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THANK YOU… …To Purdy Braford Ranch for their purchase of the Bill Rainer Cattle Co. herd pick at the 2017 International Braford Sale. Thank you to these buyers from the 2017 Advancing The Braford Breed Sale in Lake Charles, La.

Ouzts Cattle Co. Southern Accent Farm 2B Brafords Elton Turner

P.O. Box 243 Union Springs, AL 36089 Alabama: 334-738-2205

Robert Broussard Kim Fontenot Mark Armstrong

Bill Rainer Cattle Co.

2949 State Road 70 West Okeechobee, Florida 34972

REGISTERED BRAFORD CATTLE

HARVEY RANCH

New Summerfield, Texas Cell: 903-780-6455 Texas Home: 903-683-1086

Jim W. Harvey — 863.697.6624 Ronnie Trythall — 863.697.2182

A sneak peek of what is to be...

2017 CALF CROP


Cover Caption: A group of Braford heifers at Alleman Cattle Company in Rayne, Louisiana.

Other Features

Events

5 Advancing the Braford Breed Sale Report 6 Decision by Decision - Calf by Calf — An interview with Josh and Lyla Breaux of J&L Brafords by Courtney Westner, Freelance Writer

13 UBB Annual Membership Awards Presented in Houston 18 Carcass Ultrasound 101: Understanding Ultrasound Contemporary Groups by Mark Henry 5 International Braford Sale Report

In Each Issue 2 President’s Notes by Robert Mills 5380 Old Bullard Rd., Suite 600, Box 358 Tyler, TX 75703 904.563.1816 www.brafords.org • BrafordNews@brafords.org Like the United Braford Breeders on Facebook! UBB Registration Office P.O. Box 14100, Kansas City, MO 64101-4100 816.595.2443 UBB@abraonline.org

3 From the Director’s Desk by Hannah Wine

8 Junior Focus 14 Show Results 18 Association News

World Braford Congress, Fort Worth, TX

Braford News is the official publication of the United Braford Breeders (UBB). It is published four times a year and is supported by paid advertisements and subscriptions. Advertising and subscription information can be obtained from the UBB office. We appreciate your letters, comments and any editorial material you would like considered for publication.

New Member Report

Editor – Hannah Wine hwine@brafords.org Production Hereford Publications Inc./Creative Services Abigail L. Engel P.O. Box 014059, Kansas City, MO 64101 816.842.3757 • 816.842.6931 fax aengel@hereford.org

Follow the United Braford Breeders!

Zoetis is corporate sponsor of United Braford Breeders.

Editor, Hannah Wine, hwine@brafords.org

June 9-10 Louisiana Junior Braford Breeders State Show, Alexandria, LA June 17-18 Texas Junior Braford Association State Show, Gilmer, TX July 13-16 NJBA All American, Harrison County Fairgrounds, Gulfport, MS July 15 Spring 2018 Advancing the Braford Breed Bull Commitment Form Deadline August 7-8 Texas A&M Beef Cattle Short Course, College Station, TX September 1 Spring 2018 Advancing the Braford Breed Heifer Commitment Form Deadline September 10-12 Four States Fair, Texarkana, AR October 5 Advancing the Braford Breed 9 Fall Bull and Female Sale, Crockett, TX (NEW LOCATION!) March, 2018

Twitter: UnitedBrafordBreeder Instagram: unitedbrafordbreeders Facebook: United Braford Breeders

April, 2017 Alexis Juarez, Lake Charles, LA Emma Leigh Hebert, Creole, LA Isabella Juarez, Lake Charles, LA Hunter M Broussard, Jennings, LA Tayte Picou, Lake Charles, LA May, 2017 C P Ranch, Bell City, LA Kate Lorenza Leonards, Bell City, LA Luke Picou, Lake Charles, LA

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President’s Notes

by Robert Mills

S

ummer is fast approaching, spring calving is winding down, fall-calving breeders are thinking about weaning calves if they haven’t already done so, as time continues to fly past. As many of us start thinking about summer vacations and activities, there are a few Braford events that we do not need to overlook when doing our planning and scheduling. First, we need to plan to support our youth by sponsoring events with a donation and our attendance. The All American Junior Braford Show will be held in Gulfport, Mississippi, on July 12 through July 16, 2017. Also, please don’t forget to support the two state-level shows and events in both Louisiana and Texas. These youth and their parents put in many long hours to present our Braford cattle to the public. Please make financial donations to support their endeavors. You may contact me for further information on where to send your donations for

UBB Board of Directors

each of these events. Another important event for the UBB is on the horizon. March 2018 is fast approaching for World Braford Congress. Advanced planning on each of the breeders is extremely important to make sure your operation can take advantage of this opportunity for international commerce. For those of you that do not know or are not familiar with World Braford Congress, it is a great opportunity to meet, mingle and establish relationships with Braford breeders from around the world. This event occurs every three years with host countries rotating every time. Decisions need to be made now on your sale consignments for Houston and events in Fort Worth to promote your genetics in the best way possible. Our Congress committee is putting the final touches on scheduling for the pre-andpost Congress activities. Many of you will be asked to help with various events. Beginning with the Houston Livestock Show, our guests will experience what our UBB Brafords have to offer. Following Houston, the attendees will tour and travel their way to Fort Worth for the two days of World Braford Congress. Then they have the opportunity to tour ranches and attend our Spring Braford Bull Sale in Lake Charles, Louisiana, before flying to Florida to tour the Adams Ranch. By planning to attend the meetings in Fort Worth, you will have the opportunity

2 BRAFORD news l Volume 32 • Issue 2 • 2017

to further promote your operation and genetics with our international attendees. Many social activities are planned, ending with the Gala event on the last night in Fort Worth. Make plans to attend this very important event in Fort Worth, March 7 and 8, 2017. Carol or I, either one, will be very happy to answer any questions you may have regarding Congress. On one final note for our association, our contract with the Hereford Association and ABRA will expire the end of September. The board has made plans to change to Small Breed Registration and Livestock Genetic Services to take our registration system. This decision and change has been in the process for several months. The Board has investigated several options in order to bring the best possible package to our membership. This change will make things easier for online users, as well as offer more genetic evaluations and options than we have received in the past. As everyone knows, change has it challenges in the beginning, so please be patient as we convert to the new system. In closing, please continue to promote and support our Braford breed in the upcoming months. Your time and money will be important to assure the success of each of the upcoming events. Please feel free to let us know how you would like to help. Hope everyone has a blessed and safe summer.

