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A-Z of the University of Hertfordshire September 2016


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A–Z Guide 2016

IN CASE OF

EMERGENCY Please ring

+44 (0)1707 285555 OR

Internal Ext. 5555 from any telephone connected to the University switchboard If you require the information contained in this booklet in an alternative format, please contact: Head of Student Wellbeing Lena Kloos Tel: +44 (0)1707 284454 OR EXT. 4454 Email: L.J.Kloos@herts.ac.uk or disability@herts.ac.uk

Ask Herts

The simple way to find answers to your questions ask.herts.ac.uk


A–Z Guide 2016

Welcome to the University of Hertfordshire. I remember my first day at university. It was both exciting and a little daunting. This is the case for almost every student, regardless of age or how far you have travelled to be with us. This A–Z provides an introductory guide to the University which will provide reassurance and help you navigate your way to the most appropriate support. I encourage you to take full advantage of the wealth of opportunities available to you – academic, social, cultural and sporting. There is a great deal to know, and this A–Z has been devised as an introduction. Much of your time will be spent in your own academic area, but you are likely to use some of the many University-wide services. The A–Z cannot possibly be totally exhaustive, but you should find it provides enough contact points for you to investigate further those parts of the University that are of interest to you.

We can already see some of the results of our campus improvements: these include sectorleading accommodation, new learning and social spaces, enhanced sports facilities and an excellent Students’ Union. These vital changes to our University will continue throughout this year. Every effort is being made to keep disruption to a minimum, and I can assure you that the results will be outstanding. You can obtain regular updates from our website at go.herts.ac.uk/campusdevelopment Being a University of Hertfordshire student is about contributing to our communities, both on and off campus. Remain ambitious, constantly challenge yourself to excel and make the most of all aspects of your time at University. I look forward to meeting you over the course of the academic year. Good luck with your studies, and enjoy your time at Hertfordshire.

Geraldine Ward Acting Dean of Students deanofstudents@herts.ac.uk

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A–Z Guide 2016 | Contents

Contents Student Community Student Charter

Wellbeing 8

Student Jobs, Careers and Skills

Hutton Hub

38

Careers and Employment and Enterprise Service

58

The University of Hertfordshire Alumni Association

10

Student Wellbeing – Counselling, Disability, Mental Health and Health Promotion

39

Graduate Attributes

59

UHArts

11

60

Wellbeing - Counselling

39

Part-time work

Childcare 12

Wellbeing - Disability

40

Volunteering 60

Children on campus

12

Wellbeing - Mental Health

41

Study abroad: Start the adventure now

Student Code of Conduct

13

Wellbeing - Confidentiality of services

41

College Lane Accommodation Helpdesk

21

Wellbeing - Health promotion

42

Medical Centre

43

Campus Pharmacy

44

Drugs and alcohol

45

Community Liaison and Student Support (off campus)

22

Environment and sustainability

23

Equality and diversity

24

Finding your way around campus

25

Housing services

25

International student support

26

Tier 4 Visa Compliance

Chaplaincy 46 Religious and other beliefs

47

Sexual orientation

48

27

Sport (Hertfordshire Sports Village and University of Hertfordshire Athletic Union)

49

Personal safety/bullying and harassment

28

Students who are carers

51

Security services

29

Student opinion and student representation

32

Students who are pregnant, are adopting a child, or are parents

52

Hertfordshire Students’ Union

33

Students who have gender reassigned or are transitioning

53

Biodiversity Walk

54

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Student Information Useful dates

63

Examination boards

79

University of Hertfordshire scholarships

95

University structure

65

Feedback on coursework and exams

80

Academic appeals

66

Fees and finance

80

Guidelines to Students, Staff and Module Boards on Serious Adverse Circumstances

96

A. Costs

80

B. Funding and Financial support

81

C. Payments

81

D. Introduction of card charges

81

Financial policy for new UK/EU students 2016/2017

82

Appeals, complaints and disciplinary procedures 66 Awards Ceremonies

68

Attendance monitoring

69

Care leavers

69

Car parking, transport and travel

70

Student parking

70

Students commuting to University

70

Residential parking

70

Catering

71

Financial policy for new overseas students 2016/2017 84 ID cards

85

Internet: connecting to the internet and using University online services

86

Certificates 71

Library and Computing Services

87

How the university communicates with you

72

Lost Property

91

Council Tax

74

Plagiarism and collusion

92

Data protection

74

Press and publicity

94

Elective modules

76

Public Interest Disclosure – Whistle-blowing

94

Email

76

Reception Services

94

Exams

78

Doctoral College

95

Student centre

104

Student finance

105

Student loans

106

Students withdrawing

107

Under eighteen at the point of admission

108

University regulations and advice for students’ particular attention – index

109

Wednesday afternoon teaching

112

Your health and safety

113

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Student Community Contents Student Charter

8

The University of Hertfordshire Alumni Association

10

UHArts

11

Childcare 12 Children on campus

12

Student Code of Conduct

13

College Lane Accommodation Helpdesk

21

Community Liaison and Student Support (off campus)

22

Environment and sustainability

23

Equality and diversity

24

Finding your way around campus

25

Housing services

25

International student support

26

Tier 4 Visa Compliance

27

Personal safety/bullying and harassment

28

Security services

29

Student opinion and student representation

32

Hertfordshire Students’ Union

33


Student Community | A–Z Guide 2016

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Student Charter We give our full support to the Student Charter, it is designed to guide you through your time at the University to ensure you make the most of your experience. Both the University and Hertfordshire Students’ Union are dedicated to transforming lives.

