Issuu on Google+

Unit 5 Catalogue 2011-2012

unit Fault Lines

5 Julia Backhaus Pedro Font Alba


FAULT LINES

FAULTLINES Julia Backhaus & Pedro Font Alba

'Crises are ultimately productive. They force invention. Breakdowns incubate breakthroughs. Radical destruction gives way to new forms of production... Architectural design is the child of crisis' Mark Wigley, 'Space in Crisis', Volume Magazine, Iss. 19 Our world has become spectacularly unpredictable. Another year has passed where we are continuously flooded by extraordinary stories of the unforeseen. It is not just our social and financial models that show signs of exhaustion but the very ground we walk on is in a state of upheaval. Between the virtual collapse of the banking network worldwide - entire countries on the verge of bankruptcy - social unrest not seen for decades, environmental changes like extreme rainfalls and crippling droughts, earthquakes and tsunamis: the state of uncertainty and change seems to be the new global paradigm. In times of upheaval comes an opportunity to leave the familiar behind and challenge conventions with alternative propositions and novel ideas. How can we as architects respond to environments that face challenges of an unpredictable scale and frequency? How can Architecture become a critical tool to remedy political, cultural or environmental conditions that are straining our defences? How can our sophisticated production methods provide solutions to the ever-growing social demands? Our unit briefs set to investigate sudden change and slow shifts as a potential catalyst for innovation, speculation and adaption. We are interested in finding 'ad hoc' responses to the rapid pace of our times but are equally interested how to choreograph the slow and minute shifts in our surroundings that can lead to large and unexpected consequences. As a unit we place emphasis on the unique relationship between the building and its unique immediate and wider environments and encourage our students to speculate towards architectures that are both lyrical and relevant in their response to our changing natural, cultural and social environments. This year Unit 5 went on an architectural adventure beyond the familiar in search of novel architectural tools for an increasingly uncertain world. Our unit explored present conditions through speculation about possible futures, considered relevance over indulgence and identified opportunities for tactical intervention. 'What if' became the mantra for the year. The first project was sited in London. Students were asked to identify a fault line and

01


02

UNIT 5

explore an architectural response to the phenomenon of sudden change. From the streets of the recent riots, extra-ordinary pressures onto the already congested city during the Olympic games, to the bleak forecast that London might be flooded by river water or by an overwhelmed Victorian drainage network: Project 1 was a short and intense exercise, where students were asked to speculate about present or possible future scenarios and identify sites and situations that are in demand of an immediate response. Places where rules have to be changed in order to survive. We looked at immediate and spontaneous architecture that proves that 'necessity is the mother of invention'. The approach to this project was experimental and the architectural propositions ranged from 1:1 built interventions to strategic master planning. Our trip to Istanbul became a test bed in our search for an original and innovative architecture. Istanbul, a multifaceted and fluid city, has experienced rapid and dramatic global and local pressures. Not only is it located close to the North Anatolian fault line making it a earthquake sensitive area, it is also a city of many dualities. From its geographic location between Asia and Europe, the Golden Horn and the Bosporus, the Marmara and Black Sea to its economic divide between great wealth and poverty. The city is struggling between modernity and tradition, secularism and Islamism, democracy and repression - often in unlikely and contradictory combinations. As the city is reaching out to compete as a new global capital it faces new challenges, specifically finding ways for (re) development on the dense fabric of the historical peninsula. In the 2nd project students were asked to identify sites, spaces or economies of mounting pressures that are in need of reinvention and adaption to ensure their survival. It was out intention not to slip into nostalgia but to consider the opportunities that the current developments present for the city and to freely and fearlessly engage in conversations about the city. How can the fault lines and intersections that draw the city shape the contours of new imaginings for Istanbul? Some projects were placed between desire and knowledge; others were allegorical but perfectly meaningful. We want to express our gratitude to our technical tutor and critic Dr Rachel Cruise. Also we want to acknowledge our guest jurors this year for their priceless advice and generosity with their time: Abigail Ashton, Bruce Irwin, Christian Parreno, Juanjo and Lola Ruiz, Sara Safie, Murray Fraser, Geraldine Denning, Gavin Hutchison, Francisco Gonzalez de Canalees, Mark Breeze, Sam Causer, Nick Hockley, Jan Katain, Diego Garcia and Tanya Sengupta.