President - Robert Mills 15535 C.R. 1123 Athens, TX 75751 Office: 903.489.0837 Home: 903.489.0869 Mobile: 903.676.8930 Email: robert@rockcrestranch.com Vice President - Bill Rainer P.O. Box 243 Union Springs, AL 36089 Alabama: 334.738.2205 Texas: 800.729.7790 FAX: 903.683.9830 Mobile: 903.780.6455 Email: granjan.jr@gmail.com Secretary - Will Moncrief Running M Ranch 10006 Journeys End Tallahassee, FL 32312-3710 Office: 850.385.4489 Mobile: 850.566.6070 Email: w69cracker@hotmail.com Treasurer - Larry Stanberry LS Brafords 996 VZ C.R. 1805 Grand Saline, TX 75140 Home: 903.962.7219 Mobile: 214.924.9202 Email: lstanberry@earthlink.net Region 1 Director - Jim Harvey Harvey Ranch 2949 Hwy. 70 West Okeechobee, FL 34972 Office: 863.763.2523 Mobile: 863.697.6624 Fax: 863.763.7524 Email: jimharveybrafords@ embarqmail.com Region 1 Director - Zach Adams Adams Ranch Inc. 25501 Orange Ave. Fort Pierce, FL 34945 Mobile: 772.215.6268 Email: ZachAdamsRanch@gmail.com Region 2 Director - Chris Herpin Herpin Cattle Company 20102 Herpin Circle Kaplan, LA 70548 Mobile: 337.652.8125 Fax: 337.643.3382 Email: aherpin@sfbcic.com Region 2 Director - Heather Green 3313 Trailer Town Rd. Jennings, LA 70546 Mobile: 337.540.1748 Email: gran3290@aol.com Region 2 Director - Shannon Harrington 7068 N. Harrington Rd. Iowa, LA 70647 Home: 337.478.7637 Mobile: 337.485.2442 Email: sjhfarm@aol.com Region 3 Director - Scott McCullough 3226 C.R. 3115 Greenville, TX 75402 Mobile: 903.274.7799 Email: wmscottmcc@hotmail.com Region 4 Director - Paul Harris Greenview Farms 334 K-Ville Rd. Screven, GA 31560 Mobile: 912.294.2472 Fax: 912.586.6991 Email: Greenviewpaul@yahoo.com Region 4 Director - Jim Smith JS Land & Cattle Co. P.O. Box 487 Magnolia, MS 39652 Home: 601.783.7045 Mobile: 601.551.7045 FAX: 601.276.7675 Email: jimsmith@agup.co


From the Director’s Desk

Exciting New Endeavors by Hannah Wine UBB Executive Director

A

fter 10 years of working with Nancy and the staff at the American Beef Records Association (ABRA) in Kansas City and Breed Plan in Australia, it’s time to say goodbye. This year it was time for us to renew our contract with ABRA and Breed Plan to handle our registrations, computer programming efforts and genetic evaluation. Unhappily, the new contract came to us with dramatic pricing increases. After reviewing, the UBB Board of Directors began searching for and closely examining alternative options that would better serve and suit our breeders at a sustainable price point. We are pleased to announce that this dedicated, extensive search proved fruitful. On October 1, we will be transitioning to a new computer system and genetic evaluation. Livestock Genetic Services (LGS) and records management in

collaboration with the Small Registry System in Kingsville, Texas, will now handle all UBB registrations, database programming and genetic evaluation. Some of you may be familiar with LGS since they handle the genetic evaluation for several other associations, including Brangus, Beef Master and Santa Gertrudis. The Small Registry System staff that will handle our day-to-day recordkeeping is housed in the Santa Gertrudis Breeders International office. This change will allow us to make monumental advancement in the online registration system. As many of you know, our current system can be a bit clunky, and often it has been easier to register your cattle via paper forms. The new system not only will be tailored to streamline the online registration process, but also will come with a talented programming staff dedicated to supplying us with all of the bells and whistles needed to make more informed mating decisions and continue to advance our breed. However, these advancements do come at an increased cost to the UBB in the first year in order to build the new online system. In an effort to raise funds and absorb the increased costs to ensure continuation of UBB programs, we will be selling lifetime memberships from July 1 to October 1 for $1,000. Check out the lifetime membership application included in this issue. Consider purchasing a lifetime

membership for your farm or ranch, not only to aid in the new endeavors of the United Braford Breeders, but also to perpetuate the production of Braford cattle in your family operation for years to come. Along the same lines of exciting new endeavors, the UBB Board of Directors worked alongside the Breed Improvement Committee to develop a composite registration program for Braford Plus cattle, which are composite cattle resulting from the mating of UBB registered 3/8, 5/8 Brafords or UBB registered F1 Brafords and registered Angus or registered Red Angus. Many of you likely have customers who are buying Braford bulls and using them on Angus or Red Angus cows or vice versa, customers who

buy Braford cows from you and use Angus or Red Angus bulls. The Braford Plus mating is the convenient way to capture heterosis and value. This crossbreeding system has the ideal balance of maternal and carcass traits. No two breeds offer more commitment to profitability and function in the southern United States than the Braford x Angus or Braford x Red Angus mating. Registration capabilities for Braford Plus cattle will become available in October when we transition to the new genetic evaluation system with LGS.

