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Vol 6 Issue No.67 May - June 2017

REUNION ISLAND AN OPEN-AIR MUSEUM IN THE INDIAN OCEAN

INDIA’S GDP CONTROVERSY THE INFORMAL SECTOR Shri V.P. Nandakumar MD & CEO, Manappuram Finance Ltd.

AN INIMITABLE ENTREPRENEUR WITH GOLD STANDARDS! A.M. Sudeeshkumar, A.M. Sunilkumar,

Directors of Goodwin Group

Honda WR-V, an exceptional cross-hatch May - June17

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Printed by: Ajit Ravi Published by: Ajit Ravi Owned by: Ajit Ravi Printed at: S T Reddiar P.B. No: 3627, Veekshanam Road, Cochin Published at: Pegasus, L5-106 Changampuzha Nagar Kalamassery Ernakulam-682 033 e-mail: editor@uniquetimes.org uniquetimesindia@gmail.com Ph:0484 3242220, 6555533, 4025666 Mob:+91 98460 50283, 94470 50283 Editor Ajit Ravi Sub-Editor Vignesh Associate Editor Ravi Saini Editor-In-charge Jebitha Ajit Legal Advisor Latha Anand B.s.krishnan associates bskrishnanassociates@gmail.com Correspondents Dr. Thomas Nechupadam Vivek Venugopal- Quarter Mile Amrutha V Kumar Karthika S Nair Marketing BAHRAIN PRESTIGE MARKETING Tel: +971 55 2000933 Email: gopal@prestigemarketing.in UAE Phygicart.com P.O. Box: 92546, Al Karama Dubai Mr. Anish K Joy Mob: +971528946999 info@phygicart.com Tamil Nadu Vice president Uma Riyas Khan chennai, Mob: 9841072955 Andhrapradesh & Karnataka PEGASUS Ph: 09288800999 Sunilkumar NN, Saneesh Ashok Your wing Director Shwetha Menon Photographer Ashique Hassan Creative Design PEGASUS Cover Photograph A.M. Sudeeshkumar, A.M. Sunilkumar, May - June17 4 Directors of Goodwin Group

Editorial T

he successful blogger Celestine says: “Everyone faces challenges in life. It's a matter of how you learn to overcome them and use them to your advantage”. To some, challenges act as catalysts. This issue, we introduce A.M. Sudeesh, one of the directors of Goodwin Group, who finds a bit of inspiration in challenges to move forward. The group has spread its wings and started its operations at Dombivili, Mumbai in 2004. It was a gradual and evident growth from a single showroom to 11 in Mumbai, Pune, Kerala and Kuwait. The 12th branch is now being opened in Vashi in another 2 months. The group is spread across different segments – Jewellery wholesale, retail and manufacturing, Bombay Chains, Developers, Security Systems and Goodwin Charitable Trust, and lately into real estate. In the regular column, V.P. Nandakumar, the Chairman and Managing Director of Manappuram Finance, makes an interesting analysis of the fact behind the Central Statistics Office (CSO) pegging GDP as 7% despite demonetization. In Auto, our team reveals the reason behind Honda’s new cross-hatch WR-V. We introduce a wonderful, new place to visit. It is Reunion Island, an island located in the Indian Ocean. Regular articles on the stock market, gadgets, banking, movie review, and book review are there. I sincerely hope you find as much joy in this issue as it brings me.


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CONTENTS

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india’s GDP controversy the informal sector Skilling for tomorrow

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An inimitable entrepreneur with gold standards! Manappuram Miss Queen of India 2017 Akanksha wins the title

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Gadgets

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Recipes

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Makeup tips

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Reunion Island an open-air museum in the Indian Ocean

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Honda WR-V an exceptional cross-hatch

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UNIQUE DIARY

NITI Aayog to launch its first three-year plan

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he NITI Aayog, an organisation launched by the BJP-led centre government replacing the planning commission which has been controlling the Indian economy using the five-year plans since the independence, has declared a wage idea regarding their new approach to the economy by launching its first three-year plan. Unlike the former plans, apart from the economic aspects, the new plan has provisions to deal with the judicial reform aspects and law and order aspects. It is said that the main focus area of the new plan is agricultural development. It is an important fact that the NITI Aayog has a different approach than that of the planning commission in certain subjects like the state-centre relation, plan duration and plan execution.

India to allow global defence firms to collaborate with local, to set up units

''Let every man be respected as an individual and no man idolized.� Albert Einstein

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n a major policy change, the Indian government has indicated that it is ready to allow the global defence firms to collaborate with the local companies. The move is likely to help the global defence conglomerates to set up their units in our country. The major development in the defence policy has been publicised by the Finance Minister, Arun Jaitley. Presently, we spend huge money on the defence material import. The new strategy could be a game changer if it is perfectly implemented, many believe. Mr Jaitley, who is currently holding the defence minister portfolio, has announced that the centre is also planning to implement some other changes in the defence policy.

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G20 leaders plan to establish a more open economy amidst the US’ anti-globalist stand

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hile the United States’ new government is aggressively moving forward with their antiglobalist policies, the G20 finance ministers have said to be reached a consensus to promote the open market and free market. In the meeting, there have been no statements regarding the ongoing conflict between the liberal west and the new US administration which is going to propose a new tax plan and some financial regulations. The G20, one of the powerful International forums organised to discuss the economic issues, is presently struggling due to the changing global economic order and approach. Anyway, the US representative has also participated in the meeting, which is chaired by the German representative.

Indian knitwear conglomerate set to spread its wings

'' A man should never neglect his family for business.'' Walt Disney

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he Indian knitwear conglomerate, Dollar Industries, which has presence in Nepal as well as the West Asian regions, is set to spread their wings to Africa aiming at expanding its export market. Presently, its export accounts for over eight per cent of its total turnover, which stands at around Rs 830 crore. The knitwear maker has units in Tirupur, Delhi, Kolkata, Erode and Ludhiana. It is appreciable that the Indian companies have been showing more wisdom by tapping the fruit of the unexplored markets for last few years. The African region can be a treasure bowl if the companies approach this market with a right strategy.

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UNIQUE DIARY

Ashok Leyland to pump in more capital merges with SBI

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shok Leyland, the Indian automobile giant, is going to pump in a huge amount of six hundred crore rupee into their company in order to develop technology and capacity. It is set to erect new units in Andhra Pradesh, Telangana, Kenya and Ivory Coast. As per the report, the proposed units in the state of Telangana and AP, which is said to be used for creating the body of buses, are likely to become operational within the next two years. It is learned that the company has pocketed a defence contract for the production of the mine protection vehicles and bulletproof vehicles.

FM convenes meeting with US commerce secretary to discuss H-1B visa issue

''IThe only limits are, as always, those of vision.'' James Broughton

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he Indian Finance Minister, Arun Jaitley, has convened a meeting with the US commerce secretary, Wilbur Ross, to discuss the threat posed by the US government’s stiffness over the H-1B visa issue. In the meeting, the minister has reminded the US secretary the remarkable contributions made by the Indian professionals in strengthening the US economy and the American companies particularly the IT companies. Defending the new move made by US President Donald Trump in the pretext of rolling out a plan to curb the abuse of the H-1B visa provisions, the secretary has asserted that the US government only aims to encourage a merit-based system with the new executive order.

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BUSINESS

Shri V.P.Nandakumar MD & CEO Manappuram Finance Ltd. Chairman, CII’s Kerala State Council

One major factor that may have worked to mitigate the impact of demonetization is that even as people cut down on their spending in cash, many from the middle and the upper classes shifted a major of their purchases to the organised sector where non-cash payments were accepted.

India’s GDP controversy THE INFORMAL SECTOR

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ndia’s economists were mostly skeptical when, on February 28, the Central Statistics Office (CSO) published numbers showing that India’s real GDP for the third (October to December) quarter of FY 2016-17 had grown by a healthy 7 percent. Although lower than the 7.4% growth recorded in the previous quarter, this was much better than the widespread expectations of weaker growth of between 6 and 6.5 percent in the aftermath of demonetization. Private consumption, fixed investment and industrial output growth all are reported to have accelerated in Q4, with only the services sector witnessing a slowdown. Further, the forecast for GDP growth rate for the full FY 2016-17

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was kept unchanged at 7.1%, which should make India one of the fastest-growing major economies in the world. Incidentally, prior to the release of the CSO’s estimates, both the Reserve Bank of India (RBI) and the International Monetary Fund (IMF) had lowered India's growth estimates for the fiscal by up to 1 per cent, citing the impact of demonetization. Logically, the massive disruption to the cash economy should lower GDP growth as consumer spending drops drastically. When cash accounts for over three-fourth of consumer payments, the reduction in money supply will slowdown spending if not bring it to a halt. After all, we have seen before our own eyes how people were more interested in hoarding cash rather than

spending it because they had no idea how long the cash crunch would last. Whatever cash they could lay their hands on was held back and only essential spending was allowed to take place. So, how did the CSO’s calculations end up with such optimistic numbers when most economists were quite convinced the growth rate would fall sharply? Here are three factors that may have worked to mitigate the impact of demonetization. Firstly, even as people cut down on their spending in cash, many from the middle and the upper classes shifted a major of their purchases to the organised sector where non-cash payments were accepted. In this case, the loss


of business for the unorganised sector was offset by a gain for the organised sector. This would have happened with many of us who switched over to supermarkets for provisions and groceries as they accepted credit and debit cards while the neighbourhood kirana store did not. From the point of view of arriving at the GDP, the switch to the organised sector is also a shift from what cannot be measured (and therefore is only estimated) to what can be measured accurately. This has implications as we shall see shortly.