FAULT LINES

SiteLocation 1 2

3

4 6

1. Amy Begg 2. Lucas Ler 3. Simran Sidhu 4. Christopher Worsfold,Huizhen Ng 5. Samuel Dodsworth

5

03

YEAR 3


04

UNIT 5

AmyBegg amy.begg.09@ucl.ac.uk

Fault line: Hackney Wick/ Olympic Park

games continues)

The project, which takes the form of a bridge, is a response the Olympic Parks presence beside Hackney Wick, a community to the west of the development. Compulsory purchase orders were needed for the creation of the Olympic Park and Hackney Wick was left with a strong sense that its boundaries had been encroached upon. The loss and demolition of the manor garden allotments (that had been bequeathed to the people of Hackney Wick in perpetuity) were one of the key points of contention for the community. (The debate over reopening the allotments within the park post Olympic

However the population of Hackney Wick appears to have formed a strong sense of community in the despite this. The local residents and new artist population (apparently the highest density of artist anywhere in the world right now) coming together and organizing events and festivals of their own. The bridge seeks to strengthen this The bridge is sited so that it becomes a gateway from this new emerging centre of Hackney Wick out to the Olympic Park and 'temporarily' lost allotments. In doing so


FAULT LINES

TheCrossing

project 1_

the bridge acts to reinforce the boundaries that have been encroached by the Olympic Park while also stating a future claim to the land that once served a vital purpose for the community. Further it address the need for more crossing over the River Lee as there is a definite lack, especially from middle of the town.

05

AMY B.


06

UNIT 5

AmyBegg amy.begg.09@ucl.ac.uk

Turkish music therapy

The project starts with an interest in traditional Turkish music and music therapy, which has been practiced in Turkey for over 700 years. - The Ottomans treated stroke with a special type of music called the Zirefkend Makam. While interest in this form of therapy is recently renewed in Turkish hospitals, in general music as a form of therapy has also become very popular world-wide today.

To exploit the therapeutic qualities of the site and music therapy, a Stroke Rehabilitation is proposed to offer the idea of a more holistic whole body approach to healing., since stroke is something that affects the whole body. Stroke is also the 2nd most common cause of death in turkey but most people will survive a first attack. Effective early


FAULT LINES

Stroke Rehabilitation project2_

rehabilitation means that most people will make a dramatic recovery (some fully). Turkey's rising elderly population means that the need for education and dedicated clinics is vital. The body not only benefits through an increased capacity for movement, but also from the therapeutic and emotional benefits for the mind, therefore helping patients to rebuild forms of communication through song and participation. The project starts by looking at the site and the therapeutic possibilities that the island can offer1. industrial area now returning to original pleasure gardens 2. unpredictability of the site- aspects of flooding and erosion. 3. the therapeutic benefits of the nature present on the site (both the setting and

the animals + birds).

Sunlight

In the past hospitals used music therapy in order to structure the patient's day. The pieces of music or makams were very much linked to specific times of day and qualities of light. People who have suffered from a stroke often find that everything takes a lot longer than it once did and can lead to a feeling of frustration at being 'left behind' as the world rushes by. The idea of following the sun introduces the idea of a slow natural progression around the building- an acceptance of the slower rhymes of someone recovering from a stroke and an allowance for the slow process of rehabilitation and recovery.

Materiality

Concrete structure of the building allows for the natural flooding of the island and

07

AMY B.


08

UNIT 5

AmyBegg amy.begg.09@ucl.ac.uk

helps to stabilise the landscape.

Public Spaces

It is generally recognised that stroke recovery works best in dedicated clinics away from the home in order for patients to fully focus on their own recovery. Yet a feeling of separation from the 'outside world' is also unheathy and can leave patients feeling cutoff and left behind. Therefore public spaces such as an outdoor and an indoor music concert hall and educational spaces are introduced into the building. The centre benifits from the huge recent revival and interest in tradtional turkish music both in istanbul and on the international music scene. As a venue for concerts the rehab clinic would take on an atmosphere of connectedness to the city and would feel like a place that people would want to visit. This would be benificial for both general awareness of stroke and for the patients in the centre as it would give the patients the feeling of being part of something relevant and exciting. The public parts of the building are centred to the South West of the island so that, depending on their strength and level of recovery, patients can control how much they wish to be involved with the more public aspects of the building. Towards the East and North the building filters out into the landscape forming a tranquil setting for the patients living spaces and garden, wildlife areas.


FAULT LINES

Stroke Rehabilitation project2_

09

AMY B.


10

UNIT 5

Christopher Worsfold c.worsfold@ucl.ac.uk

Grain provides the foundation for world diet and its reliable presence through developments in harvest, storage and the range of subsequent produce was the core factor in the development of 'fixed' cities and towns we increasingly inhabit. The program posits a grain reserve for the city of London with global concerns over food security exponential in a world of ever unpredictable weather and financial systems the physical reserve of grain has somewhat renewed value. Urban myth through government assurance and rumor suggest the grain reserve held on site in canary wharf is enough to sustain London's current population for 90 days (the figure recommended by the UN). Taking the footprint of canary wharf and with volumetric calculation this suggests a 'sub-scraper' architecture in section that although fictional presents a physical metaphor for an

impending crisis lurking beneath the city. On the fringe of the financial city and neighboring Milwall the program makes reference to the areas historic grain industry. Milwall takes its name from the flood barrier wall for the isle of dogs that at one point had seven flour mills upon it.

7 folly type structures

The grid recalls the grid of the facades of the financial district but also denoted the allocated footprint for each of the 32 boroughs of london.