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4 BRAFORD news l Volume 32 • Issue 2 • 2017


Braford Bulls and Females See Widespread Acceptance at Advancing the Braford Breed 8 Sale in Lake Charles, LA 37 Braford and Half Blood Bulls grossed $111,700 to average $3,019 24 Registered Braford Females grossed $44,450 to average $1,852 Forty-eight buyers from eight states were on hand for the Advancing the Breed 8 Sale, which featured a select offering of registered Braford and Half Blood bulls and registered Braford females, in Lake Charles, LA. Buyers and friends were treated to home-cooked jambalaya and crawfish and shrimp Etouffee provided by the United Braford Breeders Association, as well hospitality second to none and a top end set of cattle. The day’s high-selling bull at $6,000 was Lot 308, BR Manso MP7X 220/71. This laid-back, massive half blood bull was sired by TH T90 45P Masterpiece 7X and out of JDH Lady Manso 220/6. He was purchased by Corona Ride, LLC of Hondo, TX, and was consigned by Bauer Ranch of Winnie, TX. Corona Ride also purchased the day’s second high-seller, when they paid $5,250 to own lot 305, BR Manso MP7X 826/59. Also sired by 7X and out of a Hudgins cow, he recorded the highest ADG of all bulls on test. He, too, was consigned by Bauer Ranch. Lloyd Savell of Florien, LA, purchased the day’s third highseller, when he paid $5,100 to own lot 125, HR Woodrow 740.

This powerful, first-generation Braford recorded the second highest WDA and REA scan of all bulls on test and was consigned by Harvey Ranch of Okeechobee, FL. In the registered female sale, lot 402, BR 63Y MS 6003 was the day’s top seller, when Running M Ranch of Tallahassee, FL, paid $4,000 to own this classy daughter of HF Home Run 63Y, a previous year’s Advancing the Breed high-selling bull. She recorded seven EPD traits in the breed’s top 25 percent or greater and was consigned by Bill Rainer of New Summerfield, TX, and Union Springs, AL. Mhire Cattle Co. of Welsh, LA, purchased the day’s second high-selling female, lot 153, WB CM Camelia 661P for $2,800. This deep-middled daughter of RMR Critical Mass posts top 1 percent Marbling and top 5 percent REA EPDs. She was consigned by Wayne Boozer of Douglass, TX. Mhire Cattle Co. also purchased the third high-selling female, when they paid 2,700 to own lot 154, WB LG Liz 664P. This fancy daughter of RMR Ranger’s Legacy 6180 recorded top 5 percent of the breed REA EPDs and was consigned by Wayne Boozer.

REGISTERED BRAFORDS

F1 BRAFORD CATTLE

of t ur e u f e Th reed! b r u o

THE FUTURE OF OUR BREED! Wade and Lynette Granger 675 Grangerville Rd. • Bell City, LA 70630 337.598.2759 • grangercattleco@camtel.net

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Decision by Decision — Calf by Calf An interview with Josh and Lyla Breaux of J & L Brafords By Courtney Wesner, Freelance Writer

H

commercial cattle at the time I initially got approved for the loan, to tell you the truth,” Josh said chuckling. “I did have an uncle that all he did his whole life was run and truck cows. In fact, that uncle’s dad is a Braford breeder, Leonard Broussard. But as far as knowing anything, I didn’t know much because I never had the contact,” said Josh. At the time of the loan offer, Josh was 21 and still working on a farm. He was employed by long-time Braford breeder and astute cattleman Bryan Alleman. “Mr. Bryan lived right down the road from my mom’s house growing up and this led to Josh’s getting a job at the Alleman place. That’s how we knew him,” said Lyla. Through his contact and employment with Starting Bryan, Josh started asking questions and Recently married, Josh and Lyla Breaux Josh was born and raised in the learning more specifics about the Braford catching a break from the farm work. town of Gueydan, Louisiana. There breed, from EPDs to breed benefits. his dad ran a tire company. “When “I like the Braford cattle because you I was 13, I went to work on a farm and ever since that first know what you are getting. You know every time you day of work I dreamed of rice and cattle,” said Josh. It was are getting a 3/8, 5/8 animal. The Brahman brings the an unlikely dream for a 13-year-old boy who had spent ability to handle our weather and the Hereford improves his time in a tire shop and not a hay field, but that dream the meat quality. A commercial cow is an unknown. You would eventually fuel his long-term plans. can’t control and make the calf that you want everytime His wife, Lyla, grew up in Rayne where the two currently because there is too much unknown,” said Josh. With reside today. Her family didn’t live on a farm either, but that, he made the decision to go with what he had learned was always indirectly involved with agriculture. Her would best yield consistent results, lessen his risk and what mother worked for Quality Equipment, and her father he had easiest access to. He went ahead and purchased 20 attended the University of Louisiana, where he majored head of registered Braford females out of the Alleman herd. in agribusiness and managed the farm there during that “Bryan helped me in the selection. He knew which cattle time. Today he owns and operates a lawn care business. would work for me and I trusted him,” said Josh. It was Josh and Lyla were introduced through mutual friends, through this trust between experienced cattleman and and on May 16, 2015 they were married, creating the youngest pair of adult Braford breeders. usband and wife team Josh and Lyla Breaux are the next generation of cattle producers. It’s not only their age — 23 — that qualifies them to represent next generation producers, it’s also, and more importantly, their unabashed enthusiasm, courage and work ethic. Lineage didn’t sign them up for ranch life, nor did available resources. A strong desire to participate led them to the Braford breed and to building a herd of their own. This is their story, along with the story of generosity and good favor that the established cattleman has for his younger predecessors.

Stocking “A year ago, my dad called me at 5:00 in the morning and woke me up. He wanted to let me know that FSA (Farm Service Agency) was loaning money to buy cattle and that I needed to get down there,” explained Josh. He found that it wasn’t quite as simple as what his dad made it seem at 5 am, but it was doable. After a pile of paperwork and some patience, in April of 2016, Josh got the approval for a microloan from FSA. It was enough for him to buy 20 head to start his operation and it came with an additional line of credit for operations. Josh would have access to the operating loan for each year until the note would be paid off. Dream come true, almost. Josh had to find the cattle. “I didn’t know anything about Brafords or even 6 BRAFORD news l Volume 32 • Issue 2 • 2017

Lyla inspecting and approving of the purchase of Critical Mass son raised by Rhea Shields.

Josh putting in some extra effort and patience to get a newborn calf going.


A prime example of the quality Brafords purchased in the Breaux’s initial investment.

