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NO13

SUMMER | FALL 2017

ISSUE


ABOUT US CRE8 Magazine: A biannual Art and Lifestyle publication highlighting individuals, artists and businesses that embody the spirit of creativity, ingenuity and passion!

WE HOPE TO INSPIRE AND MOTIVATE OUR READERS TO CREATE.

This issue is dedicated to BUBBA the CRE8 Magazine Coffee Boy He never once fetched us coffee, but we didn’t care, he was a faithful assistant, best friend and soul-mate. Forever in our hearts. #cre8magazinecoffeeboy

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No 13

OUR MISSION To showcase Maui to the world, and bring the world to Maui.

inspire :: create :: motivate


CONTENTS

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SUMMER/FALL 2017

No 13 FEATURED

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Our Mission

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On The Cover

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Stephanie Sachs : Artist

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Succulent Obsession

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Kula Breeze

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Scott Radke : Artist

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Antoni Gaudi

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Bret Brown : Artist

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How NOT To Be A Wine Snob

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Nonney Oddlokken : Ar tist


PU B L IS H E R U niqu e A r t Hawai i I n c. U niqu e A r t Hawai i . com

C R EAT IV E D IR E C TO R J en n i fe r S t e p h e n s info @un i q u e ar t h awai i . com

E D ITO R R us se l l C ar b on e l l r us t y c ar b s@ g mai l . com

C O N T R IB U TO R S A m i t y M ason Lar i ssa Tre e se

www.CRE8Mag.com facebook.com/cre8mag Instagram @cre8magazine

CRE8 Magazine, its publishers, its staff and its advertisers are not responsible or liable for any misinformation, misprints or typographical errors in any ads or articles which may appear in this publication. Readers are required to do their own due diligence before relying upon any information provided or advice or opinions given by CRE8 Magazine, its publishers, staff and advertisers shall not be responsible or liable for reliance upon the information provided in this publication. The contents of CRE8 Magazine are copyrighted and may not be reproduced without the express written permission of the Publishers. By submitting materials to CRE8 Magazine our advertisers warrant and represent that they are (a) the sole, legal owner or licensee of all rights or licensee of all rights including copyright, to each copyright, trademark, service mark, trade name, logo, statement, portrait, graphic, artwork or photograph of any person or any other intellectual property included in such design, (b) will hold CRE8 Magazine harmless from any claim that any portion of the design infringes upon or constitutes wrongful use of any copyright, trademark or other right of any third party.


O N TH E COVE R

“Birdcage”

SCOTT RADKE PAGE 38

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Tranquility Paintings by Stephanie Sachs “Hopefully, my paintings bold graphics and vibrant colors capture your attention at the outset, then, playful ambiguous spaces invite you in for a longer stay. These novel places allow you, the viewer, to explore the familiar and the unknown, the formed and the unformed. Inside the painting is the illusion of deep space influenced by the distant horizons of the islands.�

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“My paintings evolve over many months using thin layers to take advantage of the luminosity unique to oils. I attempt to make things awkward enough to fail and hope to find the thread that magically pulls it together.�


