Kinsely Sibille, LA Class 12 – Early Spring Yearling Heifer 3/1-3/31, 2014 NPH MUSCLES 1054 MS., Hayden Hyman, AR Class 13 – Junior Yearling Heifer 1/1-2/28, 2014 RCM 99182 MAYBELINE 4827, Clayton Owens, TX Champion Yearling Heifer NPH MUSCLES 1054 MS., Hayden Hyman, AR Reserve Champion Yearling Heifer RCM 91982 HARLIE 4875, Jesse Marett, TX Class 16 – Late Yearling Females 10/1-12/31, 2013 TR RB COOPER PENNY, Abby Henry, LA Class 17 – Early Senior Yearling Females 8/1-9/30, 2013 NPH MUSCLES 1054 MS., Hayden Hyman, AR

Champion Senior Yearling Female NPH MUSCLES 1054 MS., Hayden Hyman, AR Reserve Champion Senior Yearling Female TR RB COOPER PENNY, Abby Henry, LA Grand Champion Braford Female NPH MUSCLES 1054 MS., Hayden Hyman, AR Reserve Grand Champion Braford Female RCM 9182 CHAYNEE 5146, Pepper Townsend, TX

Grand Champion Braford Female: NPH MUSCLES 1054 MS., Hayden Hyman, AR

Grand Champion Braford Bull: TR RB DARK KNIGHT, Will Boudreaux, LA

Reserve Grand Champion Braford Bull: MR HDG RED BULL 14034, Mason Mhire, LA

Open Braford Females

Open Braford Bulls Class 22 – Spring Bull Calf March 1, 2015 and after DHF BEEF COMMANDER 1504, Cody Hanna, LA Class 23 – Junior Bull Calf 2/1-2/28, 2015 RCM 9182 STEALTH, Robert and Carol Mills, TX Class 24 – Early Junior Bull Calf 1/1-1/31, 2015 TR DC RECTANGLE 548, Thunderstorm R, TX Champion Bull Calf DHF BEEF COMMANDER 1504, Cody Hanna, LA

No photo available: Reserve Grand Champion Braford Female – RCM 9182 CHAYNEE 5146, Pepper Townsend, TX 24 BRAFORD news l Winter 2016


Reserve Champion Bull Calf RCM 9182 STEALTH, Robert and Carol Mills, TX Class 27 – Winter Bull Calf 10/1-12/31, 2014 TR DINERO 525P, Thunderstorm R, TX Champion Fall Bull Calf TR DINERO 525P, Thunderstorm R, TX Reserve Champion Fall Bull Calf LEM 1703 AXL ROSE 4002, Lainey McCullough, TX Class 31 – Summer Yearling Bull 5/1-7-5/31, 2014 EJH BANDIT 1451, Ashlee Primeaux, LA Class 32 – Late Spring Yearling Bull 4/1-4/30. 2014 RLR 14066, Madalyn Jennings, LA Class 33 – Early Spring Yearling Bull 3/1-3/31, 2014 MR HDG RED BULL 14034, Mason Mhire, LA Class 34 – Junior Yearling Bull 1/1-2/28, 2014 TR RB DARK KNIGHT, Will Boudreaux, LA Champion Yearling Bull TR RB DARK KNIGHT, Will Boudreaux, LA Reserve Champion Yearling Bull MR HDG RED BULL 14034, Mason Mhire, LA Class 39 – Two-Year-Old Bull 1/1-7/31, 2013 LA 111 HLK HARD LUCK, Leslie D. Griffith, LA Champion Senior Bull LA 111 HLK HARD LUCK, Leslie D. Griffith, LA Reserve Champion Senior Bull MR WLCH BANDIT 13020, Gary Baccigalopi, LA Grand Champion Braford Bull TR RB DARK KNIGHT, Will Boudreaux, LA Reserve Grand Champion Braford Bull MR HDG RED BULL 14034, Mason Mhire, LA Produce of Dam Robert and Carol Mills, TX Get-of-Sire Robert and Carol Mills, TX Best Six Head Robert and Carol Mills, TX

Braford Base Females Class 1 – Spring Heifer Calf calved March 1, 2015 and after CAJUNS MISS 1 49, Tyleigh Canik, LA Class 2 – Junior Heifer Calf 2/1-2/28, 2015 JP SWEET MINNIE 77, Kaleb Styron, LA Class 3 – Early Junior Heifer 1/1-1/31, 2015 JP SWEET DAISY 73, Jaselyn Roussell, LA