J&L Braford cows with new calves graze on good-looking grass at Bryan Alleman’s rental property.

eager newcomer that a relationship blossomed. Through partnership, Josh traded labor to house and feed his cattle in Alleman’s herd. He paid for the liquid feed himself. “Now that the cattle are up and rolling, and I am working for my fatherin-law at the lawn company and not for Bryan anymore, I am taking over the land rent,” Josh explained. “Nobody does that anymore, helping people like that,” said Lyla when asked about their partnership with Alleman. The gratitude in her voice is crystal clear and the acknowledgement of what Mr. Alleman did for them is just as apparent. “He didn’t have to do any of that. I wasn’t his blood, and I didn’t have a huge sum of money to buy his cattle with. He did it anyways. It kind of restores somebody’s faith in humanity. An act of kindness like that, helping someone like that,” said Josh of Alleman’s support.

unrelated genetics. “I purchased a bull from Rhea Shields, a Critical Mass son. Bryan is my mentor. If he says Yes, I do it, and if he says No, I don’t. When I asked him about this line of cattle, I got a Yes and so I invested in the bull,” said Josh. Supplementing Josh and Lyla both work for Lyla’s father at the lawn care company to supplement their cattle endeavors. Lyla is a recent graduate of the University of Louisiana, where she majored in Engineering, and is just starting out in her job search. Recently Josh had an employment opportunity that most would have jumped at. “I was bored and I was broke; so I went to the pawn shop and bought a guitar, and I taught myself how to play. If you are at home with the guitar, you can’t be out spending money, if you get my drift. I recorded this video of myself, playing the guitar and singing and uploaded it to the internet. Mr. Bryan’s wife just happened to stumble across that video one day on YouTube, and it made its way to Nashville,” Josh said. A music executive visited and presented Josh with a very nice offer to make a name and face for himself in the music industry. “I turned it down. It really wasn’t for me. I didn’t want that much attention. I like my quiet life and I like my cows. And so I said No, right on the spot” said Josh. With that, the cattle dream and the 10-year plan continued, unwavering and still on track to make it.

Planning As with any new business, financials can prove to be a challenge. With the help of the low-input Braford cow and a carefully thought out plan, the Breaux’s have been able to manage this challenge. “My plan is to take those first 20 cows and rely upon their bred-in reproductive strength to get as many calves as I can each year. Once I get the first note out of the way, I plan to keep one half of my calf crop each year and build to the point that within 10 years I have 100 head of cows. I want to make a living off of the cattle business. That was Succeeding my initial plan, and it is still my plan,” said “If I wasn’t doing this, I would do a lot of Josh, when asked to explain his long-term It’s going to take more than a little fishing,” Josh said laughing, “It takes a lot of rain and mud to halt successful plan. calving at J & L. heart to do this and a lot of guts to even try.” This year fits into the initial part of the “People think of farming as something that long-term plan and the Breaux’s plan to they are born into,” added Lyla. market the entirety of their calf crop. “My marketing plan “I worked on a farm until I was 21 years old, and I always is developing. I plan to use the Braford News, Bryan’s foot wanted to own cows, but I never thought I could. I love traffic, which is very developed, and old-fashioned word-ofeverything about it. There’s nothing in the world that can mouth to market my cattle. The awesome thing about the put a smile on your face like a newborn calf,” said Josh. The cattle market is that, for the most part, it is a free market, my Breaux’s Braford success continues to come day by day, program is no different. Anybody that is interested in my decision by decision, and calf by calf. genetics has a chance at getting them.” Josh also continues to very carefully invest in proven,

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Junior Focus

Where Are They Now? by Hayden Hyman UBB Ambassador

O

ur breed is one of a kind, but we couldn’t have made it without the juniors, directors, and open show people of the past. Heather Granger (now Heather Greene) started showing Braford cattle at the age of 10. Growing up in Southern Louisiana, young Heather started showing with a few other Braford Breeders. “Back in the day, we would sometimes have to show in All Other Breeds (AOB) because we didn’t have enough cattle to make a Braford Breed,” Heather says. Heather served as President of the Louisiana Junior Braford Breeders (LJBB) and the President of the National Junior Braford Association (NJBA) for several years, until graduation. Heather had shown Braford cattle for 11 years as a junior. “My best

memory was in college, when I had the opportunity to go to Australia and meet with some of the Braford breeders there.” Showing Brafords and being involved in the agricultural world influenced Heather to go to college at McNeese State University, in Lake Charles, Louisiana. “They had a fabulous agriculture program and livestock judging team.” Heather is now on many committees for the United Braford Breeders and is on the Board of Directors. Heather, her husband Chris, two sons, her parents, and brother and his wife now run Granger Cattle Co. LLC, in Iowa, Louisiana. “It’s pretty impressive how far the breed has come.”

From not having enough to make a breed division, to now having a division in Houston shows just how far our breed has come. “They are just good cows. I went from worrying about showing, to making money,” Heather says. She and her family still show Braford cattle today. When we have our junior meetings today, we are reminded that we are the ones who are shaping the breed’s future. I don’t think we realize that the same message was preached to the junior members years ago. Remember to thank Heather and the other members who have set us up for the success inside this breed, for all that they have done.

NATIONAL JUNIOR BRAFORD ASSOCIATION

2016-17 OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS OFFICERS President Jamie Davis Pearland, Texas Vice President Hayden Hyman Fouke, Arkansas Secretary Kylea Mansfield Katy, Texas Treasurer Ryan Danos Iowa, Louisiana Reporter Bailee O’ Brien Fort Worth, Texas UBB AMBASSADORS Maeleigh Conner Grand Lake, Louisiana Jamie Davis Pearland, Texas Hayden Hyman Fouke, Arkansas Bailee O’ Brien Fort Worth, Texas Kylea Mansfield Katy, Texas

NJBA Ambassadors Kylea Mansfield, Hayden Hyman and Bailee O’Brien working the ring at the National Braford Show during the Houston Livestock Show and Rodeo

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Carcass Ultrasound 101: Understanding Ultrasou

Though their importance is often overlooked, contemporary groups a By Mark Henry | Reprinted from BEEF Magazine