FAULT LINES

CityofLondon GrainReserve

11

project1_

Public access is restricted allowing only to see the illisonay uncertain holes under which the grain is stored. The top of the grid is planted with wheat, a canopy of wheat which manifests itself as a field of gold seen from the financial district. The grain keepers on site use wheel barrows to move a constant amount of grain from folly to folly animating the landscape but ultimately the work is pointless - to create a sense of a working landscape and security to the public who can witness this store but ultimately it is an illusion. Storage of grain underground is typical opposed to atypical but obviously not to the extent I propose. It is the duality between wanting the reserve to be there for security, (and told by government) and the realization that the physical implication of the sub scraper is impossible....to what extent is it real however is the question left for the observer.

CHRIS W.


12

UNIT 5

Christopher Worsfold c.worsfold@ucl.ac.uk

Today we can assert with almost complete certainty that our climate is changing due to human activity. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), stated that: 'warming of the climate is unequivocal. Most of the observed increase in globally averaged temperatures since the mid-20th century is very likely due to the increase in anthropogenic Green House Gases .' The Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO), a branch of the United Nations estimates that the livestock sector today accounts for 18% of total global Green House Gas emissions and the IPCC suggests a reduction of up to 95% in the sector's

emissions may be required to combat Climate change. Diet is in flux, constantly changing be it through population migration etc or the ability to grow something. 'There is a meat crisis,' said Professor Arnold van Huis (an entomologist at Wageningen University in the Netherlands and author of the UN paper). 'The world population will grow from six billion now to nine billion by 2050 and we know people are consuming more meat. Twenty years ago the average was 20kg, it is now 50kg, and will be 80kg in 20 years. If we continue like


FAULT LINES

LocustFarm+ Restaurant project2_

this we will need another Earth.' Van Huis is an enthusiast for eating insects but given his role as a consultant to the FAO, he can't be dismissed as a crank. 'Most of the world already eats insects,' he points out. 'It is only in the western world that we don't. Psychologically we have a problem with it. I don't know why, as we eat shrimps, which are very comparable.' The advantages of this diet include insects' high levels of protein, vitamin and mineral content. Van Huis' latest research, conducted with colleague Dennis Oonincx, shows that farming insects produces far less greenhouse gas than livestock. Breeding commonly eaten insects such as locusts, crickets and meal worms, emits 10 times less methane than livestock.

13

CHRIS W.


14

UNIT 5

Christopher Worsfold c.worsfold@ucl.ac.uk

The insects also produce 300 times less nitrous oxide, also a warming gas, and much less ammonia, a pollutant produced by pig and poultry farming. Being cold-blooded, insects convert plant matter into protein extremely efficiently, Van Huis says. Locust is one of the few insects that is considered HALAL as specifically named in Quran also considered kosher in jewish community. Halal is vital to proposal in Istanbul with majority of the population being muslim. Restaurant serves locust as Eco proteinand a high end product. Bar would serve small snacks and drinks but also used as pre-meal space and waiting for other

guests to arrive before heading up to main grand rest space. majority of storage and staff facilities and links the farm from cabbage canopy to locust chambers. Cabbage dropped down chute from canopy level and sorted and stored at 00. The restaurant circulation should be readable. delivery occurs at the back right of floor plan and served by a delivery lift. Locust chambers have veiwing gallery at ground level and above gantry and stair sets that allow farmer to access each box Restaurant space.....as you come up stairs glazed wall provides guests a view into


FAULT LINES

LocustFarm+ Restaurant project2_

kitchen....arriving at rest. level the glazed steps allow view back down to bar....rest seating is in sunken booths that in some way tie in with the locust wall and cabbage but also give a sense of enclosure.I have delibertaley not used the edge of the booth as what you sit on because I feel it is much nicer to have loose chair that one can adjust and move as they like. For the most

part tables are in a sunken booth group in 3's, i.e 6 covers. This allows flexibility within the rest. space in that the tables can be pushed together to form either 3 two seaters, a table of 4 and table of 2, or a table of 6. The rest would deliberately not cater for parties bigger than this as they ruin the atmosphere for other guests. One private booth of 4 is slung from celing to create an exclusive table of 4 but mainly to lift the seating above the stair set from cabbage farm that would block the view otherwise.

15

CHRIS W.