Secondly, while analysts often refer to the “shock to the economy� from the withdrawal of 86% of currency at one stroke, the fact is, even after the announcement, there were many places where cancelled notes could still be used, e.g. petrol pumps, hospitals, payment of government dues and taxes etc. Therefore, while for all the loose talk about 86% notes being invalidated at one stroke, the reality was somewhat different.

from manufacturers, the goods pushed by manufacturers to their channel partners would register as a sale in their books even as actual consumers were yet to buy the product. In this case, the full impact of demonetisation will become visible in the fourth quarter growth numbers as the inventory offloaded by manufacturers would have piled up at retail outlets as demonetisation compelled people to postpone their purchases.

Thirdly, since our GDP calculations rely on production figures

In addition to the above, two important festivals, Dussehra and

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The forecast for GDP growth rate for the full FY 2016-17 was kept unchanged at 7.1%, which should make India one the fastest-growing major economies in the world Diwali, fell in the December quarter, likely giving a leg up to consumption. Besides, the desperate rush to use old notes for consumption in the immediate aftermath of demonetisation may also have contributed to a temporary spike in consumption.

The statistical nitty-gritty

As defined, GDP is a broad measure of the value of the goods and services produced in a country. To arrive at the value, many assumptions are made, which can be problematic given the inherent weakness in the way the Central Statistical Organisation (CSO) collates data. Apparently, the CSO does not compile data on consumption but instead extrapolates the same from data on production. Furthermore, it does not have a mechanism to collect data on production in the informal sector, using instead the data for the formal sector as a proxy. And that is clearly a weakness when estimating the impact of a phenomenon like demonetisation that affected the informal sector much more than the formal sector. Indeed, considering that the informal sector accounts for 40% of India’s GDP and 75% of its employment, there is good reason to suspect that private consumption expenditure reported

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in the third quarter (indicating a 10.1%) growth was overstated. Economist Sonal Varma who is affiliated with Nomura believes that official GDP statistics have significantly underestimated the growth impact of demonetisation and cites the following three reasons for the higher than expected growth numbers: i) The inability of official statistics to capture the negative growth effects on the unorganised sectors, as the official numbers are based largely on organised sector data. ii) The GDP growth estimate for Q4 2015 was also revised lower by 0.8 percentage points to 6.5% y-o-y from 7.2%, thereby creating a significant favourable base effect for comparison iii) If companies showed their cash in hand (after demonetisation) as sales, then this may be getting captured as a higher value addition in these specific sectors (as corporate data are partly used to estimate growth). Summing up, it may be that either the impact from demonetisation was not as severe as expected, or there are some peculiar reasons such as cash in hand, or inventory pile ups, to explain the higher than expected growth figure. It may

also be the case that the official data collection machinery is not capturing the negative growth effects on the informal sector which accounts for about 40 per cent of India’s GDP and 75 per cent of employment. In fact, speaking from our own experience with gold loans, this does appear to be the case. Even as the cash shortage has eased completely by now, we continue to see a marked slowdown in the demand for gold loans from the class of micro entrepreneurs— the traders and small shopkeepers, the self employed, the semi skilled etc.—which can only be explained as the lingering after-effects of demonetization. In the last couple of years, ever since the new series for measuring GDP was unveiled, India’s GDP figures have been doubted and criticized over its accuracy. The fact that GDP growth in the aftermath of demonetization has also been reported as strong will only aggravate these concerns. The debate will, in all likelihood, go on for some more time

(V.P. Nandakumar is MD & CEO of Manappuram Finance Ltd. and the immediate Past President of Kerala State Council of CII.)


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BUSINESS

Rajesh Nair, Director, Ernst & Young LLP Rajesh is also the President of the Kerala Chapter of TiE Global

School and college education are not changing at the rapid pace of either technology or the new businesses around us. The pedagogy and the instructional styles still lag behind modern technology, to the extent, it does not really leverage the fact that the average youth reads the printed word more than the previous generation-albeit through social media-Whatsapp, Facebook etc.

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ducation has reached a sort of pinnacle in quantity, in India. The growth of the number of business schools and engineering colleges has been disproportionately high in the last two decades. With a huge build-up of supply of seats, the ease to get into these institutions has become an open road. The new reality is that the institutions are now making it easy for students to seek admission– that is to euphemistically say that they are falling over each other to get students. While all this clamour and melee is creating changes, the external factors are ushering quantum changes. The world is changing. A recent report by a reputed consulting company averred that more than 50% of the jobs we have today, will either not exist or be in a changed format, making it unrecognisable in the context of the past. The changing technology and business landscape is not the scope of this piece, but the changing panorama of skilling is. This also becomes one of paramount importance for the geographies where we are experiencing the rare phenomenon of a surfeit of younger population and the so-called ‘demographic dividend’. School and college education are not changing at the rapid pace of either technology or the new businesses around us. The pedagogy and the instructional styles still lag behind

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Skilling for tomorrow

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The institutions now need strong research and development facilities that will lead thought leadership. While the best in the world are doing it, this culture needs to percolate down to every echelon of tutorship. In India, there is additional scarcity as we lack good teachers. We have not traditionally seen teaching as a premium job with financial remuneration. modern technology, to the extent, it does not really leverage the fact that the average youth reads the printed word more than the previous generation– albeit through social media– Whatsapp, Facebook etc. The skilling effort for the future has to be a concerted effort involving an integrated determination of various stakeholders– the government, the industry, the educational institutions and the individuals. The action items and the key ‘to do’ items need synergy across the various patrons. The point to caution is that we need policies and action on a real time basis. It

is much akin to the analogy of the ship steering course which is focusing on the overall destination and navigating the immediate hurdles on an immediate basis. Some of these are anticipated difficulties but most of it are challenges we did not foresee and account for.

Focus of the government

Employment and employability are on the dashboard of every government. These are indicators which will have the right impact on the economy and also facilitate inclusive development. The government needs to initiate schemes which promote skill development avenues. Some of

these programs can be run under the aegis the various industry sector bodies. The recent initiatives of the DeenDayal Kaushal Vikas Yojana and the Prime Minister’s Kaushal Vikas Yojana, in India, are great initiatives promoted with the right impetus. The companies are compensated and incentivised to train urban youth and rural youth in skills which can be used for seeking employment with these companies or similar organisations. The Ministry of Skills has also prepared a list of jobs which have severe supply shortage and seek partners to run these schemes by individuals and organisations. It is a great avenue for entrepreneurship for the large section of trainers who are today working freelance and doing individual programs. In the last Global Entrepreneurship Summit hosted by the US, erstwhile President Obama commented at the inaugural that his role in entrepreneurship development was to just serve coffee and make

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we need for the future, the companies are perhaps the best judge of what is required. It needs clarity to decipher through the hyperbole– analytics, machine learning, but a certain stillness of thought and context needs to clarify how will it affect your industry. For the companies, it is important to think of the future now– where are the disruptors, what are the industry risks, what force will usher in. It is not about the market share today but the market of tomorrow! For the industry and sector associations and confederations like CII, TiE, FICCI, ASSOCHAM et.al, their primary objective is to start and facilitate the dialogue and identify and plug the gaps. Each industry has an ecosystem and while companies will have to play the lead role in identifying skilling needs– it also needs a collective focus.

Focus of educational institutions

It is a difficult road ahead for educational institutions. The syllabi cry to be drastically altered to include all the changes happensure that the coffee is the heart. Interestingly, this is the only thing expected from governments– set the stage, articulate conducive and encouraging policies, increase the ease of skilling initiatives and keep a constant watch on the crystal ball of the future.

Focus of the industry

The future skill requirements in various sectors are a matter of juxtaposition and some speculations as well. While there will be no change in the fundamental skills like the basics of management, finance, business modelling– what is changing is the management intuition of today. The management intuition is collectively built unconsciously and some consciously, based on various decision making experiences owned through doing it, observing it and learning it. The disruptive nature of the business has reconstituted this intuition in recent days. While the jury is always out on the important skills

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ing around. While in the Industry, the academia interface is on the rise, it is definitely a challenge for the faculty to keep pace with the new world order. Even the best teachers are reading literature and actively observing change but still are on the secondary side of cutting edge research. The institutions now need strong research and development facilities that will lead thought leadership. While the best in the world are doing it, this culture needs to percolate down to every echelon of tutorship. In India, there is additional scarcity as we lack good teachers. We have not traditionally seen teaching as a premium job with financial remuneration but seen it as a calling. In the ideal world, the teachers need to be those selfless martyrs who give their time and lives to make it a better world. But the fact is that it is also a profession– the teachers also have bills to pay. There is a critical need to attract the best to the institutions and not comprise with the chaff who have faced rejections in most other lucrative avocations. The best minds will kindle the best minds as the competence begets the competence.