Carcass Carcass Weight

Ribeye Area

Fat Thickness

T

hough their importance is often overlooked, contemporary groups are truly the cornerstone of any genetic evaluation. Unfortunately, establishment of an ultrasound contemporary group is sometimes done improperly. There are a number of rules that must be followed in order to receive the maximum benefit from reporting ultrasound data, particularly in establishing and increasing the accuracy of Carcass Expected Progeny Differences (EPD). Whether you have 5 yearlings to scan or 5,000, the process of contemporary grouping is basically the same. Here are a few guidelines: First, if receiving carcass EPDs is the end goal, then the cattle being scanned should already be registered with a respective association and birth and weaning records should be previously reported. Failure to do so may cause ultrasound data results to be delayed at the processing lab or breed association office. Any errors in this step should appear on the ultrasound barn sheet generated by your breed association prior to scanning. The birth and weaning weight contemporary groups lay the foundation for the yearling and/or ultrasound contemporary group that follows. The basic definition of a contemporary group is animals of the same breed, same sex, and similar age raised with the same environmental opportunities. Notice there is nothing contained within the definition dealing with ownership. If you share a pasture with a fellow breeder or run cows with your relatives, your calves are contemporaries. All breeders involved in the specific management technique must make the association aware of this fact prior to any performance reporting. Partnerships can strengthen the power of Carcass EPDs and should be utilized whenever possible. At the most basic level, a contemporary group can be 2 bulls raised together until the day they are scanned. As proud as you may be, scanning just one bull or heifer has

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Marbling

Retail Product

Yield Grade

Tenderness

absolutely zero genetic value; there is simply nothing to compare. Still, actual scan data can be used to market the individual, satisfy your curiosity, or let any potential buyers know the value of the beast with the hide off. One common mistake involves the inclusion of “pampered” show animals in a contemporary group with others being given less daily attention. In most cases, this ends up being detrimental to the elite animal’s carcass EPDs. First of all, show cattle are normally fed harder, making them scan fatter than their contemporaries. Any EPDs for Yield Grade, Fat, or Retail Product wind up moving in the wrong direction, masking any muscle advantage the elite animals may have possessed. The second factor is stress. No matter how comfortable the animal may seem in the show barn, they are under non-typical environmental conditions. This often causes ultrasound images to be darker than normal and return %IMF numbers far lower than the animal’s genetics are capable of producing. Along with this, animals that are easily excitable or with poor dispositions could scan poorly as well. In the end, proper cattle handling and equal treatment of contemporaries will ensure the most accurate results. Another form of “treatment” can also impact contemporary grouping. Individuals treated for illness or some form of abnormal weight loss should be removed from their contemporary group. Research trials have shown that feedlot cattle treated for illness earlier in life often grade poorer than their pen mates. The same can be said for yearling seed stock and their contemporaries. Ultrasound data from these individuals will show lower %IMF, leaner back fat, and smaller ribeye area than the animal’s genetics should allow. More importantly, the data reflects poorly on the sire and dam of the yearling. If you’re trying to “prove out” your herd sire, inclusion of these animals will skew his carcass EPDs. With the small number of progeny recorded for a dam in her lifetime, data from an


und Contemporary Groups

are truly the cornerstone of any genetic evaluation.

Ultrasound Itramuscular Fat (%)

Ribeye Area

Fat Thickness

Other Retail Product

Rules to follow • The cattle being scanned should already be registered with a respective association • A contemporary group is animals of the same breed, same sex, and similar age raised with the same environmental opportunities • Partnerships can strengthen the power of Carcass EPDs and should be utilized whenever possible

Common mistakes • Inclusion of “pampered” show animals in a contemporary group with others being given less daily attention • Stress, animals that are easily excitable or with poor dispositions • Individuals treated for illness or some form of abnormal weight loss should be removed from their contemporary group • Creep feed allows an animal to lay down subcutaneous fat at an earlier age • Pasture grasses and legumes can have an impact on carcass performance • Contemporary groups can never get larger, only smaller • Consistency must be maintained

Stayability

Mainteance Energy

Docility

“bunk breaking” or training an animal to eat concentrate feedstuffs can influence marbling deposition. Along these same lines, pasture grasses and legumes can have an impact on carcass performance. If you have one pasture in the fescue country of Missouri and another in south Louisiana, the performance of the offspring could be drastically different. Even though the cattle may be fed the same diet at the same location post-weaning, these animals have not been given the same environmental opportunities. As a result, their ultrasound phenotypes will be different. Contemporary grouping has one cardinal rule: groups can never get larger, only smaller. There are a number of reasons animals can “fall out” of their contemporary group, but they can never be added back in at a later date. For example, if you report the birth weights of your 10 March bulls on the same day, they are contemporary group A. If you then report the weaning weights on 5 of those bulls in September and the other 5 in October, they are weaning groups A and B. If you ultrasound all 10 bulls the following March, they are still in groups A & B, even though you submit their images as one group. Consistency must be maintained in order to ensure an accurate genetic evaluation. The integrity of carcass information produced via ultrasound lies in the hands of the breeder. Your customers are counting on it.

animal that has lived in the sick pen most of its life can be misleading for her as well. Other factors like creep feeding should be considered as well. Even if the animals were just over the fence, calves with access to feed prior to weaning should be in a different contemporary group from those with only access to milk and grass. Creep feed allows an animal to lay down subcutaneous fat at an earlier age. In addition, the stress involved with

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Heifers, Low Birth Weight Bulls and Semen Available

Danny Boudreaux 337-905-2330 Cell 337-249-9066 3475 Grand Chenier Hwy. Grand Chenier, LA 70643 boudreauxandson@camtel.net

Michael Boudreaux Cell 337-303-4167 162 Eugene Rd. Lake Charles, LA 70607 mlbbrafords@yahoo.com

For information on sale cattle, see our website at

www.redoakbraford.com Joe, Marshall and John Ellis 1676 Anderson C.R. 323 Palestine, TX 75803

Joe 903.876.3334 903.330.1257 Cell hollywoodjellis@aol.com

RCM 1764 HADLEY 5147 Bred by: Rock Crest Ranch, Athens, TX Owned and exhibited by: Rock Crest Ranch, Athens, TX

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TR GENESIS D105P ET Bred by: Thunderstorm R Cattle Co, Nacogdoches, TX Owned and exhibited by: Thunderstorm R Cattle Co, Nacogdoches, TX


UBB Annual Membership Awards Presented in Houston Braford members and breeders from around the country gathered in Houston, Texas on the weekend of March 10 -11 to conduct Braford business, honoring deserving breeders and attending Braford activities at the Houston Livestock Show and Rodeo. Saturday afternoon at the annual membership meeting at the Stock Show, attendees heard an update on 2016 Braford business from current UBB Board of Director’s President Robert Mills. Hannah Wine, UBB Executive Director, reported on recent UBB activity and the importance of calf registration. Following Wine’s remarks, Mills presented the annual membership awards.