16

UNIT 5

HuizhenNg hui.ng.09@ucl.ac.uk

The experimental project proposes a hotel made up of modular, mobile capsules to accommodate people who visit prominent fairs in London's parks but turns into a survival bunker in times of crises by the relocating these capsules underground, into the existing infrastructure of the Mail Rail system. Hotels are located within green spaces near the existing Mail Rail stations, which are situated across central London from East to West. The project's programme is mainly developed from the discovery of the London Mail Rail system, which runs beneath the streets of central London but has ceased operations since 2003. This project aims

to give the existing abandoned infrastructure a possible new utility and at the same time, explore the pop up phenomenon which potentially influenced the design of the built structure Inspired by pop up cards and the folding of planes to create spaces, the capsule rooms - the living room and bedroom can be reconfigured to create a compact bunker, fitting up to 4 people instead of 1 or 2 on usual days. There are also toilet capsules to serve the hotel rooms. The modular design of these capsules allow for flexibility of different configurations according to the different needs of customers, such as length of stay.The capsule rooms are then transported via the Mail Rail tracks according to different demands for hotel


FAULT LINES

TheDualHideout

project1_

rooms at different Mail Rail stations, especially when they are fluctuating due to different fairs taking place at different times and places. An ETFE canopy then shelters these capsule rooms above ground, and is designed to camouflage its existence in times of crisis. The ETFE roof employs a nitrogen fog system to mimic the appearance of clouds while the facade of the hotel reception is built with glass for transparency. A tower is also erected as an extension of the lift shaft to the bunker platform, which transformative function act as an advertising tower during festivals. However during times of crises, its facade folds down to become less conspicuous. Overall the project looks at the possibility of having a double life, and how the design can serve both scenarios - during a festive season and during times of crises.

17

HUIZHEN N.


18

UNIT 5

HuizhenNg hui.ng.09@ucl.ac.uk

Turkey has one of the largest smoking populations in the world and is well known for its traditional smoking cafes. However in 2009, the Turkish Government introduced a smoke ban to public places, affecting all bars, cafes and restaurants. Smokers are hence unable to smoke in enclosed spaces freely. By first examining the Turkish Tobacco Law's ambiguous definition of indoor and outdoor spaces, this project explores the concept of exterior and interior spaces as well as the in-betweens. Blurring the boundaries between indoor and outdoor spaces, the proposed building

creates spaces in which smokers are able to smoke shisha within the comforts of interiors spaces, while complying with the Turkish Tobacco Law. The architecture of the building is highly infrastructural - its form is derived from an attempt to boost the accessibility of the site with three different points of entry, yet at the same time maintain an elevation that allows all spaces within the building to have access to the panoramic view of the Bosphorus. The building is separated into two wings to cater to two main groups of shisha smokers - professional and social. The arrange-


FAULT LINES

19

TheSmokeWalls Walkthrough project2_

HUIZHEN N.


20

UNIT 5

HuizhenNg hui.ng.09@ucl.ac.uk


FAULT LINES

21

TheSmokeWalls Walkthrough project2_

ment and function of walls create different functional spaces for the two different smoking groups, whereby social shisha smoking results in a more communal space whereas professional shisha smoking creates a more private enclosure for utmost privacy and minimum air turbulence. The overall experience for users is a journey through walls and ambiguous territories where they are constantly displaced between indoor and outdoor spaces, public and private spaces.

HUIZHEN N.


22

UNIT 5

KunBi bikun1226@gmail.com


FAULT LINES

23

Istanbul Water Complex KUN B.

Located on an abandend shipyard next to the Golden Horn, this building is a combination of water related film studios and public playground. As a film shooting location, it provides water studio, diving pool, jumping pool for different types of film shooting. It also has space to simulate deep sea by using illusions. As a water theme play ground, all the water studios will serve public for relaxation, where the indoor space will be a futuristic atmosphere.


24

UNIT 5

KunBi bikun1226@gmail.com


FAULT LINES

25

Istanbul Water Complex KUN B.


26

UNIT 5

LucasLer wei.ler.09@ucl.ac.uk

The debate between the two groups of scientists about the weather of future London was the starting point of this project. One group of scientists think London will experience extreme heat due to global warming while the other group predicts that little ice age may strike London again. This project intends to raise awareness about climate change among the public in London by creating the two extremes

of the apocalyptical scenario using the silhouettes of the iconic Battersea Power Station and Chelsea Bridge. Inspired by the technology of a regenerator, this pavilion allows the coexistence of both hot and cold weathers. The pavilion is a coil-framed structure which harvests energy from the surrounding in order to create artificial weathers.


FAULT LINES

27

Pavilionof ApocalypticLondon project1_

LUCAS L.


28

UNIT 5

LucasLer wei.ler.09@ucl.ac.uk

This project started with a cup of coffee. Many of us drink coffee in the morning to wake up. However, have you ever thought of coffee is more than just a daily dose of caffeine? The moment we inhale the aroma of a cup of freshly ground coffee, several genes in our brain will be activated. Besides that, recent research has revealed that coffee waste could be an alternative energy source. Therefore, my proposed building is not only a self-sustained building, it also keeps its inhabitants awake.

The building site is located on an island within the district of Eyup. Apart from being just a coffeehouse, my proposed building is recycling platform which collects coffee waste from the surrounding cafĂŠs.