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The other area to focus for the institutions is the constant debate on methods of pedagogy. Every institution today has access to the best of material, money can fetch the right brick and mortar to build the hallways and the campuses. But, to foster the true culture of learning, it is different ball game. It takes culture, values, mission and the outlook to the nation building and wealth creation.

Focus on the individual

The most challenging task of all lies with the individual. There is a lot happening. Gone are the days of one job through your career. An average employee of the previously generation, who recently retired at sixty( especially in the Indian context ), has on an average changed less than two jobs or simply put, most have never changed a job in their career. Their careers took the twists and turn as dictated by that respective organisation. This is changing. A recent research says that the youngsters, who started their careers post-2006, are likely to change eleven jobs by the time they retire at sixty! That is a whopping number, you may think. But

the numbers for the western world are more bizarre– with countries having average job changes at 24! Which mean on an average many employees work in one organisation for less than eighteen months? So while technology is more like a life skill now and not a functional skill, you also need to build the right attitude. An attitude about yourself, the watch on the horizon, a lot more mulling on your individual career is the need of the hour. There is a host of things you need to focus on  Ability to think  Ability to learn  Ability to unlearn  Ability to be open to discuss change  And the ability to do things quickly The professional of tomorrow cannot navigate with just the front mirror and the rear mirror but needs to have the instinct to look at every road sign, changing weather patterns, fading landscape and imbibe every tessellation of what is around them. For the future is just around the blind corner 


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COVERSTORY

AN INIMITABLE WITH GOLDEN Running a business is generally considered just to deliver results and acquire more financial wealth. However, there are some humanitarian entrepreneurs like Sunil and Sudhish, who goes an extra mile and aspire to make this world a better place by their genuine efforts and workmanship.Openinguptheirveryhonestperspectives to Unique Times, are the Goodwin brothers, who undoubtedly have hearts of gold. At the very auspicious occasion of their Silver Jubilee celebrations, below are excerpts of a very enlightening talk with this noble team and a look into their much extensive charitable activities.

The Expedition.

How does it look like setting up some supreme values into an age-old traditional business and leave something meaningful for generations to follow you. To deliver unmatched values along with the products you sell and to do it consistently is something awe-inspiring. And that is exactly what these two amazing brothers – Mr. Sunil Kumar and Mr. Sudhish Kumar has endeavoured on. Some dreams changes a person’s life forever. And the name “Goodwin” kick-started everything years ago. Goodwin Group has created ripples of successful trend in the Gold industry, adding values like nothing we have heard before. They think and work more on a societal perspective, than on economic motives. Challenges had been a catalyst so far. It was in 90s, Goodwin group, an ISO 9001-2008 certified company, started its victorious stride, starting from the cultural capital of Kerala. The very place, Thrissur, which has contributed

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ENTREPRENEUR STANDARDS!

some of the world's most popular and immensely successful entrepreneurs from the state. The group is spread across different segments now - Jewellery wholesale, retail and manufacturing, Bombay Chains, Realty Developers, Security Systems and Goodwin Charitable Trust. Charitable Trust has become a strength and pillar to many in destitute, which inturn provides peace to the brothers. Group’s corporate office in Thrissur. The managing board is headed by Sri. Mohananan Akkarakaran, Chairman of Goodwin Group of Companies; Sri. Sunil Kumar Mohanan, Director and Sri. Sudhish Kumar Mohanan, Director.

Journey so far.

The directors believe that the foremost income a business acquires are the blessings of its customers. There was always a fascination for Gold�, says the elder brother Sunil. The motivation to enter the field of Gold making and retail, comes from

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Goodwin considers their staff their own family and vouches to believe them blindly. The group now has more than 800 employees who work harmoniously with the vision and objective and on achieving the company’s annual goals. Goodwin understands the need of continuous training for its employee base, and hence provides regular trainings on soft skills refinement and productivity. Employees are our first customers.

relatives who was in the same field for ages. The name, Goodwin, itself reflects the brothers’ ultimate purpose of life, to help and sustain others through their efforts. Their motto itself aligns to this, “Heart knows the value of relationships”. Goodwin had 2 manufacturing units in Coimbatore initially, and used to sell gold in wholesale to areas like Bombay. The group then spread its wings and started its operations to Dombivili in 1996, when Sunil moved to Bombay and settled there. Sunil, with a much grateful heart, remembers his Guru, Mr. V G Nair, who helped them in many ways paving the foundation of this manifested empire. He was essentially instrumental in helping Goodwin develop in the initial stages, financially and with public relations. Goodwin used to be pro-active in making relationships with all regional samajams and associations around, which was contributory to make the brand reputed. Like any other established businesses, it took a lot of efforts and sacrifices to brand this name as it is now known. Both brothers stood hand in hand in cementing it to success. When they

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had 23 carat concept in Bombay, it was Goodwin who brought the concept and launched 916 gold ornaments in the district of Thane. In 2005, January 21, Goodwin started this fabulous saga with their first retail showroom.It was a gradual and evident growth from a single showroom to 11 in Mumbai, Pune, Kerala and now Kuwait. The 12th branch is now being opened in Vashi in another 2 months. Both the brothers, they say, worked together with one heart to bring this brand to this level now. It makes you think deeply when Sunil tells you about something that lacks in Gold – He says, women love to adorn ornaments. Gold is indisputably an unavoidable part of those embellishments. However, unlike a rose flower, gold doesn’t emanate fragrance. Goodwin, through its impeccable service and loving staff, tries to rectify that lack in their product and fills their customer’s hearts with the real scent of gold - with Goodwin’s distinctive trustworthiness. A unique fragrance from a unique entity.

The Goodwin family.

Goodwin considers their staff their own family and vouches to believe them blindly. The group now has more than 800 employees who work harmoniously with the vision and objective and on achieving the company’s annual goals. Goodwin understands the need of continuous training for its employee base, and hence provides regular trainings on soft skills refinement and productivity. Employees are our first customers. As a part of keeping the employee lot happy, the management has derived a

Staff welfare fund too. Goodwin always keeps in mind the delight of their employees and retain them to their job satisfaction. A Parents’ meet happens twice a year for the Goodwin family. Goodwin stands strong with 125000 clients in North India. They believe that business is a by-product of maintaining genuine relationships with the customers. “We look at customers as God himself.” As part of their expansion plans, Goodwin group resolves to open up 25 new branches spreading across Maharashtra by 2020. Company runs effective Customer Care Centres now which focuses on particular areas of Maharashtra, and then expands their public relations around the centres. Mr. Sudheesh takes no chance in listening to advices, he takes it from anyone despite age, if it sounds sensible and practical. “Choose your product with much forethought; do enough market research before you launch your product; make sure your product has adequate space to get sold. Each customer would be looking for different service factors in your product. Have the wisdom to understand and provide that. Quality, Affordability and impeccable Service should be your dictum”. Goodwin today sponsors Hindustan Time’s Most stylish Awards.

Their take on the challenges and struggles faced through the journey.

Mr. Sunil Kumar retrospects those very struggling times when they planned to start retail outlets in Bombay. He says it still is challenging to get even an entry when we chose to open stores in


some particular areas. They did not hesitate to work along elders and take their advice. Problems and challenges are sent by God only to strengthen us and improve thus. Only the braveheart can withstand. Mr. Sudhish Kumar considers all challenges and hurdles as a tonic or a medicine that catalyses you to the next level of endeavour. In his life, both brothers together have faced many and overcome those valiantly. He reckons, that is how they have reached this summit bravely in this short span of life. We shouldn’t say that there is no struggle after you have made it to a higher level in life. Every businessman goes through one or the other hassles in every stage of his entrepreneurial life. We learn to manage them better. No businessman has an absolutely smooth life. The management feels proud about their management style to “minimise the big issues and eliminate the small issues” with tactical approach to issues. The point is not to repeat a mistake once learnt, the elder brother Sunil says.

Diversification of Services.

This now very dependable group started with Gold jewellery manufacturing two decades ago and now have diversified into security systems & CCTV surveillance, with some clients like the very reputed Guruvayur temple, Sabarimala and Federal Bank, some credible names to mention. The diversification and growth was solid and accelerating

You can even switch on and switch off your car with your mobile even when you are away from the vehicle, through the innovative techniques Goodwin brings you. The advanced security systems claims Japanese and German technology and are imported from HongKong, Taiwan, China, Korea etc. These ultra-modern systems titles a year’s replacement warranty. Goodwin’s products are economical and userfriendly. “Innovation and progress is the key element in the growth phase of Goodwin group”, Mr. A.M. Sudheesh Kumar, the director, reiterates. Goodwin developers has construction sites across South India. Two new projects are in the making at Thrissur near Palace Road and Sakthan Stand. “There will always be setbacks and challenges in business. Expect the unexpected, go forward only after finding solutions to overcome those hitches” – reflecting these profound thoughts is one of the Directors of Goodwin Group, Mr. A.M. Sudheesh.

About the inimitable bond the brothers share with each other.