Professor Quintin McKellar Vice Chancellor, University of Hertfordshire

Grainne O’Monghain President, Hertfordshire Students’ Union


Student Community | A–Z Guide 2016

Your University’s commitment to you • Provide excellent educational opportunities and do everything we can to make you highly employable while developing a lifelong passion for learning • Ensure the health safety and wellbeing of yourself and that of others within our Community • Provide you with an intellectually stimulating environment supporting your academic, professional and personal development • To provide a friendly and supportive environment to allow you to succeed • Work in partnership with students, student representatives and the Students’ Union, to enable you to contribute to the improvement of university life • Be entrepreneurial, innovative and creative in our outlook, and open to doing things differently

Your commitment to us • Participate fully in your studies and university experience, so you become the best that you can be • Ensure the health safety and wellbeing of yourself and that of others within our Community • Make full use of facilities, resources and support on offer at the University, asking for help when you need it • Positively represent yourself, the people you work with and the places in which you live and study • Engage proactively with your student representatives, supporting them to make your voice heard • Make the most of opportunities to feed back about your student experience

Your

Students’ Union’s commitment to you • Provide relevant and student focused activities enabling you to have the best possible experience • Strive to provide as part of the UH community relevant services and opportunities that allow you to reach your potential. • Actively seek your views to represent you and support student-led change on campus, locally and nationally • Provide you with opportunities that are fun, safe, diverse and challenging both on and off campus • Be responsible and ensure that, as a charity, every penny we earn goes directly back into services that benefit you • Enable you to get involved within the local community, with voluntary and charitable work • Provide an independent voice for all students

Shared commitments

• Behave professionally, with courtesy and integrity • Respect each other, working collaboratively and in partnership • Work together to develop our University, through ongoing dialogue and feedback • Value our collective identity and our individual diversity • Make a personal contribution to our communities within and beyond the University • To be aspirational and celebrate our successes

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The University of Hertfordshire Alumni Association Even though graduation might seem years away, once you receive your award you become part of the University of Hertfordshire Alumni Association – joining a network of thousands of graduates around the world. We want to make sure that you continue to feel connected to us and your classmates.

How we can help you As an alumnus of the University of Hertfordshire we are pleased to be able to offer support and a range of benefits, including: • Discounts and services, both on and off campus, including a free alumni membership card which provides discounted membership to the Hertfordshire Sports Village • Careers support and advice for up to two years after graduation from the Careers, Employment and Enterprise Service • Reunions and events, both social and professional • Opportunities and discounts for continued learning and study at the University of Hertfordshire • A worldwide network of alumni who can support you professionally and socially

How you can stay involved We are in regular contact with over 100,000 alumni around the world, letting them know about events, news and benefits through Futures magazine, our e-newsletter e-futures, and social media.

There are lots of ways that alumni stay involved, including: • Speaking to prospective students about their course at open days • Speaking to current students about their job and sharing career experiences • Becoming a profile or case study • Acting as an international ambassador and getting involved with our international chapters • Offering work placements or recruiting students in the future • Donating to key University projects Email: alumni@herts.ac.uk Web: www.herts.ac.uk/alumni Facebook: www.facebook.com/HertsAlumni LinkedIn group: ‘University of Hertfordshire Alumni Association’ Twitter: @HertsAlumni Ask Herts

After you leave University

100,000 alumni around the world


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UHArts UHArts is the university’s arts organisation. Each year it presents a public programme of theatre, music, film and visual arts in venues across the university and beyond. UHArts supports the cultural life of the University, enhancing the student experience and enriching the lives of University staff and the local community through its provision of high-quality and affordable arts events and creative opportunities. Alongside the UHArts programme of events, students and members of the community are

encouraged to get involved through opportunities such as: JamJar, a monthly live music event, interactive art and theatre events as well as volunteering at the Weston Auditorium. To get involved, join our mailing list or find out more email uharts@herts.ac.uk. Find us at: go.herts.ac.uk/uharts Facebook: UHArts Instagram: @unihertsarts Twitter: @unihertsarts


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Childcare The University is committed to the provision of childcare facilities for use by the students and staff and has a day nursery on the College Lane Campus. The University day nursery caters for children aged between three months and five years and is open from 08.00–18.00 Monday–Friday. It is open all year round, only closing on public and University holidays. Nursery attendance can either be full day (between 08.00 and 18.00) or split into two sessions: morning (attendance between 08.00 and 13.00) and afternoon (attendance between 13.00 and 18.00). Flexible and short-term placements are sometimes available with prior notification to the nursery management. Places are limited and not automatically guaranteed, therefore early application is recommended.

Current fees and further information can be found at go.herts.ac.uk/nursery. If you have any other questions, please contact the nursery on +44 (0)1707 284448 or ext. 4448 or email: nursery@herts.ac.uk. The child-centred provision is led by professionally qualified staff who create an environment that is loving and caring as well as educational and stimulating for all children’s individual developmental needs. Karen Conroy Nursery Manager Tel: +44 (0)1707 284448 or ext. 4448 Email: k.v.conroy@herts.ac.uk Ask Herts

Childcare

Children on campus With the exception of the day nursery, the University premises are not designed with the attendance of children in mind and there are many potential hazards both in the layout of the buildings and grounds and in the equipment and machinery used for teaching and research purposes. Employees, students and visitors must therefore obtain the consent of the appropriate manager before bringing a child on to University premises. Children are not permitted to be present at lectures, seminars or other teaching activities. Detailed information can

be found in UPR HS07 ‘Children, Young People & Vulnerable Adults’.


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Student Code of Conduct1 STUDENT CODE OF CONDUCT2 (Amendments to the version 05.0, UPR SA01 are show italics.) 1 Our University is a student-focused and diverse community of students and staff who work and study together closely and it is important that they are able to do so without disruption. The student community includes those enrolled on short courses; on undergraduate, taught postgraduate and Continuing Professional Development programmes; and those registered for research degrees. 2 The University has a fair admissions policy and aims to be responsive to all applicants and to provide pre-entry information that is appropriate. All students are able to use the high-quality learning and teaching facilities and support services that we provide and are encouraged to participate actively in the work of the University through committee membership. There are well-established processes through which students may raise queries and complaints. Fuller information is given in the Statement of Responsibilities and Commitments (Appendix I, UPR SA013, refers).