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THE A RTIST

STEPHANIE SACHS Stephanie Sachs grew up in the 70’s in a New Jersey Jewish community, the first daughter of two educators. She was exposed to culture in her immediate community, rich in East Coast history and nearby New York City where she fell in love with visiting museums and learning about great artists as well as seeing tons of theatre and dance. Stephanie’s passion for the arts became her life destiny… She applied to the prestigious Art School, Washington University in St. Louis… she was accepted and graduated in 1988 with honors, receiving a Fine Arts Degree. At 21 she was chosen to be a student at Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture and spent an idyllic summer in Maine on a lake surrounded by other dedicated emerging artists all taught by world renowned artists. At Skowhegan, she attended the last lecture of Joseph Campbell and was influenced by Agnes Martin, the zen minimalist painter. Upon her graduation, Stephanie hopped on a plane looking for adventure and landed on Maui. Over the last twenty-five years, she has lived in a shed, a mansion, a bus, a beach shack, and now has a home and studio in Kihei. During this time she explored her skills as a painter and the wild nature she inhabited… allowing herself to delve into herself creatively. “I feel my paintings have recently taken another turn... as if all the years of painting have created a wellspring of experience that flows, allowing me to create with confidence and, at the same time, with abandon. Each painting emerges as a surprise to me… gratitude is what comes to my mind, for what comes to me and that I get to share my experience and my work” Stephanie’s oil paintings and watercolors are in collections across the world. She has been selected for and shown in a number of distinguished art shows across the country. Including solo and group shows in Chelsea, New York, and multiple Art Maui shows. Stephanie was chosen to represent Hawaii in Art in America 2015, a traveling show of contemporary painting.

stephaniesachs.com

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Succulent

obsession How to care for your babies!

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Succulents, by their very nature, retain water and can often be found in arid climates like the terrain of the signature desert cactus in a spaghetti western movie. But just as a kitten born in an oven isn’t a biscuit, all cacti are succulents, but not all succulents are cacti. Succulents aren’t just desert dwellers; they can be found in the mountains, by the sea and even in rainforests. Learn what succulents work for you and how to care for them.

What’s a Succulent? From tasty green asparagus with its delicate ferns to the majestic “Purple Emperor” that sports flowers so attractive to bees, the plants known as succulents take their name from the Latin word sucus, which means juice. Their common attribute is that they have at least some parts that are thick and fleshy in order to retain water in arid soil or climates. The list of succulents is incredibly long, so for gardening purposes, we’re going to discuss the common varieties you might want to cultivate in your backyard or windowsill.

Let There Be Light Oh, yeah, succulents need light, at least a half day of sunlight. In really hot areas, a bit of afternoon shade is a good idea. They are sturdy little buggers and most are happy in “hardiness zones” 3 to 9 (think North Dakota as 3 and Florida as 9). Wherever your little succulents live, make sure they have light.

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Drainage Rules Drainage is everything with succulents. If you’re putting your plant in a garden, be sure the spot has plenty of drainage and it’s not at the end of a slope that will pool with water. Spread some pea gravel or pebbles around the plants for added benefits. For potted succulents, choose a container with a drainage hole and put some rocks or pebbles at the bottom before your chosen soil.

What to Water and When Simply put, succulents are averse to having their feet wet. Whether your charges are the garden or container variety, let the soil dry a little between waterings. That said, when you do water, do it thoroughly.

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They Can Take Some Fertilizer Succulents don’t need a lot of fertilizer, but every organism could use a little help once in a while. Your local garden store should be able to provide you with a selection of fertilizer, but do a little research before you choose. So-called “manure tea bags” provide a mild but effective fertilizer that won’t burn your precious plants as can some commercial brands. Once a month is about right.

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Blooming Colorful The most popular blooming succulents are sedums, also known as stonecrops for their ability to grow in harsh conditions. These are fleshy-leaved, sturdy perennial plants with clusters of star-shaped flowers. Pinch off the dead blooms, allowing for new flowers to come in, but don’t prune the plants back unless they’ve become too big for your taste. Cactus flowers, conversely, usually have single blooms and require a bit of wintertime cooling off in order to bloom in the warmer seasons.

Oh, How They Love to Propagate! Propagating succulents is possible from leaves and stem cuttings. Cut off a piece of the succulent just above a leaf on the stem and let the cutting sit on a windowsill in sunlight until it dries out a bit and begins to “scab over.” If you don’t let it dry out it will absorb too much water when you try to make it into a plant. You can root the cuttings in soil or water but know it does take a bit of time and you must be diligent about keeping the cuttings moist but not wet. Succulents make a lovely and often colorful addition to a drought-resistant garden or windowsill that is not regularly tended. A busy person who would love to garden but is short on time would be well suited to succulents; the rare plant species that thrives on planned neglect.