We share the same volume of responsibilities. Our father used to do business the same line of business in a small scale. It was me and my brother raised the empire to this heights. We had put in equal efforts and have stood strong

together. We do not know what tomorrow has in store for us. However, as long as we keep the values and honesty within us, we will stay together like 2 strong pillars that holds the empire we have raised. We haven’t had much change in the depth of the relationship we share right from our childhood. Eventhough we find in ourselves some imperfections that we are humans, we also have moulded ourselves with the positives, transformations and improvements as we matured with time. Everytime a new showroom is being open, both brothers constantly watch and monitor it for 3 to 6 months until they bring it on track and the managers can run it without much emergencies. The new Vashi branch is a vast 10000 sq ft international showroom, which has a separate VIP lounge, feeding room, refreshment area and are proposing to bring in all sophisticated features India might be pleasantly new to.

Who is your rolemodel or inspiration?

You cannot talk about one particular individual or role model, who inspired you to success. On a personal front, experiences itself is a role model. Many stalwarts we find ‘successful’ today have toiled their way through difficulties and rejections. Those gigantic trees that you see out there in the woods did not had someone watering and caring for it everyday. Similarly,

India is growing to be one of the No.1 again economically and industrially. With the changing times, threats to life and assets is also increasing. Thefts have become unpredictably unconventional and hi-tech. It is inevitable that people mount hi-tech devices at homes and offices inorder to assure their own security. Goodwin security systems has state-of-the-art security schemes including ones for vehicles. Goodwin determines to make this people-friendly and more accessible to the common lot.

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Goodwin Charitable Trust is an unmatched name in the field of philanthropy. 25 percent of the profit goes for charity purposes. The altruistic team behind the trust believes in providing unconditional support to the needy, whether it be education, home, money or medicine. our efforts one day and take us to the heights we aspire for.

business takes its own hard path to make way for its success through the good values, deeds and ethics it propagates.

Vision of the company.

With the new jewellery’s inauguration in Vashi, we will be reaching a family base of 150000 in numbers. Currently we are a 340 crore company. So far we have not taken any private equities and confined to raise funds from within only. We propose to take the company to a 1000 crore in 2020 and a 2000 crore in 2022. Goodwin sees themselves as a Limited Company in a short span of time and would be floating IPO. Our strength currently is the 650 staff force that steers clear the company ahead to victory. All employees are given ample freedom to work forward for the betterment of themselves and the company. Also the loyal fleet of customers are our family members.

Philanthropy, humanity and more.

Sudhish staunchly believes that they are all workers under the Managing Director, Lord God. He believes that if we do adequate hardwork, God will duly consider

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Goodwin Charitable Trust is an unmatched name in the field of philanthropy. 25 percent of the profit goes for charity purposes. The altruistic team behind the trust believes in providing unconditional support to the needy, whether it be education, home, money or medicine. All of the employees at Goodwin donates blood, which is a highly commendable deed in a very destitute world. A doctors card is provided to all those who donate blood, to assure security and transparency. Goodwin is also active campaigners for organ donation, application forms are available in all of their outlets. Their organ donation has a membership of over 84700 now. Their charity wing supports 14 plus needy orphanages and many old age homes, apart from the hundreds of unsung humanity they spread. Brothers go really excited when he tells us that there is a situation today that when a person dies, he can give life to 8 other people through organ donation. Goodwin helps on internal and external organ transplants. He happily remembers driving down at 2 am to donate cornea to a man. They run 35 offices and a tollfree number for this noble cause.

Values and Bonding.

Both Goodwin brothers strongly talks about how respecting your parents can bring more prosperity to your business. It’s their parents who light the lamp at every inauguration. Both brothers believe that no one will genuinely desire for your success than your own parents. On a question, who would he choose first – loved ones or business, Sudhish wisely answers as to one cannot survive without the securities of the other. We need

to strike a balance between both. Prioritise and give time to both so that both will yield the desired results for you. ‘It’s a choice to believe those who stand with you and to wilfully ignore those whom you can’t trust’, says Sudhish. Goodwin group strives to hold on to ethics and values, even when they have quite a fast ride on the road to success. It’s a group strengthened with youth and energy. These two decades, Goodwin has proved their sustenance in the market and proclaims that they are here to stay for more. Visions and goals are clear to everyone who is behind this. One thing they don’t compromise is on Quality. Decisions are taken with minimal time with confidence and prudence.

Advice for the start-ups and upcoming generations.

Sunil and Sudhish talks ardently about how grounded values can take you to higher destinations in life. We are a generation with goodness of both the worlds – the orthodox and the modern. He fondly remembers when he used to wait weeks for a letter from his father. Patience is an inevitable trait everyone should learn, which the coming generation is deprived of. Successful people from previous generations did not have an MBA to achieve the Himalayas they have achieved. To learn driving or swimming, it’s more of practical learning you need to be focused on. Give much of hardwork to grow your dream, eventually what you aim for will happen. You need to mould your employees’ families and children too with ethics, while you grow your business. No doubt, an honest heart of gold can boost you to achieve summits of even more higher success 


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MANAPPURAM

MISS QUEEN OF INDIA 2017 AKANKSHA WINS THE TITLE

A

s the colourful event has reached its conclusion session, every member in the audience with an anxious mind has impatiently waited to hear the final result. When the result has been finally announced, there have been no marks of surprise on the face of the audience, but there has been a relief indicat-

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ing that the deserving person gets the title. A charming girl hailing from the state of Uttar Pradesh has slowly marched forward with a smiling face, amidst the pleasant sound raised from the audience’s clap, to accept the great felicitation. Ms. Akanksha Mishra one of the sixteen beauties, who have


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participated in the seventh edition of the Manappuram Miss Queen of India 2017, has been crowned the grand title by the previous year’s winner, Ms. Ankita Kharat. While speaking to this media’s representatives after winning the title, Ms Akansksha said; “I, take this beautiful moment, on behalf of every girl who is given a chance to live her dream, to acknowledge the effort of Pegasus & Manappuram Finance Limited for believing in us and helping us thoroughly with incredible support.” She recounted the incredible grooming session that she had gone through and the support she had gotten from the organisers. She acknowledged that after the grooming session, she had sensed some difference in the way she talks, thinks, looks and even believes. She showed no reluctance to admit that she would hold on these experiences to all through her living years. She thanked Ajit and Jebitha, the backbone of the event, for their support and care and for gifting an extraordinary life experience. With an overwhelming heart, she further expressed her gratitude to each and every member of the Pegasus family such as groomers, trainers, choreographers and makeup artists. Anu Tressa (Kottayam), Reshma R K Nambiar (Kozhikode), Nidhi Sharma (Arunachal),Nishitha Shrinath (Karnataka), Akanksha Mishra (Uttar Pradesh), Rachita

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Production conglomerate, has stood out from the normal beauty contest perspective with their peculiar way of presentation and their adorable policies such as the exclusion of bikini round. It is an interesting factor to note that the event has been primarily supported by the Manappuram Finance Limited, a renowned finance conglomerate based in Kerala.

Ankithakharat Joshi (Himachal Pradesh), Riya Sadhwani (Uttar Pradesh), Sanya Manocha (New Delhi), Shabnam Ali (Karnataka), Shailja Sharma (Haryana), Sonal Mudgal (New Delhi), Sunaina Allamraju (Andhra Pradesh), Supreet Rupam (Himachal Pradesh), Sushmita M (Karnataka), Varna Sampath (Karnataka) and Zoya Mirza (Madhya Pradesh) have been the prime contestants of the beauty contest. The beauty contest, directed by Ajit Ravi, the founder and chairman of the Pegasus Event

In the prestigious event, Ms. Reshma R K Nambiar, Calicut, and Ms. Varna Sampath, Karnataka, have been awarded the first and second runner-up positions respectively. Both of them have been crowned by V P Nandakumar, the Managing Director and Chief Executive Officer of the Manappuram Finance Limited. The beauty contest, which has taken place at the Raviz Resort and Spa, Kollam, has been divided into three rounds: the designer saree, black cocktail and red gown rounds. Each contestant has given their best in all three rounds, making it difficult for the judging panel to decide who should be crowned as the ultimate

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winner. The difficult task of judging a beauty contest in which each and every contestant is one or the other way better than the other is effortlessly done by the event’s special team of judges constituting of Uma Riyas Khan, a dancer as well as actress, Rajeev Pillai, a model as well as actor, Niyati joshi, a model as well as actress, Ankita Kharat, the Miss Queen of India 2016 and Miss Asia Second Runner Up, and Kuriachan, the rotary governor. Apart from the title winner, the judges have also selected thirteen sub-title winners and four regional title winners: the Miss Queen North, Miss Queen West, Miss Queen East, Miss Queen South, Miss Beautiful Hair, Miss Beautiful Smile, Miss Beautiful Skin, Miss Beautiful Face, Miss Beautiful Eyes, Miss Congeniality, Miss Personality, Miss Catwalk, Miss Perfect Ten, Miss Talent, Miss Photogenic,

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UmaRiyaskhan

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Miss Viewer’s Choice and the Miss Social Media. Akanksha Mishra and Zoya Mirza hold the Miss Queen North and Miss Queen West titles respectively, while Nidhi Sharma and Reshma R K Nambiar get the Miss Queen East and Miss Queen South respectively. Meanwhile, Nidhi Sharma(Arunachal Pradesh), Akanksha Mishra (Uttar Pradesh), Shailja Sharma(Haryana), Riya Sadhwani (Uttar Pradesh), Anu Tressa (Kottayam), Reshma R K Nambiar(Kozhikode), Rachita Joshi (Himachal Pradesh), Nishitha Shrinath (Karnataka), Sunaina Allamraju (Andhra Pradesh)has grabbed the Miss Beautiful Smile, Miss Beautiful Skin, Miss Beautiful Face, Miss Beautiful Eyes, Miss Congeniality, Miss Catwalk, Miss Perfect Ten, Miss Photogenic and Miss Viewer’s Choice titles respectively.