1 2 3

3 This Code of Conduct is intended to clarify the standard of behaviour that the University expects from students when they are at the University and when they go out into the wider community. These standards are enshrined in University regulation. Where this Code appears to conflict with University regulation, the latter will take precedence. The examples given in this Code are illustrative and are not an exhaustive list.

texting or sending recordings/images is not acceptable; any other form of behaviour which could reasonably be regarded as disruptive or offensive is also not acceptable); iv to ensure that you do not behave in a disruptive manner either on or off campus (the University considers disruptive, inconsiderate or offensive behaviour (including such behaviour in the on-line ‘environment’) to be a breach of discipline);

4 As a student we expect you: i to commit to all elements of your programme of study, recognising that a full-time course requires the equivalent of a minimum 40 hours per week study time; ii to be punctual in your attendance and to meet deadlines (persistent, unexplained, late arrival at, or early departure from, lectures, seminars, tutorials and practicals is not acceptable); iii to be attentive in class (electronic devices other than those necessary for the session must be switched off for the entire period of the lecture, seminar, tutorial or practical, in particular, using your mobile telephone,

Academic Board Minutes: 574.3, 11 March 2009; 9, 16 March 2011; 123, 14 March 2012; 359.5.2, 1 March 2014, refer. Academic Board Minutes: 574.3, 11 March 2009; 9, 16 March 2011; 123, 14 March 2012; 359.5.2, 1 March 2014, refer. Appendix I, UPR SA01 ‘Statement of Rights and Responsibilities’.

v to be responsible for the good behaviour of any guests that you invite to the University

(children are not permitted to attend timetabled learning and teaching activities, including lectures, seminars and other teaching activities;

unless you have obtained permission beforehand, you are not allowed to bring visitors to timetabled learning and teaching activities, including lectures, seminars and other teaching activities);

vi to be respectful and polite to fellow students, staff and others visiting or working on campus;


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vii

to recognise and respect the cultural diversity of the University and take no action that might undermine the principles of cultural tolerance within our community;

viii to uphold the good name and reputation of the University in your off-campus activities, exercising respect and tolerance in the wider community; ix do not behave in ways that bring the University into disrepute; x

to carry your University Identity Card at all times when you are on campus (individuals without cards will be asked to leave campus);

xiv to comply with the law at all times and report to the relevant authorities any incidents that you may witness. In return you become a welcome member of our community, entitled to all of the rights and privileges associated with that membership which are summarised in the Statement of Responsibilities and Commitments.4

Mrs S C Grant Secretary and Registrar Signed: 25 May 2015

xi neither intentionally nor negligently to damage or misuse or make unauthorised use of University premises, property or equipment; xii

to comply with the University’s Health and Safety policies and regulations, to take reasonable care of your health and safety and not to endanger the health or safety of others;

xiii

to be personally responsible for your actions and behaviour and to comply with all University regulations, including this Code of Conduct (the University may take disciplinary action should you fail to do so);

Note 1 for Partner Organisations (UK and overseas) 4 The Statement of Responsibilities and Commitments does not apply to Partner Organisations.


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SUMMARY OF PRINCIPAL CHANGES General changes: None Section: 3.9 Re-drafted (Amendments to version 05.0, UPR SA01, are shown in italics.) 1

INTRODUCTION This Statement summarises the responsibilities and commitments of students and staff which are essential for the continued success of the University of Hertfordshire community.5 It should be read in conjunction with the Student Code of Conduct.6

2

SCOPE The Statement applies to all members of staff and all students, regardless of their mode of study, who are following taught programmes or programmes of research training which lead to awards of the University and which are provided at the University of Hertfordshire.

5

3

COMMITMENTS AND RESPONSIBILITIES

3.1 The student and staff community Our University is a student-focused, multi-ethnic community of students and staff who work and study together closely and it is important that they are able to do so without disruption. The student community includes those enrolled on undergraduate, taught postgraduate and Continuing Professional Development programmes and those registered for research degrees. 3.2 The local and wider community The University of Hertfordshire takes seriously its responsibilities to the local and wider community, recognises its broader social responsibilities as a Higher Education institution and is committed to upholding, through its aims, objectives and mission, certain standards and values. The University

shall at all times be entitled to uphold and protect its good name and reputation and, therefore, reserves the right to take disciplinary action against students where there is reason to believe that they may have breached University regulations or brought the University into disrepute through their behaviour on University premises or elsewhere. 3.3 Equality and Diversity and Access to the University of Hertfordshire 3.3.1 The University is committed to being an equal opportunities educational institution and seeks to create a climate of equality of opportunity in the process of recruitment and selection of students and in the provision of education. 3.3.2 The University’s commitment to equal opportunities is set out in its Equality and Diversity Policy.7 The University aims to ensure that no one receives less favourable treatment because of characteristics protected by UK

Terminology - This document uses the terminology set out in UPR GV08 ‘Terminology – Glossary of Approved University Terminology’ Approval - Academic Board: Minutes 724.4, 15 March 2000; 795.2, 14 March 2000; 867.2, 6 March 2002; 956, 5 March 2003; 62.2, 10 March 2004; 155.2, 9 March 2005; 257.3.2, 1 March 2006; 369, 7 March 2007; 574.3, 11 March 2009, 9, 16 March 2011; 123, 14 March 2012; 359.5.2, 12 March 2014, refer. Board of Governors: Minute 424, Board of Governors, 30 March 2000, refer. Disclaimer - The University of Hertfordshire disclaims its liability to the fullest extent permitted by law in accordance with the notice published in the University Prospectus, a copy of which may be viewed on-line via: http://www.herts.ac.uk 6 UPR SA01 ‘Student Code of Conduct’


A–Z Guide 2016 | Student Community

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legislation8 or because of family or care responsibilities, social class, trade union activity, being an ex-offender or other unreasonable grounds.

iv

3.4 Pre-entry information 3.4.1 The University will: i

ii

iii

7 8

provide a statement of its taught courses, research training programmes, entry requirements and facilities in the appropriate University prospectus, electronic media and other relevant promotional material. make available not less than four (4) months prior to registration, information concerning those fees which are determined by the University and any concessionary rates, grants, bursaries and scholarships which are available. provide outline timetables for taught full-time and sandwich courses at the time of registration, although it should be noted that this information may be subject to change.

v

vi

by the time of registration, provide information for applicants concerning tuition fees agreed with agencies outside the University, such as the Higher Education Funding Council for England and any concessionary rates, grants, bursaries and scholarships that are available.