2016 President’s List (UBB members registering 50 or more in 2016)

Jim Harvey Brafords, Okeechobee, FL 76 head Alleman Cattle Company, Rayne, LA 77 head

2016 Gold Group (UBB members registering more than 100 head in 2016)

Greenview Farms, Screven, GA, 115 head Bill Rainer, New Summerfield, TX and Union Springs, AL, 130 head

Jim Harvey Brafords

Adams Ranch

The President’s Award (for registering the most Brafords in 2016)

Adams Ranch, Fort Pierce, FL, 214 head

Retiring Board Members Jim Harvey, Okeechobee, FL Paul Harris, Screven, GA Larry Stanberry, TX Shannon Harrington, Iowa, LA Greenview Farms

Bill Rainer

Following the awards portion of the membership meeting Mills thanked outgoing directors Jim Harvey of Okeechobee, FL, Paul Harris of Screven, GA, Larry Stanberry of Grand Saline, TX and Shannon Harrington of Iowa, LA. Mills then introduced newly elected directors who will serve three years on the board, Jim Harvey of Okeechobee,

FL, Paul Harris of Screven, GA, Larry Stanberry of Grand Saline, TX and Corey Doucet of Sweetlake, LA. Mills also recognized the newly elected UBB officers, Vice President Bill Rainer of Union Springs, AL; Secretary Scott McCullough of Zionsville, IN; and Treasurer Larry Stanberry of Grand Saline, TX. Shannon Harrington, Jim Harvey, Larry Stanberry and Paul Harris

Braford Show Heifer and Show Bull of the Year Braford exhibitors were honored for showcasing their cattle throughout the 20162017 show year. To qualify for these prestigious buckles, exhibitors must have accumulated the most points at the five UBB point shows— Houston Livestock Show and Rodeo, Four States Fair, Louisiana State Fair, Fort Worth Stock Show and the Dixie Nationals.

Braford Show Female of the Year

RCM 1764 HADLEY 5147 Bred by: Rock Crest Ranch, Athens, TX Owned and exhibited by: Rock Crest Ranch, Athens, TX

Braford Show Bull of the Year

TR GENESIS D105P ET Bred by: Thunderstorm R Cattle Co, Nacogdoches, TX Owned and exhibited by: Thunderstorm R Cattle Co, Nacogdoches, TX

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2017 National Braford Show

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Show Results 2017 National Braford Show, Houston Livestock Show and Rodeo Judge: PJ Budler, Fort Worth, Texas

Braford Female Results:

Class 1: 4MB Lucy exhibited by Jesse Marett of Montgomery, TX Class 2: AG MT Dory exhibited by Amanda Lee of Folsom, LA Class 3: AAM Judy Blue Eyes D5 exhbited by Ari Montemayor of Laredo, TX Class 4: KSH Capt’s Lady 6661 exibited by Clayton McCarley of Grannis, AR Champion Braford Female: Class 5: WB DC Mila 622 exhibited by Ryan Danos of Iowa, LA AAM Judy Blue Eyes D5 exhbited by Champion Heifer Calf: AAM Judy Blue Eyes D5 exhbited by Ari Montemayor of Laredo, TX Ari Montemayor of Laredo, TX Reserve Champion Heifer Calf: WB DC Mila 622 exhibited by Ryan Danos of Iowa, LA Class 8: WB LG Heirloom 604P exhibited by Amanda Lee of Folsom, LA Champion Fall Heifer Calf: WB LG Heirloom 604P exhibited by Amanda Lee of Folsom, LA Reserve Champion Fall Heifer Calf: Savell’s L 254/3 exhibited by Hailey Sheffield of Pearland, TX Class 12: ACC 9076 Ms Exclusive exhibited by Hayden Hyman of Fouke, AR Class 13: RCM 9182 Gidget 5718 exhibited by Rock Crest Ranch of Athens, TX Class 14: RCM 1764 Hadley 5147 exhibited by Rock Crest Ranch of Athens, TX Class 15: RCM 9182 Millie 5144 exhibited by Rock Crest Ranch of Athens, TX Champion Yearling Heifer: RCM 1764 Hadley 5147 exhibited by Rock Crest Ranch of Athens, TX Reserve Champion Yearling Heifer: RCM 9182 Gidget 5718 exhibited by Rock Crest Ranch of Athens, TX Reserve Champion Braford Female: Class 18: BD 13 exhibited by Boudreaux and Son Brafords of Lake Charles, LA WB DC Mila 622 exhibited by Ryan Danos Champion Senior Yearling Female: BD 13 exhibited by Boudreaux and Son Brafords of Lake Charles, LA of Iowa, LA

Braford Bull Show Results

Champion Braford Bull: RCM 9182 Stealth 5139 exhibited by Rock Crest Ranch of Athens, TX

Class 24: AG GP Charlie exhibited by Madalyn Jennings, Folsom, LA Class 25: RCM 9182 EG Creed 6189 exhibited by Rock Crest Ranch of Athens, TX Class 26: HB Mr. Cookie Monster ET exhibited by Gene Natali of Lake Charles, LA Class 27: DD 2300 Daddy’s Money 1601 exhibited by Clayton Owens of Hillsboro, TX CLass 28: TR Genesis D105P ET exhibited by Thunderstorm R Cattle Company of Nacogdoches, TX Champion Bull Calf: TR Genesis D105P ET exhibited by Thunderstorm R Cattle Company of Nacogdoches, TX Reserve Champion Bull Calf: HB Mr. Cookie Monster ET exhibited by Gene Natali of Lake Charles, LA Class 31: TR MT Dividend C101S ET exhibited by exhibited by Thunderstorm R Cattle Company of Nacogdoches, TX Class 36: DHF Beef Commander 1504 exhibited by Cody Hanna of Ruston, LA Class 37: RCM 9182 Classified 5145 exhibited by Rock Crest Ranch of Athens, TX Class 38: RCM 9182 Stealth 5139 exhibited by Rock Crest Ranch of Athens, TX Champion Yearling Bull: RCM 9182 Stealth 5139 exhibited by Rock Crest Ranch of Athens, TX Reserve Champion Yearling Bull: RCM 9182 Classified 5145 exhibited by Rock Crest Ranch of Athens, TX Class 43: RCM 9182 Online Sportster exhibited by Rock Crest Ranch of Athens, TX Champion Senior Bull: RCM 9182 Online Sportster exhibited by Rock Crest Ranch of Athens, TX Reserve Champion Senior Bull: ACC X810 Mr Watts 517 exhibited by Doucet Brafords of Lake Charles, LA