RajeevPillai

It is a noteworthy fact that Varna Sampath (Karnataka) and Supreet Rupam (Himachal Pradesh) has been gifted with two sub-titles. When Ms Varna Sampath has been selected as the Miss Beautiful Hair and Miss Talent, Supreet Rupam (Himachal Pradesh) has become the Miss Personality and Miss Social Media simultaneously. It is learned that the title winner has been felicitated with a gift amount of Rs.1 lakh rupees and a work contract of Rs.50, 000 rupees, while the first runner up and second runner up has been gifted with a reasonable amount of Rs. 60, 000 rupees and Rs. 40, 000 rupees respectively. When the Manappuram Finance has contributed the money awarded to the winners, the goldplated crowns gifted to the winners have been given by the Parakkat

NiyatiJoshi


Jewellers. While speaking to the media personnels, event director Ajit said; “a certain portion of the profit gained from this program is used to run the ‘100 Life Challenge programme’ which is being carried out with the support of Rotary International 3211 and Padmavathy Medical Foundation.” When asked about the organiser’s decision to exclude the controversial bikini round, he asserts that the bikini round in which the physical beauty dominates over other aspects of beauty has been strictly excluded from the contest. It is said that this contest is the only gateway towards the Miss Asia contest organised by the same event production conglomerate. Around a week before the commencement of the program, the organisers started a grooming session in order to train the contestants.

Kuriyachan

The session held at PJ Princess Regency, Cochin. An expert panel of fashion choreographers and trainers– Arun Ratna (International Fashion Choreographer), Aileena Catherine Amon (Miss South India 2015), Sudhakshina Thampi (Yoga Trainer), Vipin Xavier (Fitness Trainer, Fitness 4 ever), Jithesh and Preeti Damiyan (Personality Development Trainers), Sanjay and Sunman Gowda (Nirthya Fashion Entertainment, New Delhi), Dr .Eldho Koshy (Dentist) – has trained the contestants. The event is primarily supported by Unique Times, Z-Stone Smartphones, D-Que Watches, Kanyaka, Kalpana International, NFE, Sakunthala herbal hair tone, Rotary International 3211, Padmavathy Medical Foundation, Chungath Jewellery, Parakkat Resorts, PJ Princess Regency Kochi, Vee Kay Vee’s, UT TV channel, Shafeenaz, Aiswaria advertising 

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The CGST bill that was passed in the Lok Sabha on 29 March 2017 specifically provided that ‘an agriculturist, to the extent of supply of produce out of cultivation of land, shall not be liable to register under the GST’. Adv Sherry Samuel Oommen is a practising lawyer at High Court of Kerala who specialises in tax and Corporate Laws. Presently he heads the tax and corporate law practice of Nash Capital Partners. Apart from being a qualified lawyer, he is also a chartered accountant, cost accountant and a company secretary. He is currently pursuing his Doctorate Degree and is reachable at sherryoommen@nashcp.com.

GST on agriculture

a need for closer relook

I

ndia has traditionally been an agrarian economy and even today over substantial number of the rural households depend on agriculture as their principal means of livelihood. Given the magnitude of people involved in agriculture, any economic policy or act that affects the ‘agricultural Sector’ has to factor in the larger socio economic impact, apart from the monetary impact that the policy or Act may have. Traditionally, any kind of tax on agriculture is usually discouraged in India. The Goods and Services Tax ‘GST’ did certainly take this mass sentiment into account while framing the broad parameters of the GST law. The CGST bill that was passed in the Lok Sabha on 29 March 2017 specifically provided that ‘an agriculturist, to the extent of supply of produce out of cultivation of land, shall not be liable to register under the GST’. Hence, the ques-

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tion arises, who is an ‘agriculturist’. The Bill defines the term ‘agriculturist’ to mean ‘an individual or a Hindu Undivided Family who undertakes cultivation of land (a) by own labour; or (b) by the labour of his family; or (c) by servants on wages payable in cash or kind or by hired labour under personal supervision or the personal supervision of any member of the family’. Given the alterations to the definition of agriculturist from the draft GST law introduced in June 2016 to revised model law issued in public domain in November 2016 and from there on under the draft CGST bill passed in Lok Sabha on 29 March 2017, it appears that the GST council invested substantial time to redrafted this definition several times to ensure that only specific categories of ‘persons’ covered under the scope of ‘agriculturist’. For instance, the earlier draft of the model GST law defined the term ‘agriculturist’ to


mean ‘any person’, which has now been restricted to ‘an individual or an HUF’. Based on the current draft of the GST Law, it appears that only those agricultural activities meant for ‘Raising of Crops’ could be considered as an activity of ‘Cultivation of Land’ and all those individuals and HUF involved in activities like “sericulture”or “poultry cultivation” and like may not be considered as Agriculturist. Although the literal interpretation of ‘Cultivation of Land’ appears to be extremely narrow as compared to agriculture, this may not be the real intention of the government. It would be rather prudent to define ‘Cultivation of Land’ and settle this matter once and for all.

Additionally, on a review of the definition above, it appears that wherein if any person who employed a servant for agriculture and remuneration for such labour were to be paid in kind (Crop Share), then such person would be considered as agriculturist. This is indeed a welcome measure as the earlier draft did not cover such sharing mechanism.

act shall apply to such recipient as if he is the person liable for paying the tax in relation to the supply of such goods or services or both.’ This section clearly states that any registered person who purchases goods or services from a person

Would agriculture be indirectly taxed?

Section 9(4) of CGST bill, 2017 states: ‘the central tax in respect of the supply of taxable goods or services or both by a supplier, who is not registered, to a registered person shall be paid by such person on reverse charge basis as the recipient and all the provisions of this

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The government may want to reconsider section 9(4) to protect the interest of the ‘agriculturist’.

‘who is not registered’ (in our case agriculturist –who is non-taxable) will have to deposit tax on reverse charge basis.On an economic rationale, the whole benefit of being an ‘agriculturist’ will be negated if registered persons have to eventually pay tax on a reverse charge basis on purchases made from the agriculturist. Thus, unintentionally, the government might be demotivating registered persons from buying produce from an unregistered agriculturist. The government may want to reconsider section 9(4) to

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protect the interest of the ‘agriculturist’.

Concluding Remarks

With the changing economic scenario, the agricultural sector has also been evolving. Farmers are using high-tech machineries and technologies in the agriculture, and getting more and more organized day by day. On a cautionary thought, by limiting the scope of the agriculturist only to the individual and HUF, the government could demotivate the process of the agricultural sector getting more organized.

Further, it is to be noted thatthe finance minister of India, in his address during the debate on GST bills in Lok Sabha, gave a verbal assurance of exempting the agriculture sector including the dairy and poultry industry from the GST. While expressing provisions in the final GST law in this regard could have helped in assuring the nation, one would need to wait for the exemption list to understand exemption on the agriculture sector and related sectors such as the sericulture, poultry, dairy, etc. would fall under GST regime 


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The Most Heavenly Destination

P

J Princess Regency is a green conscious hotel that has heralded a new standard of environmental responsibility in the hospitality industry and is a pretty surprise tucked away in a secret nook of Puthuvype in Vypeen.The property pops up at the end of a road, which is 100 meters off the main road. The white Indo - European style building sits on a lush five acres, surrounded by coconut palms and the backwaters. A perfect fit for the ‘Gods Own Country’ tag line. A statue of a cheery blue cavorting dolphin, the mascot, welcomes us to the property.