3.5 A fair admissions policy

i

treat all applicants fairly and consider applications in accordance with the relevant published criteria and procedures.

by the time of registration, provide information concerning other costs such as those for car parking and Universitybus (Uno) fares.

ii

offer Open Days to applicants who wish to visit the University prior to admission.

iii

at all stages of the admissions process, make decisions on offers and/or interviews as rapidly as possible.

iv

send information about Universitycontrolled student residential accommodation to applicants intending to study full-time once they have confirmed their acceptance of a place.

v

make joining information available electronically for new entrants before their arrival at the University (information for students enrolling on Continuing Professional Development programmes may not be available electronically).

provide applicants with information concerning the cost and availability of University-controlled student residential accommodation.

3.5.1 The University will:

3.4.2 Students are expected to: i

familiarise themselves with the relevant pre-entry information.

ii

have sufficient funds to meet their financial commitments.

iii

have met, as necessary, any visa and other requirements of the UK Visa Agency (UKVI).

UPR EQ03 ‘Equality and Diversity Policy’ Equality Act 2010 – Protected Characteristics: The following are defined as protected characteristics by the Act: age, disability, gender reassignment, marriage/civil partnership status, pregnancy or maternity, race, religion or belief, sex and sexual orientation.


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3.5.2 Applicants are expected to: i

provide full and accurate information in a timely manner during the application process.

ii

honour their commitment to the University if they have accepted an offer of a place.

3.6 Learning, teaching and research – taught programmes 3.6.1 The University will: i

ensure staff have the appropriate expertise and experience to deliver the courses on which students are enrolled.

ii

provide appropriate facilities for learning.

iii

provide appropriate IT facilities, laboratory accommodation and equipment to support students’ learning.

iv

provide up-to-date and well-equipped Learning Resources Centres.

v

ensure that: a staff specify assignment tasks clearly

9

and make information available to students about the criteria that will be used to assess their performance and determine the grades which are to be awarded. b staff mark students’ work fairly and that they give constructive feedback on assessed coursework. c students’ coursework is returned to them together with feedback no later than four (4) calendar weeks after the submission deadline9 unless the work is of an ongoing nature, such as a major project or dissertation, in which case, supervising staff will ensure that students are provided with feedback at interim stages. d when timetabling in-course assessments, staff will, where practicable, have regard for other assessment deadlines which students are being set. e examinations and assessments are held in appropriate surroundings. f with the exception of ‘out-of-time’ examinations which are timetabled on an individual basis, resit examinations and assessments set in the first four (4) weeks of the Semester, the dates of examinations and assessments are

published four (4) weeks before they are due to take place. 3.6.2 Students following taught programmes are expected to: i

attend and participate, as appropriate, in their lectures, tutorials, workshops, laboratory and other timetabled classes and to be punctual.

ii

as required by the Student Code of Conduct,3 behave in an acceptable and considerate way during lectures, tutorials and all other activities concerned with the learning experience held either at the University or elsewhere, for example, field trips or clinical or practice placements.

iii

comply with the University’s Health and Safety regulations, particularly when using equipment and potentially hazardous materials and while working in laboratories.

iv

undertake on their own and in untutored groups, the amount of study specified in the Definitive Module Document for each of the modules for which they are registered.

Any exceptions to this must be agreed by the relevant Associate Dean of School (Academic Quality Assurance) or the Associate Dean of School (Learning and Teaching), and notified to students in advance of the expiration of the four-week period.


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v

complete and hand in all assignments by the relevant published deadline.

vi

give responsible feedback on their learning experience when asked, for example, through the National Student Survey.

vii

ensure that they comply with those University regulations which have particular relevance within the context of learning and teaching, especially those relating to cheating, plagiarism, other academic misconduct, ethics, examinations and assessments.

viii

comply with any external regulations affecting their studies.

3.7 Programmes of research training 3.7.1 The University will: i

ii

appoint a supervision team with appropriate subject expertise and experience of supervising research students to a successful research degree submission. allocate appropriate resources to support the programme of research training.

iii

provide the opportunity for the student to undertake research training in a supportive environment.

iii

submit regular progress reports to their supervisors in accordance with a jointly agreed timetable.

iv

provide opportunities for training in generic and discipline-specific research skills and methodology.

iv

v

ensure that the student registers on a programme of research training that can be achieved in the normal completion times.

comply with the University’s Health and Safety regulations, particularly when using equipment and potentially hazardous materials and while working in laboratories.

v

ensure that they comply with University regulations, especially those relating to cheating, plagiarism, other academic misconduct, ethics, examinations and assessments.

vi

assign the intellectual property rights of their research to the University where this is required by the relevant University regulations.

vi

vii

ensure that research degree supervisors give constructive feedback on research students’ progression assessments and draft thesis or portfolio chapters. ensure that oral examinations for research degrees are conducted by appropriately qualified examiners.

3.7.2 Research students are expected to: i

undertake their research in accordance with national ethical and professional standards.

ii

give research seminars on the progress of their research in accordance with School policies.

3.8 Services and facilities 3.8.1 The University will:

provide access to a range of services and facilities additional to normal academic provision. These will be set out in detail in ‘A-Z of the University of Hertfordshire’ published to students each September.


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3.8.2 Students will: i

use these services and facilities in accordance with the relevant University regulations and the operational guidelines established by the Head of each service.

ii

take reasonable precautions to protect themselves and their personal property.

iii

carry their University Identity Cards while on University premises.

iv

for all on-campus taught programmes, record attendance at least once each week using the appropriate mechanism provided by the University.

v

for research students, record attendance as stipulated in the Research Degrees Handbook.

vi vii

3.9.2 The Executive of the Students’ Union will:

ensure their personal details are kept up to date on the University’s systems. take responsibility for regularly checking their communications from the University, including email and StudyNet.

work in partnership with the student body and Students’ Union to provide a range of opportunities for students to engage in the enhancement of their student experience. Mechanisms involving students include surveys, student discussion fora and student representation. Representatives of the Students’ Union have assured places and the opportunity to have an active role on the Board of Governors, the Academic Board and where appropriate, on committees of these two Boards. Within Schools, student representatives will have places on Programme Committees and, as appropriate, on other School committees and groups.

work in partnership with the University to ensure effective student engagement and representation. This includes electing representatives from the student body, consisting of an agreed number of fulltime remunerated student officers.

