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Union Public Schools Independent District #9 Tulsa, Oklahoma

Comprehensive Annual Financial Report For the fiscal year ended June 30, 2009

Prepared by: Department of Finance Debra J. Jacoby, CPA Chief Financial Officer/Treasurer Catherine L. Smart, CPA Director of Financial Reporting/Treasury Gail L. Easterling, CPA Director of Accounting


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COMPREHENSIVE ANNUAL FINANCIAL REPORT For the Fiscal Year Ended June 30, 2009 Page INTRODUCTORY SECTION Transmittal Letter and District Profile................................................................................... 1-18

ASBO Certificate of Excellence.....................................................................................................19

GFOA Certificate of Achievement...............................................................................................20

School Officials................................................................................................................................21

Organizational Chart.....................................................................................................................22

FINANCIAL SECTION Independent Auditor’s Report...............................................................................................23-24

Management’s Discussion and Analysis..............................................................................25-36

Basic Financial Statements

Governmentwide Financial Statements

Statement of Net Assets..................................................................................................37

Statement of Activities...............................................................................................38-39

Fund Financial Statements

Balance Sheets - Governmental Funds..........................................................................41

Statement of Revenues, Expenditures, and Changes in

Reconciliation of the Statement of Revenues, Expenditures, and Changes

Fund Balances - Governmental Funds....................................................................42 in Fund Balances of Governmental Funds to the Statement of Activities......43

Statement of Revenues, Expenditures, and Changes in

Fund Balance - Budget and Actual - (Budgetary Basis) - Budgeted

Governmental Fund Types - General Fund...........................................................44

Statement of Revenues, Expenditures, and Changes in

Fund Balance - Budget and Actual - (Budgetary Basis) - Budgeted

Governmental Fund Types - Building Fund..........................................................45

Statement of Net Assets - Proprietary Funds..............................................................46

Statement of Revenues, Expenses, and Changes in

Fund Assets - Proprietary Funds.............................................................................47

Statement of Cash Flows - Proprietary Funds.............................................................48

Statement of Net Assets - Fiduciary Funds..................................................................49

Statement of Changes in Net Assets - Fiduciary Funds............................................50

Notes to the Financial Statements........................................................................................51-69


COMPREHENSIVE ANNUAL FINANCIAL REPORT For the Fiscal Year Ended June 30, 2009 FINANCIAL SECTION (Cont.)

Page

Required Supplemental Information:

Schedule of Funding Progress for Other Post Employment Benefits............................70

Combining Schedules:

Combining Balance Sheet - Nonmajor Governmental Funds..........................................71

Combining Statement of Revenues, Expenditures, and Changes

in Fund Balances - Nonmajor Governmental Funds..................................................72

Combining Statement of Changes in Assets and Liabilities - Agency Funds..............73

Capital Assets Used in the Operation of Governmental Funds:

Comparative Schedules By Source.......................................................................................75

Schedule by Function and Activity.......................................................................................76

Schedule of Changes by Function and Activity.................................................................77

STATISTICAL SECTION Net Assets by Component............................................................................................................81

Changes in Net Assets.............................................................................................................82-83

Fund Balances of Governmental Funds.....................................................................................84

Changes in Fund Balances of Governmental Funds..........................................................85-86

Assessed and Estimated Actual Value of Taxable Property..................................................87

Direct and Overlapping Property Tax Rates.............................................................................88

Principal Property Taxpayers.......................................................................................................89

Property Tax Levies and Collections..........................................................................................90

Ratio of Outstanding Debt by Type............................................................................................91

Ratios of Net General Bonded Debt Outstanding....................................................................92

Direct and Overlapping Governmental Activities Debt..........................................................93

Legal Debt Margin...........................................................................................................................94

Demographic and Economic Statistics.................................................................................95-96

Tulsa Area Principal Employers...................................................................................................97

Capital Assets by Function and Activity....................................................................................99

Employee Information................................................................................................................ 100

Operating Statistics..................................................................................................................... 101

Support Services Statistics......................................................................................................... 102

School Building Information............................................................................................. 103-106

Insurance Schedule..................................................................................................................... 107


Union Public Schools

Independent District #9

December 4, 2009

To the Patrons of Union Public Schools: The Comprehensive Annual Financial Report of Union Public Schools, Independent District #9 (the “District”) for the fiscal year ended June 30, 2009, is hereby submitted. Responsibility for both the accuracy of the data and the completeness and fairness of the presentation, including all disclosures, rests with the District. To the best of our knowledge and belief, the enclosed data is accurate in all material respects and is reported in a manner designed to present fairly the financial position and results of operations of the various funds of the District. All disclosures necessary to enable the reader to gain an understanding of the District’s financial activities have been included. This letter of transmittal is designed to complement Management’s Discussion and Analysis and should be read in conjunction with it. Union Public School’s Management’s Discussion and Analysis can be found immediately after the report of the independent auditor, page 23. The report includes all current funds of the District. The services provided include education of preschool through adults with primary emphasis on K-12.

Education Service Center l 8506 E. 61st Street l Tulsa, OK 74133-1926 l (918) 357-4321 l Fax (918) 357-6017 website: www.unionps.org

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Pre-kindergarten programs for four-year-olds are available throughout the district, and the Union Early Childhood Center serves three-year-olds.

Introduction Union Public Schools, Independent District #9, Tulsa County, is a premiere Oklahoma school district with a strong sense of community pride. In fact, Union is its own community. Its 28-square-mile boundary does not reside within one particular city.

The comprehensive secondary curriculum serves both college-bound and non-college-bound students. Core curriculum classes of varying levels of difficulty are offered to meet individual student needs. In addition to challenging Pre-AP classes, Union offers a variety of Advanced Placement classes which allow students to earn college credit while learning about a subject in greater depth and developing study and analytical skills that are important to success in college. In partnership with Tulsa Community College, Union offers a Concurrent Enrollment Program, enabling students to earn both high school and college credits at the same time.

Instead, it encompasses both southeast Tulsa and a portion of the neighboring city of Broken Arrow, and the schools act as a unifying force for area residents. At the center of the community--our Main Street, if you will--is the school system with its more than 15,000 students, pre-kindergarten-12. Parents choose the Union district for its all-around excellence--wide-ranging academic programs, varied school-related activities, strong emphasis on character development, outstanding teachers, respected elected and administrative leaders and remarkable facilities.

The Union Collegiate Academy, a program at Union High School, provides top performing students exposure to college and career topics. Students interested in vocational programs are transported to the appropriate Tulsa Technology Center campus for the curriculum they desire.

Each year the district has an impressive number of National Merit Scholars, and its graduating classes receive millions of dollars in scholarship offers to colleges and universities throughout the country. Approximately 91.7 percent of the 2008 graduating class pursued post-secondary education. Union is one of the leading districts in Oklahoma in the number of teachers earning prestigious national certification, and its “Character Counts!” program is considered a statewide model.

Union’s award-winning Alternative School is internationally recognized and helps students stay in school or return to school, giving them a chance to get back on track to graduate. Union’s strong sense of tradition and pride is underscored in its theme, “Working to Form a More Perfect Union.”

Our Mission

When Union was founded in 1919, it combined four small, rural communities, Boles, McCollough, Mayo and Alsuma and had only four students in its graduating class. Today it is the ninth largest district in Oklahoma and has thirteen elementary schools, a Sixth/Seventh Grade Center, an Eighth Grade Center, an Intermediate High School, an Alternative School and a High School.

It is our Mission to provide our community of learners with educational opportunities to acquire and develop the best possible academic, vocational, recreational, social and participatory skills, enabling them to become valued, contributing members of a changing global society.

Our Goals

Union’s innovative curriculum features programs that provide exemplary educational experiences for students at all elementary and secondary levels. Instructional technology offers students state-of-the-art tools to enhance reading, language, math, science and writing skills. Art, music and physical education enrich the traditional curriculum. Professionals in remedial reading, speech therapy and special education are assigned to the schools along with library media specialists, nurses and counselors. Courses for gifted students are offered at all levels, as are programs for English Language Learners.

l Academic excellence for all students l Preparation of students for positive citizenship l A positive educational environment in which stu-

Two Community Schools, complete with health care clinics and other agency services, are among Union’s 13 elementary schools. The Extended Day Program offers quality child care before and after school at all elementary sites.

dents, parents, community and staff assume respon-

sibility for their role in the learning process

l l l l l

District excellence for all employees

Expanded opportunities for learning Increased use of technology Enhanced Union pride Support base to include patrons, partnerships and community resources

l Long-term plan to accommodate growth 2


Purchasing and Supply Management included three employees and a safety coordinator. They handled procurement services, districtwide quotes and bids, contract review, maintenance repair and operations sourcing, and scheduling and maintaining facility rentals and agreements.

Operational Statistics Transportation Approximately 8,895 students were eligible for transportation each day on the district’s 93 buses. Union’s buses drove more than 765,852 miles in 2008-2009.

Warehouse and distribution services involved eight employees who were responsible for food storage and distribution, central receiving, daily mail and delivery service, custodial supply distribution, records storage and maintenance and instructional supply distribution.

Union Multipurpose Activity Center (UMAC)

Nineteen buses were used for summer school with five at McAuliffe, three at Cedar Ridge, two at Briarglen, three at the Intermediate High, three at Rosa Parks and three for special education. The district’s total cost for fuel was $317,882.60.

Four employees at the Union Multipurpose Activity Center coordinated UMAC events and facility rental. The number of events held at the UMAC during 2008-2009 totaled 994 with an average of 18 events per week. The UMAC also houses the U-Wear store which markets Union spirit wear and items, the Fine Arts Department, the Athletics Department and an in-house production studio.

Construction/Facilities

Child Nutrition

Facility services’ employees each kept 32.7 acres of school property manicured; set up and cleaned for more than 157 major events; and processed 131 work orders requiring 12,773 hours to complete. They also receive Oklahoma School Plant Management Association (OSPMA) and Oklahoma Turf Research Foundation training each year.

Between 400 and 500 people celebrated the grand opening of Central Park at Union in September. Visitors got a chance to see the new facilities and eat Backyard Burgers. KHITS 106.9 provided music and Board of Education member Jeff Bennett, who owns Curves fitness club, provided tethered hot air balloon rides. Voters approved construction of the park as part of two different bond issues.  The first phase included a JV/Intramural-style football field, space for soccer and baseball, a concession stand, restrooms, a play area for younger children, and a track that circles the property for jogging or running.  The second phase, which began in the summer of 2008, included an outdoor classroom, additional running track, and baseball backstops.

Custodial services had 154 employees with 92 night custodians who each maintained 30,000 square feet of building space. Employees receive hands-on safety practice training. Eleven different languages were spoken, and Spanish and English classes were offered as was a Building Engineer certification class.

In the wake of high gas and utility prices, Superintendent Dr. Cathy Burden asked employees to help save money by cutting back on energy-related costs. With prices soaring around the nation, Union started the school year with a plan to save fuel and cut energy costs.  The plan focused on transportation and building-level conservation

With 130 employees, the child nutrition department served 249,901 breakfasts and 1,326,185 lunches during the 2008-09 school year. In addition, 48,000 adult lunches and 2,600 adult breakfasts were served along with 151,200 early childhood meals and 20,444 after-school snacks. Meals are also served during the summer months for summer school. There were 11,364 breakfasts and 11,833 lunches provided during summer to needy children.

Maintenance Services Maintenance services had 14 employees who processed 9,250 work orders annually ranging from electrical, telecommunications, mechanical, building electronics, hardware, carpentry, and preventive maintenance.

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focal part of the school. A new entrance was installed so the front of the media center could be seen from the commons area. A new circulation desk, new carpet, and a new front door also spruced up the area. Two science rooms at the High School were also remodeled, the old sisal wall covering on several hallways was removed, and a new secured entryway for the front entrance was built.

Operational Statistics (Cont.) Construction/Facilities (Cont.) to save hundreds of thousands of dollars. The number of stops buses made was reduced, as was mileage for athletic, fine arts, and out-of-town trips.  Instead of the mile minimum eligibility, Intermediate and High School students were required to live at least a mile-and-a-half from school in order to be transported. Elementary and secondary school field trips were reduced, and every site or department was charged back for its transportation costs.

Student Statistics Growth continued during the 2008-2009 school year, although it slowed to less than one percent. Union served 14,658 students – 6,993 at the elementary level and 7,665 in grades 6-12; 7,536 were male and 7,122 were female. In terms of ethnic origin, 9.9 percent were Native American, 18 percent were Hispanic, 14.3 percent were African American, 6.8 percent were Asian, and 51 percent were Caucasian.

Union dedicated its thirteenth elementary school – Thomas Jefferson Elementary – in November. Jefferson opened August 14, 2008, providing for expansion of the program for fouryear-olds districtwide. Voters approved the construction and furnishing of the school through a series of bond elections starting in 2006. The first was for $2.5 million for site development, soil testing, engineering and architectural consultants. The second bond election in 2007 included $9.5 million for construction of the site, and voters approved another $1.9 million in 2008 for furniture, fixtures, and equipment at the school.

There were 4,085 first through twelfth grade students enrolled in Union’s gifted and talented program. Ten percent or 1,470 of our students were enrolled in special education. In 20082009, approximately 3,126 students throughout the district were bilingual or lived in a home where a language other than English was spoken, compared to 206 in 1995. The total bilingual count included 39 different languages.

District voters approved a $20-million bond issue by 83.6 percent in February. Major projects included extensive remodeling at Grove and updating at the Union Performing Arts Center. At 35 years old, Grove was in desperate need of classroom, cafeteria, and gymnasium expansions due to growth in student enrollment. Additional restrooms and a new main entrance with added security features were also planned.

More than 38.5 percent of our students reported that they lived with just one of their biological parents – 4,984 (34 percent) lived with their mothers and 658 (4.5 percent) with their fathers.

Other projects in the 2009 bond issue included replacement of old balcony handrails, lighting and stage cabling, equipment and decorations at the Union Performing Arts Center; roof replacement at Clark Elementary and buildings at three other school sites; a second phase of remodeling at the softball and baseball complex; and upgrading the Eighth Grade Center’s gym and outside basketball courts. High School students returned in the fall to a media center in the midst of construction - an effort to make it a more

The total number of homeless children enrolled during the 2008-2009 school year was 739, down from 756 the previous year, and 49 students were listed as self-supporting. There were 837 students (grades K-5) enrolled in Union’s Extended Day Program, of whom 174 attended the morning program, 218 attended the afternoon program, and 445 students attended both programs. The EDP Summer Camp was held at Moore Elementary offering weekly themes over an eight-week period. Weekly camp attendance averaged 155. 4


Senior Cara Berberet received first place for her artwork in the Sutton Awards Scholarship Competition.  Cara received a $3,000 scholarship for her entry.

Student Statistics (Cont.) The number of High School students in Advanced Placement (AP) courses was 1,104, while there were 941 students, grades 9-12, enrolled in Pre-AP Courses.

Senior Nicole Sefton was featured on Channel 6, talking about her newly published book, Luxuria.

More than 11,300 Union students were involved in at least one arts class, including 6,972 elementary students who took both art and music. At the secondary level (grades 7-12) 802 were in band; 578 in orchestra; 909 in vocal music; 600 in drama; 60 in competitive speech; and 2,188 in a wide variety of visual arts disciplines.

Union High School was awarded a 2009 National Gold Council of Excellence Award by the National Association of Student Councils for its exemplary record of leadership, service, and activities that serve to improve the school and community.  Close to 140 high schools were named National Councils of Excellence, but Union was one of only 118 nationwide to receive the highly esteemed honor of being named a National Gold Council of Excellence.

During 2008-2009, 1,619 students in grades K-12 participated on 278 teams in the Intramural sports program. Additionally, over 640 Union parents volunteered their time as coaches, volunteers and coordinators, giving more than 28,600 hours. More than 5,800 practices were held, and 1,100 games were played in Union facilities, mostly on Saturday mornings.

Union’s Air Force Junior Reserve Officer Training Corps (JROTC) was invited to participate in the 56th Inaugural Parade for President-elect Barack Obama in January, and they received help from the public to raise $35,000 to pay for the historic trip.  The unit was Oklahoma’s sole representative in the parade and one of only six JROTC programs nationwide selected.

Elementary summer school was held at Briarglen, McAuliffe, Rosa Parks, and Cedar Ridge. Thanks to federal and state grant funds, classes were offered free of charge. In summer school, there were 450 first and second grade students enrolled under the Reading Sufficiency Act (RSA); 225 third grade students enrolled in RSA Academy; 100 first through fifth grade students under the Native American grant; and 302 first through fifth grade students under Title I. In addition, there were 100 kindergarten students who chose to participate in Cedar Ridge tuition-paid classes offered in June and July. During the regular school year, 307 first, 491 second and 460 third graders were eligible to participate in the Reading Sufficiency Act program.

Seniors Brooklyn Beasley and Brian DeShane were named Homecoming Queen and King.

Secondary Achievement (Gr. 7-12)

Senior Hannah Hensel won the Region 7 Bob R. Williams Scholarship ($1,000), awarded to students who have overcome obstacles, disabilities, or injury to participate in athletics. Hannah has had cystic fibrosis all her life, but she competed at the varsity level in both cross country and track since her freshman year.

Four seniors were named National Merit Finalists - Ryan Proctor, Alana Denning, Dhara Sheth, and Brian Ward. Ethan Fowler was a semifinalist.

The Union Alternative High School class  participated in the first annual Great Sand Springs Soap Box Derby Race in October. Students designed and built the racer.

Merit Commended Students included seniors Austin Cagle, Claire Eastaway, Nicola Eastaway, Courtney Handy, Aubrey Harris, Andy Iwamoto, Jennifer Kiskin, Rachael Reagan, and Jared Williams.

Junior Andrew Roberson was honored by the Oklahoma Center for Community and Justice (OCCJ) for his firstplace winning essay at the high school level. Junior John Hill was named state winner for the annual Invest Ed® competition. Hill and senior Kristen Oyler were regional winners as well. 5


Reno, Nevada.  Only one student is invited to attend the International Fair from the Regional level. 

Secondary Achievement (Cont.)

Juniors Brittany Brown, Andrew Roberson, and Destiny Vinnett were part of the Youth Ambassador Student Exchange  program, joining students from four other cities across America on a tour of Israel. First, they met Russian and Israeli students during a tour of Washington D.C. and New York City, and then traveled on to Israel.

High School Valedictorians were Oliver Cabrera, Cecilia Dinh-Nguyen, MaiNhia Lor, Heidi Pham, Kenny Quang, Varuna Rao, Dhara Sheth, Krishna Suthar, and Elizabeth Tran. Salutatorians were Stephen Allred, Megan Atchley, Ling Cheng, Claire Eastaway, Nicola Eastaway, Jennifer Kiskin, Kristin Perrin, Bao-Tran Pham, and Rachael Reagan.

The Renegade Regiment participated in a clinic provided by members of the United States Air Force Band, “Airmen of Note,” the premier jazz ensemble of the United States Air Force.

Participation in the Union High School Service Learning program grew to 85 students working in 45 different fields. The program allows students to intern or shadow professionals to learn more about a certain career.

The Regiment was crowned the Broken Arrow Invitational Champion at an event featuring 30 bands from throughout Oklahoma, Missouri, and Arkansas.  They also won second place at the Oklahoma Bandmasters Association Class 6A Marching Band Championships. 

The High School Repertory Theater Class won first place at regional competition with “Our Country’s Good.” They not only won first for the play but for tech (staging, lights, sound) as well.   Ten cast members were chosen by the judges from all the shows to be All-Star cast members, and six of the ten were from Union - Kelsey Griswold, Josh Adams, Scott Jones, Sarah Pradhan, Alex Enterline, and Ethan May. The Fine Arts Department presented an outstanding AllSchool Musical, Les Miserables.  Senior trumpet player Jenny Daer was selected for the US Army All-American High School Marching Band which played at the U.S. Army All-American Bowl, produced by SportsLink. It was the premier high school football game in the nation and featured the nation’s top high school senior football players and now, the finest high school senior marching musicians.

The Renegade Regiment was named a semifinalist at the 2008 Bands of America Grand National Championships at the new Lucas Oil Stadium in Indianapolis. The band had two great performances and ended up 16th out of the 92 groups attending. 

Seniors Ryan Proctor and Paige Giles were named Mr. and Miss Union, the highest honor a Union student may receive from the school.

Sophomore Caleb Nelson received a Gold Key at the 2009 Oklahoma Regional Scholastic Art Awards Ceremony and Exhibition. Caleb was honored for his animation short, Pirates of the Caribbean: Search for the Chest of Jewels. He was the only student in Oklahoma to win a Gold Key in the Animation category, and his project was forwarded to finals competition in New York. 

Union students placed first and/or second in almost every category entered in the Regional Science Fair.  Twenty students competed, and 11 were invited to the Oklahoma State Science and Engineering Fair (OSSEF).  These students were Cody Byrd, Charles Earnest, Sandra Fernandez, Mariam Ghanem, Brad Janzen, Meghana Rao, Varuna Rao, Michael Ripley, Allen Shih, Acille Sammur, and Hannah Wendelbo.  Senior Varuna Rao was invited to the International Science Fair in

Eighth grader Claire Thompson took first place in the Regional Spelling Bee and advanced to the State Spelling Bee in Oklahoma City. Six eighth grade students placed in the Southside Sertoma Club annual essay contest with the topic “Integrity in United States Democracy.” First place winner of $100 was Whitney Cipolla, second was Jess Vanlandingham and third was Brett Asher. Eighth grade advanced science students participated in the Desk and Derrick Club of Tulsa Energy Essay con6


The winner of the countywide contest for the annual “Don’t Bug Me” campaign was Darnaby fourth grader Isabella Beffer. She was chosen over approximately 100 other entries from both public and private schools.

Secondary Achievement (Cont.) test and took 13 of the top 15 scores. Students and sponsoring teachers in the top 10 won a cash prize, and all of those students were from Union.  First-place student Alexander Holt, his parents, his teacher, and principal received an invitation to attend the group’s annual awards banquet.

Two Moore students - third grader Victoria Kargl and fourth grader Yosef Maroof were first- and second-place winners in the state aviation poster contest. Both were recognized in Oklahoma City in a formal ceremony by the Oklahoma Aeronautics Commission. Moore won first place and $750 at the Tulsa Run in the small schools division with more than 300 entries.  Jefferson also won first place and $750 in the new schools division with 97 participants. Peters won two honors collecting $1,250 - $500 for the largest percent increase school team and $750 for first place large school division.

More than 400 eighth graders received PRIDE cards through a program the school uses to acknowledge and reward students who are making good choices. Students must make A’s or B’s in all classes, have good attendance, never receive a discipline referral, or be assigned any form of detention.  Special PRIDE privileges include front of the lunch line pass, a special area to sit at lunch, and access to hallways and lockers in the morning before the other students are dismissed from the Commons.

Six Oklahoma gymnasts who train with T3, Tulsa’s Tumbling and Tramp o l i n e Team, qualified for the JumpStart National Team and trained at the USA Gymnastics (USAG) Training Camp in Huntsville, Alabama, with some of the best elite and Olympic coaches in the country.  Sixth grader Sabrina Bogle and Andersen fifth grader Bailey Bynum made the national team for the second year in a row.

Eighth grader Mackenzie Kulka was a big winner in trampoline events at the Olympic Training Center in Colorado Springs. She took home two first-place gold cups, one in level 10 synchronized tramp and the other in level 10 individual trampoline. Seventh graders Casey Cai, Rachel Hensley, and John Mohr qualified for grand recognition in the Duke University Talent Identification Program, and 44 Union students qualified for state recognition by taking the SAT or ACT as part of the 2009 Duke University 7th Grade Talent Search.

Union Intermediate & High School Athletic Achievement

The seventh grade Competition Choir competed at the Heartland Music Fest in Oklahoma City and not only won a Superior rating, but also took the Sweepstakes trophy for highest total points.

Senior Trevor Horstmann won a state tennis championship in No. 2 singles and finished the season 33-0 with a 6-0, 6-0 win in the final.

Elementary Achievement

Senior Taylor Monaghan was named Gatorade’s boys’ state cross country runner of the year. The award recognizes athletic excellence, academic achievement, and character on and off the race course.

Andersen third grader Mallory King arrived at school in a fire truck with sirens blowing, dressed as a fireman. She received the honor after winning the City of Broken Arrow’s “Prevent Home Fires” picture contest with her entry about the importance of smoke alarms.  Darnaby fifth grader Fletcher Lowe won second place in the Tulsa Library Kids’ Creative Writing contest for his short story.

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Winners of All-Metro and All-State player of the year honors for the fall and winter sports were All-Metro boys’ swimmer of the year - Nelson Head, and All-Metro football player of the year - Tracy Moore. Steven Baker was cross country boys’ runner of the year and the Jim Thorpe Award winner for the second year in a row.


Union won its fifth state football title with a 34-20 win over Jenks before a crowd of 16,000 at Boone Pickens Stadium in Stillwater.

Union Intermediate & High School Athletic Achievement (Cont.)

The Highsteppers competed in the Champion Dance national competition in Orlando, Florida, earning Top 5 finishes in four categories.  They earned a fourth place finish with their Jazz routine, second place finishes in the Kick and Modern Dance categories, and in the Lyrical category the Squad was crowned Champions. 

Senior Jeremy Smith was named All-Metro Football Player of the Year by the Tulsa World. Linebacker Daniel Hausher and defensive back Howard Scarborough represented Union in the All-State football game. Union athletes named to the Oklahoma Coaches Association All-State Teams were Cody Beisel and Joey Sheridan – wrestling; Rachel Bailey, Nelson Head, and Rachael Reagan – swimming; and Destinee Frierson – girls’ basketball.

The Varsity Cheer Squad earned state runner-up at the Oklahoma State cheerleading championships.  They also received the Academic Achievement Award given to squads having a minimum cumulative grade point average of 3.25 and one that is ranked in the upper one-third of the 5A classification. 

Sophomore Ashton Collier had a 67 - a course record on the second day of the 58th Women’s Oklahoma Golf Association Girls Junior Championship at Willow Creek Country Club in Oklahoma City. A run-two punch by seniors Boyea Lockett and Taylor Monaghan sparked the Redskins to a Class 6A state track championship.