Champion Heifer Calf MS KAJUN LADY 569, Ryan Landry, LA Reserve Champion Heifer Calf JP SWEET DAISY 73, Jaselyn Roussell, LA Class 6 – Winter Heifer Calf 10/l-12/31, 2014 MISS COOKIES AND CREAM, Caleb Bourgeois, LA Champion Fall Heifer Calf MISS COOKIES AND CREAM, Caleb Bourgeois, LA Reserve Champion Fall Heifer Calf MISS KALLION, Corey Bourgeois, LA Class 10 – Summer Yearling Heifer 5/1-7/31, 2014 MISS CF 1, Taylor Clement, LA Class 11 – Late Spring Yearling Heifer 4/1-4/30, 2014 MISS DIAMOND R, Karlee Nunez, LA Class 12 – Early Spring Yearling Heifer 3/1-3/31, 2014 MRS JACKIE, Wacen Fontenot, LA Class 13 – Junior Yearling Heifer 1/1-2/28, 2014 MISS ELEGANCE CAT, Taylor Hess, LA Champion Yearling Heifer MISS DIAMOND R, Karlee Nunez, LA Reserve Champion Yearling Heifer MRS JACKIE, Wacen Fontenot, LA Class 16 – Late Senior Yearling Females 10/112/31. 2013 MISS LUCY, Maeleigh Conner, LA Champion Senior Yearling Female MISS LUCY, Maeleigh Conner, LA Reserve Champion Senior Yearling Female MISS BONCHASSE 3541, Harlee Styron, LA Grand Champion Braford Base Female MISS DIAMOND R, Karlee Nunez, LA Reserve Grand Champion Braford Base Female MS KAJUN LADY 569, Ryann Landry, LA

Braford Base Bulls Class 22 – Spring Bull Calf March 1, 2015 and after D&D MR STEELE TUSK, Jaselyn Roussell, LA Class 24 – Early Junior Bull Calf 1/1-1/31, 2015 MR GS NUGGET, Slade Shove, LA Champion Bull Calf MR GS NUGGET, Slade Shove, LA Reserve Champion Bull Calf CAJUNS MR 150, Tyleigh Canik, LA Class 27 – Winter Bull Calf 10/1-12/31, 2014 DC MR BULLET 1114, Dilan Comeaux, LA Champion Fall Bull Calf DC MR BULLET 1114, Dilan Comeaux, LA

No photos available: Grand Champion Braford Base Female: MISS DIAMOND R, Karlee Nunez, LA Reserve Grand Champion Braford Base Female: MS KAJUN LADY 569, Ryann Landry, LA

Grand Champion Braford Base Bull: MILL CAMO, Jace Roussell, LA

Reserve Grand Champion Braford Base Bull: MR GS NUGGET, Slade Shove, Hackberry, LA Reserve Champion Fall Bull Calf D&D DUFFY MANSO 82/4, Dilan Comeaux, LA Class 33 – Early Spring Yearling Bull 3/1-3/31, 2014 MILL FOUR RUNNER, Kaleb Styron, LA Class 34 – Junior Yearling Bull 1/1-2/28 MILL CAMO, Jace Roussell, LA Champion Yearling Bull MILL CAMO, Jace Roussell, LA Reserve Champion Yearling Bull MILL FOUR RUNNER, Kaleb Styron, LA Grand Champion Braford Base Bull MILL CAMO, Jace Roussell, LA Reserve Grand Champion Braford Base Bull MR GS NUGGET, Slade Shove, Hackberry, LA

Thank you Boudreaux & Son Brafords, Grand Chenier, LA Bob McCan, Victoria, TX, Jason Herpin, Kaplan, LA for investing in our genetics at the Advancing the Braford Breed V sale in Lake Charles.