3.10 Queries and complaints

3.9 Student Engagement

3.10.1 The University will:

3.9.1 The University will:

i

provide defined policies and procedures to enable students to take forward any

queries, complaints or appeals that they may have whether of an academic or non-academic nature. ii

endeavour to resolve all issues informally and at a local level, with formal processes being reserved only for those occasions where this has not been possible.

3.11 Conduct 3.11.1 Members of staff will: i

at all times act in a professional manner in their dealings with students and with respect to punctuality.

ii

be available at stated times, to deal with any queries, concerns and other matters raised by the students.

3.11.2 Students will:

have agreed, at registration, to comply with University regulations which include the Student Code of Conduct.3 University regulations are published as a series of documents called ‘University Policies and Regulations’ (UPRs) and may be viewed online at the following location: http://www.herts.ac.uk/secreg/


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3.12 Monitoring 3.12.1 The University’s provision, outlined in this Statement, and its operation, are monitored internally by the Dean of Students by various means, including the National Student Survey, Module Feedback Questionnaire and School annual reports.

3.12.2 Externally, the University will be monitored through independent reviews carried out by the Quality Assurance Agency, OFSTED and, where appropriate, other agencies. Mrs S C Grant Secretary and Registrar Signed: 25 May 2015


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College Lane Accommodation Helpdesk The Helpdesk is responsible for any repairs to your student accommodation at the College Lane Campus. If you notice anything that needs to be repaired, please report this to the College Lane Residences Helpdesk as soon as possible, providing as much information as you can. The Helpdesk can be contacted on: Tel: +44 (0)1707 284063 or ext. 4063 Email: clresidenceshelpdesk@derwentfm.eu The opening hours of the Helpdesk are 08:00– 20:00 Monday to Friday and 09:00–18:00 at weekends. (If you wish to report a problem out of hours, please contact security on extension 1010 or the emergency number 5555, or email the above address.)


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Community Liaison and Student Support (off campus) Community Liaison is the responsibility of the Community Partnership Office (CPO), whose main roles are as follows: • To support students living off campus and help resolve any difficulties that may arise. • To act as the first point of contact for residents of the local community who wish to discuss issues or concerns relating to student behaviour.

of those around you. Noise generated from DIY fanatics and children in the garden at weekends is acceptable; loud music at three in the morning is not! There are many factors that can contribute to a breakdown of neighbourly relations, ranging from noise and rubbish to general tidiness of the property.

We want you to enjoy university life to the fullest without the negative experiences of neighbourly disputes. These can interfere with your everyday life and, in some extreme cases, if the The CPO is headed by the Deputy Dean of Students, who has responsibility for all student University’s name is brought into disrepute, can welfare and discipline issues. It is the main point lead to dismissal from your course. of contact for voluntary and community groups We believe that introducing yourself to your wishing to work with the University. It also neighbours is not only polite but is also a works closely with local statutory bodies such positive step towards amicable relationships as the council, police and fire brigade. and will therefore help you to enjoy life as a The CPO employs a full-time Community Liaison and Support Officer who works closely with students and local residents. If you are living in the local community, please take some time to read through this section on how to be a good neighbour. In order to enjoy living in the area in which you reside, it is important to respect those around you. People who experience trouble from unpleasant neighbours can suffer from stress and anxiety, and this can lead to an overall poor quality of life. As students living in private accommodation, you are part of the local community and should therefore consider the diverse range of cultures

student.

Here are a few extra tips that might help: • Be considerate of your neighbours’ lifestyle patterns; remember they may be working full-time and need their sleep!

• Please try to park considerately. • Make sure your rubbish is put into proper bags. Don’t put your rubbish out too early otherwise local cats/foxes/birds will help themselves to the contents. • Let your neighbours know if you’re planning to have a party. Choose a suitable evening – either a Friday or Saturday, which will hopefully mean that your neighbours don’t have to get up early for work in the morning. Stick to an agreed finishing time and make sure your guests leave quietly. • If you do receive complaints from a neighbour, try to respond in a courteous way and take responsibility for your actions. Think how your parents or guardians would feel if they were living next door to you! • Don’t forget that it is not an acceptable excuse to say you were drunk and therefore not aware of how loud you were being! Also, being a student isn’t an excuse for bad behaviour!

• Noise travels; walls between properties can • More than anything, take pride in where you often be very thin. Try not to slam doors and live – it’s your home too! keep music volumes down to a reasonable To report any issues that arise, please email level. community@herts.ac.uk. • If you’ve been out for the evening, please Off-Campus Living return to your house quietly. Don’t forget that Ask Herts noises travel long distances, particularly late at night.


Student Community | A–Z Guide 2016 23

Environment and sustainability The Environment and Sustainability Team actively works to make the University a more sustainable place to live, work and study. The University is committed to reducing its impact on the environment which is detailed in our Environmental Policy. We have implemented an internationally recognised Environmental Management System to enable us to manage our environmental impacts which include pollution, waste, energy consumption, transport, sustainable purchasing and biodiversity. How can you get involved? Whatever your interests, there are opportunities for everyone to get involved, make a difference and reduce our environmental impact. Student EcoReps are employed to raise awareness through events and competitions. You can promote positive environmental behaviour through the University’s PowerDown campaign, which rewards prizes to the best environmentally themed pictures. You can also volunteer to take part in the University’s Green Impact scheme which will provide you with the opportunity to be trained as a student project assistant or a student auditor. All of these opportunities will provide you with skills which are attractive to future employers.