Seniors Andrea Bedingfield and Krista Anderson were selected for the Oklahoma All-State cheer team.  The girls made the East All-State team, selected from approximately 70 AllRegion team members. 

The Union girls’ swim team placed second and the boys’ team placed fifth in state competition.  Freshman Eastman Holloway won state championships in the 200 Freestyle and 500 Freestyle, senior Nelson Head took state championships in the 200 IM and the 100 Backstroke, and sophomore Megan Myers took state in the 500 Freestyle. The wrestling team capped off an outstanding season by winning the OSSAA Class 6A State Championship. Union wrestlers placing at the state tournament were senior Joey Sheridan who won his third consecutive individual state championship, while freshman Josh Walker won his first state championship.

The Varsity Cheerleaders competed in Dallas at the National Cheerleaders Association Nationals competition placing fifth overall and defending their Super Large Division National Champion title for the third straight year.  The Union Pom squad competed with teams representing 25 different states in the Universal Dance Association’s National Pom and Dance Championships.  The girls’ Hip Hop earned a twelfth place finish, and their Pom routine placed sixth in the nation--the highest ranking team from Oklahoma. 

The boys’ cross country team won the state championship for the second year in a row.  Steven Baker repeated with the individual championship.  Both Steven and Taylor Monaghan earned AllState honors.  The varsity football team was honored by the High School sport web site MAXPREPS and the Army National Guard. Of 15,000 high school football teams nationwide, only 30 of the top-ranked teams were honored.

Teaching & Learning What started as a small one-day showcase in nothing more than the High School lobby, YouthArts! – Union’s annual showcase of its fine arts programs – has grown into a two-week celebration of Union’s most talented artists. Celebrating its 30th anniversary, YouthArts! ran April 20 through May 2, featuring visual arts at the UMAC, dramatic performances, great music, and wonderful choirs.

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“Moving Up” –  or 6th Grade Orientation – was held in July. The fun-filled day was designed to help students overcome the normal anxieties of entering the world of


The 6th/7th Grade Center welcomed Chinese principal Mr. Qian Xiaobo from Chongqing, China, who shadowed Principal Steve Pittman and Assistant Principal Dr. Pamela Bradley in February.  The visit was sponsored by the China Education Association for International Exchange, China’s nationwide non-profit organization which conducts international educational exchanges to advance e d u c a tion and strengthen understanding and friendship among people of all countries and regions of the world. 

Teaching & Learning (Cont.) middle school.  Students had a chance to experience Locker 101, Cafeteria Drill Squad, Class Changing, a building tour and even meet principals, counselors, and some of the teachers. Six Tulsa County school districts were among more than 300 commended by State Superintendent Sandy Garrett and the State Board of Education for exceeding the minimum required teaching time per year. After criticizing a school-calendar law that took effect in May, the State Board passed a resolution that recognized districts having more than the minimum 1,050 hours or 175 days of instruction time. Union agreed to be a part of the Community Agenda for America’s Public Schools, an action plan to ensure that all children enter school healthy, ready to learn and succeed. It prepares students to pursue postsecondary education and become productive family and community members. Key national leaders from education, youth development, community engagement, health and social services, and higher education organizations signed on to a set of strategies and solutions enabling communities to support public education.

Twenty-eight High School students were served in the new ACE teacher cadet course - a primer in teacher education. Students spent the first three quarters in class learning about the sociology, history, and philosophy of education and the final quarter “student teaching.” The program was sponsored by the Oklahoma Board of Regents and a partnership with NSU Broken Arrow. 

Five students successfully completed Union’s workforce development program, “Blueprints for Building Futures,” and all five were recruited to work full-time in construction. The pilot program was an innovative, work-based instruction option for 18-21 year-olds in Tulsa County seeking their high school diplomas or GEDs while acquiring a professional construction-related skill.

EDGE, a summer high school readiness program, was designed to give incoming ninth graders an introduction to life in High School while at the same time earning credit towards graduation.  Each student who completed all 15 days earned ½ credit towards graduation in either U.S. Government or an elective. In addition to the U.S. Government component, they focused on organizational and study skills, high school mathematics preparation, and language arts skills.

More than 230 students tapped into technology to engage in different subjects and meet graduation requirements using the self-paced Apex Learning software. Students worked independently and at their own pace and had the ability to work at home which allowed them to proceed even faster according to their needs and desires. Elizabeth Thoman, founder of the Center for Media Literacy in Los Angeles and a 30-year pioneer, teacher, and strategist in media literacy, toured the High School TV studio and was interviewed and filmed by broadcasting students.

Union’s FOCUS program served students in 7th, 8th, and 9th grade with a modified four-class block schedule.  Students received 55 percent more instructional time in math and English with an emphasis on literacy in all classes.  Class sizes averaged twenty students per teacher and each FOCUS group was assigned a counselor.   The primary objective was to create an environment where students were provided with the necessary support to experience academic success and the necessary skills to proceed academically.

Community Contributions

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The Williams Companies donated $5,000 each for Union’s annual holiday I-Care program and the after-school ESCAPE program at the 6th/7th Grade Center. The total


Children Services for her community involvement during a breakfast where they named her the “You Make a Difference” Community Award winner.

Community Contributions (Cont.) of $10,000 was from the Williams Grassroots Education Grant program, which allows employees to support charities in the communities where they live and work.

Grove teacher Tiffany Bolding was awarded a $4,521.94 grant from the Tulsa Community Foundation for her “Teach Me to Write Figuratively” program.

Rosa Parks Elementary had approximately 70 QuikTrip volunteers working in the building and in the garden during September.  They helped spruce up the garden area and added some features as part of the district’s Global Gardening program. The volunteers built a pergola and raised beds, built a fence, assembled picnic tables, painted a hop scotch area, built bird feeders and worked inside the school as well.

State Farm Insurance Co. presented a $5,000 check to the Intermediate High for a service-learning project dealing with the issues of vehicles running red traffic lights and teen driving safety. The presentation coincided with National Teen Driving Safety Week. Global Gardens students at Rosa Parks had the opportunity to be a part of a global experience when Safiyanu Umar, a Nigerian Agricultural Department extension agent, hosted by Emily Oakley and Mike Appel of Three Springs Farms, visited the after-school program. 

The Community Action Project of Tulsa County (CAP) and Union opened the Rosa Parks Early Childhood Education Center in September. The center provides 12 classrooms to serve about 200 three-year-olds. The Rosa Parks Early Childhood Education Center is operated by Union in partnership with CAP. It is supported by funding from the state of Oklahoma and private donors, including the George Kaiser Family Foundation, as part of the state’s Pilot Early Childhood Program, which seeks to enhance and expand high quality early childhood education throughout Oklahoma for children birth through three years of age.

Luis M. Cruz, president of the Central Texas Region for Verizon Wireless, became principal for a day at Grove after the school was chosen to team with Verizon Wireless. Peters Elementary accepted a $1,000 check from Coldwater Creek to pay teachers for tutoring before and after school in math and reading programs.  Coldwater Creek also provided monthly volunteers to give individualized assistance for teachers and students.  The overall goal of the program was to give back to the communities, both financially and through employee volunteers. 

The George Kaiser Family Foundation donated $250,000 to Union’s FOCUS program which provides academic counseling to students in grades 7-10 who need to make marked improvements in math and English. The funds were used to pay for three FOCUS counselors, two teacher aides, administrative expenses, and student incentives and field trip expenses. Union’s Focus on Creating and Understanding Success (FOCUS) program was created in 2007 to provide students with the needed support and structure to assist them to be academically successful.

The Assistance League of Tulsa awarded grants to teachers through the Betty Bradstreet Endowment Fund. They included Clark principal Theresa Kiger-$1500; Peters teacher Jamie Lazalier-$858.56; Jarman principal Patti Pitcock-$715; Grove teacher Tiffany Bolding-$1000; Jarman enrichment specialist Jill Fitts-$450; Peters teacher Richelle Breitzke-$1000; Peters media specialist Kay Leslie-$1000; and High School teacher and debate coach Melissa Carrell-$1,220 (matching funds).

The High School was awarded a $4,700 grant for a partnership with Northeastern State University’s College of Education to support projects connected to the ACE teacher cadet program.  This project allowed for the “College Connection” between the students in the ACE program at Union High School and teacher education candidates and faculty in the NSU College of Education.

Boevers established a partnership with Tee Town Golf and participated in their SNAG (Starting New At Golf) program. Students who demonstrated good behavior through the first quarter were treated to a Good Behavior Party featuring golf lessons.

Clark principal Theresa Kiger was honored by Family and 10


American Indian 5.2%, Asian 1.6%, Hispanic 7.2%, Caucasian and other 81.5%. Three hundred sixty-eight were male and 1,443 female.

Community Contributions (Cont.) Grove teacher Tiffany Bolding was selected to attend the Colonial Williamsburg Teacher Institute.  She applied for and received The Oklahoma Foundation for Excellence Grant. 

At the end of 2008-2009, Union had 59 Nationally Board Certified teachers at 17 schools and 36% of district teaching and administrative staff held graduate-level degrees – 348 had master’s degrees and 21 had doctorates.

The Higher Education Roundtable awarded Jarman principal Patti Pitcock a grant for $225 to purchase prekindergarten Community Helper puppets for the dramatic play center of the classrooms.

Professional Development About 1,200 educators attended a national education conference hosted by Union at the Renaissance Tulsa Hotel & Convention Center in July. Sponsored by Solution Tree, a national education organization, the Professional Learning Communities at Work Institute was designed to help educators implement the most promising strategies for improving their schools in substantive ways and helping students learn. This was the third year Union had been a part of the conference and the first year to host it.

Alternative junior high teacher Kim Unruh was one of 20 teachers in Tulsa County who won a grant from the Arts and Humanities Council’s Higher Education Cultural Roundtable.

In an effort to ensure safety and promote a healthy learning environment, Union worked directly with secondary students to talk about concerns they faced every day and how to deal with them using the S.A.R.A. (Scanning, Analysis, Response and Assessment) program. Under S.A.R.A., students identified negative issues that might adversely affect them at school, such as apathy, low self-esteem, peer pressure and so on, and then worked with teachers to develop responses to deal with those issues.

Grove fourth grade teacher Celesta Catcher won a grant from US Cellular through the DonorsChoose program. Her class received a large rug for their “frog pond” themed room. Intermediate High teacher Cindy Brown received a $500 grant to purchase a pen tablet for her graphics class through US Cellular and the DonorsChoose program.

Employee Achievement Betsy Glad, a third grade teacher at Cedar Ridge Elementary School, was named a top-12 finalist for the 2009 Oklahoma State Teacher of the Year.

Six Union teachers received grants from Fund for Teachers.  Kara Brunk, Janie Evans, and Nicole Miranda (6th/7th Grade Center) were granted a trip to Costa Rica to assist the Ecology Project International in authentic research for the international conservation of sea turtles. Moore teachers Karen Dale and Debbie McClellan won a grant that allowed them to study the genesis of European fairytales with a 21-day trip to Germany and Denmark. McAuliffe’s Lisa Shotts attended summer institutes at Columbia University to develop and enhance the teaching of reading and writing.

Intermediate High PreAP biology teacher Andrea Gaines was named the 20082009 Union Teacher of the Year. The Site Teachers of the Year were Sharon Berumen (Andersen); Lisa Welter (Boevers); Norma Keys (Briarglen); Sarah Worley (Cedar Ridge); DeAnne Finley (Clark); Dana Bundy (Darnaby); Deanna Ogez (Grove); Jessica Smith (Jarman); Diana Irick (Jefferson); Molly Linehan (McAuliffe); Brooke Kasbaum (Moore); Sharon Beam (Peters); Cynthia Elliott (Rosa Parks); Rebecka Rhodes (6th Grade); Julie Gardner (7th Grade); Haley Brad-

Employee Statistics Union’s Employee Clinic provided free flu shots and no- or low-cost wellness screenings for all qualifying employees at a number of Union sites in November. During 2008-2009, Union employed 73 administrators – 57 certified and 16 non-certified and 968 certified teachers. Support staff members accounted for another 770 positions, 605 full time and 165 part time. The ethnic diversity among the staff was African-American 4.5%;

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(NSTA) is the largest professional organization in the world promoting excellence and innovation in science teaching and learning.

Employee Achievement (Cont.) ley (8th Grade); Jeff Kennedy (Alternative); and Ginger Swanson (High School).

Jeff Murry, web and video instructor at the Intermediate High, won The Writing Teacher Tips and Techniques Contest. The online contest asked teachers to submit a tip for helping students in the writing process. Murry’s tip was a short video on using the Internet to help engage students in the writing process.

Moore behavior tech Steven Blades was named the 2009 Support Employee of the Year. The honor was the first time that Union coworkers recognized a support employee across all departments.

Boevers teachers Jacque Wiles and Karen Pearman were selected for the State Superintendent’s Master Teachers Project.  Wiles’ focus was on elementary language arts and reading, and Pearman’s focus was on social studies.  Both participated in professional development, facilitated book study groups, and served on a regional conference planning committee.

Fourteen Union teachers earned National Board Certification in 2008 including Karen Pearman – Boevers; Aaron Parsons – Darnaby; Paige Bergin, Sharon Ellis, Sonya Neece, and Sheri Tallman – Jarman; Sue Byrd – Jefferson; Linda Barton – Peters; Dena Chisholm – Rosa Parks; Timilyn Downey and Jan Green – 6th Grade; Tammy Ward – 7th Grade; Melissa Underwood – 8th Grade; and Diana Bjornson – Intermediate High.

Cedar Ridge Elementary won third place in the large division for third highest API in the category of large schools for Academic Performance Index (API) scores in a contest sponsored by the State Department of Education. Qualified teachers received a $1,000 bonus. Grove fifth grade teacher Tiffany Bolding was selected by State Superintendent Sandy Garrett to participate in the Master Teachers Project sponsored by the OK Department of Education. 

High School world history teacher Sandy Thompson contracted with Old American Publishing to write a regional history book on oil patch communities in the northeastern section Oklahoma titled Boomtowns in the Oil Patch.

Jarman fifth grade teacher Denise Thomas was named one of two state finalists for the Presidential Award for Excellence in Teaching of Science.  One of the highest honors a teacher can receive is being named a finalist for the Presidential Award for Excellence in Mathematics and Science Teaching.

Tulsa Advocates for Rights of Citizens named Kem Morrow Educator of the Year. TARC is affiliated with Tulsa Area United Way as well as the national group for handicapped citizens’ rights. High School AP Art and English teacher Janet Purinton was selected as one of 25 nationwide participants for the National Endowment for the Humanities Summer Institute in China.  The five-week program included excursions and workshops as well as opportunities to develop classroom curriculum with Professor Annette Juliano, a renowned art historian at Rutgers University and Dr. Hsin-Mei Agnes Hsu, Director of Education and Dean of the Confucius Institute, both renowned specialists in Asian art. 

Jarman fifth grade teacher Paige Bergin was selected as Oklahoma’s Outstanding Teacher in Mathematics at the elementary level by the Oklahoma/Arkansas Section of the Mathematical Association of America (OK-AR MAA).

Alternative teacher Harriet Chenault was a cast member of “Hannah and Martin” which advanced to regional competition in the American Association of Community Theatre. Intermediate High teacher Leland Newton was selected as one of 185 science teachers from around the nation to take part as Fellows in the 2008 NSTA New Science Teacher Academy. The National Science Teachers Association

Jarman teachers Paige Bergin, Kristin Henness, and Jessica Smith were chosen from this area for the State Department of Education’s Master Teacher Project for Professional Development.  McAuliffe first grade teacher Kim Dyer and her son, Lane, published their first book together – Lane’s Imagination. Lane not only helped write the story but also illustrated 12


for the district.  Winners were Paige Bergin (Jarman), Julie Gateley (McAuliffe), Andrea Holcomb (ESC), Rebecca Morales (IHS), Beverly Thummel (ESC), Tamara Pittman (HS), and Susan Weavel (Grove). They were honored with a tree-planting ceremony in Central Park at Union. 

Employee Achievement (Cont.) two of the pictures in the book. The story is about a boy who never gets bored because he uses his imagination to draw adventures that seem to come to life. 

Senior students at the Oklahoma School of Science and Mathematics honored their favorite hometown teachers during a special recognition ceremony.  Intermediate teachers Debbie Mooney and Donna Hardway were honored by Grace Kim and Jackson Autrey respectively, and Clark teacher Edith Wilson was honored by Ding Ren.

Peters media specialist Kay Leslie was selected to attend the George Washington Teachers Institute in Mt. Vernon, Virginia, during July. Superintendent Dr. Cathy Burden was named a recipient of the prestigious Whitney M. Young Jr. Service Award by the Indian Nations Council of the Boy Scouts of America. In keeping with the spirit of Young, a prominent social reformer and civil rights leader who worked to improve the lives of young African Americans, Burden was honored for her dedication and commitment to improving Tulsa’s workplace and community environment.  The national award is designed to recognize “unsung heroes”—people who do exceptional service for disadvantaged youth. Union’s Finance Division was recognized by two finance associations and the State Department of Education for its financial reporting. The state awarded a Certificate of Achievement for Excellence in Annual Financial Reporting to Union for the school year ending June 30, 2008, giving Union a perfect 100-percent score.

Varsity football coach Kirk Fridrich was named All-Metro Coach of the Year. Union coaches named OCA Region 7 Coaches of the Year included Rudy Garcia (boys’ basketball), David Lynn (swimming), Kevin Gannon (tennis), Steve Dunlap (wrestling), and Art Davis (Junior High Coach of the Year).

The Certificate of Excellence in Financial Reporting by the Association of School Business Officials International and the Certificate of Achievement for Excellence in Financial Reporting by the Government Finance Officers Association were given to Union Public Schools. This was the sixteenth consecutive year for Union to earn the national distinctions from both of these agencies. (See certificates on pages 23-24.)

Parent Support The Basketball Booster Club honored Joel Hartman with their first annual “Fan of the Year” award. Mr. Hartman became a fan and a regular attendance fixture after making friends with Union students when they visited Woodland Terrace Retirement Community for the annual “senior prom” coordinated by High School Leadership students. He said he not only enjoyed watching the growth and development of both the girls’ and boys’ teams, he also appreciated the character, sportsmanship, and integrity displayed by both the student-athletes and coaches.  

Student Assistance Program Coordinator Danny Williams was honored by the City of Broken Arrow with a proclamation in his honor for his “philanthropy and acts of kindness” to help make Broken Arrow a greater city and “improving the lives of countless others.” Treasury clerk Bernice Tharps won honors at the National Soul Food Cook-off in Oklahoma City. Tharps won first place on pork roast, first on booth decoration, third place on black-eyed peas and on BBQ sauce.

The Union Schools Education Foundation distributed 44 grants totaling $32,332.16 to 47 teachers at 15 of the district’s 18 sites. The classroom grants ranged from $121.19 to the maximum amount of $5,000.

Fifty ecologically-minded employees responded to a Twelve Days of Green Up campaign by sending in ideas for the Green Up committee to consider.  Six practical suggestions to make Union more ecologically responsible were highlighted by the committee.  The ideas were a combination of short-term plans that could lead to immediate conservation and suggestions for long-term energy savings that might take a while to incorporate into building plans

Union and its Parent-Teacher Association became the first in Oklahoma to launch “Be There,” a national multimedia campaign to persuade parents to find opportunities to connect with or to “be there” for their kids on a daily basis. The PTA used posters, videos, and flyers to spread the message to parents in the district and beyond.  Kids who have adults who are there for them, do better in school and in life. 

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school in the area for the Make-A-Wish Foundation with $5,149.97.

Community Service

The Union/Jenks “Save a Life Summer”  blood drive collected 557 units toward the 1,000-pint total goal which translated into as many as 1,650 lives affected.

Toward the end of summer, Clark teachers went door-todoor to visit every Clark student, all 550 of them.  They gave each student a backpack, pencil, magnet, and information regarding school supplies, meet the teacher times, bus stops, and the first day of school.  The staff at Clark Elementary showed how to ‘Be There’ for its community when it hosted a neighborhood block party at the Salida Creek Apartments with free food and drinks, and fun for all. Principal Theresa Kiger was recognized by Family and Childrens Service for community service that “makes a difference.”

Union teachers and staff members also pitched in for the Tulsa Area United Way Day of Caring - a day in which they did yard work at Temple Israel and prepared clientmade holiday greeting cards for sale at the Bridges Foundation.

Eighth Grade FOCUS students asked the school to ‘have a heart’ in February by sponsoring a canned food drive competition through fourth hour classes. Each canned food item was worth one point and each boxed item was worth a half point. The class that collected the most items received a pizza party.

Union Redskins football players teamed up with the Down Syndrome Association of Tulsa (DSAT) to present First Downs for Down Syndrome — a national fund-raising program started by the Kansas City Chiefs. All monies raised provided disability awareness materials to area schools. Down syndrome acceptance and awareness is close to the hearts of the Redskin football team — one of the young men serving as its equipment manager was born with Down syndrome.

Peters’ Student Council raised $289 for the “Nothing But Nets” program. The money raised provided mosquito nets for children in refugee camps in Africa through a program administered by the United Nations. Members of the varsity baseball team visited the John 3:16 mission to help serve meals.

Union came together once again for the annual “I Care” Holiday Project, benefiting hundreds of families and children during the holiday season. The project was made possible by a cadre of volunteers and students in the Drug-Free Youth program, as well as many people and businesses who donated time and money.

Union’s quarterback coach Josh Blankenship accepted a second place plaque and a laptop computer from The Salvation Army’s 2008 Red Kettle Drive on behalf of the football team.  The team also won the High School 8-Hour “Ring-a-Thon” competition for their efforts to raise money for the community.

Communications Web site improvements, facility dedications, enhanced publications, a larger publicity network, and changes to the Union Football Coach’s Show highlighted 2008-2009 in the Communications Department.

Union was nominated for the prestigious Sun Award given by the Tulsa Area United Way to an organization with the overall best campaign, participation, and volunteers. Union employees, students, and patrons donated $167,366 which exceeded its goal and represented an eight-percent increase over the previous year’s total amount. The number of Key Club Donors ($500 or more) was 89.

Collaborating with the Information Technology and Teaching/Learning Departments, Communications launched teacher web pages. These enabled Union teachers to post their photos and professional biographies; classroom phone numbers and e-mail addresses; daily schedules and projects; and other helpful information. The other major change to the district web site was modification of the Employee Network (formerly known as the InTRAnet) to allow employee log-in access from any computer, not just school or office computers.

Students at the Intermediate High and the 6th/7th Grade Center walked to raise money for the Union I Care program. I Care’s goal was to raise $32,000 to aid 753 families and purchase gifts for 1,535 district children. The Moore Student Council raised the most of any

The department assisted with planning and created invitations, programs, and publicity materials for the Jefferson 14


High and the High School; replacement of all secondary student files servers (4); installation of hardware and software for the Safari Montage Video-on-Demand systems at all schools; upgrade of 300 teacher and administrator computer systems; and installation of the new media center program (Destiny) at all schools.

Communications (Cont.) Elementary School and Central Park at Union dedication ceremonies. It provided similar services for the 30th Anniversary Fine Arts Celebration, and coordinated publicity for Union’s Air Force Junior ROTC appearance in the Presidential Inaugural Parade in Washington D.C.

In cooperation with the Operations Department, 120 SMART Interactive white boards were installed at all sites; new phone systems were installed at Cedar Ridge and Jarman; and two Intelligent Science Classrooms were remodeled and installed.

Communications created successful information campaigns for the Union Green-Up conservation effort; the February 2009 bond election; and the Union Collegiate Academy pilot program. With each of these came new flyers and brochures, electronic phone messages, on-hold messages, videos, speaking engagements, and media coverage. Regarding media coverage, Communications Representatives from school sites, district departments and booster clubs provided more than 100 news stories or tips and some 3,000 photographs every month! Union was in the local news approximately 425 times throughout the year, and of that coverage, 56 percent was considered to be positive; seven percent negative, and 37 percent neutral.

IT teamed with Student Assessment for the installation of 650 laptops for end-of-instruction (EOI) testing in the spring and for use the rest of the year by each site for instruction. The new student/parent/employee calling system, (Connect-ED), was installed and used extensively throughout the year to inform parents and employees of school closings and important events. Over the summer, the hard drives on all student computers (3,100) were erased and re-imaged. The computers were then re-named and re-joined to the network.

Winnercomm, a sports production company, donated a news set to Union High School for its television studio, giving the Union Football Coach’s Show a new look. The addition of the Inside Union segment, a short video featuring outstanding Union students and/or programs, broadened the show’s appeal. A partnership with Radio Station 97.1 FM The Sports Animal brought new host Kevin Ward to the show and landed Union’s game broadcasts, which were previously on KRMG Radio, on The Sports Animal.

Economic Condition & Outlook

Technology During 2008-2009, the Information Technology department completed 11,276 work orders. More than 60% of those were completed remotely by the three technicians in the solution center while the end user was on the phone with them. The IT department completed several projects funded by the 2008 bond issue including installation of all computer and networking equipment for the new Jefferson Elementary; upgrade of labs with new computer systems at the Sixth & Seventh Grade, the Eighth Grade, the Intermediate

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Union Public Schools is located within the Tulsa Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA), a seven county area whose population exceeds 905,755 or 25.1 percent of the population of the state of Oklahoma. The Tulsa Metropolitan Chamber of Commerce reports Tulsa’s major industries as aerospace, transportation and logistics; advanced manufacturing and services; health care; IT and telecommunications; petroleum and natural gas; architectural and structural metal manufacturing. The Chamber estimates the value of all goods and services produced in the Tulsa MSA as $33.6 billion, or 29 percent of the Oklahoma economy. Forbes Magazine in 2008 ranked Tulsa fifth highest among the 200 largest metro areas in the country to weather a recession. Tulsa offers a low cost of doing business at seven percent under the U.S. average due to low rent, energy costs, and taxes. Other qualities that attract new growth are Tulsa’s sound infrastructure and low cost of living. Tulsa has not experienced the same reduction in the housing market caused by the mortgage/ housing crisis as the rest of the country. An October 2009 arti-


Parks Elementary School. These clinics provide a convenient way for students to receive a wide range of health care services. They operate at no cost to the school district. The primary goal of the clinics is to serve the families of all children in each of the schools, including those who qualify for Medicaid or have no health insurance. The school clinics provide at least one full-time physician’s assistant or a resident physician. In addition, a pediatrician visits each school clinic as part of a rotating schedule. The physicians work with and assist school nurses.

