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Amerika by Franz Kafka, directed by Michal Dočekal, Hungarian Theatre of Cluj, Cluj, Romania Aren’t we responsible for the failures and disappointments that we have experienced during the past quarter of a century? If this is how we read Kafka, we might get closer to the spirit of the novel’s stage adaptation. We witness Karl Rossmann’s encounter with national hatred, social injustice, the world of money and power, and the world of the unemployed and homeless. At the end he himself becomes a slave of the new world, because the mechanism of money and sex represented by Brunelda, the singer, captures him too. He is confronted with the cold rejection of our society, expressed by the student: “Give up all hope!” The way indicated to Karl by his Uncle, that is both punishment and experience, ends at the Natural Theatre of Oklahoma, and this world theatre is, in a sense, a metaphor for eternity. The ending of the novel is open: we can consider America to be a world of automatized and instrumentalized human relationships (as Chaplin stated in Modern Times  with brilliant wit), but also as a dream-world, a world where human freedom needs to rise above the horizon like an unconquerable Indian warrior who overcomes a (maybe lost) battle.

What Happened After Nora Left Her Husband; Or Pillars Of Society by Elfriede Jelinek, directed by Snežana Trišić, Yugoslav Drama Theatre, Belgrade, Serbia The play “What Happened after Nora Left Her Husband; or Pillars of Society” by the Austrian author Elfriede Jelinek, recipient of the Nobel Prize for Literature, could be perceived as a sequel or a paraphrase of two plays by Ibsen–“Nora (A Doll’s House)” and “The Pillars of Society” The play follows the story of Nora Helmer after she left her husband seen through a theatrical kaleidoscope of male projections/phantasms of women in the role of a wife, mother, labourer, artist, lover, prostitute, concubine, dominatrix and ultimately a business woman. Will Nora get to live her dream and hope of self-realisation or will she have to

TRANSLATE A symposium on surtitles, dubbing and more

Théâtre National du Luxembourg, 2016

Intercultural exchange is happening on the stages of theatres across Europe and the globe. This leads to the growing necessity of forms of translation for theatre productions. So far this is done through surtitles, dubbing or a translated synopsis. However, translation is not just a means for communication, it can be an artistic means in its own right, which can be included in the intercultural conception of a production. Coupled with the idea of theatre as a universal language, international experts and theatre makers from all over Europe discussed these topics at a symposium held at the Théâtre National du Luxembourg, in collaboration with the Union des Théâtres de l’Europe. The audience followed an interesting debate on the

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UTE - Conflict Zones - Zones de Conflit  

Three Years of Battle Union des Théâtres de l'Europe

UTE - Conflict Zones - Zones de Conflit  

Three Years of Battle Union des Théâtres de l'Europe

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