What is available? • Electric cars are available on both campuses to hire per hour/day. • You are eligible for Student discounts on Uno buses, with tickets available via smart phones. • You can hire a bike through our new UBike scheme, complete with lights, lock, mudguards and rack, all year round. Email: sustainable@herts.ac.uk Web: www.herts.ac.uk/sustainable


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A–Z Guide 2016 | Student Community

Equality and diversity The University is committed to advancing equality of opportunity and promoting fair treatment for all students regardless of age, disability, ethnic, national or cultural background, gender or gender identity, parental or care responsibilities, pregnancy or maternity, religion or belief, sexual orientation or socio-economic background. You will find that at this University we work hard to:

The Equality Office works across the University and with the Students’ Union to promote and advance equality of opportunity and diversity. For more information on how the University is working to ensure our students can learn in an inclusive and encouraging environment, please see Equality Office: StudyNet > Student Support > Personal Life > Equality Office.

Please contact the Equality Office: • attract students nationally and internationally • if you need information or advice on equality, from diverse backgrounds. diversity or inclusion. • ensure equality of opportunity, inclusivity and fair treatment in teaching, learning and • if you are experiencing discrimination, assessment and in all our student services bullying or harassment. and facilities. • with your suggestions as to how we can advance equality – eg, by events, initiatives • promote an inclusive ethos of fairness, or publicity. courtesy and respect. • deal with any complaints of unfair treatment, bullying or harassment.

You can help to make equal opportunities a reality at the University by: • completing equality monitoring questions at enrolment so we can understand the effectiveness and impact of our policies. • treating other students and staff with dignity and respect. • reporting any incidents that cause you concern, including any of discrimination, harassment or bullying. Equality Office See: StudyNet > Student Support > Personal Life > Equality Office Tel: +44 (0)1707 284982 / 289362 Email: equality@herts.ac.uk Please see the entry ‘Disability’ in the A–Z for information on University disability services. Also, the following A–Z entries all have equality information: Religious and other beliefs; Sexual orientation; Students who are pregnant, are adopting a child, or are parents; Students who are carers; Students who have gender reassigned or are transitioning; Personal safety/ bullying and harassment.


Student Community | A–Z Guide 2016 25

Finding your way around campus Maps and signs are available across the University to help you find your way around. Maps and directions are also available on the University’s website. Alternatively, if you want directions to a particular room, building or location on College Lane or De Havilland campus you can download the Herts Mobile app which is available for iPhone and Android devices. Simply search for ‘Ask Herts’ in your app store. Ask Herts

Campus maps

Housing services The University has a wide range of accommodation at the College Lane and de Havilland Campuses. The majority of students can expect to spend their first year in University accommodation on campus. As you are already a student here you will have made arrangements for your first year, but don’t forget to look ahead to future years as time will pass more quickly than you think. If you are in halls, please remember that communal living does require a bit of give

and take. The rules set out in the Code of Conduct and Licence Agreement are to ensure that everyone has a good time rather than to restrict your individual freedom. For allocations queries, please contact the Residential Allocations Team based in the Hutton Hub on College Lane Campus. For enquiries relating to premises management (eg, cleaning, repairs) or pastoral issues (eg, welfare, discipline), please contact the Accommodation Office Helpdesk at College Lane Campus, the Helpdesk at de Havilland Campus or the Estates Helpdesk.

Naomi Banton Housing Manager Tel: +44 (0)1707 285030 or ext. 5030 Email: n.n.1.banton@herts.ac.uk


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A–Z Guide 2016 | Student Community

International student support The International Student Support (ISS) Team is responsible for supporting overseas students during their stay in the UK. It is based in the Student Centre on the College Lane Campus. Throughout your studies, the ISS Team is available to offer you advice and support on all aspects of your time in the UK including immigration, employment and personal matters. Help can also be provided with renewing your student visa. Upon completing your studies, the team can help you with your plans to return home or give you guidance with regard to switching your student visa to another immigration category. Immigration advice in the UK is regulated by the OISC (Office of the Immigration Services Commissioner). The Immigration and Asylum Act 1999 made it unlawful for anyone to provide unregulated immigration advice or immigration services. The International Student Advisers (part of the ISS Team) are specifically trained to supply immigration advice and guidance to staff and students in accordance with OISC regulations. Their advice is free. The ISS Team has produced a lot of useful information and step-by-step guides on StudyNet and AskHerts covering a variety of topics. Please take the time to read the information on which is regularly updated. See go.herts.ac.uk/international-student-support for details.

Though your time here at the University is designed for you to obtain a degree, we recognise that it cannot be all work and no play. This is why the ISS Team organises a number of social and cultural events and trips throughout the year that are open to all students and staff. These events and trips are a great way of making new friends and seeing other parts of the UK and Europe. Join the Facebook group called ‘UH ISS Club’ to find out more information. Previous trips have included Cambridge, Stonehenge, Stratford-upon-Avon, Windsor Castle, France and Spain. Social events have included trips to a fireworks display, a medieval banquet and Alton Towers. We have also held events to celebrate prominent festivals such as Diwali, Eid, Christmas and Chinese New Year. All trips and events are advertised on StudyNet. Most trips incur a small fee to cover transport costs and, in some cases, a guided tour of the area or ticket entry. Tickets are available via http://store.herts.ac.uk/ then just click on ‘Conference & Events’, ‘Events’ and ‘International Student Support Excursions’. There are also opportunities to take part in the HOST programme, which offers students from overseas the opportunity to spend a weekend with a British family in a British home. See http://www.hostuk.org.uk/ for details.