James Noel, Jr. 409 E. Lafayette Street Abbeville, LA 70510

337-898-1166 Office • 377-652-6260 Cell • jamesnoeljr@gmail.com

JNJ - BREEDING UP FROM THE TOP - JNJ

Winter 2016 l BRAFORD news

25


State Fair Of Louisiana Junior Show

October 30, 2015 • Shreveport, LA • Judge: Sherman Jones, Groveton, TX

Braford Females

Class 1 – Spring Heifer Calf calved 3/1-4/30, 2015 1 MISS CAJUNS QUEEN, Corey Bourgeois, LA 2 MRS ANNIE NENEZ, Shelby Welch, LA Class 2 – Junior Heifer Calf 1/1-2/29, 2015 1 TR LG MS TRADITION, Madalyn Jennings, LA 2 MRS NUNEZ 1/15, Shelby Welch, LA Class 3 – Winter Heifer Calf 11/l-12/31, 2014 1 MRS ELAE, Ali Fontenot, LA Class 4 – Senior Heifer Calf 9/1-10/31, 2014 1 S5 CM MS 389, Ryan Danos, LA 2 AG GP MIRANDA 1014P, Madalyn Jennings, LA Class 5 – Late Summer Yearling Heifer 7/1-8/31, 2014 1 S5 GO MS 378, Gene Natali, LA

Class 6 – Early Summer Yearling Heifer 5/1-6/30, 2014 1 GW 358 MS LIZ 514, Garrett Wood, LA 2 LV LEGACY MS SASSY 42 Class 7 – Spring Yearling Heifer 3/1-4/30, 2014 1 RLR 14034, Madalyn Jennings, LA 2 MISS WLG RAINAN 14057, Emilee Keller, LA Class 8 – Junior Yearling Heifer 1/1-2/28, 2014 1 GW X817 MS ZOIE 114, Garrett Wood, LA 2 TR LG CHRISTINA 473P, Hannah Doucet, LA Class 9 – Senior Yearling Heifer 9/1-12/31, 2013 1 TR RB COOPER PENNY, Abby Henry, LA 2 NPH MUSCLES 1054 MS, Brynlee Boudreaux, LA Grand Champion Female S5 CM MS 389, Ryan Danos, LA

Reserve Grand Champion Female RLR 14034, Madalyn Jennings, LA

Braford Bulls

Class 13 – Spring Bull Calf 3/1-4/30, 2015 1 DHF BEEF COMMANDER 1504, Cody Hanna, LA 2 4G MR GUILBEAUX, Jed Guilbeaux, LA Class 15 – Winter Bull Calf 11/1-12/31, 2014 1 GB MR BUCKLES, Will Boudreaux, LA 2 SAVELL’S 173/2, Lora Peace, LA Class 18 – Early Summer Yearling Bull 5/1-6/30, 2014 1 EJH MR BANDIT 1451, Ashlee Primeaux, LA Class 19 – Spring Yearling Bull 1/1-2/28, 2014 1 RLR 14066, Madalyn Jennings, LA 2 MR HDG RED BULL 14034, Mason Mhire, LA Class 20 – Junior Yearling Bull 1/1-2/28, 2014 1 ACC X810 MR WATTS 517, Hannah Doucet, LA 2 MR ABEAR, Karlee Nunez, LA Grand Champion Bull RLR 14066, Madalyn Jennings, LA Reserve Grand Champion Bull DHF BEEF COMMANDER 1504, Cody Hanna, LA

Braford Base Females Grand Champion Female: S5 CM MS 389, Ryan Danos, LA

Reserve Grand Champion Female: RLR 14034, Madalyn Jennings, LA

Grand Champion Bull: RLR 14066, Madalyn Jennings, LA

Reserve Grand Champion Bull: DHF BEEF COMMANDER 1504, Cody Hanna, LA

Class 1 – Spring Heifer Calf calved 3/1-4/30, 2015 1 D&D MS JENNY MANSO, Ellen Deshotel, LA 2 MRS NUNEZ, Kinlee Boudreaux, LA Class 2 – Junior Heifer Calf 1/1-2/29, 2015 1 MS KAJUN LADY 569, Ryann Landry, LA 2 J SWEET DAISY 73, Jaselyn Roussell, LA Class 3 – Winter Heifer Calf 11/1-12/31, 2014 1 MISS COOKIES & CREAM, Caleb Bourgeois, LA 2 MIKELYN, Victoria Dooley, LA Class 4 – Senior Heifer Calf 9/1-10/31, 2014 1 MISS KALLION, Corey Bourgeois, LA Class 6 – Early Summer Yearling Heifer 5/1-6/30, 2014 1 MISS CF 1, Taylor Clement, LA 2 MISS CHENIE LAMBEAU, Ashton Smith, LA Class 7 – Spring Yearling Heifer 3/1-4/30, 2014 1 MISS DIAMOND R, Karlee Nunez, LA 2 MRS. JACKIE, Wacen Fontenot, LA Class 8 – Junior Yearling Heifer 1/1-2/28, 2014 1 MISS ELEGANCE CAT, Taylor Hess, LA 2 ABBY 71, Jacob P. Fly, LA Class 9 – Senior Yearling Heifer 9/1-12/31, 2013 1 MISS LUCY, Maeleigh Conner, LA 2 MISS BONCHASSE 3541, Harlee Styron, LA Grand Champion Braford Base Female MISS DIAMOND R, Karlee Nunez, LA Reserve Grand Champion Braford Base Female MS KAJUN LADY 569, Ryann Landry, LA