2017 National F1 Female Show Results, Houston Livestock Show and Rodeo Reserve Champion Braford Bull: TR Genesis D105P ET exhibited by Thunderstorm R Cattle Company of Nacogdoches, TX

Judge: PJ Budler, Fort Worth, Texas

National F1 Female Show

Class 1: Miss Diamond R 573 exhibited by Karlee Nunez of Creole, LA Class 2: Miss GC TW4 2 C/1 exhibited by Grace Marie McCall of Grand Chenier, LA Class 3: Miss 4-J 112/6 exhibited by Abear-Nunez of Creole, LA Class 4: Miss RB Belle exhibited by Baliegh Conner of Creole, LA Class 5: Miss Doogey exhibited by Abear-Nunez of Creole, LA Champion Heifer Calf: Miss RB Belle exhibited by Baliegh Conner of Creole, LA Reserve Champion Heifer Calf: Miss Doogey exhibited by Abear-Nunez of Creole, LA Class 8: 265 exhibited by Tanner Whitney of Sour Lake, LA Champion Senior Heifer Calf: X Miss 4-T 295 exhibited by Cole Tesch of Sealy, TX Reserve Champion Senior Heifer Calf: Miss Lady Gold 75 exhibited by Abear-Nunez of Creole, LA Champion F1 Female: X Miss 4-T 295 exhibited by Cole Tesch of Class 12: Mrs Nunez 37/15 Exhibited by Abear-Nunez of Creole, LA Class 14: Miss FC Mamie exhibited by Abear-Nunez of Creole, LA Sealy, TX Class 15: Ms Kajun Lady 569 exhibited by Cajun Connection Cattle Co. of Creole, LA Champion Yearling Heifer: Miss FC Mamie exhibited by Abear-Nunez of Creole, LA Reserve Champion Yearling Heifer: Ms Kajun Lady 569 exhibited by Cajun Connection Cattle Co. of Creole, LA Class 18: Miss Kallion Cinnamon exhibited by Corey Bourgois of Iowa, LA Champion Senior Yearling Female: Miss Kallion Cinnamon exhibited by Corey Bourgois of Iowa, LA Reserve Champion Senior Yearling Female: Miss Cookies & Cream exhibuted by Caleb Bourgeois of Iowa, LA

Reserve Champion F1 Female: Miss RB Belle exhibited by Baliegh Conner of Creole, LA

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Show Results Dixie National Livestock Show Results Female Show Results

Class 1: LV LG Ms Sally 61 exhibited by Logan Vest Class 2: RCM 1702 Carmen 6161 exhibited by Rock Crest Ranch Class 3: WB DC Mila 622 exhibited by Ryan Danos Champion Heifer Calf: WB DC Mila 622 exhibited by Ryan Danos Reserve Champion Heifer Calf: LV LG Ms Sally 61 exhibited by Logan Vest Class 6: DD 4018 Jewel 1501 exhibited by Clayton Owens Champion Fall Heifer Calf: DD 4018 Jewel 1501 exhibited by Clayton Owens Reserve Champion Fall Heifer Calf: Savell’s L 254/3 exhibited by Hailey Sheffield Class 10: ACC 9076 MS Exclusive exhibited by Hayden Hyman Class 11: RCM 9182 Gidget 5718 exhibited by Rock Crest Ranch Class 12: RCM 1764 Hadley 5147 exhibited by Rock Crest Ranch Class 13: RLR CK Dallas 15007 exhibited by Kylea Mansfield Champion Yearling Heifer: RCM 1764 Hadley 5147 exhibited by Rock Crest Ranch Reserve Champion Yearling Heifer: ACC 9076 MS Exclusive exhibited by Hayden Hyman Grand Champion Braford Female: RCM 1764 Hadley 5147 exhibited by Rock Crest Ranch Reserve Grand Champion Braford Female: WB DC Mila 622 exhibited by Ryan Danos

Bull Show Results

Class 22: CK Mr Lewis 4816 exhibited by Hailey Sheffield Class 23: DD 2300 Daddy’s Money 1601 exhibited by Clayton Owens Class 24: TR Genesis D105P ET exhibited by Thunderstorm R Cattle Co Champion Bull Calf: TR Genesis D105P ET exhibited by Thunderstorm R Cattle Co Reserve Champion Bull Calf: CK Mr Lewis 4816 exhibited by Hailey Sheffield Class 27: TR MT Dividend C101S ET exhibited by Thunderstorm R Cattle Co Champion Fall Bull Calf: TR MT Dividend C101S ET exhibited by Thunderstorm R Cattle Co Reserve Champion Fall Bull Calf: HNH Muscles 1054 Mr. 662 exhibited by Hayden Hyman Class 32: LEM 1703 Floyd 5001 exhibited by Granger Cattle Co Class 33: RCM 9182 Classified 5145 exhibited by Rock Crest Ranch Class 34: RCM 9182 Stealth 5139 exhibited by Rock Crest Ranch Champion Yearling Bull: RCM 9182 Classified 5145 exhibited by Rock Crest Ranch Reserve Champion Yearling Bull: RCM 9182 Stealth 5139 exhibited by Rock Crest Ranch Class 39: RCM 9182 Online Sportster exhibited by Rock Crest Ranch Champion Senior Bull: RCM 9182 Online Sportster exhibited by Rock Crest Ranch Grand Champion Braford Bull: RCM 9182 Online Sportster exhibited by Rock Crest Ranch Reserve Grand Champion Braford Bull: RCM 9182 Classified 5145 exhibited by Rock Crest Ranch