Built by entrepreneur ‘Prakash James’, the resort is a dream come true for him. ‘’The dream was to build a five star property, I want to provide the basic facilities but I had to open it as a three-star rating”, he says. But now, it has been reclassified as Four Star. An island of calm, it looks like the perfect getaway from the city, without really going away. The rooms spell luxury and comfort, the view is resplendenttake in the sunrise or the sunset or watches the moon rise, its reflection skimming the water’s surface’’. Luxury Suites, Premium, Deluxe and Executive rooms are the options you can choose from. The categories and the levels of the lure

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element may differ, but the same attention has been given to each room. There is a room for the physically challenged, with all requirements met. Interestingly, the art on the walls represent aspects of the Kochi of yore, painted versions of old photographs. The proximity to the beach would make it more attractive for the lovers of the sea. The view from each of the rooms, especially the premium ones, is breathtaking. At nights you can see light from the lighthouse play peekaboo. A mangrove by the backwaters near the resort forms a cover over the canal; unfortunately it is not in a state to be used for boating or any kind of tourism related activity. The Puthuvype beach is close by as is the lighthouse. Cherai beach is only 15 kilometers away. A curio shop offers memorabilia and sports gear such a swimsuits and such. The property also boasts an Ayurvedic & Aromatic spa, a health club, and of course a swimming pool. There is a larger pond for peddle boats. The resources, like the backwaters, have been utilized well. Not just as a weekend getaway, it is ideal for conferences,

get-togethers, workshops, parties and weddings too - these can be accommodated in a boardroom (Leo), a mini hall (Aswathi) which can fit in 75-100 and a larger hall (Abin), which can fit in around 450-500 plus a wide spacious lawn for 800-1200 people, a 24 hours Coffee Shop and a multi cuisine restaurant. There are a couple of lounges which can also double up as play area and even a boardroom. Each of these bears the names of Prakash’s family members. The restaurant offers a bouquet of cuisines - the star is seafood. ‘’We have access to fresh seafood and we offer the best of the catch. In the expert hands of our chefs, we assure you the best will be put on the table,’’ says Andrew Noronha, Deputy General Manager. ‘’There are a number of activities for our guests-indoor and outdoor games, canoeing, pedal boating, bird watching and angling. There is a special play area for kids also,’’ he adds. Tours can be arranged to nearby places of interest as well, Andrew says 


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Dr Bimal John MS, Diploma in Advanced EndoscopicSurgery(France), Diploma in Minimally Invasive Surgery (Germany), FMAS. Currently, the Director of MinimallyInvasiveGynecology and Program Director for IVF andAssistedReproductionat Credence Hospital, Trivandrum, Kerala. He is an invited faculty at the American Association of Gynecological Laparoscopic Surgeons and the only Indian reviewer for their scientific publication, The Journal of Minimally Invasive Gynecology. He can be reached at bmj@ credencehospital.com

“In my experience of operating on over two thousand cases of advanced endometriosis, good outcome, whether it is pain relief or achieving pregnancy, is possible with surgical treatment. Therefore, ensure that you choose an experienced and expert surgeon for your primary surgery.”

Killer cramps?

Could you be suffering from Endometriosis? A disease every woman should know about

“I dread every period.” “I wish endometriosis was taken more seriously.”“Getting the correct diagnosis is a battle in itself.”These are some actual statements from women who suffer from endometriosis. It is a near-invisible and rarely discussed condition, and even when it is, it is usually mired by myths, often directing the blame to the women themselves. Endometriosis is termed as a secret plague and a silent killer, and affects over 176 million women worldwide. That is, one in 10 women in the reproductive age group. Look around

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your neighborhood or your office. Statistically speaking, at least one of the women around you has this disease. No wonder then, that the annual estimated cost burden associated with endometriosis, worldwide, is a staggering Rs.7,35,598 crores. Yet, strangely, it is poorly understood and it has no permanent cure.

What is endometriosis?

Endometriosis occurs when the tissue that lines the inside of the uterus (endometrium) is found outside of the uterus. Although these cells can grow anywhere inside the body, it is most commonly found around the ovaries,

outside the uterus, abdominal organs, and rarely, even in the lungs and brain. Just as the uterine lining is shed, resulting in the monthly period, this tissue in abnormal sites also bleeds like a mini period, causing inflammation and scar tissue formation. As the disease progresses, it causes a wide range of symptoms. The most obvious is severe abdominal pain, especially during periods. Unfortunately, such pain is often dismissed as normal or ignored. Other symptoms include irregular bleeding, tiredness and easy fatigability, pain during sexual intercourse, pain during passing urine or motion, and inability to conceive.


How can endometriosis be diagnosed?

Endometriosis is hard to diagnose. 68% of women with endometriosis were initially misdiagnosed with another condition. And 27 years is the average age when women are finally diagnosed with endometriosis, whereas 40% of adolescents with chronic pelvic pain were found to have endometriosis. Likewise, it is estimated that on an average, it takes around eight years before a woman is diagnosed to have endometriosis. While physical examination, ultrasound scan, or even an MRI may help in certain cases, the only definitive way to know is via laparoscopy, and that too by a specialist who knows what to look for. Don’t waste your time

with doctors who don’t know about endometriosis, find a specialist right away!

surgery, around 40-50% women with mild or moderate endometriosis conceive within one year.

Infertility and Pregnancy chances

Treatment options

Having endometriosis does not mean you are infertile, although around 40% of women with endometriosis may not be able to have children, whereas 40-50% women with endometriosis do get pregnant, either naturally or with assisted reproductive technology. Compared to a 15-20% monthly fertility rate in normal couples, patients with mild endometriosis conceive on their own at a rate of 2%-4.5% per month and those with moderate and severe endometriosis have monthly pregnancy rates lower than 2%. With laparoscopic

Endometriosis is a condition that affects every woman differently. So there is no treatment that will work similarly for every woman. Likewise, treatment is dependent on the severity of your pain and symptoms, as well as desire to achieve pregnancy. You should discuss your full range of symptoms with your doctor, so that he or she can suggest all treatment options. The three main treatment modalities for endometriosis include surgery, hormonal therapy and pain management. If you are undergoing surgery, laparoscopic excision is

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Surgery is very effective when done by an expert. However, recurrence rates are high when the severity of the disease is also high, and even hysterectomy along with removal of both ovaries may not ensure complete cure. the best treatment, and therefore you need to go to an expert who has sufficient experience in treating the disease. This is important as the surgery is tailored for you, on the basis of your disease grade, need to preserve fertility, and symptoms. Surgery is very effective when done by an expert. However, recurrence rates are high when the severity of the disease is also high, and even hysterectomy along with removal of both ovaries may not ensure complete cure. Endometriosis is an estrogen dependent disease. Therefore, medications that slow down or stop the production of estrogen, such as oral contraceptive pills, progestins, GnRH-analogues, Mirena Intrauterine device, etc., are frequently used to stop the progress of the disease or for symptom relief. Painkillers and other medications may turn out to be less effective over time. A specialized pain clinic or psychologist may be able to help you better.

Coping with Endometriosis

Coping with endometriosis requires a lot of will-power and emotional support besides expert medical care. Pain can become part of everyday life for women suffering from endometriosis. A healthy diet, and avoiding alcohol and caffeine can prevent symptom aggravation. Applying a heated pad or even a hot water bottle or bag over your lower belly may relieve some of the pain and cramps. While it can be a challenge to exercise due to the pain and lack of energy, endometriosis can get worse without it. Regular, moderate exercise such as walking, swimming, yoga, etc., definitely seem to help a lot of women suffering from endo. And so does plenty of TLC 

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Painful periods? When should you see the doctor?

 Onset of painful periods after age 25 years, with previously normal menstrual cycles  Inability to attend school or work due to the pain  Pain during menses as well as at times other than menses  Poor relief of pain despite pain killer or oral contraceptive medications  Pain during sexual intercourse  Pain/bleeding during passing urine or motion  Inability to get pregnant despite regular unprotected sex


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GADGETS

Nokia 5

MRP: `13,390 (approximately)

       

Android v7.1 (Nougat) 13 MP Primary Camera 8 MP Secondary Camera 5.2 inches Display 2 GB RAM 16 GB Internal Memory 128 GB External Memory 1.4 GHz Octa Core Processor

Lenovo K6 Power (16 GB)

MRP: `7, 999 (approximately)

       

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Android v6.0.1 (Marshmallow) 13 MP Primary Camera 8 MP Secondary Camera 5.0 inches Display 2 GB RAM 16 GB Internal Memory 128 GB External Memory 1.4 GHz Octa Core Processor

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Xiaomi Mi Mix

MRP: `34, 990 (approximately)

       

Android v6.0 (Marshmallow) 16 MP Primary Camera 5 MP Secondary Camera 6.4 inches Display 4 GB RAM 128 GB Internal Memory No External Memory 2.35 GHz Quad Core Processor

Lenovo Zuk Edge

MRP: `22, 990 (approximately)

       

Android v7.0 13 MP Primary Camera 8 MP Secondary Camera 5.5 inches Display 6 GB RAM 64 GB Internal Memory No External Memory 2.35 GHz Quad Core Processor

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COOKERY

Toshma Biju

OATS WITH CHEESE SOUP

Ingredients

• • • • • • •

Oats........................................ 1/4 cup Milk........................................ 1/2 cup Chopped onions......................3 tb spn Salt..........................................to taste Pepper powder.........................1/4 tsp Vegetable oil...........................1 1/2 tsp Grated cheese.........................2 tb spn

Method Heat oil in a pan, add onion saute until onion turns brown. Cook oats with water stirring continuosly until it thickens.Add milk and bring it to boil. Remove from heat, add onion, salt and pepper powder. Serve hot.

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MUSHROOM SOUP

Ingredients

• • • • • • • •

Button mushrooms(chopped)..............................1 1/2 cup Finely chopped onion.........................................................1 Cornflour............................................................... 2 tab spn Butter.................................................................... 2 tab spn Milk........................................................................... 3 cups Salt........................................................................... to taste Pepper powder..............................................................1 tsp Grated cheese........................................................ 3 tab spn

Method Heat butter in a pan and add onions. When onions turn brown, add mushroom. Saute for two minutes. Add cornflour mixed with milk. When the soup starts thickening add salt and pepper and remove from heat. Garnish with grated cheese.