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breeze

LOCATION: Lower Kula, Tiki Farms | Marcus Knox Chinnery Maui, Hawaii PHOTOGRAPHY: Amanda Johnson amandamcjohnson11@gmail.com

HAIR, MAKEUP & STYLING: MiRa Carman MauiMira.com

MODEL: Kerry Elizabeth Barley KerryElizabethBarley.com

VEHICLE: Chris Hoyt | 1940 Dodge Power Wagon

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The Wonderful World of Artist

Scott Radke 39


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THE A RTIST

SCOT T RADKE Scott Radke is an American artist based in Berea, OH. He creates surreal, heartfelt, emotionally charged characters and places them in natural settings. His sculptures are collected world wide with notable commissions for Mark Parker, Morgan Spurlock, Sera Gamble, to name a few. His earlier work has appeared in films such as “Desolation Sound” starring Jennifer Beals, The Birthday Massacres “Blue” video, as well as Guillermo Lecouna’s “Mother Corn”.

scottradke.com

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antoni

gaudi BARCELONA, SPAIN By Larissa Treese Images by Amity Mason


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“THERE ARE NO STRAIGHT LINES OR SHARP CORNERS IN NATURE. THEREFORE, BUILDINGS MUST HAVE NO STRAIGHT LINES OR SHARP CORNERS.”

Many have claimed nature as their muse, but almost no one has used it in the same manner as Antoni Gaudi. If you were to walk the streets of Barcelona, Spain, your appreciation for detailed architecture will be stimulated, but passing by one of Gaudi’s creations will stop you in your tracks. Tucked up next to the already stunning buildings that have endured for centuries stands an ethereal sight: one that, in our current lives, prompts the feeling of entering the minds of Dr. Seuss or Tim Burton. Exaggerated curves with endless fluidity and bright bursts of color defy what we know of as common, and draws you into examining it in more detail. It isn’t until you understand the mind of Gaudi that you start picking up objects that are familiar in nature. 54


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Antoni Gaudi was an architect from Reus, Catalonia, Spain and because of his work, the style of Catalan Modernism became a world-wide subject to study and appreciate. In the beginning of the 1900’s, he combined his ultimate passions; architecture, nature and religion and developed his humble talent within a small diameter of distance. Contrary to the typical work of architects back then, he rarely drew any of his plans out, preferring to use 3D models and molds. Some of his greatest inspirations came from visiting mountains and caves in Spain, with every aspect of his designs incorporating a sense of respect and details celebrating nature. Door knobs created out of clay and molded to perfectly fit your hand and windows that playfully encouraged the natural light to reflect off the floor and pillars, mimicking tree trunks are just a few of the characteristics of his unique style. His work can be viewed by the public in world-famous places such as the church of Sagrada Familia, apartments like the Casa Batllo and Casa Mila, and Colonia Guell park. Every detail, every piece of material selected, every curve and bend were specific and thoughtful. Because of people and minds like his, boundaries will continuously be challenged, although there is no other creative mind like the one of Antoni Gaudi.

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MIXEDartistMEDIA

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THE A RTIST

BRET BROWN Bret Brown is a California based artist/illustrator that works mostly in pen/ink and mixed media (acrylic, watercolor, phototransfers, collage, found object, graphite, ink, spray paint). His work is symbolic and at times playful. He creates pieces that are intended to tell stories, often of interpreted dreams. Bret inspires to create both questions and dialogue with the viewer. Born in the 70’s, Bret was, and continues to be, heavily influenced by the Southern Californian pop, surf, punk, and skate cultures of the 80’s and 90’s. His work is mostly personal, emotional, and psychological. It tends to be expressive in style. Bret likes to tell stories. Stories about his life and subsequent observations. His work is also influenced by the concepts of scale invariance and interconnectedness as he combines both personal, social, religious, and humanistic themes.