Coffeehouses and coffee culture has been an integral part of Istanbul social culture for centuries; people came here throughout the day to read books and beautiful texts, play chess and backgammon and discuss poetry, politics and literature. However it has traditionally been seen as a realm for men in their various neighbourhoods to The scheme proposes a coffeehouse, coffee gather. In the 1980's feminist protests were waste collection centre, debating chamber as well as a continuity of public green space held in the male sphere of coffee houses in linking both sides of the Golden Horn, Istanbul. Istanbul, in an attempt to break the male


FAULT LINES

29

FeministCoffeehouse

project2_

LUCAS L.


30

UNIT 5

LucasLer wei.ler.09@ucl.ac.uk

domination of the public square. The program will attempt to attract a larger female clientèle than the traditional Istanbul coffee house, to enable the same socialisation and forum of political discussion, that men have enjoyed for centuries. Women would be encouraged to recycle, garden, drink coffee, exchange opinions and read on the site. There has been an increase over the years in the female literacy levels in Turkey, that is in line with the growing political voice that women in the country have been fighting for. hoods to gather. In the 1980's feminist protests were held in the male sphere of coffee

houses in Istanbul, in an attempt to break the male domination of the public square. The program will attempt to attract a larger female clientèle than the traditional Istanbul coffee house, to enable the same socialisation and forum of political discussion, that men have enjoyed for centuries. Women would be encouraged to recycle, garden, drink coffee, exchange opinions and read on the site. There has been an increase over the years in the female literacy levels in Turkey, that is in line with the growing political voice that women in the country have been fighting for.


FAULT LINES

31

FeministCoffeehouse

project2_

LUCAS L.


32

UNIT 5

Samuel Dodsworth samuel.dodsworth.09@ucl.ac.uk


FAULT LINES

33

DigitalCemetryand CremationCeremony project1_

London is facing a dilemma as local councils across the city are asking people to consider alternatives to traditional burial. With graveyards almost full to capacity cremation seems to be the only option. Located on the Blackfriars Bridge the building features experiences replicated from those of the peripherally positioned outer city graves and brings them into sharp focus with the central city position. The building is electrically powered by thousands of PV cells which are hung in stripes above the decking; these double as engraved tombstones and are erected to commemorate each person cremated on site. With online cemeteries open to malicious attack the building serves as a secure place for those grieving to upload or change virtual profiles, whilst at the same time be able to view the shadow of their loved-ones 'dead cell' within the limitless masses.

SAM D.


34

UNIT 5

Samuel Dodsworth samuel.dodsworth.09@ucl.ac.uk

The town of Ortakoy is split into two, a traditional side and one transformed for tourism to satisfy western Istanbul's desire to officially become recognised as European. As a consequence traditions such as marriage ritual are changing. This building retreat condenses the wedding rituals down to a weeklong ceremony based around 7 events and the circulations responds to its specific requirements, giving separate routes for the bride and groom to prevent any chance meeting, as well the obligatory as mass access.


FAULT LINES

35

TraditionalTurkish Wedding,Retreatand Ceremony project2_

SAM D.


36

UNIT 5

Samuel Dodsworth samuel.dodsworth.09@ucl.ac.uk

With much of Istanbul's history and many of the events identified for the marriage based upon water the building focuses on an evolution of these principals via passive means of water purification and transportation, filtrating sea water to varying degrees to wherever needed. The water system gradually replenishes its fresh water store in preparation for the following couple's marriage the next week, before its eventual release back into the Bosporus source.


FAULT LINES

37

TraditionalTurkish Wedding,Retreatand Ceremony project2_

SAM D.


38

UNIT 5

SimranSidhu simran.sidhu.09@ucl.ac.uk


FAULT LINES

39

The Bus Stop House

project 1_

SIMRAN S.

The proposal acts as an immigrant safe house, in the area of Southall, West London, where the transformation of a public space, a bus stop, can be adapted to create a private house for immigrants who are looking for a place to sleep. The proposal is a careful intervention into a key point in the daily lives of these immigrants, as it deploys under the strict timetable of the local bus routes and work schedules of the people who live within it.


40

UNIT 5

SimranSidhu simran.sidhu.09@ucl.ac.uk


FAULT LINES

41

New Fener - Balat Market Masterplan

project 2_

Istanbul is a city that is currently in a state of flux, with the many layers that make up the culture, the architecture, topography, and societies that all reside within it. With this in mind, I realised that with the Government's new ambition of putting Istanbul back on the global map, a cleaning up process of some of the older parts of the city is underway, especially in areas like Fener and Balat (districts home to Jewish, Greek Orthodox and Muslim communities). They all live harmoniously with one another through the function of a local market, which runs all the way through the districts every other day. As well as this, old timber houses from the Ottoman empire in the area are being taken apart or completely destroyed to attract a different social class, leaving the former residents of these communities homeless. With this, and the large factor of Istanbul rapidly running out of space to build, I wanted to design a new housing scheme for these residents, which incorporated their valuable market. The market acts as the 'green lung' for the scheme, with an emphasis of building housing on the waterfront of the Golden Horn, a move that Istanbul is soon going to have to consider if they are to allow for a larger

SIMRAN S.