VEGETABLE SOUP Ingredients

• • • • • • • • •

Carrot(grated)....................................................2 Chopped onions..................................................1 Chopped tomatoes..............................................2 Celery..................................... 1/2 cup (chopped) Milk ......................................................1 1/4 cup Olive oil.............................................. 2 1/4 tb sp Pepper powder............................................. 1 t sp Salt........................................................... to taste Water.....................................................6 1/4 cup

Method Heat olive oil in a pan. Add onions, carrots, celery and continue sautering for 10 minutes. Add tomatoes, salt and pepper.cover it and cook until tender. Add water and bring it to a slow boil. Reduce the heat and simmer the soup for 30 minutes. Remove the soup from heat. Heat the milk and add milk to the soup stirring continuosly.

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CREAM OF TOMATO SOUP

Ingredients

• • • • • • • • •

Tomato............................................................................... 4 Buter.........................................................................2 tb sp Maida..................................................................... 2 tb spn Milk............................................................................ 1 cup Water....................................................................... 1/2 cup Onion...............................................................1 (chopped) Carrot...............................................................2 (chopped) Pepper powder.......................................................... 1/4 tsp Salt...........................................................................to taste

Method Clean and cut tomatoes. Cover vegetables with water. Add pepper powder and cook on slow heat till the vegetables are tender. Make white sauce with flour , milk and put tomato puree to the white sauce and cook.

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BEAUTY

Makeup tips T

here is a party that you like to attend. Or a family function. Or you are getting felicitated yourself. You like to look nice and radiant in this party. A lot of people see the process of applying makeup as something that takes time and they tend to overdo it. You don't want to look a grunge in that sense. There is intensity in simplicity as well. So, here are some makeup tips that you need to keep in mind.

Lipstick and nail polish should be the same colour

If you are wearing pink lipstick then apply pink nail polish, red for red, and so on. The appearance will look better and contrasting colour will make the appearance more tangled. Apply the outline of the lipstick which itself should be able to blend in with the lipstick colour and make sure that you apply it as simple as possible for the better blend with your facial beauty. You just need to enhance the colour of your lips not necessarily the lipstick as such. Apply nail polish on the previous day or at least 5-6 hours before going to the party as it will be needing time to settle down and for you to scrap off the extras which spread on the skin. Avoid wearing nail polish while applying other makeup unless you feel that you can handle it from getting damaged.

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Makeup

When you wear plain coloured clothes, don't wear similar coloured makeup. For example pink for the plain pink dress, red for red etc. It is better when the colours contrast in that sense. Wear dark coloured makeup for light coloured clothes and vice versa.

Cream and foundation

When you wear cream and foundation, make sure that apply the same on your neck or else the face "mask" is obvious and will look awkward, especially in photographs. Don't apply too much of foundation after applying the cream. The idea is to help the skin glow but bring it down a notch as skin's natural colour is any day and better and it should go.

Eyes

Eye makeup is the most impor-

tant part. More vibrant your eyes look, less cream you need. Apply outline along the edge of the eyes and brush the eyebrows. Adding glitter and highlighters are optional. Make sure that the highlighter blends with the skin such that you won't be able to point it out at first look. After applying a single line, just brush it along the eyebrows. If you want, you may thread the eyebrows based on how you like it to look like.

Ornaments

As per the current trends, for long earrings, you need not wear


necklaces but wear simple looking ornaments set for salwar kameez with intense designs or gowns. At the same time, design jewellery will look great in plain clothes. Contrast works here well. Make sure that you apply makeup before wearing the attires and ornaments as the makeup needs time to settle. So, have a great time! ď Ź

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Reunion Island, an island located in the Indian Ocean, is one such heaven, a peaceful world.

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he Indian Ocean has many gifted islands. Some of them still have no inhabitants. Some of them are still either owned or controlled by the western powers. The abundance of natural resources and the strategical position of these islands foil any discussion aiming at liberating these islands completely. Till recently, the travel enthusiasts were unaware about the richness of these alluring destinations in the Indian Ocean. Have you ever dreamed of visiting a heaven having beautiful gardens, pleasing streams, mesmerising flowers and many more natural wonders? Reunion Island, an island located in the Indian Ocean, is one such heaven, a peaceful world. This island was discovered during the tenth century. Prior to the seventeenth century, the island was not inhabited by the human beings. It was during that century some people from France, Madagascar and Africa were made to settle there eyeing at some industrial and colonial gains. The

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REUNION ISLAND AN OPEN-AIR MUSEUM IN THE INDIAN OCEAN

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The pretty sea shores filled with white sand, prepossessing natural beauty offered by the grassy lands, fetching streams and mesmerising hill tops, and calm countryside turn this island into a kind of destination which cannot be appropriately described using beautifully crafted worlds alone.

unfortunate fact was that the colonial rulers exploited the people who were made to settle on the island. The preponderance of the people, excluding the French colonial agents, was treated as the slave workers. After several decades-longsuppression, the innocent population was finally liberated in the year 1848 when the slavery was abolished by the authorities. It was believed that there were no indigenous people in this island. Almost all of the first generation inhabitants were either forcefully or purposefully relocated from other regions. Because of these reasons, the island shared

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an acquired or adopted culture and language. Notably, in this region, the slavery did not end with the abolition of this inhuman practice. It continued in the form of bonded labours till the region became a vital department of the French mainland in 1946. During the period of indirect slavery, post the abolition of slavery, several people from South India were brought here. Now, this territory has a population of over eight lakh people. Even though nearly thirty per cent of the people living here are unemployed, this land holds

the highest per capital income rate in the region. The main occupation of this region is agriculture. It is an unfortunate fact that the land has not properly tapped the potential of their tourism sector until now. So, despite the sudden rise in the number of tourists visiting this land, no serious work has been initiated to develop the tourist infrastructure. Nonetheless, the region has gotten into the era of change. The pretty sea shores filled with white sand, prepossessing natural beauty offered by the grassy lands, fetching streams and mesmerising hill tops, and calm countryside turn this island into a kind of destination which cannot be appropriately described using beautifully crafted worlds alone. Le Pinton de La Fournaise, Mafate, Cilaos, Voile de la Mariee, Saint-Paul Market, Aquarium of Reunion Island, Eden Garden, BoucanCanot Beach, Ermitage


Beach, and Saint-Denis are the popular tourist destinations. This region is like an open-air museum. The beauty is not at all confined to the above-mentioned, ten, spots. The nature goddess has showered her blessing in each and every element of this blessed island. It is apparent in each and every element; even a grass of this island has a peculiar, different, beauty. Here, in this island, the visitors are given a peculiar opportunity to get a glimpse of an active volcano. Le Piton de Fournaise is an active volcano located in the Indian Ocean. The visitors are offered a closer view as well as distance view. To get a closer view, they need to hire a helicopter while a small trekking is enough for the latter, a more beautiful view. Those travellers who have ever dreamed of spending a few hours

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The Aquarium of Reunion Island is the popular destination for the travellers, research personals and all those enthusiasts who love to know more about the Indian Ocean and the life inside the sea.

in a kind of region which have no connection to the contemporary world and no sign of modernity, Mafate gives a perfect solution through fulfilling the wildest dream of living in a pre-civilised world by offering such a place where no element of civilisation or modernity have found its place. Actually, this region is one of the three calderas found on this island. Cilaos is another caldera located in the region. But, unlike the above-mentioned caldera, this one is a modernised region. It is well connected to the external world and has beautiful waterfalls, canyons and natural beauty. The region offers numerous opportunities to explore some adventure sports activities like rock climbing. Here, the traveller is given adequate opportunity to

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interact closely with some local settlers in order to get a clear understanding of the culture and art of this region extensively. Voile de la Mariee is one of the places which cannot be excluded from the do-visit list. It is a mesmerising waterfall offering a vivid optical illusion.

tion for the travellers, research personals and all those enthusiasts who love to know more about the Indian Ocean and the life inside the sea. Here, the travellers will get a chance to see nearly five hundred rare species of coral reef, sea animals and fish.

The best place to learn the culture, tradition and culinary of the land is its markets. Saint-Paul Market is one of the open-air markets located in this region. Inside the market, there are nearly three hundred stalls selling fruits, vegetables and local products. Just like the Reunion people, the local vendors are friendly and generous.

The Island also offers a chance to visit one of the world’s most popular botanical gardens, the Eden Garden. Here, the traveller can enjoy the beauty of nearly seven hundred varieties of plants. It is the perfect place to spend some calm and quite hours. The traveller will admire this place because of its calmness and the rejuvenating effect it gives to the soul.