Economic Condition & Outlook (Cont.) cle in Business Week ranked Tulsa as having the seventh strongest metro economy in the United States, crediting a solid housing market as one of the criteria for the city’s success (see Statistical Section on pages 95-96 for additional demographic details). However, the ongoing turmoil in the national and international financial markets does have an effect on the area’s economy. The Office of the State Treasurer reports that the state ended its fiscal year with revenues below projections due to a decline in gross production taxes on oil and natural gas, a reflection of low prices of these commodities. These lower oil and gas prices will continue to negatively affect state revenues in the current year as the state feels the impact of slower revenue streams and rising operating costs.

In addition to student healthcare, Union partners with the University of Oklahoma Physicians-Tulsa to provide low cost medical services for its employees through an employee clinic. This unique partnership provides access to quality healthcare while controlling escalating healthcare costs. The clinic is staffed by a fully-licensed OU physician, a physician assistant and a licensed practical nurse. Even some pharmacy services are available.

Enrollment Union has experienced significant growth in student enrollment. During the 2000-2001 school year, the district recorded total enrollment of 13,054. In 2008-2009, enrollment reached 14,658. The administration projects enrollment in the 2009-2010 school year to reach more than 15,000 students with the continuation of the four-year-old program to every elementary site and the three-year-old program, serving approximately 1,109 students in both programs. A steady yet moderate growth is forecast through 2010. Additional enrollment details may be found in the Statistical Section of this CAFR.

The unemployment rate in the Tulsa MSA declined to 4.1 percent in 2007, then continued a decline to a 2008 level of 3.8 percent. However, the Tulsa Metropolitan Chamber of Commerce projects the 2009 unemployment rate to increase to 5.1 percent. It also projects that the rate will fluctuate between 4.8 and 5.5 percent through 2012 as the impact of the current national economic event filters through Oklahoma. Union Public Schools contributes to Tulsa’s workplace initiatives by offering community programs for both adults and children such as: * Adult Basic Education – classes for adults who need basic instruction in reading, writing, math, and life skills, * *

Workplace Education – links education goals to the employer’s desire for high performance work and product quality,

Facilities

G.E.D. Preparation – instruction to prepare adults to take the Tests of General Educational Development (G.E.D.),

To accommodate this growth in student population, the district maintains over 2.5 million square feet of facilities, including thirteen elementary schools (grades pre-kindergarten-five), a Sixth/Seventh Grade Center, an Eighth Grade Center, an Intermediate High School (grades 9-10), an Alternative School serving both middle school and high school students, a High School (grades 11-12), and an Education Service Center. The district’s newest construction includes an early childhood center which opened in the fall of 2008. Please refer to the Statistical Section of this CAFR for additional facility details.

* English as a Second Language – instruction to non English speaking adults to help them be productive citizens of our community. The district continues to be a leader in healthcare initiatives. A joint effort between University of Oklahoma School-Based Bedlam Clinic and Union Public Schools produces cutting-edge services for the Union community. The Union Public Schools Bedlam School-Based Health Clinic operates at both Roy Clark Elementary School, and Rosa

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ing data is compiled to allow for the preparation of financial statements in conformity with generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP). The internal control structure is designed to provide reasonable, but not absolute, assurance that these objectives are met. The concept of reasonable assurance recognizes that 1) the cost of a control should not exceed the benefits likely to be derived; and 2) the valuation of costs and benefits requires estimates and judgments by management.

Bond Funds On February 10, 2009, district voters overwhelmingly approved a $20-million bond proposal which included funds for phase II of the baseball/softball complex; performing arts center upgrades, furniture; acquisition of textbooks, media books and instructional hardware/software; and building repairs and renovations to sites districtwide. Other equally crucial items on the ballot included textbooks and classroom materials; library books; instructional equipment; technology, operations equipment, security cameras and equipment, building repairs and renovations to sites districtwide.

Long-Term Financial Planning The Board of Education of Union Public Schools, in conjunction with the Superintendent and Chief Financial Officer, establishes a system of sound financial planning and management to assure that the district’s objectives are addressed and that funds are expended in accordance with plans expressed through the Board budget. The financial management system components include: 1) a planning process that consists of a review of state statutes, Board policies, concepts, ideas, problems, constraints, approaches and systems before dollar amounts are established in the budget; and 2) a budget that is the expression of the plans of the Board through three main budgets – the General Fund, a Special Revenue Fund and the Child Nutrition Fund.

Grants/Federal Programs During the 2008-2009 school year, Union received more than $9.3 million in federal grant money. Grants were used to fund such programs as drug education, special education, professional development, remedial programs, enrichment programs in math and reading, and supplies and materials. The district’s child nutrition program received more than $2.8 million in federal and state money. Approximately 42% of Union’s students were eligible for free or reduced meals.

Budgetary Controls

The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA) appropriated significant new funding for programs under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) and under Title I. The overall goals of the ARRA funds are to stimulate the economy in the shortterm and invest in education and other essential public services to ensure the long-term economic health of our nation. ARRA funds were distributed quickly to states and other entities in order to avert layoffs and create jobs. Union Public Schools received in excess of $2.3 million of ARRA funds for 2008-2009.

The district utilizes budgetary controls to ensure compliance with legal appropriation limitations and to provide an operating plan for the district’s resources. The annual appropriated budget includes activity of the General, Special Revenue Funds and Child Nutrition Funds. Capital projects activity is controlled with approval of projectlength financial plans. Initial budgets are adopted at the beginning of the fiscal year with periodic amendments approved by the Board as necessary. The level of budgetary control is maintained by fund, project, and function. Individual line items may be adjusted without Board action, but total budgeted expenditures may not exceed appropriations at the major fund level without Board approval. The district utilizes an encumbrance system as a technique of budgetary control with encumbered appropriations lapsing at year end.

Internal Control Management of the district is responsible for establishing and maintaining an internal control structure designed to ensure that the assets of the district are protected from loss, theft or misuse and to ensure that adequate account-

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district to include the right of the district to acquire buildings, equipment or other facilities or improve school sites through such an agreement. It also authorizes a district to use proceeds for the sale of bonds, as authorized under the Oklahoma Constitution, for lease-purchase payments.

Independent Audit Oklahoma state statutes require an annual audit by independent certified public accountants. The accounting firm of Cole and Reed, LLP, was selected by the Board to conduct the audit. In addition to meeting the requirements set forth in state statutes, the audit was also designed to meet the requirements of the Federal Single Audit Act of 1984 and related OMB Circular A-133. The auditor’s report on the basic financial statements is included in the financial section of this report.

Closing In closing, without the leadership and support of the Union Board of Education, preparation of this report would not have been possible. Sincerely,

Catherine E. Burden, Ph.D. Superintendent

Debra J. Jacoby, CPA Chief Financial Officer/Treasurer

Major Initiatives Major initiatives that were enacted as a result of the 2009 Oklahoma Legislative Session included:

Catherine L. Smart, CPA Director of Financial Reporting/Treasurery

HB 1837: Inner City Schools Rescue Program – authorizes the Oklahoma Commission for Teacher Preparation to establish a program to recruit and train teachers to work in inner city schools and provide technical assistance and support to those teachers.

Gail Easterling, CPA Director of Accounting

HCR 1004: Internet-Based Education Administration Task Force – creates a task force to study the issues related to the administration of Internet-based courses and curriculum in public schools. HB 1592: Surety Bond – requires any superintendent or financial officer who has supervision of or authority to expend school district funds to be required to furnish a surety bond of not less than $100,000. The bill also requires any lease-purchase agreement entered into by a school 18


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Board of Education 2008-2009

Name

Scott McDaniel Jeff Bennett Ross Ford Heather McAdams Ed Payton

Office

Seat

Term of Office

President Vice President Clerk Member Member

4 1 2 3 5

2009-2014 2006-2011 2007-2012 2008-2013 2005-2010

Administration 2008-2009 Cathy Burden, Ph.D. - Superintendent Debra Jacoby, CPA - Chief Financial Officer/Treasurer Kirt Hartzler, Ed.D. - Asst. Superintendent for Teaching & Learning Jarod Mendenhall - Asst. Superintendent for Support Services Charlie Bushyhead - Executive Director of Secondary Education Kathy Dodd, Ph.D. - Executive Director of Elementary Education Gretchen Haas-Bethell - Executive Director of Communications Lee Snodgrass - Executive Director of Technology Cynthia Solomon - Executive Director of Human Resources Jackie White - Executive Director of Pupil Accounting/Grants Steve Dunlap - Director of Athletics Gary Greenhill - Director of Transportation Penny Kay, Ed.D. - Director of Special Education Cathy Smart, CPA - Director of Financial Reporting/Treasury Ed Tackett - Director of Fine Arts Michelle Bergwall - Director of Construction Chuck Chapman - Director of Maintenance Services Susan Crowder - Director of Federal Programs Drew Diamond - Director of Security Gail Easterling, CPA - Director of Accounting Chuck Hanna - Director of Evening & Summer Academy Joanna Jamison - Director of Adult & Community Education Sarah McBryde - Director of Marketing Lynn McClure - Director of Early Childhood Center Lisa Neal, CPA - Director of Payroll Tim Neller - Director of Child Nutrition Todd Nelson - Director of Student Assessment Lisa Witcher - Director of Professional Development Hassan Yekzaman - Director of Facilities Services David Young - Director of Purchasing & Supply Management

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Union Public Schools Administrative Organizational Chart Board of Education

Superintendent of Schools Chief Financial Officer/ Treasurer

*Executive Director of Human Resources *Executive Director of Pupil Accounting/Grants *Director of Financial Reporting/Treasury *Director of Accounting *Director of Payroll

Executive Director of Communications

Asst. Supt. for Teaching & Learning *Director of Special Education *Director of Fine Arts *Director of Athletics *Director of Professional Development *Director of Early Childhood *Director of Adult/Community Education *Director of Student Achievement Exec. Dir. for Secondary Teaching & Learning

Asst. Supt. for Support Services *Executive Director of Technology *Director of Facilities *Director of Maintenance *Director of Child Nutrition *Director of Transportation *Director of Construction *Director of Purchasing *Director of Marketing *Director of Security

Exec. Dir. for Elementary Teaching & Learning

*Secondary Principals/Assistants *Summer/Evening Academy

*Elementary Principals/Assistants *Director of Federal Programs 2008-2009

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Independent Auditors’ Report To the Board of Education Union Public Schools Tulsa, Oklahoma We have audited the accompanying financial statements of the governmental activities, business-type activities, and each major fund of Union Public Schools (the “District”) as of and for the year ended June 30, 2009, which collectively comprise the District’s basic financial statements as listed in the table of contents. These financial statements are the responsibility of the District’s management. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on these financial statements based on our audit. We conducted our audit in accordance with auditing standards generally accepted in the United States of America and the standards applicable to financial audits contained in Government Auditing Standards, issued by the Comptroller General of the United States. Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial statements are free of material misstatement. An audit includes examining, on a test basis, evidence supporting the amounts and disclosures in the financial statements, assessing the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the overall financial statement presentation. We believe that our audit provides a reasonable basis for our opinion. In our opinion, the financial statements referred to above present fairly, in all material respects, the respective financial position of the governmental activities, the business-type activities, and each major fund of the District, as of June 30, 2009, and the respective changes in financial position and cash flows, where applicable, thereof and the respective budgetary comparisons for the General Fund and the Building Fund, for the year then ended, in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America. Management’s Discussion and Analysis on pages 25 through 36 and the Schedule of Funding Progress for Other Post Employment Benefits on page 70 are not required parts of the basic financial statements but are supplementary information required by the Governmental Accounting Standards Board. We have applied certain limited procedures, which consisted principally of inquiries of management regarding the methods of measurement and presentation of supplementary information. However, we did not audit the information and express no opinion on it.

23


Our audit was conducted for the purpose of forming opinions on the financial statements that collectively comprise the District’s basic financial statements. The combining and individual nonmajor fund financial statements and other schedules, listed in the table of contents as Combining Schedules and Capital Assets Used in the Operation of Governmental Funds, respectively, are presented for purposes of additional analysis and are not a required part of the basic financial statements. Such information has been subjected to the auditing procedures applied in the audit of the basic financial statements and, in our opinion, is fairly presented, in all material respects, in relation to the basic financial statements taken as a whole. The accompanying Introductory and Statistical sections, as listed in the table of contents, have not been subjected to the auditing procedures applied in the audit of the basic financial statements and, accordingly, we express no opinion on them.

Oklahoma City, Oklahoma December 3, 2009

24


The Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Union Public School District’s financial performance provides a narrative overview of the district’s financial activities for the fiscal year ended June 30, 2009. The intent of this discussion and analysis is to look at the district’s financial performance as a whole. Readers should also review the transmittal letter, notes to the basic financial statements, and supplementary information to enhance their understanding of the district’s financial performance. Financial Highlights Key financial highlights for fiscal year 2009 are as follows: »

In total, net assets increased $5.03 million. Net assets of governmental activities increased $4.53 million which represents a 3.4 percent increase from fiscal year 2008.

»

Net assets of business-type activities increased $498,444 or 20.1 percent from fiscal year 2008.

»

General revenues accounted for $95.53 million in revenue or 77.6 percent of all revenues. Program specific revenues in the form of charges for services and sales, grants and contributions accounted for $27.57 million or 22.4 percent of total revenues of $123.09 million.

»

The district had $113.43 million in expenses related to governmental activities; only $22.45 million of these expenses were offset by program specific charges for services, grants or contributions. Expenses are shown in programs that are easily identifiable utilizing the current Oklahoma Cost Accounting System (OCAS) coding structure.

»

Among the major funds, the general fund had $94.90 million in revenues, $91.74 million in expenditures, and $441,975 in transfers into the fund resulting in a fund balance increase of $3.60 million. The building fund had $3.59 million in revenues, $4.31 million in expenditures, and $434,125 in transfers into the fund yielding a fund balance decrease of $286,140. Bond fund revenues totaled $241,592 and bond sale proceeds were $20.0 million. Expenditures in the bond fund totaled $20.82 million. The sinking fund had $18.93 million in revenues and $17.61 million in expenditures.

»

Net assets for the child nutrition enterprise fund increased $498,444. This increase resulted from operating revenues of $2.10 million and nonoperating revenues of $3.03 million exceeding operating expenses of $4.63 million.

Overview of the Financial Statements This Comprehensive Annual Financial Report (CAFR) consists of a series of basic financial statements: 1) governmentwide financial statements, 2) fund financial statements, and 3) notes to the financial statements. Other supplementary information is included in addition to the basic financial statements. These statements are organized so the reader can understand Union Public School District as a financial whole, an entire operating entity. The statements then proceed to provide an increasingly detailed look at specific financial activities. Government-wide financial statements. The government-wide financial statements are designed to provide information about the activities of the district as a whole, presenting both an aggregate view of the district’s finances and a longer-term view of those finances. The Statement of Net Assets presents information on all of the district’s assets and liabilities, with the difference between the two reported as net assets. 25


The Statement of Activities presents information showing how the district’s net assets changed during fiscal year 2009. While this document contains the large number of funds used by the district to provide programs and activities, the view of the district as a whole looks at all financial transactions and asks the question, “How did we do financially during 2009?” The Statement of Net Assets and the Statement of Activities answer this question. These statements include all assets and liabilities using the accrual basis of accounting similar to the accounting used by most private-sector companies. This basis of accounting takes into account all of the current year’s revenues and expenditures regardless of when cash is received or paid. These two statements report the district’s net assets and changes in those assets. This change in net assets is important because it tells the reader that, for the district as a whole, its financial position has improved or diminished. The causes of this change may be the result of many factors—some financial, some not. Non-financial factors include the district’s property tax base, current property tax laws in Oklahoma restricting revenue growth, facility conditions, mandated educational programs, and other factors. The Statement of Net Assets and the Statement of Activities are divided into two distinct types of activities: »

Governmental activities—most of the district’s programs and services are reported here, including instruction, support services, operation and maintenance of plant, pupil transportation, and extracurricular activities.

»

Business-type activities—these goods or services are provided on a fee basis to recover all of the expenses of the goods or services provided. The district’s child nutrition program is reported as a business-type activity.

The government-wide financial statements can be found beginning on page 37. Fund Financial Statements. A fund is a grouping of related accounts that is used to maintain control over resources that have been segregated for specific activities or objectives. Union Public School District uses fund accounting to ensure and demonstrate compliance with finance-related legal requirements. All of the funds can be divided into three categories: 1) governmental funds, 2) proprietary funds, and 3) fiduciary funds. Governmental Funds. Governmental funds are used to account for essentially the same functions reported as governmental activities in the government-wide financial statements. However, unlike the government-wide financial statements, governmental fund financial statements focus on near-term inflows and outflows of spendable resources, as well as on balances of spendable resources available at the end of the fiscal year. Such information may be useful in evaluating the district’s near-term financing requirements. Because the focus of governmental funds is narrower than that of the government-wide financial statements, it is useful to compare the information presented for governmental funds with similar information presented for governmental activities in the government-wide financial statements. By doing so, readers may better understand the long-term impact of the district’s near-term financing decisions. Both the governmental fund balance sheet and the governmental fund statement of revenues, expenditures, and changes in fund balances provide a reconciliation to facilitate this comparison. Information is presented separately in the governmental fund balance sheet and in the governmental fund statement of revenues, expenditures, and changes in fund balances for the general fund, the building fund, the sinking (debt service) fund and the bond fund, all of which are considered to be major funds. A summary of the district’s major funds can be found in Note A of the notes to the financial statements beginning on page 51 of this report.

26


The basic governmental fund financial statements begin on page 41 of this report. Proprietary Funds. Proprietary funds use the same basis of accounting as business-type activities. The basic proprietary fund financial statements begin on page 46 of this report. Fiduciary Funds. Fiduciary funds are not reflected in the government-wide financial statement because the resources of those funds are not available to support the district’s own programs. The accounting used for fiduciary funds is much like that used for proprietary funds. The basic fiduciary fund financial statements begin on page 49 of this report. Notes to the financial statements. The notes provide additional information that is essential to a full understanding of the data provided in the government-wide and fund financial statements. The notes to the financial statements can be found beginning on page 51 of this report. Other information. In addition to the basic financial statements and accompanying notes, this report also presents certain required supplementary information concerning the district. Government-Wide Financial Analysis Recall that the Statement of Net Assets provides the perspective of the district as a whole. Table 1 provides a summary comparison of the district’s net assets for fiscal years 2009 and 2008: Table 1 Net Assets (In Millions) Governmental Activities Business-Type Activities 2009 Assets Current Assets Noncurrent Assets Capital Assets, net Other Assets Total Assets

$

Liabilities Current Liabilities Noncurrent Liabilities Total Liabilities Net Assets Invested in Capital Assets, Net of Related Debt Restricted for Debt Service Restricted for Capital Projects Unrestricted Total Net Assets

$

75.26 $

2008

2009

72.96

$

2.71

Total

2008 $

2.12

2009 $

77.97 $

2008 75.08

118.54 22.65 216.46

110.16 24.05 207.17

0.47 0.00 3.17

0.50 0.00 2.62

119.01 22.65 219.63

110.66 24.05 209.79

26.99 52.41 79.40

27.67 46.97 74.64

0.19 0.00 0.19

0.14 0.00 0.14

27.36 52.23 79.59

27.81 46.97 74.78

118.53 8.73 2.59 2.67 132.52

0.47 0.00 0.00 2.52 2.98

0.50 0.00 0.00 1.98 2.48

121.64 9.80 2.18 3.44 137.06 $

$

27

$

$

122.11 9.80 2.18 5.96 140.05 $

119.03 8.73 2.59 4.66 135.01


Total assets were $219.63 million. Cash and cash equivalents were $39.48 million. Investments totaled $34.35 million. Capital assets net of depreciation were $119.01 million. Taxes and other receivables were $3.40 million. Net assets of the district’s governmental activities increased by $4.53 million. This increase is primarily attributable to increases in student growth, state and local funding sources and current ad valorem collections, which affect the general fund, building fund and sinking fund. The district was able to increase its ending fund balance percentage in the general fund to 13.99 percent on a budgetary basis, which placed it in a favorable operating position to weather the economic downturn. The district will continue to monitor state revenue projections and market conditions to anticipate circumstances that may warrant changes in spending in the next fiscal year. The net assets of the district’s business-type activities increased by $498,444. Analysis of the child nutrition activity indicates that it should remain stable and self-supporting. Governmental Activities. As reported in the Statement of Activities on beginning on page 38 the cost of the district’s governmental activities for the year ended June 30, 2009, was $113.43 million. However, not all of this cost was borne by the taxpayers. Of this amount, $2.11 million was paid by those who used or benefited from the services rendered (e.g., charges for before and after school care and summer school tuition), and $20.34 million was paid through various federal and state grants and contributions. Consequently, the net cost of $90.98 million, after taking into consideration these fees and subsidies, was paid by the taxpayers, unrestricted federal and state aid, and other general revenues. Graph 1 below illustrates the cost of services in the district’s three largest programs -- instruction, support services, and food services. The graph compares the cost of the services with the revenues generated by the program. Graph 1 - Program Revenues and Expenses $70,000,000

$63,851,000

$60,000,000

$49,579,991

$50,000,000 $40,000,000

Program Revenues

$30,000,000

Expenses

$20,000,000 $10,000,000

$14,839,575

$7,611,278

$5,119,554

$4,634,620

$Instruction

Support Services

28

Food Services


Table 2 provides a summary comparison of the district’s change in net assets for the fiscal years 2009 and 2008: Table 2 Changes in Net Assets (In Millions)

Governmental Activities 2009 Revenues Program Revenues: Charges for Services Operating Grants and Contributions Capital Grants and Contributions General Revenues: Property Taxes Other Taxes State Aid Not Restricted to Specific Programs Other Taxes Total Revenues Expenses Instruction: Regular Instruction Special Education Instruction Vocational Education Other Instruction Support Services: Pupil Services Instructional Staff Services General Administration Services School Administration Services Business Services Operations & Maintenance Services Pupil Transportation Services Other Support Services Community Services Capital Outlay Interest on Long-Term Debt Food Services Total Expenses Change in Net Assets Net Assets, Beginning Net Assets, Ending

$

$

2.11 20.34 0.00

Business-Type Activities

2008

$

1.91 14.60 0.00

2009

$

2008

2.10 $ 3.02 0.00

1.85 2.58 0.00

Total 2009

$

2008

4.21 $ 23.36 0.00

3.76 17.18 0.00

49.61 5.20

47.45 5.02

0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00

49.61 5.20

47.45 5.02

39.99 0.72

37.30 2.91

0.00 0.01

0.00 0.05

39.99 0.73

37.30 2.96

117.97

$

109.19

$

5.13

$

4.48

$

123.10

$

113.67

49.63 7.28 0.79 6.15

45.52 6.79 0.70 6.13

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

49.63 7.28 0.79 6.15

45.52 6.79 0.70 6.13

$

6.35 4.41 1.80 7.69 6.94 13.33 3.77 0.37 2.80 0.51 1.61 0.00 113.43

$

6.52 4.17 1.58 7.44 6.33 13.11 3.65 0.25 0.97 2.09 1.97 0.00 107.23

$

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 4.63 4.63

$

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 4.50 4.50

$

6.35 4.41 1.80 7.69 6.94 13.33 3.77 0.37 2.80 0.51 1.61 4.63 118.07

$

6.52 4.17 1.58 7.44 6.33 13.11 3.65 0.25 0.97 2.09 1.97 4.50 111.74

$

4.53 132.52 137.06

$

1.96 130.57 132.52

$

0.50 2.48 2.98

$

(0.02) 2.51 2.48

$

5.03 135.01 140.04

$

1.93 133.08 135.01

29


Total governmental revenues were $117.97 million. Graph 2 illustrates the components of this revenue. Governmental activities increased the district’s net assets by $4.53 million, thereby accounting for a majority of the growth in the net assets of the district.

Graph 2 - Governmental Activities - Revenue by Source Other, $719,569 Operating Grants & Contributions, $20,344,841

Charges for Services, $2,106,012 State Aid, $39,992,313

Other Operating Grants & Contributions Property Taxes Other Taxes

Property Taxes, $49,606,362

Other Taxes, $5,196,047

State Aid Charges for Services

Instruction comprised 56.29 percent of governmental program expenditures. Support services expenditures made up 43.71 percent of governmental expenditures. Graph 3 illustrates the components of the expenses in the governmental activities.