For more information, contact: The International Student Support Team Tel: +44 (0)1707 281299 or ext. 1299 Fax: +44 (0)1707 284738 Email: iss@herts.ac.uk go.herts.ac.uk/international-student-support Ask Herts

International advice


Student Community | A–Z Guide 2016 27

Tier 4 Visa Compliance The University holds a Tier 4 Sponsor licence which allows us to sponsor international students to come to the UK to study with us. In order to retain that licence, you and the University have an obligation to follow the rules and responsibilities set out by the Home Office. The conditions attached to your Tier 4 visa can be found on your vignette (the sticker in your passport) or on your Biometric Residence Permit (BRP) or on the decision letter which came with your visa. If you do not follow the conditions of your Tier 4 visa and the responsibilities which come with holding a visa, the University will have no choice but to report your visa to the Home Office. The Home Office may then curtail (cancel) your visa. Curtailment can result in your withdrawal from the University, removal from the UK, affect future immigration applications and may even result in a bar from returning to the UK for a certain period of time.

University of Hertfordshire and you, our Tier 4 students. The Tier 4 Compliance team are here to help with any problems or queries you have regarding the responsibilities of your visa and how to remain compliant. The Tier 4 Compliance team is based in the Student Centre (Hutton Hub), and we work alongside the International Student Support team (ISS). We are available to see students without appointment between 9:00am and 4:00pm Monday to Friday. Top 10 tips to comply with your Tier 4 visa: 1. Check your emails regularly, including your junk folder as the University will contact you via email with information or important matters.

5. Swipe your student ID card at least once a week on a check-in reader, and attend Visa Checks. 6. Apply for Authorised Absence if you need to be absent during term time. You should apply and wait for a decision before your absence. See the Tier 4 absence procedure on Ask Herts or StudyNet for further details. 7. Don’t exceed your permitted working hour limit – check your visa for your work restriction. 8. If you need to register with the police, make sure you do this and keep your police registration certificate up to date. 9. Contact the Tier 4 Compliance team if you withdraw/suspend studies, finish earlier than you expected, or want to transfer course.

2. Keep your contact details updated via StudyNet – this includes your email address, telephone number and term-time 10. Prepare for a visa extension early address. Remember to inform the Home It is therefore very important that you if your current visa does not cover the end Office as well. maintain your Tier 4 visa by understanding of your course. Speak to the International the conditions and responsibilities that Student Support Team for advice on 3. If you receive any correspondence from are attached to it. Information about visa the Home Office relating to your visa, or you making a visa application. conditions and responsibilities can be found on have a new passport or visa, please let the The Tier 4 Compliance team the Tier 4 Compliance pages of Studynet University have a copy of this as we will go.herts.ac.uk/tier4compliance. need to update your record. Tel: +44 (0)1707 284800 The Tier 4 Compliance team strive to ensure 4. Attend all lectures and tutorials, and hand in Fax: +44 (0)1707 284738 Email: Tier4compliance@herts.ac.uk that there is a strong partnership between the all coursework. go.herts.ac.uk/tier4compliance


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A–Z Guide 2016 | Student Community

Personal safety/bullying and harassment The University promotes the personal safety and wellbeing of all students by: • encouraging you to take good care of yourself and your belongings. • encouraging you to take an interest in the wellbeing of other students. • ensuring that campuses are safe, accessible, well lit and welcoming, with security staff readily available to help with any difficulties or concerns. • promoting an inclusive ethos of fairness, courtesy and respect. • helping to access specialist services for domestic violence and forced marriage.

Off campus: If you have any personal safety concerns, for yourself or another student, please contact any Community Liaison & Support Officer Tel: +44 (0)1707 285165 or ext. 5165 of the following who will be able to help you: Email: Community@herts.ac.uk If you are concerned about your personal Police contact safety: PC Jenny Edwards Initial contact: Tel: 07710143672 Email: Jenny.Edwards@herts.pnn.police.uk On campus: Security Please be aware that the Neighbourhood Tel: +44 (0)1707 285555 or ext. 5555 Officer spends most of her shift out and Off campus (during office hours): Community Liaison & Support Officer Tel: +44 (0)1707 285165 or ext. 5165 Email: Community@herts.ac.uk

about working in the community, so when you contact her please be prepared to leave a message. PC Edwards will respond to you as soon as she can.

If you feel you are being harassed or bullied:

If you wish to report an incident any time, day or night, please telephone 101.

• offering support and advice from Dignity and Initial contact: Respect Advisors. On campus: A Dignity and Respect Advisor, or the • facilitating Police Community Support Equality Office Officers’ work with students. See: StudyNet > Student Support > • helping you to report any crimes, including Personal Life > Equality Office hate crimes. Tel: +44 (0)1707 289362 / 284982 Email: equality@herts.ac.uk To find out more, pick up a copy of the ‘Student Guide to a Safe and Secure Or Environment’. This guide is included in the Advice and Support Centre (ASC) in the Freshers’ Fair Welcome Bag and is also Students’ Union available from any of the reception areas Tel: +44 (0)1707 285022 or ext. 5022 around the University. Email: asc@herts.ac.uk

IN AN EMERGENCY, TELEPHONE SECURITY ON

+44 (0)1707 285555 or ext. 5555 OR THE POLICE ON 999 Ask Herts

Equality Office


Student Community | A–Z Guide 2016 29

Security services The Security Department regards the safety of students and the protection of their belongings as of paramount importance, and will do everything possible to prevent the occurrence of crime. We have a twenty-four-hour manned Control Room located on the de Havilland Campus, coupled with twenty-four-hour patrolling officers covering all aspects of the campuses. Although the level of crime on all University sites remains very low, we need your help to reduce it even further. The Security Department works very closely with the Hertfordshire Constabulary in analysing crime to establish trends, thus enabling resources to be targeted at the areas where crime is most prevalent. To ensure that the profiles reflect an accurate picture, all campus crime must be reported to University Security. In addition, why not use the University Confidential Crime Line on extension 3333 or +44 (0)1707 286333. There is no requirement to leave your personal details. If you are suspicious of anything you see or hear, ring the Security Control Room on +44 (0)1707 281010 or ext. 1010. In an emergency call Security on ext. 5555.

be, it may be a small part of something much larger, and we and the police need to be made aware of it. YOU MUST REPORT ALL CRIMES ON CAMPUS To help us to help you, a list of important telephone numbers is given below. In addition, if you feel that you would like to personally discuss any aspect of security or crime, actual or potential, we would be very pleased to hear from you. The Head of Security or the Security Services Manager would welcome you to discuss any points you may wish to make, or questions that you need to ask. You can contact them via any manned security position or security officer or via email; alternatively, you can contact the Control Room at the de Havilland Campus for contact details. Security telephone numbers

University Confidential Crime Line: +44 (0)1707 286333 or ext. 3333 Police non-emergency numbers: Tel: 0845 3300222 or 101 Crimestoppers: 0800 555 111 or http://www.crimestoppers-uk.org Do: • Lock all doors and windows when you go out. • Put all valuables out of sight. • Report all suspicious persons or circumstances to Security Control. • Report all crime to Security Control. • When going off campus, whether walking or driving, plan your route and keep to well- lit areas.