Braford Base Bulls Grand Champion Braford Base Female: MISS DIAMOND R, Karlee Nunez, LA

Reserve Grand Champion Braford Base Female: MS KAJUN LADY 569, Ryann Landry, LA

Grand Champion Braford Base Bull: CAJUNS MR 150, Tyleigh Canik, LA

Reserve Grand Champion Braford Base Bull: MILL FOUR RUNNER, Kaleb Styron, LA

26 BRAFORD news l Winter 2016

Class 13 – Spring Bull Calf 3/1-4/30, 2015 1 CAJUNS MR 150, Tyleigh Canik, LA 2 MR BRIGHT MANSO, Corey Bourgeois, LA Class 14 – Junior Bull Calf 1/1-2/28, 2015 1 JP SWEET CRACKER, Jace Roussell, LA 2 MR GS NUGGET, Slade Shove, LA Class 15 – Winter Bull Calf 11/1-12/31, 2014 1 DC MR BULLET 1114, Dilan Comeaux, LA Class 19 – Spring Yearling Bull 3/1-4/30, 2014 1 MILL FOUR RUNNER, Kaleb Styron, LA Class 20 – Junior Yearling Bull 1/1-2/28, 2014 1 CB MR LUCKY 214, Grant Guilbeaux, LA 2 MILL CAMO, Jace Roussell, LA Grand Champion Braford Base Bull CAJUNS MR 150, Tyleigh Canik, LA Reserve Grand Champion Braford Base Bull MILL FOUR RUNNER, Kaleb Styron, LA


Fort Worth Stock Show and Rodeo January 17, 2016 • Judge: Jim Williams, Boling, TX

Braford Heifers

Class 1: CK SOUTHERN GYPSY, Jamie Davis, TX Class 2: RCM 9182 GIDGET 5718, Rock Crest Ranch, TX Class 3: RCM CHAYNEE 5146, Pepper Townsend, WA Class 4: 4D MISS 21, Christian Doucet, LA Class 5: GPN MISS ATHENA, Joseph Natali, LA Champion Heifer Calf: RCM 9182 GIDGET 5718, Rock Crest Ranch, TX Reserve Champion Heifer Calf: GPN MISS ATHENA, Joseph Natali, LA Class 8: AAM DS PLATFORM SUEDE B6, Ari Montemayor, TX Class 9: S5 CM MS 389, Ryan Danos, LA Champion Fall Heifer Calf: AAM DS PLATFORM SUEDE B6, Ari Montemayor, TX Reserve Champion Fall Heifer Calf: S5 CM MS 389, Ryan Danos, LA Class 13: Miss WLG BUBBLES 14038, Granger Cattle Company, LA Class 14: RCM 9182 HARLIE 4875, Jesse Marett, TX Class 15: RCM 9182 MAYBELINE 4827, Clayton Owens, TX Champion Yearling Heifer: RCM 9182 HARLIE 4875, Jesse Marett, TX Reserve Champion Yearling Heifer: RCM 9182 MAYBELINE 4827, Clayton Owens, TX Class 18: TR RB COPPER PENNY 411P, Abby Henry, LA Class 19: NPH MUSCLES 1054 MS DOTTIE, Hayden Hyman, AR Champion Senior Yearling Female: NPH MUSCLES 1054 MS DOTTIE, Hayden Hyman, AR Reserve Champion Senior Yearling Female: TR RB COPPER PENNY 411P, Abby Henry, LA Grand Champion Braford Female: NPH MUSCLES 1054 MS DOTTIE, Hayden Hyman, AR Reserve Champion Braford Female: RCM 9182 HARLIE 4875, Jesse Marett, TX