42

UNIT 5

SimranSidhu simran.sidhu.09@ucl.ac.uk

population to reside in Istanbul. The key aspects to this housing are to retain the craft of timber structures as an ode to the timber structures from the ottoman empire and preserve some of the heritage that lived amongst the architecture that the residents used to live in. The scheme also exploits its location on the waterfront by weaving in canal systems into the market place from the Golden Horn, so that the market and housing is accessible from the

sea, creating some of the market as temporary, as well as allowing for fishing and other small scale water functions of the market to be carried out. I think the project incorporates tradition of timber from the Ottoman Era, with a modern outlook which allows the housing and market to be completely adaptable for the constantly changing and uncertain state of Istanbul's future.


FAULT LINES

43

New Fener - Balat Market Masterplan

project 2_

SIMRAN S.


44

UNIT 5


FAULT LINES

45

SiteLocation 1 2

3

YEAR 2

4 5

Year 2:, Robin Ashurst, Zion Chan, Joanne Jiong Chen, Him Wai , Arthur Kay, Camilla Wright , Peter Simpson, Jack Sergant


46

UNIT 5

ArthurKay arthur.kay.10@ucl.ac.uk

The only thing we have to fear is fear itself... Terry-Fyed

Terry-Fyed Terrence Fyed is a normal man living in the area of Nine Elms, South London. He has always kept up with world news and approaches these problems pragmatically. A psychologist in 2012 would tell Terry that he is crippled by paranoia. The stories and images which have dominated World news for the last fifty years rule his life. Terrence's daily routine is dominated by the news. Whilst he does still go out to work and return home every day, the amount of fear he experiences is proportional to the amount news he hears. Fear spreads virally throughout the city. Our house is our corner of the world, a centre of intimacy.

Over time he has made a series of architectural interventions to his Victorian house. Addressing, and providing architectural solutions to specific fears derived from perceived local and global threats. The relocation of the US embassy to the area, his houses proximity to the river and the recently finished nuclear reactor at Battesea Power Station don't help Terry stay calm...


FAULT LINES

47

ParanoiaHouse

project1_

ARTHUR K.


48

UNIT 5

ArthurKay arthur.kay.10@ucl.ac.uk

My programme is to design a Kurdish Language Centre. Whilst a fifth of Istanbul speaks Kurdish, the language has been banned until very recently. There are no buildings in the city dedicated to the teaching and preservation of this language. The Kurds have been harshly repressed, ever since Turkeys formation and are under threat from what the UN has called 'cultural elimination'. Today, they represent societies underclass, living in the un-wanted gaps and missing spaces within the city. I have tried to incorporate these features into my design for this building and held it in mind whilst selecting an appropriate site. My building will be provide a space for the teaching and preservation of the Kurdish language

in all its forms. Incorporated the traditional kurdish Paf pattern, again used symbolic, and incorporated in miniature paintingThe buildings floor plan is set up around a strict orthogonal geometry. Fractal aspect of the design, taking a concept, design or geometry and repeating this throughout the building. The floor planes are perforated with a series of courtyards and voids throughout the building. These spaces bring light into the interior spaces as well as creating uncomfortable, and uninhabitable spaces within the building, a metaphor for the Kurds and a fractal idea, similar to the site and nature of the building.


FAULT LINES

49

Kurdish LanguageCentre

project2_

ARTHUR K. Whilst the building itself acts as a 'bedrock', working with the metaphor as the Kurdish language as the foundations of a nationality. Canopy to be integrated within the building, a structure to react with the book Market and the library below. It is a light weight filagery structure acting as a projection or shadow of what the future could be for the Kurdish people.


50

UNIT 5

CamillaWright


FAULT LINES

51

Nature-ARitual

project1_

CAMILLA W.

A scheme that comments on the current obsession with 'green' living, an idea that we, as a nation, have idealized and often made superficial for self-gratification. The scheme entails a series of spaces one of which consists of recycling confession booths; redeem your indulgence in the act of recycling.


52

UNIT 5

CamillaWright A building that harnesses rain and local grey water to reuse for leisure and fire fighting purposes. The trough like roofs carry water over and down into the building where it is stored for the requirements of the fire engine. These roofs are accessible to the public and form shallow pools providing an oasis in the otherwise dry and dense city. This design romanticizes the typology of the fire station and integrates public recreation with a service programme.


FireStationand WaterLandscape Istanbul

FAULT LINES

53

project2_

CAMILLA W.


54

UNIT 5

HimwaiLai him.lai.10@ucl.ac.uk

The area east of Hackney Wick across the River Lea was once the site of allotment gardens once owned and tended to by Wick residents. Unfortunately, the upcoming Olympics has meant a seizure of the very land of which the gardens once stood on, being repurposed into a media center and sealed off by an unsightly electric fence. The aim of the project is thus to recreate the allotments on the narrow canal that is the River Lea as compensation for the affected Wick residents.