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What an Evening at the 2017 International Braford Sale! 14 Elite Braford Lots Average $3,132 UBB members from four states consigned 14 elite breeding pieces to the 2017 International Braford Sale held on Saturday, March 11 at the Houston Livestock Show and Rodeo. Buyers and guests enjoyed a complimentary Cajun pre-sale supper prepared by the Harrington and Primeaux families that was sponsored by Boudreaux and Son Brafords, LS Brafords and Greenview Farms. As always, the Braford hospitality was second to none. The sale kicked off with lots of excitement for the 2018 World Braford Congress with the sale of RCM 9182 Sara 6109, an eyecatching March RCM 2149 Davidson 9182 daughter, donated by Rock Crest Ranch of Athens, Texas. This heifer to support the 2018 World Congress was the high selling animal, going for $9,000 to Reina Petry of Gueydan, Louisiana. The evening’s second high seller was consigned by S5 Farms of Iowa, Louisiana. S5 55 MS 601, a March-born brockle-face female out of a TR Milk Truck son and a first-generation Greenview-bred cow sold for $4,000 to Shannon Harrington of Iowa, Louisiana. Purdy Braford Ranch of Sweetlake, Louisiana purchased the third high-selling lot of the night at $3,300, the pick of the herd of the 2016 born F1 females at Greenview Farms in Screven, Georgia, the oldest Polled Hereford operation in the state. The UBB would like to specially thank sale chairmen Danny Boudreaux and Larry Stanberry and the many volunteers that made the sale possible. Make plans to join us for the 2018 International Braford Sale at the Houston Livestock Show!

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Association News 2017 NJBA All American Slated for July 13-16

Top 10 in U.S. Beef Herd Expansion The U.S. beef cowherd expanded 3.5 per cent in 2016 to 31.2 million head, up 1.04 per cent from a year ago. Among the top 10 beef cow states, Oklahoma reported the most cows with an 8.9 per cent increase, leading the 2017 herd inventory of 2.095 million head. Texas was second at 4.46 million head with a 4 per cent increase. The other top 10 beef cow states with strong growth were Missouri (3), Nebraska (4), South Dakota (5), Kansas (6), Montana (7), Kentucky (8), Iowa (9), and North Dakota (10).

Amanda Gross (Amanda Lee) and family will be hosting the 2017 All American Braford Show July 13-16 at the Harrison County Fairgrounds in Gulfport, Mississippi. The All American is much, much more than just a Braford and F1 cattle show. The event is jam packed with all sorts of contests like showmanship, judging, sales talk, quiz bowl and much more. Weaver Livestock and Leather will be providing a free educational session for all exhibitors on Thursday, July 13 at 3 p.m. Make plans to join us! Holiday Inn, Gulfport Airport 10.1 miles from the fairgrounds, 4.7 miles from the beach 9515 Hwy 49, Gulfport, MS 228.679.1700 Rate: $112/night Group Code: National Junior Braford ​ ilton Garden Inn, Gulfport Airport H 11.7 miles from the fairgrounds, 5.2 miles from the beach 14108 Airport Road Gulfport, MS 39503 228.863.4669 Rate: $109/night Group Code: UBB

BBQ Tips from a Meat Scientist

Stacy Zuelly is an assistant professor of animal science at Purdue University who specializes in meat sciences. She has a made a career out of selecting the right piece of meat for cooking and grilling. Zuelly says the best way to get the most out of your meat is to start with the best cut you can afford. Then buy a digital meat thermometer and use it. Cooking by color and touch, she says, can be deceiving. She recommends a meat thermometer with a thin tip so it doesn’t break up burgers when inserted. For an easy BBQ experience, she suggests that you pick a center cut. Though the most expensive, cuts from the center are more tender. However, don’t pass over shoulder or round, just know it will be less tender and need marinade. They should be cooked low and slow. Zuelly recommends front cuts for flavor. Because animals fatten from front to rear, cuts like beef brisket have more fat, flavor and juiciness. While you’re still at the store or butcher shop, look at the cut info on the package so

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you will know how to prepare it. Use your cut to determine cooking method. Burgers, steaks and chops can go on the grill, but less tender cuts should be slow cooked at low temperature. Look for marbling in a steak. High Choice and Prime will give you the most consistency. “From a flavor standpoint,” Zuelly says, “nice flecks of fat inside the meat are important.” Know what different certified breeds offer you. Zuelly doesn’t recommend a certain breed of meat, but she does say that if it is certified, you know you’ll get a certain standard of marbling and consistency. As for what cuts to look for, Zuelly recommends sirloin (top sirloin, bottom sirloin, tri-tips). When selecting pork, she says you should look for marbling and pink color. Grilling poultry can be tricky, she says, since it often needs marinade for moisture. And finally, on the subject of lamb, she says that it’s tender and lean. Don’t ruin it by overseasoning. Stacy Zuelly offers a BBQ Boot Camp that will help you become an expert in grilling. For more information, go to www.cvent.com/ events/bbq-boot-camp/event-summarye8c177f0ad014fe79bce4da05c1ac34c.aspx.

China Beef Market To Reopen in July More than a decade has passed since China barred U.S. beef from entering its country. Now an actual date has been set to allow access to U.S. beef — July 17. China’s 1.3 billion consumers are an important market for U.S. producers. “Beef consumption has been on the rise in China, and the nation has emerged as one of the top beef markets in the world,” says Kate Brooks, professor of agriculture economics at University of NebraskaLincoln. Brooks says China has significant potential as an export market, but cautions that it could take several years for the U.S. to realize that potential.

Got Braford News? If you have Braford or Braford member related news, share it with Braford News! Send us your announcements, births, awards, etc. to ubb@ brafords.org and then look for it in print in future issues of this magazine!

New Location for the Fall 2017 Advancing the Braford Breed Sale The Fall Advancing the Braford Breed Sale will be held at the East Texas Livestock Facility in Crockett, Texas on Thursday, October 5.


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Profile for United Braford Breeders

Braford News | Volume 32, Issue 2  

Printed May 2017

Braford News | Volume 32, Issue 2  

Printed May 2017

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