Graph 3 - Governmental Activities - Expenses Instructional Staff Services, $4,408,668

Administration Services, $9,490,625

Pupil Services, $6,345,355

Business Services, $6,937,956 Operations/Maintenance, $13,334,079

Pupil Services Instructional Staff Services Administration Services Business Services Operations/Maintenance

Instruction, $63,851,000

Pupil Transportation Pupil Transportation, $3,771,826 Other, $367,950 Community Services, $2,801,866

Capital Outlay, $513,383 Interest on Long-Term Debt, $1,608,283

Capital Outlay Interest on Long-Term Debt Community Services Other Instruction

The increase in student instructional services expenses represents, in large part, the district’s multi-year plan to prioritize instructional services to address such issues as class size, curriculum development, and negotiated teacher raises. 30


The increase in student instructional services expenses represents, in large part, the district’s multi-year plan to prioritize instructional services to address such issues as class size, curriculum development, and negotiated teacher raises. Business-Type Activities. Business-type activities consist of child nutrition services. This program had operating revenues of $2.10 million, nonoperating revenues of $3.02 million, and expenses of $4.63 million for fiscal year 2009. The increase in Child Nutrition expenditures reflects additional student growth as well as an increase in the cost of food. The Child Nutrition fund ended the year in a positive financial condition. Management has reviewed this program and, barring any unforeseen problems, the child nutrition program should remain stable and require no support from tax revenues. Financial Analysis of the Government’s Funds As noted earlier, Union Public School District uses fund accounting to ensure and demonstrate compliance with financerelated legal requirements. Governmental Funds. The focus of the district’s governmental funds is to provide information on near-term inflows, outflows, and balances of spendable resources. Such information is useful in assessing the district’s financing requirements. In particular, unreserved fund balance may serve as a useful measure of a government’s net resources available for spending at the end of the fiscal year. As of the end of the current fiscal year, the district’s governmental funds reported combined ending fund balances of $59.89 million. Approximately $23.86 million of this total amount constitutes unreserved fund balance. Of this amount, $21.67 million is undesignated and available for spending at the district’s discretion, while the remainder is designated for compensated balances ($1.31 million); incurred claims ($118,494); and early retirement incentives ($769,561). The remainder of fund balance is specifically reserved to indicate that it is not available for new spending because it has already been committed to debt service ($9.77 million); capital projects ($25.26 million); arbitrage ($756,470); and inventories ($217,198). The general fund is the chief operating fund of the district. At the end of the current fiscal year, unreserved fund balance of the general fund was $17.08 million. As a measure of the general fund’s liquidity, it may be useful to compare both unreserved fund balance and total fund balance to total fund expenditures. Unreserved fund balance represents 18.62 percent of total general fund expenditures. The fund balance of the district’s general fund increased by $3.60 million during the current fiscal year. This increase is due primarily as a result of a $2.64 million increase in the district’s mid-term state aid allocation, estimated ad valorem collections above the 95 percent level budgeted, increases in the State Flexible Benefit Allowance, and an upfront Federal Stimulus (ARRA) funding for use in 2009-2010. The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA) appropriated significant new funding for programs under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) and under Title I. The overall goals of the ARRA funds are to stimulate the economy in the short-term and invest in education and other essential public services to ensure the long-term economic health of our nation. ARRA funds were distributed quickly to states and other entities in order to avert layoffs and create jobs. Union Public Schools received in excess of $2.32 million of ARRA funds for 2008-2009. Controlling fiscal year-end expenses to maintain a continuing level of fund balance is also a contributing factor to the district’s financial stability. The district relies on the ending fund balance to meet cash flow needs during the first six months of the following fiscal year. While a small portion of the revenue is collected during the first six months of the fiscal year, the significant revenue collections occur in late spring. This annual cash flow trend requires the district to 31


increase the ending fund balance each year as the expenditure budget grows in order to meet cash flow requirements of the first six months prior to tax revenues being collected. The general fund revenue budget was revised during the year to reflect the mid-term state aid revenue increase of $2.64 million, primarily due to student growth. The official October 2008 child count of 14,566 reflected that the district grew by 209 actual students and 746 weighted students. The district initially built a based on zero student growth. In addition, the district received the Federal Stimulus (ARRA) payment of $2.32 million, and other smaller revenue changes for a total combined revenue budget change of $5.49 million. The general fund expenditure budget was also increased during the year by $4.19 million to fund the 145 new positions required to open Thomas Jefferson Elementary, to allow the expansion of the district’s all-day four-year-old program, and to open the CAPTC Rosa Parks three-year-old program. In addition, the increase to the expenditure budget covered the state-mandated increases in the State Flexible Benefit Allowance, the employer-paid teacher retirement contribution, rising utility costs, the Federal Stimulus (ARRA) allocation, and the payment of a one-tine year-end employee stipend. The variance in the final budget versus the actual revenues and expenditures revealed a variance in revenues of $571,638 and a variance in expenditures of $4.78 million. The approved final expenditure budget was intentionally larger than anticipated actual expenditures to provide the flexibility necessary to manage any unanticipated revenue receipts and expenditures incurred in the final days of the fiscal year. The building fund had a total fund balance of $4.59 million. The net decrease in fund balance during the current year in the building fund was $286,140. This planned decrease in fund balance is attributed to the $1.4 million allocated to fund a portion of the Union Multipurpose Activity Center (UMAC) operating and utility expenses, safety initiatives including County School Resource Officers, as well as custodial positions for the district’s newest facilities, Thomas Jefferson Elementary and the CAPTC Rosa Parks Building. The Oklahoma Constitution allows building funds to be used for erecting, remodeling, repairing, or maintaining school buildings; purchasing furniture, equipment, or computer software; paying energy and utility costs; purchasing telecommunications services; paying fire and casualty insurance premiums; purchasing security systems; and paying salaries of security personnel. The ending fund balance will be used for those purposes. The sinking (debt service) fund had a total fund balance of $9.80 million, all of which was reserved for the payment of debt service. The net increase in fund balance during the current year in the debt service fund was $1.07 million. Millage rates for sinking fund levies are not controlled by the district but are set annually by the Tulsa County Excise Board after a thorough review of property valuations and the district’s debt service needs. The bond fund had a total fund balance of $25.26 million, all of which was reserved for capital projects. The net decrease in fund balance during the current year in the bond fund was $1.15 million. This decrease in fund balance is primarily the result of the construction costs to complete Thomas Jefferson Elementary, and also lower interest rate revenue. On February 10, 2009, district voters approved a $20 million bond proposal which included funds for phase II of the baseball/softball complex; performing arts center upgrades, furniture; acquisition of textbooks, media books and instructional hardware/software; and building repairs and renovations to sites districtwide. Other equally crucial items on the ballot included: textbooks and classroom materials; library books; instructional equipment; technology, operations equipment, security cameras and equipment, building repairs and renovations to sites district wide. Because of its strong patron support base, the district is prudent to keep bonded capacity at traditional levels while not imposing an undue tax burden on the community. Statutory requirements dictate that bond funds be used for the voter-approved purposes of acquiring school sites, constructing and equipping new school facilities, renovating existing facilities, and acquiring transportation equipment.

32


Proprietary Funds. Union Public School District’s proprietary funds provide the same type of information found in the government-wide financial statements, but in more detail. The proprietary funds have operating revenues of $10.67 million and nonoperating revenues of $3.11 million. Operating expenses were $12.86 million. General Fund Budgetary Highlights Union Public School District adopts an annual appropriated budget for its general fund. The district’s budget is prepared according to Oklahoma law and is based on accounting for certain transactions on a basis of cash receipts, disbursements, and encumbrances. The most significant budgeted fund is the general fund. For the general fund, budget basis revenue was $95.38 million with original budget estimates of $90.46 million and a final budget of $95.95 million. The majority of the revenue increase came from mid-term state aid, Federal Stimulus (ARRA) funding, and ad valorem collections. The final expenditure budget was intentionally approved to be larger than needed in order to provide the necessary spending authority to the district by the Board to meet the State of Oklahoma spending requirements. The district must have sufficient budget spending authority to allow for any unanticipated revenues that might be collected during the last thirty calendar days of the fiscal year. During 2007-2008, the majority of the additional spending authority was allocated to the instructional function area. Because the revenue collections were within $571,638 of the final revenue budget, it was not necessary to spend the entire expenditure budget in order to stay within the carryover limit required by the Board. Senate Bill 531 was passed by the Legislature to allow districts with $10 million or more in general fund collections to carry forward an ending fund balance of up to 14 percent. Capital Assets and Debt Administration Capital Assets. At the end of fiscal year 2009, the district had $141.66 million in property, plant and equipment (net of depreciation), of which $141.19 million was in governmental activities. Table 3 shows a comparison of fiscal years 2009 and 2008 balances. Table 3 Capital Assets (Net of Depreciation, in Millions)

Land

Governmental Activities 2009 2008

Business-Type Activities 2009 2008

Total 2009

2008

$

14.29

$

14.19

$

0.00

$

0.00

$

14.29

$

14.19

Construction in Progress

8.36

9.85

0.00

0.00

8.36

9.85

Buildings/Improvements

109.00

101.91

0.00

0.00

109.00

101.91

Machinery, Equipment and Vehicles Total

9.54

8.25

$ 141.19

$ 134.21

0.47 $

0.47

$

0.50

10.01

8.76

0.50

$ 141.66

$ 134.71

Capital assets of $225.56 million exceeded depreciation of $106.55 million. As a growing school district, Union is committed to provide the facilities and tools that enable district staff to produce a quality product. Union’s student population has exceeded the 14,600 mark. Therefore, additional classroom space and equipment are necessary each year to accommodate that growth. The acquisition of capital assets is critical to the Board’s desire to provide lower class sizes districtwide, technology-related instructional opportunities, and neighborhood elementary schools. 33


Bond issue dollars are the only resource available to schools to purchase many of these capital assets since state funding goes almost exclusively to pay teacher and staff salaries. Recent bond issue projects include: *Phase II addition to the softball/baseball complex *Performing Arts Center renovation *Furniture, fixtures and equipment *Roof refurbishments/replacements *Early childhood furniture and playground equipment *Remodel science labs and media center at high school *Acquisition of textbooks and computer hardware/software *Acquisition of athletic, spirit and fine arts uniforms and equipment *Renovations and repairs to various school sites Additional information on the district’s capital assets may be found in note D to the financial statements beginning on page 61. Long-Term Debt. At June 30, 2009, the school district had $63.00 million in bonds outstanding, $16.15 million due within one year. Table 4 summarizes bonds outstanding for fiscal years 2009 and 2008. Table 4 Outstanding Debt, at Year End (In Millions)

2009 General Obligation Bonds Due: 2008/2009 0.00 2009/2010 16.15 2010/2011 17.90 2011/2012 14.10 2012/2013 9.85 2013/2014 5.00 Total

$63.00

2008 15.55 16.15 12.90 9.10 4.85 0.00 $58.55

On April 1, 2009, the district issued $20.0 million in voted general obligation bonds for the purpose of constructing, equipping, repairing and remodeling school buildings, acquiring school furniture, fixtures and equipment, acquiring and improving school sites, and acquiring transportation equipment. The final payment is due April 1, 2014. On April 1, 2008, the district issued $19.4 million in voted combined purpose bonds for the purpose of constructing, equipping, repairing and remodeling school buildings, acquiring school furniture, fixtures and equipment, acquiring and improving school sites, and acquiring transportation equipment. The final payment is due April 1, 2013. On April 1, 2007, the district issued $17.0 million in voted combined purpose bonds for the purpose of constructing, equipping, repairing and remodeling school buildings, acquiring school furniture, fixtures and equipment, acquiring and improving school sites, and acquiring transportation equipment. The final payment is due April 1, 2012. On April 1, 2006, the district issued $15.2 million in voted combined purpose bonds for the purpose of constructing, equipping, repairing and remodeling school buildings, acquiring school furniture, fixtures and equipment, acquiring and improving school sites, and acquiring transportation equipment. The final payment is due April 1, 2011. 34


On April 1, 2005, the district issued $13.0 million in voted general obligation bonds for the purpose of constructing, equipping, repairing and remodeling school buildings, acquiring school furniture, fixtures and equipment, and acquiring and improving school sites. The final payment is due April 1, 2010. Additional information on the district’s long-term debt can be found in note E to the financial statements beginning on page 63 of this report. Economic Factors Fiscal year 2008-2009 ended with evidence that the state’s revenues were being sharply impacted by the nationwide recession. At fiscal year end, general fund revenue collections for the state totaled $5.52 billion. According to the Office of the State Treasurer, those collections were $434.7 million or 7.3 percent below the prior year; and $427.8 million or 7.2 percent below original estimates. During the first half of fiscal year 2009 revenue collections exceeded estimates by $189.5 million or 6.6 percent. However, during the final six months of the fiscal year collections were below the estimates by $617.3 million or 20.1 percent. The state treasurer predicts a revenue shortfall in fiscal year 2010, with slowdowns in every revenue source. Gross production tax collections on oil and natural gas were down 5.5 percent of estimates reflecting the low prices of those commodities. State income taxes generated $220.6 million, which was $74.3 million or 25.2 percent below the prior year. Motor vehicle tax collections were also 25.1 percent below the prior year. Despite revenues falling below appropriations, the state was able to use cash reserves to make up most of the shortfall. The State Treasurer was, however, quick to add that the lower revenue collections will likely prompt cuts to all state agencies in fiscal year 2010. In spite of the downturn, an October 2009 article in Business Week ranked Tulsa as having the seventh strongest metro economy in the United States, crediting a solid housing market as one of the criteria for the city’s success. At the fiscal year’s end, the district’s tax revenue sources and state aid had once again outperformed prior year collections. Union Public Schools began the budgetary year with conservative estimates and revised those budget estimates during the year to reflect the increased revenue collections. The district continued its tradition of maintaining a strong year-end fund balance. During the summer of 2008 the Board of Education approved expenditure budgets that included funds for 101 new positions funded from the General, Building and Child Nutrition Funds. Included were new teaching positions, teacher aide/paraprofessional positions, child nutrition positions, support positions, and one administrative position. The majority of the new positions were needed to address class size needs, the opening of the CAPTC Rosa Parks three-yearold program, and the opening of Thomas Jefferson Elementary. The budget also included an increase in funding for the employer’s portion of the teacher retirement contribution. The district expects student growth to continue, particularly at the secondary level and anticipates continuing to add teachers and programs over the next few years. Although the county assessor provided Union with projections of no growth in the district’s net assessed valuation, actual growth was recorded at two percent. The continued increase in student enrollment and the continued business and residential growth in the district will provide additional ad valorem income. By working to provide mutual benefit to the community and schools, Union has enjoyed a history of positive citizen support. The district’s patron base once again passed a bond issue on February 10, 2009, for $20.0 million. These bond dollars provided the necessary funding for facilities, renovations, technology, textbooks, instructional equipment and uniforms. It is these annual bond dollars and strong patron support that allow Union the opportunity and obligation to maintain facilities and to maximize the use of instructional technology and equipment. State law limits a school district’s bonding capacity to ten percent of its net assessed valuation.

35


Based on these factors, the Board of Education and administration are confident that with prudent fiscal management, Union Public Schools can continue to make instruction the top budgetary priority to ensure the district keeps its academic focus and delivers its services more efficiently and effectively. Union continues to attract families who want excellent learning opportunities for their children, and also continue to attract the best in faculty and staff by providing the facilities and tools that enable them to produce a quality product. Contacting the School District’s Financial Management This financial report is designed to provide our citizen’s, taxpayers, investors, and creditors with a general overview of the district’s finances to show the district’s accountability for the funds it receives. If you have questions about this report or need additional financial information, contact Debra J. Jacoby, CPA, Chief Financial Officer at Union Public Schools, 8506 East 61st Street, Tulsa, Oklahoma 74133.

36


Governmental Activities

Business-Type Activities

Total

ASSETS CURRENT ASSETS Cash and cash equivalents Investments Receivables: Property taxes-delinquent Due from other governments Accrued interest Other Internal balance Inventories TOTAL CURRENT ASSETS

$

37,851,902 $ 33,825,000

1,626,158 $ 525,000

39,478,060 34,350,000

688,358 2,528,493 66,061 60,673 25,000 217,198 75,262,685

58,284 1,288 (25,000) 522,018 2,707,748

688,358 2,586,777 67,349 60,673 739,216 77,970,433

NONCURRENT ASSETS Land and construction-in-progress Capital assets being depreciated, net TOTAL NON-CURRENT ASSETS

22,648,412 118,544,846 141,193,258

466,530 466,530

22,648,412 119,011,376 141,659,788

TOTAL ASSETS

216,455,943

3,174,278

219,630,221

CURRENT LIABILITIES Accounts payable Liability for incurred claims Accrued wages payable Accrued interest payable Current portion of long-term obligations TOTAL CURRENT LIABILITIES

1,248,987 533,094 6,837,278 522,031 17,849,395 26,990,785

52,555 138,481 191,036

1,301,542 533,094 6,975,759 522,031 17,849,395 27,181,821

NON-CURRENT LIABILITIES Non-current portion of long-term obligations Non-current portion of OPEB liability TOTAL NON-CURRENT LIABILITIES

50,465,578 1,940,431 52,406,009

-

50,465,578 1,940,431 52,406,009

TOTAL LIABILITIES

79,396,794

191,036

79,587,830

LIABILITIES AND NET ASSETS

NET ASSETS Invested in capital assets, net of related debt Restricted for debt service Restricted for capital projects Unrestricted TOTAL NET ASSETS

$

See notes to financial statements. 37

121,638,825 9,796,665 2,184,657 3,439,002 137,059,149 $

466,530 2,516,712 2,983,242 $

122,105,355 9,796,665 2,184,657 5,955,714 140,042,391


TOTAL SCHOOL DISTRICT

BUSINESS-TYPE ACTIVITIES Food services

TOTAL GOVERNMENTAL ACTIVITIES

TOTAL SUPPORT SERVICES

SUPPORT SERVICES Pupil services Instructional staff services General administration services School administration services Business services Operations and maintenance services Pupil transportation services Other support services Community services Capital outlay Interest on long-term debt

TOTAL INSTRUCTION

GOVERNMENTAL ACTIVITIES Instruction Regular instruction Special education instruction Vocational education Other instruction

$

$

118,065,611

38

4,206,256

2,100,244

23,364,151

3,019,310

20,344,841

2,106,012

113,430,991

4,634,620

5,872,173

1,739,105

14,472,668

6,030,136 4,748,138 308,224 3,386,170

49,579,991

$

$

1,123,284 1,408,941 35,489 458,059 324,738 690,307 148,617 191,593 1,491,145 -

366,907

366,907 -

546,323 60,810 1,131,972 -

$

$

6,345,355 4,408,668 1,802,455 7,688,170 6,937,956 13,334,079 3,771,826 367,950 2,801,866 513,383 1,608,283

63,851,000

49,629,935 7,275,708 793,237 6,152,120

Expenses

Program Revenues Charges Operating for Grants and Services Contributions

$

$

(90,980,138) $

-

(90,980,138)

(41,968,713)

(5,222,071) (2,999,727) (1,766,966) (7,230,111) (6,613,218) (12,097,449) (3,562,399) (176,357) (178,749) (513,383) (1,608,283)

(49,011,425)

(43,232,892) $ (2,527,570) (485,013) (2,765,950)

484,934

484,934

-

-

-

-

-

$

$

Primary Government BusinessGovernmental Type Activities Activities

Net (Expense) Revenue and Changes in Net Assets

(90,495,204)

484,934

(90,980,138)

(41,968,713)

(5,222,071) (2,999,727) (1,766,966) (7,230,111) (6,613,218) (12,097,449) (3,562,399) (176,357) (178,749) (513,383) (1,608,283)

(49,011,425)

(43,232,892) (2,527,570) (485,013) (2,765,950)

Total


See notes to financial statements.

NET ASSETS AT END OF YEAR

39

$

2,983,242

$ 140,042,391

135,009,794

2,484,798 132,524,996 $ 137,059,149

5,032,597

498,444

4,534,153

CHANGES IN NET ASSETS

NET ASSETS AT BEGINNING OF YEAR

95,527,801

31,052,460 18,553,902 5,196,047

13,510

$

95,514,291

-

TOTAL GENERAL REVENUES

$

39,992,313 531,971 201,108

31,052,460 18,553,902 5,196,047

Total

13,510 -

$

Primary Government BusinessGovernmental Type Activities Activities

39,992,313 518,461 201,108

GENERAL REVENUES Taxes Property tax, levied for general purposes Property tax, levied for debt services County taxes State aid not restricted to specific programs Interest and investment earnings Other

Expenses

Program Revenues Charges Operating for Grants and Services Contributions

Net (Expense) Revenue and Changes in Net Assets


This page is intentionally left blank.

40


General Fund ASSETS Cash and cash equivalents Investments Due from other funds Property taxes-delinquent Due from other governments Other Accrued interest Inventories

$

TOTAL ASSETS

$

9,815,874 $ 12,500,000 355,501 2,388,255 60,673 30,733 217,198 25,368,234 $

Building Fund

Sinking Fund

4,207,705 $ 825,000 50,785 22,235 2,033 5,107,758 $

Other Governmental Funds

Bond Fund

4,912,962 $ 4,750,000 282,072 118,003 15,700 10,078,737 $

Total Governmental Funds

10,991,355 $ 14,750,000 15,728 25,757,083 $

2,664,875 $ 666,808 3,331,683 $

32,592,771 32,825,000 666,808 688,358 2,528,493 60,673 64,194 217,198 69,643,495

494,568 $ 494,568

- $ 48,860 332,364 381,224

1,248,987 6,837,278 641,808 332,364 688,358 9,748,795

LIABILITIES AND FUND BALANCES LIABILITIES Accounts payable Accrued wages payable Due to other funds Other liabilities Deferred revenues

$

TOTAL LIABILITIES FUND BALANCES Reserved for capital projects Reserved for debt service Reserved for inventories Reserved for arbitrage Unreserved Undesignated Unreserved, reported in other governmental funds Designated for Compensating Balance fund Designated for Insurance Recovery fund Designated for Early retirement incentive fund TOTAL FUND BALANCES TOTAL LIABILITIES AND FUND BALANCES

$

682,914 $ 6,441,322 591,808 355,501 8,071,545

71,505 347,096 50,000 50,785 519,386

$

282,072 282,072

$

217,198 -

-

9,796,665 -

25,262,515 -

756,470

17,079,491

4,588,372

-

-

-

25,262,515

1,305,934 118,494 769,561 2,950,459

25,757,083 $

3,331,683

17,296,689

4,588,372

25,368,234 $

5,107,758 $

9,796,665 10,078,737 $

25,262,515 9,796,665 217,198 756,470 21,667,863 1,305,934 118,494 769,561 59,894,700

AMOUNTS REPORTED FOR GOVERNMENTAL ACTIVITIES IN THE STATEMENT OF NET ASSETS ARE DIFFERENT BECAUSE: Capital assets used in government activities are not financial resources and, therefore, are not reported as assets in governmental funds. Cost of assets Accumulated depreciation

$

246,086,317 (104,893,059)

141,193,258

Property taxes receivable will be collected this year, but are not available soon enough to pay for the current period’s expenditures and, therefore, are deferred in the funds. Long-term liabilities, including bonds payable, are not due and payable in the current period and, therefore, are not reported as liabilities in the funds. Long-term liabilities at year-end consist of: Bonds payable Accrued interest on the bonds Premium on bonds payable Arbitrage Early retirement incentive Compensated absences Other Post Employment benefits

688,358

63,000,000 522,031 225,296 283,082 393,283 4,080,948 1,940,431

(70,445,071)

Internal service funds are used by the District to charge the costs of health insurance benefits and short-term disability benefits for the employees of the District to the individual funds. The assets and liabilities of the internal service funds are included with governmental activities.

5,727,904 $

TOTAL NET ASSETS--GOVERNMENTAL ACTIVITIES See notes to financial statements. 41

137,059,149


Other Governmental Funds

Total Governmental Funds

$

762,179 -

$ 52,657,909 3,220,869 54,220,098 8,321,948

241,592

762,179

118,420,824

-

4,408,318 97,520 1,011,017 20,340 224,006 1,124,693 797,027 1,384,736

436,883 122,143 29,605 16,947 131,464 17,459 49,786 28,805

57,705,606 6,286,437 4,606,186 1,761,637 7,508,683 6,775,282 13,714,350 4,485,709

947

-

102,316 1,825 11,649,826

7,239 1,671 -

364,204 2,769,678 84,175 11,651,223

-

-

15,550,000 2,058,875

-

-

15,550,000 2,058,875

TOTAL EXPENDITURES

91,738,913

4,310,631

17,608,875

20,821,624

842,002

135,322,045

EXCESS (DEFICIENCY) OF REVENUES OVER (UNDER) EXPENDITURES

3,160,332

1,318,567

(20,580,032)

(79,823)

(16,901,221)

REVENUES Local sources Intermediate sources State sources Federal sources TOTAL REVENUES EXPENDITURES Current Instruction Student Instructional staff General administration School administration Business Operations and maintenance Student transportation Non-instruction expenditures Child Nutrition Operations Community service operations Other Capital outlay Debt service Principal Interest

General Fund

Building Fund

Sinking Fund

$ 29,136,330 3,220,869 54,220,098 8,321,948

$ 3,590,366 -

$ 18,927,442 -

94,899,245

3,590,366

18,927,442

52,860,405 6,066,774 3,562,414 1,724,350 7,153,213 5,622,040 8,572,093 3,072,168

3,150 11,090 4,295,444 -

254,649 2,766,182 84,175 450

(720,265)

Bond Fund $

241,592 -

OTHER FINANCING SOURCES (USES) Issuance of debt Premium on issuance of debt Transfers in Transfers out TOTAL OTHER FINANCING SOURCES (USES)

441,975 -

434,125 -

189,600 (441,975)

20,000,000 (574,330)

140,205 -

20,000,000 189,600 1,016,305 (1,016,305)

441,975

434,125

(252,375)

19,425,670

140,205

20,189,600

NET CHANGE IN FUND BALANCE

3,602,307

1,066,192

(1,154,362)

60,382

3,288,379

2,890,077

56,606,321

2,950,459

$ 59,894,700

FUND BALANCE AT BEGINNING OF YEAR FUND BALANCE AT END OF YEAR

(286,140)

13,694,382

4,874,512

8,730,473

26,416,877

$ 17,296,689

$ 4,588,372

$ 9,796,665

$ 25,262,515

See notes to financial statements. 42

$


TOTAL NET CHANGE IN FUND BALANCES-GOVERNMENTAL FUNDS

$

3,288,379

AMOUNTS REPORTED FOR GOVERNMENTAL ACTIVITIES IN THE STATEMENT OF ACTIVITIES ARE DIFFERENT BECAUSE: Capital outlays to purchase or build capital assets are reported in governmental funds as expenditures. However, for governmental activities, those costs are shown in the statement of net assets and are allocated over their estimated useful lives as annual depreciation expenses in the statement of activities. This is the amount by which depreciation is less than capital outlays in the period. Depreciation expense Capital outlays Retirements and adjustments Repayment of bond principal is an expenditure in the governmental funds, but it reduces long-term liabilities in the statement of net assets and does not affect the statement of activities. Proceeds from the sale of new bonds is revenue in the governmental funds, but increases long-term liabilities in the statement of net assets and does not affect the statement of activities. Principal payments Premium on issuance of bonds Amortization of bond premium Bond sale proceeds

(9,464,810) 16,478,019 (29,790)

6,983,419

15,550,000 (189,600) 8,924 (20,000,000)

(4,630,676)

Because some property taxes will not be collected for several months after the District's fiscal year ends, they are not considered as "available" revenues in the governmental funds, instead, they are counted as deferred revenues. They are, however, recorded as revenue in the statement of activities.