Pontoons can be outfitted with aeroponics systems from which residents can hire out and grow whatever they desire. Other pontoons can support the growth of vines, that would form a literal green wall that can block out the unsightly fence. The pontoons themselves can be rearranged to form a bridge connecting both sides of the river- a subtle invitation to the press occupying the media center to explore and discover Hackney Wick and not only to focus on the Games.


FAULT LINES

55

FoatingGardensof HackneyWick

project1_

HIMWAI L.


56

UNIT 5

HimwaiLai him.lai.10@ucl.ac.uk


FAULT LINES

57

MarmaraBoatClub

project2_

Evocative of wooden sailboats which once ruled the sea surrounding antiquated Istanbul, the facility aims to reintroduce lateen skiffs back to the Marmara, the boats themselves being available for rental to the public. The layout of the facility is such that a central mooring space is created where calmer waters flow and where skiffs can be moored safely when not in use. Smaller and lighter dinghies can be dragged on land and suspended from a structure forming a temporary canopy which people can admire and relax under. Other structural components are reminiscent of upturned wooden boat hulls which its form in turn is derived from the natural curves of tree branches.

HIMWAI L.


58

UNIT 5

JackSargent

jack.sargent.10@ucl.ac.uk

A rain water harvesting and recycling scheme located in the symbolic new heart of london’s financial world.


FAULT LINES

59

CanaryWharfFogNets

project1_

JACK S.


60

UNIT 5

JackSargent jack.sargent.10@ucl.ac.uk

Istanbul's craft skills are currently in a state of decline. The gold and silversmiths of the grand bazaar are being pushed out by extremely high rents. The project aims to slow and possibly reverse this decline. The project is situated on the bank of the golden horn in Istanbul, Turkey.

The program is a goldsmiths workshop, incorporating accommodation and a public market area. The project aims to jump start the regeneration of the craft skills of Istanbul and the area directly adjacent to the site.


FAULT LINES

61

GoldenHornGoldsmiths

project2_

JACK S.


62

UNIT 5

JoanneChen jiong.chen.10@ucl.ac.uk

Numerous studio spaces were demolished to make way for London 2012 Olympic regeneration programmes. Loss of workspaces meant a disappearance of vibrancy, diversity and cultural influence from a community of artists. As the construction work extends over a long period of time, the construction sites gradually lose their previous functions to become forgotten spaces. The program is a metaphor for revivingforgotten spaces by providing the artists with affordable studio complexes with a strong community infrastructure. The proposed studios will not only help to promote the artists' work vitalise and trendify the area. In order for the proposed itnhabitable

space to be removed and reused elsewhere, it is designed to be portable with leafshaped modules, whose design is inspired and derived from Hoberman structures. Some of the repeating modules are mutated to have specific functions such as doors, windows, and other utilities. The concept of the pop-up structure is similar to that of Lego toy blocks, which are prefabricated, and their combination could be customised according to occupants' needs.


FAULT LINES

63

Pop-upArtistCommune Shoreditch

project1_

JOANNE C.


64

UNIT 5

JoanneChen jiong.chen.10@ucl.ac.uk

Golden Horn was an old trading harbour and popular residential and commercial area. In the first half of 18th century it was famous for its tulip gardens where upscale people came to enjoy the romantic sunset. As a sign of revitalising the blissfulness of the old days of Golden Horn, the program

consists of an urban beach of tulip fields on the shore of Golden Horn. To revive the old industrial's prosperity, a factory is proposed to extract essential oil from tulip flowers to make perfume. The building is a combination of industry and landscape.


FAULT LINES

65

GoldenHornPerfume Factory+UrbanBeach

project2_

JOANNE C.


66

UNIT 5

PeterSimpson peter.simpson.10@ucl.ac.uk

Foreseeing a future in which the Thames barrier is breeched due to rising sea water levels, the Docklands Water Park speculates new possibilities for the local community on the Isle of Dogs. A series of platforms rise and fall with the tide, which offer alternative ways of providing energy for the community and uses the salt water to grow new crops.


FAULT LINES

67

DocklandsWaterPark

project1_

PETER S.


68

UNIT 5

PeterSimpson peter.simpson.10@ucl.ac.uk

The theatre showcases contemporary performances of both Mime and Shadow Puppet Theatre over two separate auditoriums. Whilst the requirements for shadow puppet theatre are strictly controlled due to the lighting. The auditorium for the mime theatre is a lot more playful due to the physical nature of the performances. Scenery is moved into the auditorium on tracks and acrobats descend from the roof, this is all played out in front of the historic skyline of Istanbul.


FAULT LINES

69

MimeandShadow PuppetTheatre

project2_

PETER S.