bretbrownart.bigcartel.com

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How NOT to be a Wine Snob By Leann Zotis

Anyone who enjoys a glass of wine with dinner or at a social gathering knows the experience of encountering another ardent wine drinker. The questions are always the same, surrounding preferences of white wine over red, dry wines versus sweet or favorite growing regions. It does seem that nearly all oenophiles have very specific opinions when it comes to their grape of choice. It’s hard to pin someone down on their wine preferences without coming off as a wine snob. In fact, many wine drinkers take pride in being labeled as such. Still, for the less persnickety lovers of wine, there are certain steps you must take to avoid being pigeonholed.

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Don’t insist on having your wine decanted for a specific amount of time before you would even consider consuming it. While it may be nice to allow your wine to breathe, especially a red wine, before you drink it, remember that it is not necessary to decant before enjoying. It is entirely possible to pop a cork, pour a glass and have a delightful wine experience.

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Don’t brag too much about the wine cellar in your basement, if you have one. It’s okay to secure your wines at the desired temperature, away from excessive light exposure and stored on their side to keep the cork wet, just don’t draw attention to the fact.

Good wine is for drinking, not collecting. There is no honor in being the proud owner of hundreds of bottles of wine, stored for decades in your dusty basement. If you are so inclined to be a collector, make sure that is your own dirty, little secret. In the presence of others, be a lover of wine, not a hoarder.

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Don’t judge the quality of a bottle of wine by the price tag. A large part of the pricing structure revolves around the cost of production, not the quality of the grape, although that’s not universally true. Don’t turn up your nose without at least giving it a taste.

Don’t over-share when it comes to your excessive knowledge about every vintage coming out of Napa, Burgundy or your local wine and spirits store. Wine drinking should be more about good times with good people than it is about reciting copious wine facts from your vast knowledge of grapes, soil and vine-grafting processes.

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Don’t become the resident authority on the best years for the various grapes. Above all, when offered a glass of wine, don’t ask your host if you can see the label before deciding if you will drink a glass or not. Give it a chance. You may be pleasantly surprised.

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Wine is a beverage consumed for pleasure and enjoyment, not to quench your thirst. It’s fun to study and learn about the grapes, the wine making process or the history of the vineyard. It’s even more fun to taste and experiment with the vast offerings available. With so many wines and so little time, it would be a shame to limit yourself by being a self-proclaimed wine snob. 73


THREAD GLUE Works by Nonney Oddlokken 75


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THE A RTIST

NONNEY ODDLOKKEN In my series Little Tiny Fables, I use magical realism to slow down, reexamine and explore the process and complexities of choice, particularly during a conundrum. It is the in-between moments and mental connections of making a decision that intrigue me. Is that right or wrong? Should I go left or right? Should I stay or go? Is that good or evil? People make choices constantly, but often are so focused on the results and unconscious of the mental process that leads them to their decisions. Having surreal powers, animals often play the role of supreme messengers and fact checkers to the central human figure. This allows me to strip away perceived, common knowledge - which still can be wrong, within itself. One cannot rely on the prepackaged concepts of behavior and decorum for any answers. Everything must be learned and reviewed from ground upward. I placed my fables in the landscape of the Louisiana swamp lands and Gulf of Mexico, the land of my childhood and one that is so dear to me. Nonney Oddlokken, a New Orleans based artist, layers hand made papers, found and painted imagery that is then embellished with a variety of different types of thread-work and stitching to create texture in her mixed media collage work.

threadpaperglue.com

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Jennifer J Stephens.com

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Profile for Unique Art Hawaii Inc

CRE8 Magazine | Issue No. 13  

CRE8 Magazine is a biannual Art publication based in Maui, Hawaii. The magazine highlights individuals, artists, and businesses that embody...

CRE8 Magazine | Issue No. 13  

CRE8 Magazine is a biannual Art publication based in Maui, Hawaii. The magazine highlights individuals, artists, and businesses that embody...

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