(464,607)

Internal service funds are used by the District to charge the costs of health insurance benefits and short-term disability benefits for the employees of the District to the individual funds. The changes in net assets of the internal service fund are included with governmental activities.

422,307

Interest on long-term debt in the statement of activities differs from the amount reported in the governmental funds because interest is recorded as an expenditure in the funds when it is due, and, thus. Requires the use of current financial resources. In the statement of activities, however, interest expense is recognized as the interest accrues, regardless of when it is due.

(7,312)

Some expenses (arbitrage, compensated absences, early retirement incentives, and other post employment benefits) reported in the statement of activities do not require the use of current financial resources, and therefore, are not reported as expenditures in governmental funds. CHANGE IN NET ASSETS OF GOVERNMENTAL ACTIVITIES

See notes to financial statements.

43

(1,057,357) $

4,534,153


Original Budget REVENUES Local sources Intermediate sources State sources Federal sources

$

TOTAL REVENUES EXPENDITURES Instruction Support services Student Instructional staff General administration School administration Business Operation and maintenance Student transportation Non-instructional services Child Nutrition Operations Community services operations Other outlays Capital outlay TOTAL EXPENDITURES

FUND BALANCE AT BEGINNING OF YEAR FUND BALANCE AT END OF YEAR

Actual

29,563,481 $ 3,185,000 50,820,289 6,894,219 90,462,989

30,328,406 $ 3,290,000 54,153,767 8,179,952 95,952,125

29,900,707 $ 3,133,223 54,223,771 8,122,786 95,380,487

54,726,340

55,617,767

53,014,702

(2,603,065)

6,510,162 3,678,175 1,371,538 6,669,520 5,491,446 7,326,777 3,216,224

7,185,660 4,524,042 1,506,461 6,791,480 5,798,800 8,288,577 3,177,132

6,064,901 3,562,414 1,724,350 7,153,213 5,622,040 8,466,453 3,075,612

(1,120,759) (961,628) 217,889 361,733 (176,760) 177,876 (101,520)

199,942 2,882,948 300,826 92,373,898

331,218 2,866,023 479,875 96,567,035

254,649 2,766,182 84,175 450 91,789,141

(76,569) (99,841) (395,700) 450 (4,777,894)

3,591,346

4,206,256

9,749,997

-

(1,910,909)

EXCESS REVENUES (EXPENDITURES)

$

(614,910)

9,749,997

9,749,997

7,839,088 $

9,135,087

13,341,343 $

ADJUSTMENTS TO CONFORM WITH GAAP Receivables at end of year Inventory at end of year Worker's compensation

2,479,661 217,198 1,258,487

FUND BALANCE AT END OF YEAR (GAAP BASIS)

See notes to financial statements. 44

Variance Over (Under)

Final Budget

$

17,296,689

(427,699) (156,777) 70,004 (57,166) (571,638)

4,206,256


Original Budget REVENUES Local sources Interest and Other

$

3,759,682 $ 370,000

3,611,747 $ 434,126

4,064,100

4,129,682

4,045,873

(83,809)

5,875,177 291,361

5,954,981 211,557

3,150 11,092 4,295,444 947

3,150 11,092 (1,659,537) (210,610)

6,166,538

6,166,538

4,310,633

(1,855,905)

(2,102,438)

(2,036,856)

4,828,864

4,828,864

4,828,864

2,792,008

4,564,104 $

EXPENDITURES Support services Instructional staff Business Operation and maintenance Other TOTAL EXPENDITURES

FUND BALANCE AT BEGINNING OF YEAR FUND BALANCE AT END OF YEAR

Actual

$

2,726,426

$

(264,760)

ADJUSTMENTS TO CONFORM WITH GAAP Receivables, end of year

24,268

FUND BALANCE AT END OF YEAR (GAAP BASIS)

See notes to financial statements.

45

Variance Over (Under)

3,694,100 $ 370,000

TOTAL REVENUES

EXCESS REVENUES (EXPENDITURES)

Final Budget

$

4,588,372

(147,935) 64,126

1,772,096 1,772,096


Governmental ActivitiesInternal Service Fund: Employee Insurance Fund

Business-Type Activities Enterprise Fund: Child Nutrition Fund ASSETS CURRENT ASSETS Cash and equivalents Investments Due from other governments Accrued interest receivable Inventories

$

TOTAL CURRENT ASSETS NONCURRENT ASSETS Capital assets, net TOTAL NONCURRENT ASSETS TOTAL ASSETS

1,626,158 525,000 58,284 1,288 522,018

$

5,259,131 1,000,000 1,867 -

2,732,748

6,260,998

466,530

-

466,530

-

$

3,199,278

$

6,260,998

$

52,555 138,481 25,000

$

533,094 -

LIABILITIES CURRENT LIABILITIES Accounts payable Liability for incurred claims Accrued wages payable Due to other funds TOTAL CURRENT LIABILITIES NET ASSETS Invested in capital assets Unrestricted TOTAL NET ASSETS TOTAL LIABILITIES AND NET ASSETS

See notes to financial statements.

46

$

216,036

533,094

466,530 2,516,712

5,727,904

2,983,242

5,727,904

3,199,278

$

6,260,998


Governmental ActivitiesInternal Service Fund: Employee Insurance Fund

Business-Type Activities Enterprise Fund: Child Nutrition Fund OPERATING REVENUES Meals Insurance contributions

$

Other income TOTAL OPERATING REVENUES OPERATING EXPENSES Salaries and wages Purchased and contracted services Food suppliers Commodities Depreciation Management fees Medical claims Other operating expenses TOTAL OPERATING EXPENSES OPERATING INCOME (LOSS) NONOPERATING REVENUES Interest income Federal and state grants Donated commodities TOTAL NONOPERATING REVENUES CHANGES IN NET ASSETS NET ASSETS AT BEGINNING OF YEAR $

NET ASSETS AT END OF YEAR

See notes to financial statements.

47

2,100,244 -

$

8,565,904

-

-

2,100,244

8,565,904

2,101,308 153,962 2,024,108 132,997 91,890 130,355

391,103 1,092,902 6,709,976 28,250

4,634,620

8,222,231

(2,534,376)

343,673

13,510 2,837,812 181,498

78,634 -

3,032,820

78,634

498,444

422,307

2,484,798

5,305,597

2,983,242

$

5,727,904


Governmental ActivitiesInternal Service Fund: Employee Insurance Fund

Business-Type Activities Enterprise Fund: Child Nutrition Fund CASH FLOWS FROM OPERATING ACTIVITIES Receipts from user charges Cash payments for insurance claims Cash payments to suppliers for goods and services Cash payments to employees for services

$

NET CASH PROVIDED BY (USED IN) OPERATING ACTIVITIES CASH FLOWS FROM CAPITAL AND RELATED FINANCING ACTIVITIES Capital assets purchased Non-operating grants received NET CASH PROVIDED BY CAPITAL AND RELATED FINANCING ACTIVITIES CASH FLOWS FROM INVESTING ACTIVITIES Proceeds from sales and maturities of investments Purchases of investments Investment Income NET CASH USED IN INVESTING ACTIVITIES NET INCREASE (DECREASE) IN CASH AND CASH EQUIVALENTS

2,100,244 (2,241,547) (2,092,142)

$

(2,233,445)

523,559

(57,215) 2,814,024

-

2,756,809

-

666,336 (769,674) 18,096

980,323 (1,980,323) 77,057

(85,242)

(922,943)

438,122

(399,384)

1,188,036

CASH AND CASH EQUIVALENTS AT BEGINNING OF YEAR CASH AND CASH EQUIVALENTS AT END OF YEAR RECONCILIATION OF OPERATING LOSS TO NET CASH PROVIDED BY (USED IN) OPERATING ACTIVITIES Operating income (loss) Adjustments to reconcile operating income (loss) to net cash provided by (used in) operating activities Depreciation Decrease in inventories Increase in accounts payable Increase (Decrease) in accrued wages payable Decrease in due from other funds Increase in liability for incurred claims NET CASH PROVIDED BY (USED IN) OPERATING ACTIVITIES

8,565,904 (6,530,065) (1,121,152) (391,128)

5,658,515

$

1,626,158

$

5,259,131

$

(2,534,376)

$

343,673

91,890 157,388 42,487 9,166 $

(2,233,445)

(25) 3,891 176,020 $

523,559

SUPPLEMENTAL DISCLOSURE OF NONCASH ACTIVITIES Commodities received from Department of Human Services

$

181,498

$

-

Commodities consumed

$

132,997

$

-

See notes to financial statements.

48


PrivatePurpose Trust Fund ASSETS Cash and cash equivalents

Agency Fund

$

84,437

$

2,272,813

$

-

$

7,341 8,919 2,256,553

$

-

$

2,272,813

$

84,437

$

-

LIABILITIES AND NET ASSETS LIABILITIES Accounts payable Wages payable Due to student groups TOTAL LIABILITIES NET ASSETS Unreserved/undesignated

See notes to financial statements.

49


PrivatePurpose Trust Fund ADDITIONS Contributions Interest income

$

4,570 846 5,416

TOTAL ADDITIONS DEDUCTIONS Other operating expenses

14,484 14,484

TOTAL DEDUCTIONS CHANGE IN NET ASSETS

(9,068) 93,505

NET ASSETS AT BEGINNING OF YEAR $

NET ASSETS AT END OF YEAR

See notes to financial statements.

50

84,437


NOTE A--SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES Basis of Presentation: The financial statements of the Union Public Schools Independent District No. 9 (the “District”) have been prepared in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America as applied to government units. The Governmental Accounting Standards Board (“GASB”) is the accepted standard-setting body for establishing governmental accounting and financial reporting principles. With respect to proprietary activities, the District has adopted GASB Statement No. 20, Accounting and Financial Reporting for Proprietary Funds and Other Governmental Entities that use Proprietary Fund Accounting. The District has elected to apply all applicable GASB pronouncements as well as Financial Accounting Standards Board (“FASB”) pronouncements and Accounting Principals Board (“APB”) opinions, issued on or before November 30, 1989, unless those pronouncements conflict with or contradict GASB pronouncements. The more significant of the District’s accounting policies are described below. Reporting Entity: The District is a corporate body for public purposes created under Title 70 of the Oklahoma statutes and, accordingly, is a separate entity for operating and financial reporting purposes. The District is part of the public school system of Oklahoma under the general direction and control of the Board of Education and is financially dependent on the state of Oklahoma for support. The general operating authority for the public school system is the Oklahoma School Code contained in Title 70, Oklahoma statutes. As required by accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America, the basic financial statements present the reporting entity which consists of the primary government, organizations for which the primary government is financially accountable, and other organizations for which the nature and significance of their relationship with the primary government are such that exclusion could cause the District’s basic financial statements to be misleading or incomplete. The District has presented the entities which comprise the reporting entity in the basic financial statements for 2009. The District has not identified any component units that should be included in the District’s reporting entity. The governing body of the District is its Board of Education composed of five elected members. The appointed superintendent is the executive officer of the District. Basic Financial Statements: The government-wide financial statements (i.e. the statement of net assets and the statement of activities) report information on all of the non-fiduciary activities of the District. For the most part, the effect of interfund activity has been removed from these statements. Interfund services provided and used are not eliminated. Governmental activities, which are normally supported by taxes and intergovernmental revenues, are reported separately from business-type activities, which rely to a significant extent on fees and charges for support. The statement of activities demonstrates the degree to which the direct expenses of a given function or segment is offset by program revenues. Direct expenses are those that are clearly identifiable with a specific function or segment. Program revenues include 1) charges to customers or applicants who purchase, use or directly benefit from goods, services, or privileges provided by a given function or segment, and 2) grants and contributions that are restricted to meeting the operational or capital requirements of a particular function or segment. Taxes and other items not properly included among program revenues are reported as general revenues.

51


NOTE A--SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES--Continued Basic Financial Statements--Continued: Separate financial statements are provided for governmental funds, proprietary funds, and fiduciary funds, even though the latter are excluded from the governmentwide financial statements. Major individual governmental funds and major individual enterprise funds are reported as separate columns in the fund financial statements. Governmental Funds: Governmental funds are used to account for all or most of a government’s general activities, including the collection and disbursement of earmarked monies (special revenue funds), the acquisition or construction of general fixed assets (capital projects funds), and the servicing of general long-term debt (debt service funds). The District reports the following major governmental funds: General Fund The General Fund is used to account for all financial transactions except those required to be accounted for in another fund. Major revenue sources include local property taxes and state funding under the Foundation and Incentive Aid Program. Expenditures include all costs associated with the daily operations of the schools except for programs funded for building repairs and maintenance, school construction, and debt service on bonds and other long-term debt. Building Fund The District’s Building Fund is a special revenue fund and consists of monies derived from property taxes levied for the purpose of erecting, remodeling, or repairing buildings and for purchasing furniture and equipment. Sinking Fund The District’s sinking fund is a debt service fund and is used to account for the accumulation of financial resources for the payment of general long-term debt principal, interest and related costs. The primary revenue sources are local property taxes levied specifically for debt service and interest earnings from temporary investments. Bond Fund The District’s bond fund is a capital project fund and is used to account for the proceeds of bond sales to be used exclusively for acquiring school sites, constructing and equipping new school facilities, renovating existing facilities, and acquiring transportation equipment. This fund is also utilized to acquire books and other non-capitalizable items. Other Governmental Funds The District’s other governmental funds include the Compensating Absence Fund, the Insurance Recovery Fund, the Early Retirement Incentive Fund, and the Arbitrage Fund. All of which are nonmajor governmental funds. These funds are used to account for the long term payables of the district.

52


NOTE A--SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES--Continued Proprietary Funds: Proprietary funds are used to account for activities similar to those found in the private sector, where the determination of net income is necessary or useful to sound financial administration. Goods or services from such activities can be provided either to outside parties (enterprise funds) or to other departments or agencies primarily within the District (internal service funds). Proprietary funds distinguish operating revenues and expenses from non-operating items. Operating revenues and expenses generally result from providing services and producing and delivering foods in connection with a proprietary fund’s principal ongoing operations. Operating expenses for enterprise funds and internal service funds include the cost of sales and services, administrative expenses and depreciation on capital assets. All revenues and expenses not meeting this definition are reported as non-operating revenues and expenses. The District reports the following major proprietary funds: Child Nutrition Fund The District’s Child Nutrition Fund is an enterprise fund used to account for the operations of the child nutrition programs. In addition to meal ticket sales, revenue sources include federal and state grants for free and reduced meals. Employee Insurance Fund The Employee Insurance Fund is an internal service fund used to account for the accumulation, recording and disbursing of District and participant contributions to the District’s self-insured medical, dental, and short-term disability programs. Fiduciary Funds: Fiduciary funds are used to account for assets held on behalf of outside parties, including other governments, or on behalf of employees or other funds within the District. When these assets are held under the terms of a formal trust agreement, a pension trust fund, an investment trust fund or a privatepurpose trust fund is used. Currently, the District utilizes only a private-purpose trust fund to account for activities of the Union School District Public Trust. Agency funds generally are used to account for assets that the District holds on behalf of others as their agent and do not involve measurement of results of operations. The District’s fiduciary funds have been excluded from the government-wide financial statements. Private-Purpose Trust Fund The Union School District trust fund is a private-purpose trust fund used to account for donations received for the benefit of specified individuals associated with the District. Agency Fund The Agency Fund consists of the School Activities fund. The School Activities fund is used to account for monies collected principally through fundraising efforts of the students and District sponsored groups. The administration is responsible, under the authority of the Board, for collecting, disbursing and accounting for these activity funds.

53


NOTE A--SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES--Continued Basis of Accounting and Measurement Focus: The government-wide financial statements are reported using the economic resources measurement focus and the accrual basis of accounting, as are the proprietary fund and fiduciary fund financial statements. The economic resources measurement focus is not applicable to the agency funds and therefore have no measurement focus. Revenues are recorded when earned and expenses are recorded when a liability is incurred, regardless of the timing of related cash flows. Property taxes are recognized as revenues in the year for which they are levied. Grants and similar items are recognized as revenue as soon as all eligibility requirements imposed by the provider have been met. Agency funds are reported in fiduciary fund financial statements and apply the accrual basis of accounting but do not have a measurement focus. Governmental fund financial statements are reported using the current financial resources measurement focus and the modified accrual basis of accounting. Revenues are recognized as soon as they are both measurable and available. Revenues are considered to be available when they are collectible within the current period or soon enough thereafter to pay liabilities of the current period. For this purpose, the government considers revenues to be available if they are collected within 60 days of the end of the current fiscal period. Expenditures generally are recorded when a liability is incurred, as under modified accrual accounting. However, debt service expenditures, as well as expenditures related to compensated balances are recorded only when the payment is due. Property taxes and interest associated with the current fiscal period are all considered to be susceptible to accrual and so have been recognized as revenues of the current fiscal period. All other revenue items are considered to be measurable and available only when cash is received by the government. Budgets and Budgetary Accounting: The District is required by state law to prepare an annual budget. A preliminary budget must be submitted to the Board of Education by December 31 for the fiscal year beginning the following July 1. If the preliminary budget requires an additional levy, the District must hold an election on the second Tuesday in February to approve the levy. If the preliminary budget does not require an additional levy, it becomes the legal budget. If an election is held and the taxes are approved, then the preliminary budget becomes the legal budget. If an election rejects the additional taxes, the District must adopt a budget within the approved tax rate. A budget is legally adopted by the Board of Education for the General Fund and Building Fund that includes revenues and expenditures. These budgets are prepared on a cash basis for revenues and principally on the modified accrual basis for expenditures. Budgetary control is maintained by fund, function, and activity and budgeted expenditures may not exceed appropriation at the fund level. Amendments may be made to the budget without approval by the governing body at the function and activity levels. Fund level budgetary amendments require approval of the governing body. In addition, encumbrance accounting is employed. Under this system, purchase orders, contracts and other commitments for the expenditure of resources are recorded to reserve a portion of the applicable appropriation. At the end of the year, encumbered appropriations for which goods and/or services have not been received lapse. At the beginning of the next year, prior year encumbrances are reviewed and some are reestablished. There were no material encumbrances which lapsed at June 30, 2009, and were reinstated during fiscal year 2009, for the General Fund and Building Fund.

54


NOTE A--SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES--Continued Assets, Liabilities and Net Assets Cash and Cash Equivalents: For purposes of the statement of cash flows, the District considers all cash on hand, demand deposits and highly liquid investments with an original maturity of three months or less when purchased to be cash and cash equivalents. Investments: Investments consist of certificates of deposit with maturities greater than three months when purchased and United States Treasury securities and agencies. Investments are reflected at fair value. Property Tax Revenues and Receivables: The District is authorized by state law to levy property taxes which consist of ad valorem taxes on real and personal property within the District. The county assessor, upon receipt of the certification of tax levies from the county excise board, extends the tax levies on the tax roll for submission to the county treasurer prior to October 1. The county treasurer must commence tax collection within fifteen days of receipt of the tax rolls. The first half of taxes is due prior to January 1. The second half is due prior to April 1. If the first payment is not made timely, the entire tax becomes due and payable on January 2. The second half of the taxes becomes delinquent on April 1 of the year following the year of assessment. If not paid by the following October 1, the property is offered for sale for the amount of taxes due. The purchaser is issued a certificate of ownership; the original owner has two years to redeem the property by paying the taxes and penalty owed. If at the end of two years the original owner has not done so, the purchaser is issued a deed to the property. Uncollected taxes assessed on valuations made each year are recorded in the District’s governmental fund financial statements. The delinquent taxes which are not collected within 60 days of the year end are recorded in the governmental fund financial statements as deferred revenue. Uncollectible personal and real property taxes are deemed to be immaterial because the real property can be sold for the amount of taxes due. Inventories: Inventories in the governmental funds are carried at cost and are recorded as expenditures when consumed on a first-in, first-out method rather than when purchased. Inventories include fuel, instructional, janitorial, medical, and food service supplies. Cost of donated federal surplus commodities is based on values established by the federal government at the time of donation. Inventories for proprietary funds are stated at the lower of cost or market on a first-in, first-out method.

55


NOTE A--SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES--Continued Inventories at June 30, 2009 consist of the following: Governmental activities Instructional Janitorial Computer accessory Transport Medical Total governmental activities

$

Business-type activities Food service

32,880 163,682 831 16,313 3,492 217,198 522,018

$

739,216

Capital Assets: All purchased capital assets are valued at cost where historical records are available and at an estimated historical cost where no historical records exist. Donated capital assets are valued at their estimated fair market value on the date received. The costs of normal maintenance and repairs that do not add to the value of the assets or materially extend asset lives are not capitalized. Improvements are capitalized and depreciated over the remaining useful lives of the related capital assets, as applicable. Depreciation of all exhaustible capital assets is charged as an expense against their operations. Depreciation has been provided using the straight-line method over the following estimated useful lives: Useful Life Buildings and structures Improvements Equipment Furniture and fixtures

10-50 years 10-50 years 5-40 years 5-10 years

Capitalization Threshold $ $ $ $

2,500 2,500 2,500 2,500

Compensated Balances: Liability for compensated balances attributable to the District’s governmental funds is recorded in the government-wide financial statements. It is the district’s policy that vacation is accrued in the current fiscal year to be used in the next fiscal year. If an employee separates employment, the district policy provides payment to the employee. Sick leave may also be accumulated up to 120 days. Upon retirement or severance of employment, the district policy provides payment to eligible employees for accumulated sick days. This liability is intended to accommodate these payments. Long-Term Debt: Long-term debt is recognized as a liability of the applicable governmental activities, business-type activities or proprietary fund type in the statements of net assets. Internal Balances: Amounts reported in the fund financial statements as interfund receivables and payables are eliminated in the entity-wide governmental and business-type activities columns of the statement of net assets, except for the net residual amounts due between governmental and business-type activities, which are presented as internal balances, as applicable.

56


NOTE A--SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES--Continued Due To/From Other Funds: Amounts owed between funds which are due within one year are reported as due to other funds. Interfund Transactions: Interfund transactions are either loans or transfers. Loans are reported as receivables and payables as appropriate and are subject to elimination. Interfund transactions are presented as transfers. Transfers within governmental activities or within business-type activities are eliminated. Fund Equity: In the fund financial statements, reserves represent those portions of fund balance not appropriable for expenditure or legally segregated for a specific future use. Designations of fund balance represent tentative management plans that are subject to change. Inter-fund Receivables, Payables and Transfers: The composition of interfund balances as of June 30, 2009, was as follows: Receivable Fund Compensating Balance Compensating Balance Compensating Balance Early Retirement Incentive Total

Payable Fund General Building Child Nutrition General

Amount 250,000 50,000 25,000 341,808 $ 666,808 $

These represent amounts necessary to subsidize the Internal Service Fund and Early Retirement Incentive liability. These amounts are expected to be paid within the next fiscal year. Inter-fund transfers, which represent transfers of interest earnings during the year ended June 30, 2009, were as follows:

57


NOTE A--SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES--Continued Revenues, Expenses and Expenditures State Revenues: Revenues from state sources for current operations are primarily governed by the state aid formula under the provisions of Article XVIII, Title 70, Oklahoma statutes. The Board of Education administers the allocation of state aid funds to school districts based on information accumulated from the districts. After review and verification of reports and supporting documentation, the State Department of Education (the “Department”) may adjust allocations of money for errors disclosed by review. Normally, such adjustments are treated as reductions or additions of revenue of the year when the adjustment was made. The District receives revenue from the state to administer certain categorical educational programs. Board of Education rules require that revenue earmarked for these programs be expended only for the program for which the money is provided and require that the money not expended as of the close of the fiscal year be carried forward into the following year to be expended for the same categorical programs. The Department requires that categorical educational program revenues be accounted for in the General Fund. Benefits Funded by the state of Oklahoma: For 2009, the state of Oklahoma contributed estimated payments benefiting District employees as follows: Plan

Amount

Teachers’ Retirement System of Oklahoma

$ 5,597,560

The District has recognized the revenues and expenditures related to this on-behalf payment in its basic financial statements. The District is legally responsible for these contributions. Net Assets The government-wide and business-type fund financial statements utilize a net asset presentation. Net assets are categorized as investment in capital assets (net of related debt), restricted and unrestricted. Investment in Capital Assets: Investment in capital assets (net of related debt) is intended to reflect the portion of net assets which are associated with non-liquid capital asset less outstanding capital asset related debt. The net related debt is debt less the outstanding liquid assets and any associated unamortized cost. Restricted Net Assets: Restricted net assets are liquid assets (generated from revenues and net bond proceeds) which have third party (statutory, bond covenant or granting agency) limitations on their use. The District would typically use restricted net assets first, as appropriate opportunities arise, but reserve the right to selectively defer the use thereof to a future project or replacement equipment acquisition.

58


NOTE B--CASH AND INVESTMENTS Custodial Credit Risk: Custodial credit risk is the risk that in the event of failure of counterparty, the District will not be able to recover the value of its deposits or investments. Deposits are exposed to custodial credit risk if they are uninsured and uncollateralized. Investment securities are exposed to custodial credit risk if they are uninsured, are not registered in the name of the District, and are held by counterparty or the counterparty’s trust department but not in the name of the District. The District’s policy requires that all deposits and investments in excess of amounts covered by federal deposit insurance be fully collateralized by the entity holding the deposits or investments. As of June 30, 2009, all of the Districts deposits and investments were either covered by federal deposit insurance or were fully collateralized. Deposits: The District had deposits at financial institutions with a carrying amount of approximately $39,251,000 at June 30, 2009. The bank balance of these deposits at June 30, 2009 was approximately $43,520,000. Credit Risk: Fixed-income securities are subject to credit risk. Credit quality rating is one method of assessing the ability of the issuer to meet its obligation. The District’s investment policy requires that, except for United States Treasury securities, the District’s investment portfolio will be diversified to avoid incurring undue concentration in securities of one type. The District’s policy also requires that all deposits and investments in excess of amounts covered by federal deposit insurance be fully collateralized by the entity holding the deposits or investments. Due to the unstable economic climate and extremely low available interest rates for investing, investments were purchased to obtain the highest possible interest rate. Therefore, the investment portfolio consisted of $35,600,000 in Certificates of Deposit with interest rates ranging from .30% to 1.05% with original maturity dates from 90 days to 15 months as of June 30, 2009. Interest Rate Risk: Interest rate risk is the risk that changes in interest rates will adversely affect the fair value of an investment. The District’s investment policy limits the duration of fixed-income securities to a maximum maturity from the date of purchase of sixty months, provided that sufficient liquidity is available to meet the District’s major cash outlays. The District’s investment committee and Board of Education monitor the District’s investment performance on an ongoing basis to limit the District’s interest rate risk. As of June 30, 2009, all of the District’s investments were scheduled to mature in less than eighteen months.