The Aquarium of Reunion Island is the popular destina-

As the writer has mentioned earlier, the Reunion


Island is also famous for its amazing beaches filled with white sand. Ermitage and BoucanCanot are the two popular islands of this region. The travellers can either calmly spend several hours on the beach by simply enjoying the beauty of the waves and shore or creatively spend some productive hours by engaging in some adventure sports activities like snorkelling and surfing. Just like all other tourist locations, though the land has no indigenous inhabitants, this region also has some historical buildings and museums exposing its rich culture and tradition. Most of these buildings are located in the capital city, Saint-Denis. Spend this holiday on this island ď Ź

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AUTO REVIEW

VIVEK VENUGOPAL

C Now, it is the turn of Honda to spruce up the Jazz a bit and comes up with the WR-V.

ross-hatch– a term coined to describe it when car manufacturers take an existing hatchback from their line-up and give it some SUVinspired kit. Toyota has done it with the Etios Cross, Hyundai with the i20 Active, VW with the Cross Polo and Fiat with the Av-ventura or Urban Cross. Now, it is the turn of Honda to spruce up the Jazz a bit and comes up with the WR-V. They may be a bit late to the party, butthey arrived with gifts and champagne bottles in their hands. I am not a fan of the crosshatches, but I have to say that the WR-V is the most thorough job of

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them all. While most others may get away with slapping plastic claddings, roof rails and new wheels on their existing cars, the WR-V gets completely redesigned from front to rear. The vehicle has bigger wheels, raised suspension and much more equipment. The front end looks radically different as that of a Jazz, with its raised bonnet line giving it a two-box look. The headlamps and grill are well integrated with the tall front bumper which houses the second grille and a contrasting scuff plate. The rear gets new L-shaped tail lamps that extend into the boot lid. The side profile is similar to the Jazz, except for the cladding around the wheel arches


Honda WR-V an exceptional cross-hatch and running board. The WR-V looks better with larger 16-inch wheels and bigger tyres. It is very similar to the Jazz except for some new brushed aluminium trim on the dashboard, new gear knob and the addition of a centre armrest. It also gets a segment first sunroof– a feature that many Indians aspire to have. The WR-V also gets cruise control, keyless entry and start or stop button in the diesel variant. Honda says these are not available in the petrol car because it uses a different ECU and wiring harness. The 7-inch touchscreen infotainment system is easy to use and below it is the touch controls for the HVAC- like in all modern Hondas. The seats are the same as in the Jazz but the raised ride height makes them easier to get in and out of. The upward fold-

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ing rear ‘Magic seats’ of the Jazz surprisingly didn’t make it to the WR-V. Boot remains a huge 363 litres and is shaped well. Powering the WR-V are the familiar 1.2 petrol and 1.5 diesel engines mated to a 5-speed and 6-speed manual transmissions respectively. The WR-V was conceived with the diesel engine in mind and the petrol model was only added later owing to the current shift of customers towards petrol engines. The 90bhp, 1.2 petrol engine loves to be revved, but you will need to wring its neck to get anywhere fast. It lacks low end and midrange performance isn’t great either. However, it is quite refined and fuel efficient. If you want even more fuel efficiency and can sacrifice some refinement, you can opt for the diesel WR-V. Yes, it is clattery, especially on a cold start, but it does offer good drivability. The power delivery is very linear and there is no surge like you get

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around 2000rpm in most diesels. That makes it easy to deal with in bumper to bumper traffic, while parking and on inclines. Surely, it suits the long distance road-trip nature of the WR-V better than the petrol engine. A lot of effort has gone into the WR-V’s suspension tuning. The raised suspension has reworked articulation at the rear and consequently, a 25mm increase in wheelbase compared to the Jazz can be noted. Ground clearance is now 188mm, but the raised suspension hasn’t come at the expense of handling. There is minimal body roll and the grip levels have only increased. The WR-V gets wider 195/60 R16 tyres as opposed to the regular Jazz shod with 175/65 R15 tyres. Handling is quite neutral and the ride is very absorbent. You can feel the suspension working over broken patches. We took it over some rough terrain and it didn’t bottom out even once.

It is very similar to the Jazz except for some new brushed aluminium trim on the dashboard, new gear knob and the addition of a centre armrest.


The WR-V has priced about eighty thousand to 1.2 lakh rupees more than the Jazz, which is a bit on the pricier side. Also, it doesn’t get the option of an automatic transmission and is the only Honda in the current range to not get it. But, it comes with lots of equipment and features like cruise control and sunroof are not offered by any of its competitors. It is a good travel companion, with its bigger tyres and added ground clearance, more so than the regular Jazz. The rest of the practical bits are carried over as they are. So if you want a practical hatchback with some offroad attitude thrown in, the WRV is just that ď Ź

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MOVIE REVIEW

Baahubali 2: The Conclusion

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t is the second and final part of the renowned, fantasy, movie, Baahubali, which hit the screen nearly two years before. Just like their first part, the final part is also getting a good response from the audience, who has been eagerly waiting for last two years to know the answer to a confusing question- why did Kattappa kill Baahubali. The film’s director, S SRajamouli, has succeeded in keeping the secret undisclosed and maintaining the fire of the question unquenched. The second part revolves around Baahubali’s son, Shiva. While Shiva unwraps the secrets behind the mystery slowly as the narration progresses, we get to know all answers to our question. There are several mesmerising action sequences. The technical team, particularly postproduction team, deserves a special appreciation.

Maatr

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t is a thriller film directed by Ashtar Sayed. In the film, Raveena Tandon appears in the lead role. The story is the prime attraction of the film and it is written by renowned writer Michael Pellico. The film has been produced by the CDB Musical Production, in which our writer is an executive producer. Apart from Raveena, Madhur Mittal, Divya Jagdale, Anurag Arora and Saheem Khan act in the film. Another important peculiarity of this movie is its songs. A Pakistani Sufi rock band, named Fuzon, has created exceptional songs for this entertainment thriller. Some of its songs have already hit the hit chart unsurprisingly.

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Unforgettable

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t is a family thriller directed by Denise Di Novi. The film’s story revolves around two ladies: Tessa and Julia. The latter marries the former’s ex-husband, David. While the latter tries to create a paradise with her husband, the jealous mindset of the former prompts her to foil the latter’s paradise. The film discusses a complicated subject and takes the viewer to several emotional situations. Rosario Dawson, Katherine Heigl, Geoff Stults, Cheryl Ladd and Isabella Rice appear in the lead roles. Caleb Deschanel has helped the director to capture mesmerising shots with his exceptional cinematography skills. Popular musician Toby Chu has created this film’s music.

Guardians of the Galaxy Vol.2

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his science fiction movie is directed by James Gunn. It is the latest movie of the ‘Guardians of the Galaxy’ series. Notably, the director himself has written its screenplay. There are several astounding action sequences throughout the movie. Chris Pratt, Vin Diesel, Zoe Saldana, Dave Bautista and Bradley Cooper appear in the prominent roles. The film is grabbing good response from the audience. The critics claim that even though it is not as good as its former parts or original part, it still possesses some kind of freshness. It is a feel good movie. Tyler Bates has created its music.

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BOOK REVIEW

The Plant Paradox: The Hidden Dangers in "Healthy" Foods That Cause Disease and Weight Gain Author Price

: Dr. Steven R Gundry : $17.45

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o you know anything about lectin? The lectin is one of the dangerous proteins contained in the fruits, vegetables and nuts. Gluten is one variety of the lectin. In this book, the writer tries to educate the readers about the adverse effects of the lectin. Though the book prompts us to ditch some of our favourite dishes, it also gives an insight about some food items which have less amount of lectin and can substitute your favourite dish perfectly and gifts us several tricks and methods through which the unhealthy protein can be comply eradicated from our food materials. More importantly, the book also discusses some methods through which we can effetely execute detoxification.

I Hope I Screw This Up: How Falling In Love with Your Fears Can Change the World Author Price

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: Kyle Cease : $16.99

ave you ever thought of those factors that can actually give you ultimate happiness? There are several things which can gift you that. Have you ever dreamed of gaining happiness and ultimate fulfilment by embracing fear and pain? Surely, none of us has had such a creative dream. This motivation book, written by a renowned stand-up comedian, teaches you to do so. The book asks us to see the pain and fear in a different point of view. The book helps the reader to unlearn those negative concepts that made way into your mind due to your fear of confronting the fear and pain effectively.

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BOOK REVIEW

The Secrets of My Life Author Price

: Caitlyn Jenner : $18

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n this memoir, the writer discusses the difficulties faced by her during her journey from Bruce Jenner to Caitlyn Marie Jenner. The former decathlete who is an Olympic gold medalist clearly mentions, through this beautifully articulated book, how her fear grew as she successfully climb each and every step pointed towards success and publicity and how she finally decides to break free and embrace her true identity. The book elucidates the way through which the writer achieved strength to drop her mask. There are several emotional elements in the story which can be clearly understood only by a person who has undergone similar trauma. The book has the potential to inspire many.

Into the Water Author Price

: Paula Hawkins : $16.80

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t is a mesmerising thriller novel written by the extraordinary writer, Hawkins, who has a special skill to play with the reader’s mind. Just like her first novel, ‘The girl on the train’, this novel also has all the elements necessary to turn it into an addictive novel. There are several twists and turns. The important fact is that it is difficult to predict the path through which the protagonist is taking the reader in advance. The physiological element of the story has taken the narrative to an unexpected level. The teen and her mother’s sister stand in one end of the narration while the deceased mother and a deceased teen are placed on the other end.

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Printed On 01/ 05/ 2017

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