70

UNIT 5

RobinAshurst robin.ashurst.10@ucl.ac.uk

As compensation for the loss of the marathon, the London Olympics Board titled Brick Lane 'Curry Capital' of the Olympics, and gave Tower Hamlets several thousand student tickets to practice Olympic events. The mayor of Tower Hamlets, Lutfur Rahman, did not see this as adequate compensation, preferring an involvement in the hosting of the games. I want to use this intervention as an opportunity to re-instate Tower Hamlets’ role in the Games, creating a theatrical end to the final event. Water will be distributed using the water vessels hanging from a hinged roof structure. As the runners pass through the pavilion, the roof will lower from its upright position,

and spray a cloud of mist for them to run through. At the end of the race, in celebration of the end of the final event, the water will all be expelled from the water vessels into the air. In my final design, the water will be distributed using the water vessels hanging from the roof. As the runners pass through the pavilion, the roof will lower from its upright position, and spray a cloud of mist for them to run through. At the end of the race, in celebration of the end of the final event, the water will all be expelled from the water vessels, into the air.


FAULT LINES

71

OlympicWaterPavilion

project1_

The spectators will have stalls that line the sides of the road. These will be part of a Brick Lane market that lines the sides of the stalls, bringing the business that would have benefitted Tower Hamlets back to them. At the start of the race, the perspective walls will be bending outwards, away from the runners. As the marathon progresses, they will slowly close inwards, creating a skewed perspective for the runners, making them appear to be approaching the finish line quickly. The spectators will also be able to stand behind the perspective

walls at the tail-end of the pavilion. I am attempting to recreate the theatricality of finishing in a stadium, by using these walls to create a stage for the race winner to enter, signifying the culmination of the Games.

ROBIN A.


72

UNIT 5

RobinAshurst robin.ashurst.10@ucl.ac.uk

The hospital will be primarily used by three bodies - the patients that will be brought in from the bridges along the Golden Horn by the ambulance boats; the boats themselves, which will navigate the system of water channels that create the base of the building; and the visitors, whether they are visiting people being treated in the wards, or coming for a place to stay the night instead of sleeping on the bridge.


t

FAULT LINES

73

GoldenHornHospital

project2_

ROBIN A.


74

UNIT 5

ZionChan zion.chan.09@ucl.ac.uk

Nine Elms is currently under regeneration. Therefore, a lot of people are going to be attracted to the area to live, work and visit. One of the main focuses of the development plan is the green space within the area. Although numbers of gardens are being planned, it seems that the proposal doesn't give much consideration on private individual use of a garden. I'm interested in how people can modify the area in their own way, and how they can have their own frontage in an area which every single bit are being planned. Adding a second layer to the place and create an interesting landscape.

The proposal is a Mobile Garden, which can be used on land or on water. The parking facilities of the mobile garden is a public garden located along the coastal line of Nine Elms, they also serve as a pier for the garden to go into River Thames. And each mobile garden is a module that can be taken out and putting back by people renting it. When the Mobile Garden is used on Land, it becomes a Private Garden Pavilion, which is slightly elevated from ground level. As a floating garden, it can be used as a individual garden or a when two or more garden being composed together, it can provide bigger space and more varieties of configuration for different functions.


FAULT LINES

75

mobilegardenNineElms

project1_

ZION C.


76

UNIT 5

ZionChan zion.chan.09@ucl.ac.uk

The building is a rehabilitation centre for visually impaired people in Istanbul. The blind community in Istanbul has always been a disadvantaged minority which people may forget. According to Six Dots Foundation for The Blind, there are 40,000 blind people in Istanbul, while 38,000 not being to leave their home. 1% of blind people is getting education and around the same number of blind people is getting a job. One of the biggest problems for them is to deal with the traffic. Istanbul is known for its heavy traffic. Considering a visually impaired people

already has to deal with the complex cityscape, adding on it the horrible traffic condition, it is easy to understand why blind people in Istanbul is not getting training or education. Yenikapi used to be one of the busiest ports in Turkey, along the southern shore of the city's historically central peninsula. With development plans along the costal line, Yenikapi would become the most visited place in Istanbul. This provides a chance for visually impaired people to train the mobility skill with heavy traffic.


FAULT LINES

77

RehabilitationCentrefor VisuallyImpaired

project2_

More importantly it will provide a lot of chance for the general public to interact with blind people if a rehabilitation centre is being built here. As Muslim would not keep dogs in their houses, they would prefer miniature horse for guide animal instead of dogs. The idea is to idea the building itself as a training ground for both people and ponies. Main Spaces include the stable, staff office, exterior training rout (the ramp) and training workshop. The initial thought is to have a training rout for mobility training go around specific training rout for example the personal management training room. By multiplying the training rout and the training room, a more complex and organic

form is developing more similar to the streetscape of Istanbul. The road network of Istanbul itself is the evidence of the dramatic historical change of the city, which result in a complex and organic form. The mobility training for blind people would require a safe training rout which imitative the street of Istanbul. Throughout the daily travel of visually impaired people, they would experience different places and different quality of streets.

ZION C.


Unit 5 Catalogue 2011-2012

unit Fault Lines

5 Julia Backhaus Pedro Font Alba


Unit5 Student Catalogue 2011-12