59


NOTE C--RECEIVABLES Receivables at June 30, 2009, all due within one year, for the government’s individual major funds, internal service and fiduciary funds in the aggregate, are as follows:

These receivables are expected to be collected within the next fiscal year.

60


NOTE D--CAPITAL ASSETS A summary of changes in capital assets for the year ended June 30, 2009, follows:

61


NOTE D--CAPITAL ASSETS--Continued Depreciation expense was charged to functions of the District as follows: Business-Type Activities

Governmental Activities Instruction $ 7,496,993 Pupil services 43,970 Instructional services 151,803 General administration 38,863 School administration 267,054 Business services 590,694 Operations and maintenance services 274,991 Transportation services 592,663 Community services 7,779

Child nutrition fund

$

91,890

$ 9,464,810 NOTE E--LONG-TERM DEBT State statutes prohibit the District from becoming indebted in an amount exceeding the revenue to be received for any fiscal year without approval by the District’s voters. Bond issues have been approved by the voters and issued by the District for various capital improvements. State law requires these bonds be fully paid serially within 25 years from the date of issue. Long-term debt of the District consists of bonds payable, obligations for compensated balances, a liability for the early retirement incentive plan and a liability for arbitrage earnings on outstanding bond issues. Debt service requirements for bonds are payable solely from the fund balance and future revenues of the sinking fund. In prior years, the liability for compensated balances has been primarily liquidated from the fund balance of the General Fund. The following is a summary of long-term debt activity of the District for the year ended June 30, 2009:

62


NOTE E--LONG-TERM DEBT--Continued A brief description of the outstanding general obligation bond issues at June 30, 2009, is set forth below: Amount Outstanding Independent School District No. 9 Building Bonds Series 2005, original issue $13,000,000, interest rate of 3.5% to 4% (3.5% at June 30, 2009), due in installments of $3,250,000 annually, final payment of $3,250,000 due April 1, 2010.

$ 3,250,000

Independent School District No. 9 Building Bonds Series 2006, original issue $15,200,000, interest rate of 4%, due in installments of $3,800,000 annually, final payment of $3,800,000 due April 1, 2011.

7,600,000

Independent School District No. 9 Building Bonds Series 2007, original issue $17,000,000, interest rate of 4%, due in installments of $4,250,000 annually, final payment of $4,250,000 due April 1, 2012.

12,750,000

Independent School District No. 9 Building Bonds Series 2008, original issue $19,400,000, interest rate of 3% to 3.25%, due in installments of $4,850,000 annually, final payment of $4,850,000 due April 1, 2013.

19,400,000

Independent School District No. 9 Building Bonds Series 2009, original issue $20,000,000, interest rate of 2.5% to 3.0% due in installments of $5,000,000 annually, final payment of $5,000,000 due April 1, 2014.

20,000,000 $63,000,000

Maturities of long-term debt are as follows:

Interest on general long-term debt incurred during the current year was approximately $2,059,000.

63


NOTE F--EARLY RETIREMENT INCENTIVES In 1994, the District revised its early retirement incentive plan whereby new or additional participants are paid stipends ranging from $300 to $700 per month plus health and life insurance coverage. An eligible participant is one who qualifies for service retirement benefits through the Teachers’ Retirement System of Oklahoma, has completed one (1) full year at the top step of the previous year’s salary schedule, has ten years experience as an employee of the District, and has received Board approval for participation in the plan. All benefits terminate in the event of death, after two or five years of receiving benefits from the plan or, if the retiree accepts employment as a certified employee with any other school district in the state of Oklahoma. As of June 30, 2009, there are 55 participants in the plan. The District has funded this liability with available General Fund assets and has recorded the liability in the statement of net assets. Amounts accrued with respect to employees electing to retire under this plan as of June 30, 2009 was approximately $726,000. NOTE G--RISK MANAGEMENT Effective December 1, 1988, the District began a self-insured medical program for District employees and their eligible dependents. This program is administered by an independent third party and covers medical and dental expenses for employees with dependent coverage available at additional charges. In order to mitigate the risk associated with this program, the District has purchased individual “stop loss” insurance of $150,000 and aggregate “stop loss” insurance of approximately $9,664,000 plus 100% of employee and District premium contributions. Monthly, the District contributes $111 per employee for the program, which covers expected claims, stop loss coverage, cost containment provisions and administrative costs. A summary of premiums collected from the District and employees and claims paid from July 1, 2008 through June 30, 2009 is set forth below: District and employee premiums

$ 7,666,721

Claims and changes in estimates Insurance and administrative costs

$ 6,382,242 1,295,687

Total claims incurred and other costs

$ 7,677,929

64


NOTE G--RISK MANAGEMENT--Continued A summary of changes in the aggregate liability for claims in the current and the two prior fiscal years are set forth below:

The claims liability shown above includes the District’s estimated liability for medical and dental claims incurred but not reported to the District (or the administrator) as of June 30, 2009. The activity for this program is reflected in the accompanying fund financial statements in the internal service fund. There were no significant reductions in coverage from that in prior years and settlements have not exceeded insurance coverage for each of the past three fiscal years. The District purchases commercial insurance for all other types of risk including, but not limited to, property, casualty, workers’ compensation, vehicle, and employee life. Settlements have not exceeded insurance coverage for each of the past three fiscal years. The full amount of the claims liability at June 30, 2009 is expected to be paid during fiscal year 2010. As such, the full liability of $533,094 has been classified as a current liability in the accompanying June 30, 2009 financial statements. NOTE H--EMPLOYEE RETIREMENT SYSTEM The District participates in the state-administered Teachers’ Retirement System of Oklahoma (the “System”), which is a cost-sharing, multiple-employer public employee retirement system (“PERS”). Under the System, contributions are made by the District, the state of Oklahoma, and the participating employees. Participation is required for all teachers, and other certified employees and is optional for all other regular employees of public educational institutions who work at least 20 hours per week. A participant’s date of membership is the date of the first contribution made to the System. The System is administered by a board of trustees which acts as a fiduciary for investing the funds and governing the administration of the System. The District has no responsibility or authority for the operation and administration of the System nor has it any liability, except for the current contribution requirements.

65


NOTE H--EMPLOYEE RETIREMENT SYSTEM--Continued The System provides defined retirement benefits based on members’ final compensation, age, and term of service. In addition, the retirement program provides for benefits upon disability and to survivors upon the death of eligible members. Title 70 O. S. Sec. 17-105 defines all retirement benefits. The authority to establish and amend benefit provisions rests with the legislature of the state of Oklahoma. The contribution rates for the District, which are not actuarially determined, and its employees are established by state statute and applied to the employee’s earnings plus employer-paid fringe benefits. The District was required to contribute 8.5% for the period July through December 2008 and 9% for the period January through June 2009 of applicable compensation for the year ended June 30, 2009. Participating members are required to contribute 7.0% of regular annual compensation not to exceed members’ maximum contribution. The legislature of the state of Oklahoma has enacted new legislation to increase the District’s contribution amount to 9.5% effective January 1, 2010. The compensation for employees covered by the System for the year ended June 30, 2009 was approximately $52,519,000; the District’s total compensation was approximately $84,039,000. Total contributions by the District made during the year ended June 30, 2009 amounted to approximately $5,389,000. These contributions represented approximately 11% of covered compensation and represent approximately 6.9% of total contributions to the System. The District has contributed its required contribution to the System. Trend information for the District’s annual required contributions is as follows: Teachers’ Retirement System of Oklahoma Required Percentage Contributed Contribution Fiscal year 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009

$ $ $ $ $

3,128,133 3,417,884 4,101,057 4,806,810 5,389,432

100% 100% 100% 100% 100%

Separately issued financial statements of the System can be obtained by contacting the Teachers’ Retirement System of Oklahoma at P.O. Box 53524, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73152, by calling (405) 521-2387, or at the TRS website at www.trs.state.ok.us. These stand-alone financial statements can be useful in assessing the System’s accumulation of sufficient assets to pay pension benefits as they become due and in reviewing historical trend information.

66


NOTE I--OTHER POST-EMPLOYMENT INSURANCE BENEFITS-HEALTH AND DENTAL INSURANCE PROGRAM District employees have the option of continuing health, vision and dental coverage at their own expense upon retirement if they are covered by an employment contract that provides for post-retirement benefits and who meets one of the following requirements: • • • •

Age 55 with 5 years of service Rule of 80 if hired before July 1, 1992 (combined age and service years) Rule of 90 if hired after July 1, 1992 (combined age and service years) 10 years of service

Retired employees may pay the same premium as the District pays for current employees. Funding Policy - Contribution requirements of the District are established and may be amended by the Board of Education. All contributions are made by the retirees. Benefits are funded under a “pay as you go” funding method; however expenses are recorded as benefits accumulate. Annual OPEB cost and net OPEB obligation - The District’s annual OPEB cost is calculated based on the annual required contribution of the District (ARC), an amount actuarially determined in accordance with the parameters of GASB Statement 45. The ARC represents a level of funding that, if paid on an ongoing basis, is projected to cover normal cost each year and amortize any unfunded actuarial liabilities over a period not to exceed thirty (30) years. The following table shows the components of the District’s net OPEB obligation for the year, the amount actually contributed, and changes in the District’s net OPEB obligation:

The net OPEB obligation at June 30, 2009 is included in the government-wide Statement of Net Assets as a non-current obligation.

67


NOTE I--OTHER POST-EMPLOYMENT INSURANCE BENEFITS-HEALTH AND DENTAL INSURANCE PROGRAM--Continued This obligation is currently unfunded. The annual required contribution for 2009 was determined as part of an actuarial valuation on July 1, 2007, using the projected unit credit actuarial cost method with 30-year amortization of the unfunded liability. The actuarial assumptions included: (a) discount rate of 4% per year compounded annually, (b) salary increases of 4% per year (c) age-based monthly retiree medical costs (d) varying participation rates for active and inactive employees, with adjustments made for persons who terminate prior to retirement (e) health trend rates increasing 5%-10% annually Trend Information GASB 45 was not implemented until the 2008 fiscal year; therefore, only two years of trend information is available.

Funded Status and Funding Progress The funded status of the plan as of the most recent actuarial report dated July 1, 2007 is as follows:

Actuarial valuation of an ongoing plan involves estimates of the value of reported amounts and assumptions about the probability of occurrence of events far into the future. Examples include assumptions about future employment, mortality, and the healthcare cost trend. Amounts determined regarding the funded status of the plan and the annual required contributions of the employer are subject to continual revision as actual results are compared with past expectations and new estimates are made about the future. The schedule of funding progress, presented as required

68


NOTE I--OTHER POST-EMPLOYMENT INSURANCE BENEFITS-HEALTH AND DENTAL INSURANCE PROGRAM—Continued supplementary information following the notes to the financial statements, will over time provide multi-year trend information that shows whether the actuarial value of plan assets is increasing or decreasing over time relative to the actuarial accrued liabilities for benefits. NOTE J--COMMITMENTS AND CONTINGENCIES Amounts received or receivable from grantor agencies are subject to audit and adjustment by grantor agencies. Any disallowed claims, including amounts already collected, may constitute a liability of the applicable funds. The amount, if any, of expenditures which may be disallowed by the grantor cannot be determined at this time although the District believes such amounts, if any, would be immaterial. As of June 30, 2009, the District had outstanding commitments (contracts and purchase orders) of approximately $1,058,000, primarily for construction projects and equipment. On occasion, the District is party to legal proceedings which arise in the normal course of operations. Any liability resulting from these proceedings is not believed, by management, to have a material effect on the financial statements. NOTE K--NEW PRONOUNCEMENTS Governmental Accounting Standards Board (“GASB”) Statement No. 51, Accounting and Financial Reporting for Intangible Assets, which establishes accounting and financial reporting requirements for intangible assets including easements, water rights, timber rights, patents, trademarks, and computer software. The requirements of this statement are effective for financial statements for periods beginning after June 15, 2009. Governmental Accounting Standards Board (“GASB”) Statement No. 53, Accounting and Financial Reporting for Derivative Instruments, which addresses the recognition, measurement, and disclosure of information regarding derivative instruments entered into by state and local governments. The requirements of this statement are effective for financial statements for periods beginning after June 15, 2009. Governmental Accounting Standards Board (“GASB”) Statement No, 54, Fund Balance Reporting and Governmental Fund Type, which is to enhance the usefulness of fund balance information by providing clearer fund balance classifications that can be more consistently applied and by clarifying the existing governmental fund type definitions. The requirements of this statement are effective for financial statements for periods beginning after June 15, 2010. The District’s management is in the process of determining what, if any, impact the above pronouncements will have on the District’s financial reporting process.

69


$

13,072,990

Actuarial Value of Assets (a) $

Actuarial Accrued Liability (AAL) (b)

The actuarial liability is based on the projected unit credit method.

July 1, 2007

Actuarial Valuation Date -

$

70

13,072,990

Unfunded AAL (UAAL) (b-a) 0.0% $

Funded Ratio (a/b) 42,509,871

Covered Payroll (c)

35.75%

UAAL as a percentage of Covered Payroll (b-a)/(c)


Compensating Balance Fund ASSETS Cash and cash equivalents Investments Due from other funds Property taxes-delinquent Due from other governments Other Accrued interest Inventories TOTAL ASSETS

Insurance Recovery Fund

$

1,006,917 325,000 -

$

$

1,331,917

$

$

25,983 25,983

$

Early Retirement Incentive Fund

118,494 118,494

$

$

782,994 341,808 1,124,802

Total Nonmajor Governmental Funds

Arbitrage Fund $

$

756,470 756,470

$

-

$

$

2,664,875 666,808 3,331,683

LIABILITIES AND FUND BALANCES LIABILITIES Accounts payable Accrued wages payable Due to other funds Other liabilities Liability for claims incurred Deferred revenues TOTAL LIABILITIES FUND BALANCES Reserved for capital projects Reserved for debt service Reserved for inventories Reserved for arbitrage Unreserved Undesignated Unreserved, reported in other governmental funds Designated for Compensating Balance fund Designated for Insurance Recovery fund Designated for Early retirement incentive fund TOTAL FUND BALANCES TOTAL LIABILITIES AND FUND BALANCES

-

$

22,877 332,364 355,241

$

-

-

-

756,470

-

-

-

-

756,470 -

769,561 769,561

756,470

1,305,934 118,494 769,561 2,950,459

1,305,934 118,494 118,494

1,305,934 $

48,860 332,364 381,224

1,331,917

71

$

118,494

$

1,124,802

$

756,470

$

3,331,683


Compensating Balance Fund REVENUES Local sources Intermediate sources State sources Federal sources

$

Insurance Recovery Fund

Arbitrage Fund

354,061 $ -

5,889 $ -

762,179 -

340,173

62,056

354,061

5,889

762,179

70,993 42,508 51,190 17,459 22,198 3,882

1,400 27,588 24,923

365,890 79,635 29,605 78,874 -

16,947 -

436,883 122,143 29,605 16,947 131,464 17,459 49,786 28,805

7,239 1,671 -

-

-

-

7,239 1,671 -

-

-

-

-

-

TOTAL EXPENDITURES

217,140

53,911

554,004

16,947

842,002

EXCESS (DEFICIENCY) OF REVENUES OVER (UNDER) EXPENDITURES

123,033

8,145

(199,943)

(11,058)

(79,823)

-

-

-

140,205 -

140,205 -

TOTAL OTHER FINANCING SOURCES (USES)

-

-

-

140,205

140,205

NET CHANGE IN FUND BALANCE

123,033

8,145

(199,943)

129,147

60,382

1,182,901

110,349

969,504

627,323

2,890,077

1,305,934 $

118,494

EXPENDITURES Current Instruction Student Instructional staff General administration School administration Business Operations and maintenance Student transportation Non-instruction expenditures Child Nutrition Operations Community service operations Other Capital outlay Debt service Principal Interest

OTHER FINANCING SOURCES (USES) Issuance of debt Transfers in Transfers out

FUND BALANCE AT BEGINNING OF YEAR FUND BALANCE AT END OF YEAR

$

72

$

Total Nonmajor Governmental Funds

62,056 $ -

TOTAL REVENUES

340,173 -

Early Retirement Incentive Fund

$

769,561

$

756,470

$

2,950,459


Balance June 30, 2008 HIGH SCHOOL TOTAL

$

Additions

Deductions

Adjustments

295,661 $

424,989 $

(371,460) $

101,231

130,340

(152,095)

913

80,389

4,951

8,610

(8,301)

-

5,260

84,762

80,515

(72,015)

4,779

98,041

SIXTH/SEVENTH GRADE CENTER TOTAL

121,038

117,151

(108,941)

2,160

131,408

ELEMENTARY ACTIVITY FUNDS TOTAL

276,131

406,286

(390,225)

8,292

300,484

STUDENT CLUBS TOTAL

241,316

436,754

(385,716)

1,334

293,688

1,027,200

356,254

(367,883)

(20,168)

995,403

INTERMEDIATE HIGH TOTAL ALTERNATIVE TOTAL EIGHTH GRADE CENTER TOTAL

ADMINISTRATIVE TOTAL TOTAL FUNDS HELD FOR STUDENT ACTIVITIES

2,690 $

Balance June 30, 2009 351,880

$

2,152,290 $ 1,960,899 $ (1,856,636) $

- $

2,256,553

$

2,162,876 $ 1,966,573 $ (1,856,636) $

- $

2,272,813

10,586 2,152,290

-

16,260 2,256,553

- $

2,272,813

SUMMARY-ACTIVITY FUNDS ASSETS Cash LIABILITIES Accounts payable and accrued liabilities Funds held for student activities TOTAL LIABILITIES

$

16,260 1,960,899

(10,586) (1,856,636)

2,162,876 $ 1,977,159 $ (1,867,222) $

See independent auditors' report

73


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74


2009 GOVERNMENTAL FUNDS CAPITAL ASSETS Land Buildings Improvements other than buildings Machinery and equipment Construction-in-progress TOTAL GOVERNMENTAL FUNDS CAPITAL ASSETS

INVESTMENTS IN GOVERNMENTAL FUNDS CAPITAL ASSETS BY SOURCE General fund Special revenue fund Capital projects fund Donations Other sources Unidentified source TOTAL GOVERNMENTAL FUNDS CAPITAL ASSETS

See independent auditors' report

75

2008

$

14,293,205 $ 180,688,146 4,215,600 38,534,159 8,355,207

14,192,844 168,236,222 3,917,666 34,014,318 9,852,509

$

246,086,317 $

230,213,559

$

3,180,816 $ 15,315,943 227,412,191 2,149 175,218

3,294,714 5,350,343 211,396,676 1,231,966 293,543 8,646,317

$

246,086,317 $

230,213,559


See independent auditors' report

TOTAL GOVERNMENTAL FUNDS CAPITAL ASSETS

GENERAL GOVERNMENT Instruction Student Instructional support General administration School administration Business Operations and maintenance of plant services Transportation Support services-central Other support services Non-instructional Other-unclassified $

$ 14,293,205 $

$ 14,293,205 -

Land

76

180,688,146

179,431,028 632 167,785 969,814 82,066 36,821 -

Buildings

$

$

$

4,215,600 $

4,143,322 29,980 4,887 37,411 -

Improvements Other Than Buildings

38,534,159

15,157,251 182,267 970,125 196,372 1,576,109 3,589,786 3,140,793 9,353,149 2,609,323 27,859 413,430 1,317,695

Machinery and Equipment

$

$

$

8,355,207 $

8,355,207 -

Construction In-Progress

246,086,317

221,380,013 182,267 970,757 196,372 1,576,109 3,787,551 4,115,494 9,390,560 2,691,389 27,859 450,251 1,317,695

Total


See independent auditors' report

TOTAL GOVERNMENTAL FUNDS CAPITAL ASSETS

GENERAL GOVERNMENT Instruction Student Instructional support General administration School administration Business Operations and maintenance of plant services Transportation Support services-central Other support services Non-instructional Other-unclassified

77

230,213,559 $

$

$

208,486,847 138,246 586,827 185,210 1,440,721 3,357,220 3,436,217 8,071,361 2,780,338 29,111 383,766 1,317,695

$

Governmental Funds Capital Assets June 30, 2008 $

16,478,019 $

13,245,602 71,458 396,317 11,162 198,327 436,994 681,183 1,368,118 68,858 -

Additions

(50,655) $

(48,097) $ (419) (168) (500) (1,471) -

Reclassifications & Adjustments

(554,606) $

(304,339) $ (27,437) (11,968) (62,771) (6,663) (1,406) (48,919) (87,478) (1,252) (2,373) -

Deductions

246,086,317

221,380,013 182,267 970,757 196,372 1,576,109 3,787,551 4,115,494 9,390,560 2,691,389 27,859 450,251 1,317,695

Governmental Funds Capital Assets June 30, 2009


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78


Table of Contents Contents

Page

Financial Trends

……………………………………………………………………………….

81-86

These schedules contain trend information to help the reader understand how the District's financial performance and well-being have changed over time.

Revenue Capacity

……………………………………………………………………………….

87-90

These schedules contain information to help the reader assess the District's most significant local revenue source, the property tax.

Debt Capacity

……………………………………………………………………………….

91-94

These schedules present information to help the reader assess the affordability of the District's current levels of outstanding debt and the District's ability to issue additional the District's ability to issue additional debt in the future.

Demographic and Economic Information

……………………………………………………….

95-98

These schedules offer demographic and economic indicators to help the reader understand the environment within which the District's financial activities take place.

Operating Information

………………………………………………………………………………

These schedules contain service and other data to help the reader understand how the information in the District's financial report relates to the services the District provides and the activities it performs.

Sources:

Unless otherwise noted, the information in these schedules is derived from the comprehensive annual financial reports (CAFR) for the relevant year. The District implemented GASB Statement 34 in the fiscal year ended June 30 ,2001. Schedules presenting districtwide information include information beginning in that year.