Braford Bulls

Class 24: HNH CMT MR BLACKJACK 662, Hayden Hyman, AR Class 25: DHF BEEF COMMANDER 1504, Cody Hanna, LA Class 26: RCM 9182 CLASSIFIED 5145, Rock Crest Ranch, TX Class 27: RCM 9182 STEALTH 5139, Rock Crest Ranch, TX

Grand Champion Braford Female: NPH MUSCLES 1054 MS DOTTIE, Hayden Hyman, AR

Grand Champion Braford Bull: MR HDG RED BULL 14034, Mason Mhire, LA

Reserve Champion Braford Female: RCM 9182 HARLIE 4875, Jesse Marett, TX

Reserve Grand Champion Braford Bull: RCM 9182 CLASSIFIED 5145, Rock Crest Ranch, TX

Champion Bull Calf: RCM 9182 CLASSIFIED 5145, Rock Crest Ranch, TX Reserve Champion Bull Calf: DHF BEEF COMMANDER 1504, Cody Hanna, LA Class 31: GB MR BUCKLES, Will Boudreaux, LA Champion Fall Bull Calf: GB MR BUCKLES, Will Boudreaux, LA Reserve Champion Fall Bull Calf: LEM 1703 AXL ROSE 4002, Laine McCulough, TX Class 35: EJH MR BANDIT 1451, Ashleey Primeaux, LA Class 36: RCM 9182 ONLINE SPORTSTER, Rock Crest Ranch, TX Class 37: MR HDG RED BULL 14034, Mason Mhire, LA Class 38: TR RB DARK KNIGHT B107 ET, Will Boudreaux, LA Champion Yearling Bull: MR HDG RED BULL 14034, Mason Mhire, LA

Reserve Champion Yearling Bull: TR RB DARK KNIGHT B107 ET, Will Boudreaux, LA Class 43: LA 111 HLK HARD LUCK 0913, by Lazy Acre Cattle Ranch, LA Champion Senior Bull: LA 111 HLK HARD LUCK 0913, by Lazy Acre Cattle Ranch, LA Reserve Champion Senior Bull: MR WLCH BANDIT 13020, J&G Livestock, LA Grand Champion Braford Bull: MR HDG RED BULL 14034, Mason Mhire, LA Reserve Grand Champion Braford Bull: RCM 9182 CLASSIFIED 5145, Rock Crest Ranch, TX Produce-of-Dam: Rock Crest Ranch, TX Get-of-Sire: Rock Crest Ranch, TX Breeders Best-Six-Head: Rock Crest Ranch, TX Herdsman Award: Boudreaux and Son, LA

For information on sale cattle, see our website at

www.redoakbraford.com Joe, Marshall and John Ellis 1676 Anderson C.R. 323 Palestine, TX 75803

Joe 903.876.3334 903.330.1257 Cell hollywoodjellis@aol.com

Winter 2016 l BRAFORD news

27


EST. 2003

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AGUAYO RANCH

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UAY O

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UAY O

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EST. 2003

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NCH

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REGISTERED BRAFORDS

re of u t u f The reed! our b

AR Nicholas 441 Look for Aguayo Ranch Look for Aguayo Ranch heifers at Burton Coliseum bulls at the Houston Livestock Commercial Sale Complex, Lake Charles, La.

See you in Houston!

March 17, 2016.

675 Grangerville Rd. • Bell City, LA 70630 337.598.2759 • grangercattleco@camtel.net

Steve & Belia Aguayo 936 -661-5570 saguayo@eastex.net

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Wade and Lynette Granger

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March 2, 2016.

EST. 2003

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Registered UBB Brafords 3378 FM 946 N Oakhurst, TX 77359

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A lleman

Cattle Company

Quality genetics for the Braford and commercial industry Owners Bryan and Roxanne Alleman Cell 337.278.2586 Office 337.334.9322 allemancattle@cox.net

28 BRAFORD news l Winter 2016

A lleman Cattle Company R egistered UBB Brafords

2709 Abbeville Hwy. • Rayne, LA 70578

Owner Neil J. Alleman 337.581.3171 nja8836@cox.net


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Braford News | Winter 2016  

The Winter 2016 issue of Braford News, the official publication of the United Braford Breeders.

Braford News | Winter 2016  

The Winter 2016 issue of Braford News, the official publication of the United Braford Breeders.

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