79

99-108


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80


54,187,893 9,531,619 13,654,328 77,373,840

District-wide Invested in capital assets, net of related debt Restricted for debt service Restricted for capital projects Unrestricted Total district net assets 67,990,935 8,558,294 2,267,467 5,663,539 84,480,235

60,354 1,170,700 1,231,054

4,492,839 83,249,181

67,930,581 8,558,294 2,267,467

2002

64,923,011 9,223,955 2,389,243 16,179,489 92,715,698

44,817 1,330,385 1,375,202

14,849,104 91,340,496

64,878,194 9,223,955 2,389,243

2003

The District implemented GASB 34 on June 30, 2001; therefore, only nine fiscal years are presented.

a

77,183 1,185,097 1,262,280

12,469,231 76,111,560

Unrestricted Total governmental activities net assets

Business-type activities Invested in capital assets, net of related debt Restricted for debt service Restricted for capital projects Unrestricted Total business-type activities net assets

54,110,710 9,531,619 -

Governmental activities Invested in capital assets, net of related debt Restricted for debt service Restricted for capital projects

2001

81

71,161,095 10,422,859 1,845,081 22,798,435 106,227,470

136,747 1,564,776 1,701,523

21,233,659 104,525,947

97,620,227 10,892,944 1,827,460 6,892,937 117,233,569

165,884 1,816,424 1,982,309

5,076,513 115,251,260

97,454,343 10,892,944 1,827,460

103,533,951 9,832,578 1,947,000 10,053,963 125,367,492

248,538 1,782,505 2,031,043

8,271,458 123,336,449

103,285,413 9,832,578 1,947,000

Fiscal Year ending June 30, 2005a 2006a

71,024,348 10,422,859 1,845,081

2004

(accrual basis of accounting)

Net Assets by Component Last Nine Fiscal Yearsa

106,795,924 8,962,506 2,669,637 14,651,146 133,079,213

517,708 1,991,887 2,509,595

12,659,259 130,569,618

106,278,216 8,962,506 2,669,637

2007

119,034,140 8,730,473 2,590,181 4,655,000 135,009,794

501,205 1,983,593 2,484,798

2,671,407 132,524,996

118,532,935 8,730,473 2,590,181

2008

122,105,355 9,796,665 2,184,657 5,955,714 140,042,391

466,530 2,516,712 2,983,242

121,638,825 9,796,665 2,184,657 3,439,002 137,059,149

2009


1,075,757 405,412 50,383 9,938 7,808,999 11,645 9,362,134

2,553,115 2,553,115 74,072,098

Business-type activities Food service Total business-type activities expense Total district expenses

Program Revenues Governmental activities Charges for services Regular instruction Operations and maintenance services Pupil transportation services Community services Other support services Operating grants and contributions Capital grants and contributions Total governmental activities program revenues

2,357,464 24,744 71,883,678

2,737,291 645,449 71,518,983

332,549 354,810 49,942 694,879 8,534,234 3,768 9,970,182

2,644,997 2,644,997 74,528,675

3,859,569 2,407,173 857,008 4,217,173 1,731,372 8,513,675 2,144,481 2,724,745 473,063 867,033

35,457,130 3,629,908 499,598 2,119,542

3,592,764 2,054,701 752,589 4,154,638 1,711,679 9,128,147 2,271,203 1,766,662 195,539 795,581

33,199,806 6,238,789 195,593 2,078,552

2002

Support Services Pupil services Instructional staff services General administration services School administration services Business services Operations and maintenance services Pupil transportation services Central services Other support services Community services Capital Outlay Interest on long-term debt Loss on disposal of capital assets Unallocated depreciation Total governmental activities expenses

Expenses Governmental activities Instruction Regular instruction Special education instruction Vocational education Other instruction

2001

387,926 266,539 49,942 677,983 9,288,866 10,671,256

2,595,990 2,595,990 75,733,097

2,404,350 69,424 73,137,107

4,178,773 2,623,839 892,275 3,996,982 1,573,293 8,893,176 2,439,055 2,027,362 192,854 780,448

36,889,541 3,545,854 506,460 2,123,421

2003

82

502,743 272,044 49,941 699,611 10,365,374 11,889,713

2,720,792 2,720,792 74,028,778

1,898,043 29,319 71,307,986

4,508,084 2,696,354 697,079 4,896,862 4,268,201 9,269,540 2,570,888 31,801 877,860

375,770 486,644 46,846 625,746 12,961,205 14,496,211

3,030,259 3,030,259 83,513,910

1,848,492 85,140 80,483,651

4,185,963 2,915,880 1,095,275 5,139,160 4,225,520 10,975,680 2,584,087 7,410 803,775

37,806,776 4,665,926 461,209 3,683,358

Fiscal Year ending June 30, 2005

30,298,793 4,688,315 500,456 4,076,391

2004

(accrual basis of accounting)

Changes in Net Assets Last Nine Fiscal Yearsa

447,137 420,672 50,030 699,034 11,081,996 12,698,869

3,697,466 3,697,466 90,736,281

1,882,922 87,038,815

4,440,099 3,541,667 1,002,064 6,023,236 5,121,989 12,288,840 2,374,353 582,250 646,307

38,283,502 5,593,513 615,074 4,642,999

2006

427,645 391,535 49,699 890,915 14,595,393 16,355,187

3,845,046 3,845,046 100,957,868

2,319,704 15,477 97,112,822

5,290,042 3,776,075 1,248,323 6,869,205 5,970,849 13,011,254 2,876,195 297,187 789,528

42,667,523 6,178,927 633,877 5,168,656

2007b

370,303 494,775 49,829 995,745 14,603,862 16,514,514

4,504,683 4,504,683 111,735,966

6,518,814 4,165,969 1,578,563 7,440,213 6,333,400 13,113,272 3,649,174 252,566 974,305 2,085,460 1,970,686 107,231,283

45,516,291 6,793,935 703,858 6,134,777

2008c

366,907 546,323 60,810 1,131,972 20,344,841 22,450,853

4,634,620 4,634,620 118,065,611

6,345,355 4,408,668 1,802,455 7,688,170 6,937,956 13,334,079 3,771,826 367,950 2,801,866 513,383 1,608,283 113,430,991

49,629,935 7,275,708 793,237 6,152,120

2009


(62,156,849) (122,812) (62,279,661)

21,305,252 14,332,307 4,645,244 22,382,239 3,093,181 734,659 66,492,882 41,587 25,128 66,715 66,559,597

4,336,033 (56,097) 4,279,936

Net (Expense) Revenue Governmental activities Business-type activities Total district-wide net expense

General Revenues and Other Changes in Net Assets Governmental activities Taxes Property tax, levied for general purposes Property tax, levied for debt services Other taxes State aid not restricted to specific programs Interest and investment earnings Gain on disposal of capital assets Other Total governmental activities

Business-type activities Interest and investment earnings Other Total business-type activities Total district-wide

Change in Net Assetsb Governmental activities Business-type activities Total district 7,137,622 (31,226) 7,106,396

19,659 22,506 42,165 69,093,283

23,315,922 16,528,839 4,708,663 22,287,289 1,707,867 502,538 69,051,118

(61,913,496) (73,391) (61,986,887)

1,607,549 962,505 1,552 2,571,606 12,541,788

2002

8,091,315 144,148 8,235,463

13,550 27,699 41,249 70,598,415

24,923,646 17,597,219 4,840,896 21,472,043 1,393,318 330,044 70,557,166

(62,465,851) 102,899 (62,362,952)

1,545,665 1,122,390 30,834 2,698,889 13,370,145

2003

13,185,451 326,321 13,511,772

14,217 28,137 42,354 72,646,078

25,744,557 18,094,314 3,789,472 23,539,518 1,169,353 266,510 72,603,724

(59,418,273) 283,967 (59,134,306)

10,725,313 280,785 11,006,098

27,233 13,823 41,056 76,753,809

26,954,190 18,530,671 4,647,151 24,193,082 1,735,761 651,898 76,712,753

(65,987,440) 239,729 (65,747,711)

1,633,670 1,590,718 45,600 3,269,988 17,766,199

Fiscal Year ending June 30, 2005

1,627,587 1,265,653 111,519 3,004,759 14,894,472

2004

b

83

The District implemented GASB 34 on June 30, 2001; therefore, only nine fiscal years are presented. In FY08, the District recorded a prior period adjustment to correct the FY07 beginning net assets. See Note A in the Notes to the Financial Statements for a detailed explanation. cThe 2005 GAAFR requires that losses on the sale of capital assets of governmental activities be reported as an expense of the general government function.

a

1,523,360 855,698 51,245 2,430,303 11,792,437

Business-type activities Charges for services Food service Operating grants and contributions Capital grants and contributions Total business-type activities program revenues Total district program revenues

2001

(accrual basis of accounting)

Changes in Net Assets Last Nine Fiscal Yearsa

8,085,189 48,734 8,133,923

85,715 18,828 104,543 82,529,678

27,502,714 15,845,469 4,681,575 28,956,973 2,997,624 974,222 1,466,558 82,425,135

(74,339,946) (55,809) (74,395,755)

1,670,481 1,856,414 114,762 3,641,657 16,340,526

2006

7,233,169 478,552 7,711,721

75,705 75,705 88,066,509

28,953,433 17,152,566 5,515,782 31,331,687 3,203,223 1,834,113 87,990,804

(80,757,635) 402,847 (80,354,788)

1,824,667 2,423,226 4,247,893 20,603,080

2007b

1,955,378 (24,797) 1,930,581

55,809 55,809 92,727,956

30,235,766 17,211,390 5,017,881 37,301,704 2,020,465 884,941 92,672,147

(90,716,769) (80,606) (90,797,375)

1,846,537 2,577,540 4,424,077 20,938,591

2008c

4,534,153 498,444 5,032,597

13,510 95,527,801

13,510

31,052,460 18,553,902 5,196,047 39,992,313 518,461 201,108 95,514,291

(90,980,138) 484,934 (90,495,204)

2,100,244 3,019,310 5,119,554 27,570,407

2009


40,313,503

5,515,568 45,829,071

4,866,517 43,084,342

104,801 7,833,648 7,938,449

38,217,825

653,304 6,818,511 7,471,815

2002

44,891,097

6,474,917

38,416,180

198,839 8,575,849 8,774,688

2003

48,627,364

7,129,302

41,498,062

44,743,099

6,644,461

38,098,638

193,805 9,628,949 9,822,754

Fiscal Year ending June 30, 2005

170,777 9,426,794 9,597,571

2004

41,316,951

7,643,708

33,673,243

335,756 12,841,083 13,176,839

2006

1,031,837 102,154 818,344 9,181 42,757,977

5,982,523

34,813,938

246,549 12,163,313 12,409,862

2007b

b

84

The District implemented GASB 34 on June 30, 2001; therefore, only nine fiscal years are presented. Beginning in 2006-07, the District changed the presentation of unreserved fund balances to reflect its limitations on the use of available current financial resources. Prior to 2006-07, fund balances designated for compensated balances, incurred claims and early retirement incentives were presented as unreserved in the general fund. c Beginning in 2007-08, the District changed the presentation of reserved fund balances. There are no unreserved fund balances in the sinking fund or building fund.

a

All Other Governmental Funds Reserved, reported in: Sinking fund Reserved for debt service Bond fund Reserved for capital projects Other governmental funds Reserved for arbitrage Unreserved, reported in: Building fund Other governmental funds Designated for Compensating Balance fund Designated for Insurance Recovery fund Designated for Early retirement incentive fund Undesignated Total all other governmental funds

General Fund Reserved Unreserved Total general fund

2001

(modified accrual basis of accounting)

Fund Balances of Governmental Funds Last Nine Fiscal Yearsa

756,470

627,323

1,182,901 110,349 969,504 42,911,939

1,305,934 118,494 769,561 42,598,011

4,588,372

25,262,515

26,416,877

4,874,512

9,796,665

217,198 17,079,491 17,296,689

2009

8,730,473

350,087 13,344,295 13,694,382

2008c


Expenditures Current Instruction Student Instructional staff General administration School administration Business Operations and maintenance Student transportation Central Other Non-instruction expenses Child nutrition operations Community service operations Other Capital outlay Debt service Principal Interest Other Total expenditures Excess (deficiency) of revenues over (under) expenditures

Revenues Local sources Intermediate sources State sources Federal sources Total revenue

38,425,797 3,839,720 2,229,909 808,195 4,165,611 1,725,059 8,442,121 1,978,011 2,146,769 343,017 867,130 9,415,528 15,225,000 2,496,875 92,108,742 (13,221,138)

715,113 9,124,364 12,835,000 2,594,940 435 83,656,964 (7,737,307)

41,070,796 2,295,337 32,834,832 2,686,639 78,887,604

2002

34,744,436 3,542,543 1,808,599 609,161 3,963,459 1,659,243 8,695,547 1,886,070 1,227,236 250,818

39,129,723 1,965,824 32,602,827 2,221,283 75,919,657

2001

(17,601,735)

14,750,000 2,416,625 98,968,286

12,759,344

854,681

40,110,968 4,235,888 2,744,151 875,004 4,158,621 1,587,130 8,871,212 3,620,184 1,909,347 75,131

43,183,608 2,658,519 32,624,511 2,899,913 81,366,551

2003

85

(12,440,850)

15,100,000 2,104,594 95,522,829

12,107,888

908,868

36,122,022 4,547,220 2,709,605 695,250 5,033,251 3,891,683 10,007,104 2,276,095 19,249

(16,784,197)

16,350,000 1,760,594 108,686,805

15,060,578

770,730

41,859,274 4,356,364 3,066,857 1,103,302 5,365,227 4,495,703 12,006,385 2,487,555 4,236

46,984,892 2,977,543 37,575,503 4,364,670 91,902,608

Fiscal Year ending June 30, 2005

44,547,574 2,587,262 32,396,897 3,550,246 83,081,979

2004

(modified accrual basis of accounting)

Changes in Fund Balances of Governmental Funds Last Nine Fiscal Yearsa

(15,272,063)

16,100,000 1,582,688 112,082,119

15,722,696

655,580

43,605,503 4,433,401 3,476,405 996,004 6,066,017 4,957,327 12,073,913 2,385,547 27,038

48,356,237 3,349,338 39,848,938 5,255,543 96,810,056

2006

(16,505,952)

15,600,000 1,690,750 120,954,145

9,885,716

808,090

51,985,668 5,363,085 3,826,101 1,255,414 7,206,173 5,792,730 13,188,041 4,193,488 158,889

49,279,313 3,673,503 45,955,606 5,539,771 104,448,193

2007

(18,006,138)

15,300,000 1,907,375 127,317,039

14,090,638

1,025,158

53,392,683 6,357,726 4,059,052 1,683,588 7,168,559 5,863,816 13,050,900 3,169,865 247,679

49,545,643 3,163,313 50,825,886 5,776,059 109,310,901

2008

(16,901,221)

15,550,000 2,058,875 135,322,045

364,204 2,769,678 84,175 11,651,223

57,705,606 6,286,437 4,606,186 1,761,637 7,508,683 6,775,282 13,714,350 4,485,709 -

52,657,909 3,220,869 54,220,098 8,321,948 118,420,824

2009


21.68%

21.10%

(101,735)

1,669,494 (1,669,494) 17,500,000

17,500,000

2003

21.60%

4,559,150

1,164,149 (1,164,149) 17,000,000

19.34%

(3,659,082)

733,503 (733,503) 13,125,115

13,125,115

Fiscal Year ending June 30, 2005

17,000,000

2004

17.89%

(72,063)

1,335,826 (1,335,826) 15,200,000

15,200,000

2006

b

86

16.54%

674,049

2,055,151 (2,045,150) 17,180,001

17,170,000

2007

The District implemented GASB 34 on June 30, 2001; therefore, only nine fiscal years are presented. Noncapital expenditures are total expenditures less capital outlay reported on the Reconciliation of the Statement of Revenues, Expenditures and Changes in Fund Balance of Governmental Funds to the Statement of Activities.

a

20.11%

4,262,693

Net changes in fund balances

Debt service as a percentage of noncapital expendituresb

1,483,089 (1,450,588) 16,432,501

1,777,664 (1,777,664) 12,000,000 3,211,363

16,400,000

12,000,000

2002

Other financing sources (uses) Issuance of debt Premiums on new issuance of debt Transfers in Transfers out Total other financing sources (uses)

2001

(modified accrual basis of accounting)

Changes in Fund Balances of Governmental Funds Last Nine Fiscal Yearsa

15.14%

1,438,482

1,782,913 (1,782,913) 19,444,620

19,444,620

2008

14.82%

3,288,379

20,000,000 189,600 1,016,305 (1,016,305) 20,189,600

2009


333,669,634 372,615,589 405,315,585 430,349,607 453,625,924 474,661,676 498,893,897 522,082,141 545,541,198 565,264,788

Real Property Assessed Valuea 75,362,471 80,382,723 85,742,414 86,604,080 89,567,334 86,929,063 88,567,122 93,106,851 95,693,541 99,307,726

Personal Property Net Assessed Valuea 19,903,266 21,887,929 20,719,080 32,039,107 27,685,707 24,321,011 23,263,576 22,826,022 24,184,955 23,041,264

Public Service Property Property Assessed Valueb 428,935,371 474,886,241 511,777,079 548,992,794 570,878,965 585,911,750 610,724,595 638,015,014 665,419,694 687,613,778

Total Net Assessed Value 4,008,793,406 4,426,001,653 4,803,652,759 5,041,470,268 5,274,344,635 5,424,552,706 5,656,237,944 5,907,277,101 6,149,826,618 6,358,338,256

Total Estimated Actual Valuec

10.70% 10.73% 10.65% 10.89% 10.82% 10.80% 10.80% 10.80% 10.82% 10.81%

Ratio of Gross Assessed Value to Total Estimated Actual Value

Source: Tulsa County Assessor

87

Assessed value is defined as the taxable value of real or personal property and is subject to an assessment rate set by the County Assessor to calculate the amount of tax liability. The current assessment rate is 11% for real property and 10% for personal property. b Public service property is centrally assessed by the Oklahoma State Board of Equalization. The assessment rates on public service property, and on airlines and railroads included in the public service category, are set at 22.85% and 11.84% respectively. c Estimated actual value is used in computing the gross assessed value for tax purposes. The Oklahoma Constitution provides that this value will not exceed a 5% increase over the previous year unless improvements were made to the property or if title to the property is transferred, changed, or conveyed to another person. d Components of total direct tax rate are found on the Direct and Overlapping Property Tax Rate table.

a

2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009

Fiscal Year Ended June 30,

Assessed and Estimated Actual Value of Taxable Property Last Ten Fiscal Years

74.28 71.69 73.63 73.89 73.30 72.59 67.65 68.36 67.36 68.66

Total Direct Tax Rated


Direct and Overlapping Property Tax Rates Last Ten Fiscal Years Rates for Taxpayers in the City of Tulsaa Direct Rates Fiscal Year 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009

Overlapping Rates

Union School District General Building Sinking 36.05 36.05 36.05 36.05 36.05 36.05 36.05 36.05 36.05 36.05

5.15 5.15 5.15 5.15 5.15 5.15 5.15 5.15 5.15 5.15

33.08 30.49 32.43 32.69 32.10 31.39 26.45 27.16 26.16 27.46

Total Direct Rates 74.28 71.69 73.63 73.89 73.30 72.59 67.65 68.36 67.36 68.66

Tulsa County 24.32 23.93 24.31 23.83 22.89 22.61 22.59 22.21 22.21 22.21

Tulsa Comm College 8.80 8.70 8.39 8.31 8.28 7.21 7.21 7.21 7.21 7.21

Tulsa VoTech

Tulsa City

13.33 13.33 13.33 13.33 13.33 13.33 13.33 13.33 13.33 13.33

12.33 12.02 11.53 11.23 11.16 10.11 9.97 12.67 13.48 14.08

Total Overlapping Rates 58.78 57.98 57.56 56.70 55.66 53.26 53.10 55.42 56.23 56.83

Total Direct & Overlapping Rates 133.06 129.67 131.19 131.59 128.96 125.85 120.75 123.78 123.59 125.49 127.39

Ten-Year Average

Rates for Taxpayers in the City of Broken Arrowb Direct Rates Fiscal Year 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009

Overlapping Rates

Union School District General Building Sinking 36.05 36.05 36.05 36.05 36.05 36.05 36.05 36.05 36.05 36.05

5.15 5.15 5.15 5.15 5.15 5.15 5.15 5.15 5.15 5.15

33.08 30.49 32.43 32.69 32.10 31.39 26.45 27.16 26.16 27.46

Total Direct Rates 74.28 71.69 73.63 73.89 73.30 72.59 67.65 68.36 67.36 68.66

Tulsa County 24.32 23.93 24.31 23.83 22.89 22.61 22.59 22.21 22.21 22.21

Tulsa Comm College 8.80 8.70 8.39 8.31 8.28 7.21 7.21 7.21 7.21 7.21

Tulsa VoTech 13.33 13.33 13.33 13.33 13.33 13.33 13.33 13.33 13.33 13.33

Total Broken Arrow Overlapping City Rates 14.00 14.90 16.30 16.48 12.89 15.08 15.06 15.74 15.30 15.72

60.45 60.86 62.33 61.95 57.39 58.23 58.19 58.49 58.05 58.47

Ten-Year Average a

Approximately 86% of the District lies within the City of Tulsa. The ten-year tax levy average for property owners in the City of Tulsa is 127.29 mills. b Approximately 14% of the District lies within the City of Broken Arrow. The ten-year tax levy average for property owners in the City of Broken Arrow is 130.58 mills. Note: A mill is the equivalent of $1 per $1,000 of net assessed value. The District's millage rate levy is pursuant to provisions of the Constitution of the State of Oklahoma contained in Article X. The County Excise Board certifies the Estimate of Needs submitted by the District annually and computes the rate of mill levy necessary for general fund, building fund and sinking fund purposes. Once the levy is certified by the Excise Board, the county assessor extends said levies upon the tax rolls. Pursuant to a recent amendment to the Oklahoma Constitution enabling local school districts to seek permanent voter approval of a 5-mill emergency levy, a 5.15-mill building levy, and a 10-mill local support levy, the District submitted such permanent levies to the voters at an election held on February 13, 2001. The permanent levies were approved, and the District no longer has to submit approval of these funding sources to voters on an annual basis. Source: Tulsa County Clerk

88

Total Direct & Overlapping Rates 134.73 132.55 135.96 136.84 130.69 130.82 125.84 126.85 125.41 127.13 130.68


Based on FY08-09 Net Assessed Valuation of 687,613,778 Based on FY99-00 Net Assessed Valuation of 428,935,371

Source: Tulsa County Assessor

b

89

55,357,425

Total

a

3 4 6 7 8 9

5,088,210 4,746,214 3,772,231 3,680,666 3,548,446 3,256,577 63,634,495

10

9.25%

1 5

Rank

2,862,744

1.08% 1.06% 0.87% 0.58% 0.57% 0.56% 0.54% 0.43%

12,106,038 4,397,769

Taxable Assessed Value

2

3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

7,445,808 7,277,584 5,969,134 3,963,487 3,945,007 3,819,285 3,717,895 2,989,128

1.96% 1.61%

Valuea

2000

11,898,530

1 2

Rank

13,456,951 11,050,216

Taxable Assessed Value

% of Total District Net Assessed

Woodland Hills Mall (formerly RREEF USA Fund #3) Public Service Company of Oklahoma Automotive Components Holding LLC (formerly Ford Motor Company) SouthCrest Hospital Wal-Mart Expedition Properties Tech Ridge Properties QuickTrip ERP Operating LP/QR Oklahoma Natural Gas General Telephone Co. Hilti Corporation State Farm Insurance Columbia Crest LLC MCI Bergen Brunswign Drug

Taxpayer

2009

Principal Property Taxpayers Current Year and Nine Years Ago

12.91%

1.19% 1.11% 0.88% 0.86% 0.83% 0.76%

0.67%

2.77%

2.82% 1.03%

Valueb

% of Total District Net Assessed


31,862,376 34,045,869 37,681,583 40,564,693 41,845,428 42,531,334 41,313,014 43,614,225 44,822,671 47,211,562

Total Tax Levied for Fiscal Year 31,184,166 33,322,140 37,047,430 39,275,161 40,611,805 41,626,700 40,155,225 41,923,508 43,123,100 45,842,202

Current Tax Collections 97.87% 97.87% 98.32% 96.82% 97.05% 97.87% 97.20% 96.12% 96.21% 97.10%

Percent of Current Tax Collected 706,047 436,813 401,090 629,746 706,084 993,048 687,930 909,225 893,785 1,032,762

Delinquent Tax Collections 31,890,213 33,758,953 37,448,520 39,904,907 41,317,889 42,619,748 40,843,155 42,832,733 44,016,884 46,874,964

Total Tax Collection

Collected in Subsequent Yearsb

100.09% 99.16% 99.38% 98.37% 98.74% 100.21% 98.86% 98.21% 98.20% 99.29%

Ratio of Total Tax Collection to Levy

1,030,607 1,095,247 1,196,441 1,058,312 1,536,139 1,453,586 1,593,293 1,429,130 1,152,965 1,401,874

Outstanding Delinquent Taxes

Source: Tulsa County Treasurer

90

Ad valorem taxes not paid on or before April 1 are considered delinquent. Interest accrues on delinquent taxes at the rate of one and one-half percent monthly (18 percent annually) to a maximum of 100 percent of the taxes due until such time as the delinquent taxes are paid. If not paid by the following October 1, the property is offered for sale for the amount of taxes due.

b

a

The Tulsa County Assessor is required to file a tax roll report on or before October 1 of each year with the Tulsa County Treasurer who must begin collecting taxes by November. The first half of taxes is due and payable on or before December 31. The second half becomes due and payable on or 'before March 31. If the first half is not paid by December 31, the total tax becomes due and payable on January 1.

2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009

Fiscal Year Ended June 30,

Collected within the Fiscal Year of the Levya

Property Tax Levies and Collections Last Ten Fiscal Years

3.23% 3.22% 3.18% 2.61% 3.67% 3.42% 3.86% 3.28% 2.57% 2.97%

Ratio of Delinquent Taxes to Total Levy


52,310,000 51,475,000 52,650,000 55,400,000 57,300,000 53,950,000 53,050,000 54,450,000 58,550,000 63,000,000

Governmental Activities General Obligation Bonds -

Business-Type Activities General Obligation Bonds 52,310,000 51,475,000 52,650,000 55,400,000 57,300,000 53,950,000 53,050,000 54,450,000 58,550,000 63,000,000

Total District 4,008,793,406 4,426,001,653 4,803,652,759 5,041,470,268 5,274,344,635 5,424,552,706 5,656,237,944 5,907,277,101 6,149,826,618 6,358,338,256

Total Estimated Actual Valueª 1.30% 1.16% 1.10% 1.10% 1.09% 0.99% 0.94% 0.92% 0.95% 0.99%

Ratio of Outstanding Debt to Estimated Actual Valuationª

Sources:

District records Tulsa County Assessor Oklahoma State Department of Education

Note: The District issues only general obligation bonds.

b

91

Since the District lies within the boundaries of two Oklahoma cities, per capita calculations are based on the final audited average daily membership (ADM) certified by the Oklahoma State Department of Education as a more relevant indicator of the debt ratio. See Demographic and Economic Statistics.

12,830 13,049 13,239 13,389 13,719 13,836 13,993 14,253 14,360 14,566

Average Daily Membership (ADM)b

ªEstimated actual valuation is taken from the table, Assessed and Estimated Actual Value of Taxable Property, which the District considers a more appropriate economic base than personal income on which to calculate the debt ratio.

2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009

Fiscal Year Ended June 30,

Last Ten Fiscal Years

Ratios of Outstanding Debt by Type

4,077 3,945 3,977 4,138 4,177 3,899 3,791 3,820 4,077 4,325

Ratio of Outstanding Debt Per Studentb


52,310,000 51,475,000 52,650,000 55,400,000 57,300,000 53,950,000 53,050,000 54,450,000 58,550,000 63,000,000

General Obligation Bonds 9,958,417 9,997,287 8,031,880 8,755,925 9,960,387 10,331,474 9,055,835 8,962,506 8,730,473 9,796,665

Less Sinking Fund Balance 42,351,583 41,477,713 44,618,120 46,644,075 47,339,613 43,618,526 43,994,165 45,487,494 49,819,527 53,203,335

Net General Bonded Debt Outstanding 4,008,793,406 4,426,001,653 4,803,652,759 5,041,470,268 5,274,344,635 5,424,552,706 5,656,237,944 5,907,277,101 6,149,826,618 6,358,338,256

Total Estimated Actual Valueª 1.06% 0.94% 0.93% 0.93% 0.90% 0.80% 0.78% 0.77% 0.81% 0.84%

Ratio of Net Debt to Estimated Actual Valuationª

Sources:

District records Tulsa County Assessor Oklahoma State Department of Education

Note: The District issues only general obligation bonds.

b

92

Since the District lies within the boundaries of two Oklahoma cities, per capita calculations are based on the final audited average daily membership (ADM) certified by the Oklahoma State Department of Education as a more relevant indicator of the debt ratio. See Demographic and Economic Statistics.

12,830 13,049 13,239 13,389 13,719 13,836 13,993 14,253 14,360 14,566

Average Daily Membership (ADM)b

ªEstimated actual valuation is taken from the table, Assessed and Estimated Actual Value of Taxable Property, which the District considers a more appropriate economic base than personal income on which to calculate the debt ratio.

2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009

Fiscal Year Ended June 30,

Ratios of Net General Bonded Debt Outstanding Last Ten Fiscal Years

3,301 3,179 3,370 3,484 3,451 3,152 3,144 3,192 3,469 3,653

Ratio of Net Debt Per Studentb


Direct and Overlapping Governmental Activities Debt As of June 30, 2009

Jurisdiction

Net Assessed Valuationa

Amount Subject to Taxation in Districta

Estimated Percent Applicable to the Districtb

Net General Obligation Bonded Debt Outstandingc

Amount Applicable to the District

As it applies to a resident of the City of Tulsa: Direct: Union Public Schools Overlapping: Tulsa County (unincorporated) Tulsa Technology Center #18 Tulsa Community College City of Tulsa Total Overlapping

687,613,778

687,613,778

100.00%

53,203,335

53,203,335

8,710,318 4,583,510,242 4,583,510,242 2,934,134,698 12,109,865,500

2,126,035 687,613,778 687,613,778 532,417,035 1,909,770,626

24.41% 15.00% 15.00% 18.15%

338,575,000 338,575,000

61,436,545 61,436,545

391,778,335

114,639,880

Total Direct and Overlapping

As it applies to a resident of the City of Broken Arrow: Direct: Union Public Schools Overlapping: Tulsa County (unincorporated) Tulsa Technology Center #18 Tulsa Community College City of Broken Arrowd Total Overlapping

687,613,778

687,613,778

100.00%

53,203,335

53,203,335

8,710,318 4,583,510,242 4,583,510,242 532,090,525 9,707,821,327

2,126,035 687,613,778 687,613,778 152,858,389 1,530,211,980

24.41% 15.00% 15.00% 28.73%

71,770,000 71,770,000

20,618,008 20,618,008

124,973,335

73,821,343

Total Direct and Overlapping

a

2008-09 net assessed valuations as certified by the Tulsa County Assessor.

b

Estimated percent was determined by the ratio of net assessed value of property subject to taxation in the District to the net assessed value of property in the overlapping unit.

c

Net general obligation bonded debt outstanding as reported by the overlapping unit.

d

The City of Broken Arrow had judgments totaling $814,262 as of 6/30/2009 that are reported on the tax rolls but not included as a component of net general obligation bonded debt outstanding.

93


Net Assessed Valuationa 388,932,650 428,935,371 474,886,241 511,777,079 548,992,794 570,878,965 585,911,750 610,724,595 638,015,014 665,419,694 687,613,778

Legal Debt Limit 10% of Net Assessed Valuationb 38,893,265 42,893,537 47,488,624 51,177,708 54,899,279 57,087,897 58,591,175 61,072,460 63,801,501 66,541,969 68,761,378 Outstanding GO Bonded Indebtedness 45,070,000 52,310,000 51,475,000 52,650,000 55,400,000 57,300,000 53,950,000 53,050,000 54,450,000 58,550,000 63,000,000

63,000,000 (9,796,665)

Less Sinking Fund Balance 8,490,697 9,958,417 9,531,619 8,031,880 8,755,925 9,960,387 10,331,474 9,055,835 8,962,506 8,730,473 9,796,665

53,203,335 15,558,042

68,761,377

Total Net Debt Subject to Legal Limit 36,579,303 42,351,583 41,943,381 44,618,120 46,644,075 47,339,613 43,618,526 43,994,165 45,487,494 49,819,527 53,203,335

Sources:

District records Tulsa County Assessor

94

Note: The District has no default of record on principal and interest payments of its general obligation bonded indebtedness.

b

Net assessed valuation is taken from the table, Assessed and Estimated Actual Value of Taxable Property. The general obligation indebtedness of the District is limited by Oklahoma law to 10% of the net assessed value of the taxable property in the District. c The legal debt margin is the additional debt incurring capacity of the District as allowed by Oklahoma law.

a

Fiscal Year Ended June 30, 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009

Legal Debt Margin Calculation for Fiscal Year 2009: 10% of FY 2008-09 Net Assessed Valuation Debt Applicable to Limitation Current Sinking Fund Balance Legal Debt Margin

Legal Debt Margin Last Ten Fiscal Years

Legal Debt Marginc 2,313,962 541,954 5,545,243 6,559,588 8,255,204 9,748,284 14,972,649 17,078,295 18,314,007 16,722,442 15,558,043

Percent of Net Debt to Debt Limit 94.05% 98.74% 88.32% 87.18% 84.96% 82.92% 74.45% 72.04% 71.30% 74.87% 77.37%


12,977 13,054 13,315 13,517 13,819 13,969 14,101 14,345 14,519 14,658

Official State October 1 Enrollmentb 12,830 13,049 13,239 13,389 13,719 13,836 13,993 14,253 14,360 14,566

Average Daily Membership (ADM)b N/A 1.71% 1.46% 1.13% 2.47% 0.86% 1.13% 1.86% 0.75% 1.44%

% Change in Average Daily Membership 428,935,371 474,886,241 511,777,079 548,992,794 570,878,965 585,911,750 610,724,595 638,015,014 665,419,694 687,613,778

Net Assessed Valuation (NAV)c 33,433 36,392 38,656 41,004 41,613 42,346 43,645 44,765 46,340 47,207

Per Student NAVd 12,143 12,395 12,660 12,722 13,041 13,143 13,251 13,450 13,662 13,974

Average Daily Attendance (ADA)b

94.65% 94.99% 95.63% 95.02% 95.06% 94.99% 94.69% 94.37% 95.14% 95.93%

Student Attendance Percentage

b

95

Union Public Schools district specific demographic data Obtained from the Oklahoma State Department of Education c Obtained from the Tulsa County Assessor d Since the District lies within the boundaries of two Oklahoma cities, per capita calculations are based on the final audited average daily membership (ADM) certified by the Oklahoma State Department of Education as a more relevant indicator of the debt ratio. e Obtained from Estimate of Needs - General Fund

a

2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009

Fiscal Year Ended June 30,

Demographic and Economic Statisticsa Last Ten Fiscal Years

54,093,536 58,612,803 64,784,028 64,476,447 66,316,809 72,702,329 77,620,261 86,045,683 93,006,429 101,447,717

Expenditure Appropriation Approved by County Excise Boarde


Demographic and Economic Statisticsa Last Ten Fiscal Years Fiscal Year Ended June 30, 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008d 2009e

b

Population

861,465 868,243 875,855 878,650 879,820 885,778 897,752 910,619 922,457 925,698

Total Personal Income (in thousands)b

Real Per Capita Personal Incomec

24,984,000 27,242,700 26,574,100 26,728,700 28,762,800 30,723,200 33,722,800 35,821,600 37,647,200 39,312,500

29,002 30,733 29,303 28,808 30,161 31,083 32,757 33,474 39,423 34,923

Labor Forcec

Unemployment Rateb

440,415 443,383 445,837 442,397 438,872 443,221 450,274 452,677 457,722 434,674

2.9% 0.0% 5.0% 6.1% 5.1% 4.3% 3.8% 4.1% 4.6% 5.0%

a

Tulsa MSA specific demographic data Obtained from OSU Center for Applied Economic Research Oklahoma Economic Outlook c Obtained from Tulsa Metro Chamber 2009 Economic Profile d Projected estimate based on Tulsa Metro Chamber 2009 Economic Profile and OSU Center for Applied Economic Research 2009 Oklahoma Economic Outlook e Projected forecast based on Tulsa Metro Chamber 2009 Economic Profile and OSU Center for Applied Economic Research 2009 Oklahoma Economic Outlook b

Note: Tulsa MSA comprises seven counties: Creek, Okmulgee, Osage, Pawnee, Rogers, Tulsa and Wagoner

96


30,306

7,500 7,000 4,500 4,437 2,750 2,719 2,500 2,300 2,100 2,000

Employees 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

Rank

3.27%

0.81% 0.76% 0.49% 0.48% 0.30% 0.29% 0.27% 0.25% 0.23% 0.22% 0.00%

County Employment b

Percentage of Tulsa

Sources: Tulsa Metro Chamber

b

a

97

Tulsa MSA specific demographic data Based on the estimated population count from the Tulsa Metro Chamber 2009 Economic Profile of 925,698 c Based on the population count from the Tulsa Metro Chamber 2009 Economic Profile of 861,374

American Airlines Tulsa Public Schools Saint Francis Healthcare System City of Tulsa St. John Medical Center Bank of Oklahoma Tulsa Community College Broken Arrow Public Schools OneOK Inc. NORDAM Group Hillcrest Healthcare System LDDS WorldCom Commercial Financial Services Williams Energy Group

Employer

2009

Tulsa Area Principal Employersa Current Year and Nine Years Ago

1 2 3 7 5

6 4 8 9 10

4,000 4,300 3,800 3,200 2,755 37,019

Rank

10,904 6,000 5,040 3,924 4,000

Employees

2000

0.50% 0.44% 0.37% 0.32% 4.30%

0.46%

1.27% 0.70% 0.59% 0.46% 0.46%

County Employmentc

Percentage of Tulsa


This page is intentionally left blank.

98


143,498,776

1,442,114

121,300,703 933,125 5,156,486 2,712,694 11,953,654 142,056,662

153,609,964

1,439,702

133,908,078 19,264 714,773 219,337 83,842 306,506 1,849,580 5,421,243 5,421,225 426,223 3,800,191 152,170,262

2002

169,660,831

1,428,722

148,238,260 90,398 834,676 219,940 291,110 360,277 2,012,259 6,871,328 5,803,563 482,345 3,027,953 168,232,109

2003

Source: District records

The District implemented GASB 34 on June 30, 2001; therefore, only nine fiscal years are presented.

a

Total Capital Assets

Business-Type Activities Child nutrition services

Governmental Activities Instruction Student Instructional support General administration School administration Business Operations and maintenance Transportation Support services Non-instructional Other-unclassified Total Governmental Activities

2001

99

185,272,903

1,537,471

164,886,634 123,660 919,716 220,655 456,290 678,973 2,416,201 6,893,177 3,649,529 489,760 3,000,837 183,735,432

2004

196,039,050

1,573,069

176,667,150 126,055 491,940 58,407 464,879 794,291 2,563,062 7,022,334 3,049,948 227,078 3,000,837 194,465,981

203,665,154

1,683,143

184,824,453 212,980 536,641 64,032 499,951 1,606,011 2,862,196 6,941,245 2,809,449 307,358 1,317,695 201,982,011

Fiscal Year Ending June 30, 2005 2006

Capital Assets by Function and Activity Last Nine Fiscal Yearsa

219,452,494

2,001,269

196,571,020 144,811 533,624 71,288 1,300,504 3,144,740 3,171,697 8,082,169 2,809,449 304,228 1,317,695 217,451,225

2007

232,281,805

2,068,246

208,486,847 138,246 586,827 185,210 1,440,721 3,357,220 3,436,217 8,071,361 2,809,449 383,766 1,317,695 230,213,559

2008

248,209,405

2,123,088

221,380,013 182,267 970,757 196,372 1,576,109 3,787,551 4,115,494 9,390,560 2,719,248 450,251 1,317,695 246,086,317

2009


31,633 44,708 39,560 13 795

28,478 40,678 36,270 12 783

51

53

548

28,886 43,334 38,791 282

25,731 39,304 35,118 290

537

25,641 39,372 31,239 500

22,486 35,342 27,894 481

2001

53

575

32,033 45,316 40,376 14 812

29,286 43,942 38,817 294

26,041 39,980 31,714 504

2002

57

583

32,033 45,416 39,795 13 782

29,286 44,042 38,402 280

26,041 40,080 31,469 489

2003

49

591

32,033 45,416 39,712 14 759

29,286 44,042 37,920 271

26,041 40,080 31,156 474

2004

64

602

32,033 46,778 42,596 12 813

29,286 45,363 39,689 289

26,041 41,282 32,675 512

2005

64

617

32,233 49,729 43,183 12 845

30,486 48,263 40,240 289

28,425 44,033 33,608 544

2006

Source: District records

100

Note: Salary ranges are per the Union Classroom Teacher's Association (UCTA) Master Contract which is negotiated annually. Employee counts are taken from the census information that is obtained each Spring for negotiation purposes.

72

660

33,500 52,829 45,986 13 891

32,300 51,363 42,318 299

31,100 47,133 35,941 579

2007

In 2009, average salary of current and prior years was re-calculated from a pay table average to a true average salary to reflect a more accurate average salary

a

Administrative Personnel Number of Administrators

Support Personnel Number of Support

Certified Personnel Bachelor's Minimum Salary Maximum Salary Average Salary Number of Teachers Master's Minimum Salary Maximum Salary Average Salary Number of Teachers Doctor's Minimum Salary Maximum Salary Average Salary Number of Teachers Total Certified Personnel

2000

Employee Information Last Ten Fiscal Years

72

712

34,000 55,279 46,640 15 916

32,800 52,913 43,048 308

31,600 48,799 36,514 593

2008

71

769

34,000 55,870 43,612 16 960

32,800 53,479 42,604 309

31,600 48,799 36,301 635

2009a


12,830 13,049 13,239 13,389 13,719 13,836 13,993 14,253 14,360 14,566

Average Daily Membership (ADM)a N/A 74,072,098 74,528,675 75,733,097 74,028,778 83,513,910 90,736,281 101,794,702 111,735,966 118,065,611

Operating Expendituresb N/A 5,676 5,629 5,656 5,396 6,036 6,484 7,142 7,781 8,106

Cost Per Pupilc N/A N/A -0.83% 0.48% -4.60% 11.86% 7.43% 10.14% 8.95% 4.17%

Percentage Change 783 795 812 782 759 813 845 891 916 960

Teaching Staffd

16:1 16:1 16:1 17:1 18:1 17:1 17:1 16:1 16:1 15:1

Pupil/ Teacher Ratio

b

101

Final audited average daily membership (ADM) obtained from the Oklahoma State Department of Education. Operating expenditures are the total expenses of the school district as reported in the Government-Wide Statement of Activities. The District implemented GASB 34 on June 30, 2001; therefore, only eight fiscal years of financial data are presented. c Cost per pupil is calculated by dividing operating expenditures by the final audited average daily membership (ADM) certified by the Oklahoma State Department of Education. d Teaching staff includes all certified personnel whose pay is based on the Union Classroom Teacher's Association (UCTA) Master Contract. e Number of graduates obtained from District records maintained by the Union High School Registrar.

a

2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009

Fiscal Year Ended June 30,

Operating Statistics Last Ten Fiscal Years

760 769 751 759 870 809 807 899 841 965

Number of Graduatese


12,830 13,049 13,239 13,389 13,719 13,836 13,993 14,253 14,360 14,566

Average Daily Membership (ADM)a 1,989 2,031 2,368 2,687 3,528 4,101 4,586 5,320 5,728 6,015

Free and Reduced Countb 15.50% 15.56% 17.89% 20.07% 25.72% 29.64% 32.77% 37.33% 39.89% 41.29%

Free and Reduced Percentage 99,566 101,557 129,832 143,985 185,204 263,750 335,983 413,191 475,846 497,407

Number of Breakfasts Servedb

Child Nutrition

1,446,923 1,475,861 1,886,765 1,912,943 1,333,299 1,294,764 1,148,763 2,076,210 1,445,585 1,277,953

Number of Lunches Servedb 91 94 94 92 92 92 92 106 106 116

Number of Buses Operatedb

834,944 834,050 838,816 735,000 826,113 831,682 820,532 830,680 864,343 852,377

Transportation Estimated Number of Miles Drivenb

b

a

102

Final audited average daily membership (ADM) and average daily haul (ADH) obtained from the Oklahoma State Department of Education Obtained from District records

2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009

Fiscal Year Ended June 30,

Support Services Statistics Last Ten Fiscal Years

7,340 7,522 8,034 8,386 8,283 7,891 7,810 8,253 10,334 8,895

Average Daily Haul (ADH)a


Elementary: Andersen Elementary (1984) Square Feet Capacity (students) Enrollment Percentage of Capacity Used Boevers Elementary (1975) Square Feet Capacity (students) Enrollment Percentage of Capacity Used Briarglen Elementary (1971) Square Feet Capacity (students) Enrollment Percentage of Capacity Used Cedar Ridge Elementary (1994) Square Feet Capacity (students) Enrollment Percentage of Capacity Used Clark Elementary (1977) Square Feet Capacity (students) Enrollment Percentage of Capacity Used Darnaby Elementary (1979) Square Feet Capacity (students) Enrollment Percentage of Capacity Used

District Building

67,709 600 463 77.17% 59,773 600 560 93.33% 61,349 600 620 103.33% 82,000 600 613 102.17% 71,480 600 547 91.17% 73,458 600 540 90.00%

59,773 600 596 99.33% 61,349 600 614 102.33% 82,000 600 631 105.17% 71,480 600 647 107.83% 73,458 600 672 112.00%

2001

67,709 600 673 112.17%

2000

103

73,458 600 543 90.50%

71,480 600 590 98.33%

82,000 600 598 99.67%

61,349 600 596 99.33%

59,773 600 599 99.83%

67,709 600 517 86.17%

2002

73,458 600 514 85.67%

71,480 600 645 107.50%

82,000 600 600 100.00%

61,349 600 579 96.50%

59,773 600 604 100.67%

67,709 600 519 86.50%

2003

73,458 600 490 81.67%

71,480 600 557 92.83%

82,000 600 580 96.67%

61,349 600 625 104.17%

59,773 600 659 109.83%

67,709 600 531 88.50%

73,458 600 538 89.67%

71,480 600 615 102.50%

82,000 600 554 92.33%

61,349 600 615 102.50%

59,773 600 682 113.67%

67,709 600 530 88.33%

Fiscal Year Ending June 30, 2004 2005

School Building Information Last Ten Fiscal Years

73,458 600 488 81.33%

71,480 600 659 109.83%

82,000 600 529 88.17%

61,349 600 576 96.00%

59,773 600 656 109.33%

67,709 600 567 94.50%

2006

73,458 600 564 94.00%

71,480 600 702 117.00%

82,000 600 545 90.83%

61,349 600 576 96.00%

59,773 600 426 71.00%

67,709 600 549 91.50%

2007

73,458 600 538 89.67%

71,480 600 776 129.33%

82,000 600 566 94.33%

61,349 600 589 98.17%

59,773 600 442 73.67%

67,709 600 505 84.17%

2008

73,458 600 571 95.17%

71,480 600 556 92.67%

82,000 600 591 98.50%

61,349 600 538 89.67%

59,773 600 481 80.17%

67,709 600 475 79.17%

2009


District Building Grove Elementary (1974) Square Feet Capacity (students) Enrollment Percentage of Capacity Used Jarman Elementary (1991) Square Feet Capacity (students) Enrollment Percentage of Capacity Used McAuliffe Elementary (1987) Square Feet Capacity (students) Enrollment Percentage of Capacity Used Moore Elementary (2000) Square Feet Capacity (students) Enrollment Percentage of Capacity Used Peters Elementary (1978) Square Feet Capacity (students) Enrollment Percentage of Capacity Used Rosa Parks (2006) Square Feet Capacity (students) Enrollment Percentage of Capacity Used Thomas Jefferson (2008)a Square Feet Capacity (students) Enrollment Percentage of Capacity Used 60,777 600 549 91.50% 68,592 600 597 99.50% 70,316 600 655 109.17% 74,632 600 537 89.50% 70,893 600 605 100.83% -

2001

60,777 600 665 110.83% 68,592 600 643 107.17% 70,316 600 570 95.00% 70,893 600 633 105.50% -

2000

104

-

-

70,893 600 626 104.33%

74,632 600 576 96.00%

70,316 600 654 109.00%

68,592 600 607 101.17%

60,777 600 563 93.83%

2002

-

-

70,893 600 659 109.83%

74,632 600 626 104.33%

70,316 600 656 109.33%

68,592 600 590 98.33%

60,777 600 575 95.83%

2003

-

-

70,893 600 577 96.17%

74,632 600 649 108.17%

70,316 600 754 125.67%

68,592 600 608 101.33%

60,777 600 612 102.00%

-

-

70,893 600 602 100.33%

74,632 600 652 108.67%

70,316 600 634 105.67%

68,592 600 639 106.50%

60,777 600 615 102.50%

Fiscal Year Ending June 30, 2004 2005

School Building Information Last Ten Fiscal Years

-

-

70,893 600 615 102.50%

74,632 600 654 109.00%

70,316 600 710 118.33%

68,592 600 607 101.17%

60,777 600 600 100.00%

2006

-

-

70,893 600 584 97.33%

74,632 600 578 96.33%

70,316 600 607 101.17%

68,592 600 603 100.50%

60,777 600 590 98.33%

2007

72,000 600 0.00%

71,300 600 479 79.83%

70,893 600 587 97.83%

74,632 600 596 99.33%

70,316 600 630 105.00%

68,592 600 606 101.00%

60,777 600 621 103.50%

2008

69,356 600 473 78.83%

71,300 600 612 102.00%

70,893 600 574 95.67%

74,632 600 470 78.33%

70,316 600 518 86.33%

68,592 600 559 93.17%

60,777 600 575 95.83%

2009


District Building Secondary: 6th/7th Grade Center (1993) Square Feet Capacity (students) Enrollment Percentage of Capacity Used 8th Grade Center (1982) Square Feet Capacity (students) Enrollment Percentage of Capacity Used Intermediate High School (1987) Square Feet Capacity (students) Enrollment Percentage of Capacity Used Senior High School (1972) Square Feet Capacity (students) Enrollment Percentage of Capacity Used

2001 276,126 2,200 2,062 93.73% 139,845 1,100 977 88.82% 432,564 2,200 1,986 90.27% 473,149 2,200 1,743 79.23%

2000 276,126 2,200 1,951 88.68% 139,845 1,100 1,000 90.91% 432,564 2,200 1,921 87.32% 473,149 2,200 1,761 80.05%

105

473,149 2,200 1,727 78.50%

432,564 2,200 2,011 91.41%

139,845 1,100 1,009 91.73%

276,126 2,200 2,099 95.41%

2002

473,149 2,200 1,822 82.82%

432,564 2,200 2,007 91.23%

139,845 1,100 1,018 92.55%

276,126 2,200 2,103 95.59%

2003

473,149 2,200 1,858 84.45%

432,564 2,200 2,108 95.82%

139,845 1,100 1,059 96.27%

276,126 2,200 2,152 97.82%

473,149 2,200 1,852 84.18%

432,564 2,200 2,156 98.00%

139,845 1,100 1,091 99.18%

276,126 2,200 2,194 99.73%

Fiscal Year Ending June 30, 2004 2005

School Building Information Last Ten Fiscal Years

611,119 2,200 1,932 87.82%

432,564 2,200 2,220 100.91%

165,620 1,300 1,132 87.08%

276,126 2,200 2,156 98.00%

2006

611,119 2,200 1,937 88.05%

432,564 2,200 2,308 104.91%

165,620 1,300 1,109 85.31%

276,126 2,200 2,210 100.45%

2007

611,119 2,200 2,044 92.91%

432,564 2,200 2,264 102.91%

165,620 1,300 1,139 87.62%

276,126 2,200 2,137 97.14%

2008

611,119 2,200 2,082 94.64%

432,564 2,200 2,325 105.68%

165,620 1,300 1,137 87.46%

276,126 2,200 2,121 96.41%

2009


104,915 12,948 -

2001

104,915 12,948 -

2000

-

-

12,948

104,915

2002

-

-

12,948

104,915

2003

150,400

-

12,948

104,915

150,400

-

12,948

104,915

Fiscal Year Ending June 30, 2004 2005

150,400

63,000

12,948

104,915

2006

150,400

63,000

12,948

104,915

2007

150,400 32,000

-

63,000

12,948

104,915

2009

150,400

63,000

12,948

104,915

2008

b

106

Construction in progress as of June 30, 2008; actual square footage noted in 2009 Building owned by Tulsa Community Action Project; operated by Union Public Schools. The facility currently houses a 3-year old program. The building was opened in August of 2008.

a

Note: Enrollment is based on the annual October 1 district child count required by the Oklahoma State Department of Education. All building information was obtained from District records. Increase in capacity is only shown when the square footage added was for regular instructional classroom space.

District Building Other: Education Service Center (1979) Square Feet Extended Education Building (1996) Square Feet Linde Building/New Education Service Center (2005) Square Feet Union Multipurpose Activity Center (2003) Square Feet Rosa Parks Early Childhood Center (2008)b Square Feet

School Building Information Last Ten Fiscal Years


Insurance Schedule June 30, 2009 Coverage

Deductible

Effective 7/1/2008 - 6/30/2009 School Package Policy (1) Building and Contents (All Locations) Includes Equipment Breakdown (Boiler & Machinery)

411,496,215

3,000/5,000 Property Damage/Wind, Hail & Lightning

Electronic Data Processing (Hardware/Software/Media)

18,850,000

2,500/2,500 Electronic Equipment/Laptops

Earthquake

10,000,000

25,000

Flood

5,000,000

25,000

General Liability

1,000,000

1,000

Employee Benefits Liability

2,000,000

2,500

Automobile Liability

1,000,000

1,000

Umbrella

5,000,000

-

School Leaders Professional Liability Includes Employment Practices Liability (2)

1,000,000

50,000

Storage Tank Pollution Liability (3)

1,000,000

5,000

Fiduciary Liability Includes $25,000 for fines in connection with HIPAA law violations (4)

2,000,000

2,500

Workers' Compensation (5) Effective 8/16/2007 - 6/30/2009 Medical Professional Liability (6)

500,000 1,000,000 single occurrence 2,000,000 aggregate

10,000

5,000,000

15,000

Effective 7/1/2004 - 6/30/2009 Crime (7) (1) National American Insurance Co. (2) Westchester Insurance Co. (ACE) (3) Zurich North America (4) Chubb Insurance (5) CompSource Oklahoma (OSAG) (6) Admiral Insurance Co. (7) Chubb Insurance Note: The District is currently self-insured for health insurance coverage. Employees were offered the choice of a PPO through Mutual Assurance Administrators (MAA) or an HMO through Community Care through June 30, 2009. Source: International Insurance Brokers

107


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108


Union Comprehensive Annual Financial Report