Note: contact with security at any site can be made via the Control Room at the de Havilland Campus.

• Carry a torch and a personal attack alarm.

Security Control Room

de Havilland Campus: +44 (0)1707 281010 or ext. 1010

Emergency for all University of Hertfordshire NOTE: University Confidential Crime Line posters are in all campus buildings. Regardless campuses or sites: +44 (0)1707 285555 or of how insignificant you may regard a crime to ext. 5555

• Walk with confidence. Try to be accompanied. If possible, carry a mobile phone. Be aware of what is going on around you, but if in doubt about any situation relating to your safety, call the police on 999.

• When using taxis, always use reputable companies.


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A–Z Guide 2016 | Student Community

• If you have to travel by bus, avoid isolated • Bury a personal attack alarm in the bottom stops and always sit on the lower deck. If it of your bag. Always keep it to hand. is empty, sit near the driver or conductor. • When answering the telephone, never give your name, number or any information • If you have to travel by tube or train, sit in about yourself unless you are certain that an area that is busy and, if possible, one that will be near the exit when you arrive at the caller is known to you. your destination. • Leave your front door open when in your • Ensure bicycles are secured with a security flat or room, especially late at night or during the early hours. rated lock and preferably in a well-lit area. Don’t: • Leave keys in ‘hidden’ areas outside. Burglars know where these locations are. • Put your name and/or address on key fobs. • Let unknown people into your accommodation. • Override accommodation access doors or fire exits to keep them open. • Allow other individuals to use your access (ID) cards. • Leave valuables visible to prying eyes. • Leave valuables visible when visiting the Learning Resource Centres, even when taking a short break away from your study area. • Take short cuts through unlit areas alone.

• Admit unknown persons into your flat or room without first checking their credentials. If in doubt, refuse admittance and call Security Control. The above list of suggestions is not exhaustive, and there are lots of additional simple steps that can be taken to ensure that you are safe. Further advice relating to personal safety can be obtained from the Security Department or your local police.

Spiked drinks Although this is rare at the University there is a national increase in spiked drinks: please consider the following advice while out socialising: How to avoid drink spiking If your drink has been spiked it’s unlikely that you will see, smell or taste any difference. Some drugs, such as GHB, may taste slightly salty or smell unusual. If you start to feel strange or more drunk than you should be, obtain help immediately from a trusted friend or professional. The following steps may help prevent drink spiking: • Never leave your drink unattended, and keep an eye on your friends’ drinks. • Don’t accept a drink from someone you don’t know.

The Security Department has produced a ‘Student Guide to a Safe and Secure Environment’. Copies are available throughout the Campus and from Security.

• Consider sticking to bottled drinks and avoiding punch bowls or jugs of cocktails.

LOOK AFTER IT … LOCK IT OR LOSE IT

• If you think your drink has been tampered with, don’t drink it – tell a trusted friend or professional immediately.

• Don’t give your address to someone you’ve just met.


Student Community | A–Z Guide 2016 31

• Before going out, let someone know where you’re going and what time you expect to be home. • Make plans for your journey home or back to your residence. • Avoid taking expensive equipment with you or anything that could be a target for thieves. • If you are travelling abroad, be aware of the local area and where you can find help. What should I do if I think my drink has been spiked? First, tell someone you trust, such as: • A close friend • A relative • A medical professional • Security • The police If you aren’t with anyone, call someone you trust or the Security Control Room and get to a safe place. Ask to use a phone if yours has been stolen. If you need urgent help, call 999. Be wary of accepting help from a stranger and don’t leave with someone you don’t know.


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A–Z Guide 2016 | Student Community

Student opinion and student representation At the University we put students at the heart of everything we do. We want students to be involved, to give us your views, to feel empowered and to help us shape and improve your learning experience. Student opinion is fundamental to the running of the University and takes place at all levels in a variety of ways.

2. the Module Feedback Questionnaire (MFQ). Students complete this survey in a teaching session at the end of every module. It is the University’s way of obtaining immediate, specific feedback on each module. Distance-learning students complete an online version of the module feedback survey.

a student appointed by the University and the Students’ Union to help support and coordinate representatives. SSROs work with the HSU Student Officer for the School and are a vital link between students, the Students’ Union and the University. They work to inform students within their School about University surveys and the work of the Students’ Union.

Here are some ways in which you can get involved in shaping the student learning experience at the University:

• Attend a student forum or focus group – these are run at School, department or programme level. Look out on your StudyNet pages for dates, times and venues.

Each School has a School Academic Committee and Programme Committees. Student opinion is essential to making the work of these committees effective. The Student Reps attend these committees and feed back the views of the student body. Even if the role of Student Rep is not for you, make sure you know who your Student Rep is and ensure that your views are heard and considered. Student Reps must provide feedback to their fellow students on the work they are undertaking and the outcomes they have achieved.

• Complete the University student feedback questionnaires. Student feedback is collected on academic matters such as teaching and learning and on central services such as Library and Computing Services and the Uno bus.

• Become a Student Rep, a School Student Rep Organiser (SSRO) or a Hertfordshire Students’ Union (HSU) Student Officer for your School.

Each programme has Student Reps elected to represent their peers and to work in conjunction with HSU. The Student Rep 1. the National Student Survey (NSS) which system is run as a joint project between the runs for all Final Year Undergraduate University and the Students’ Union. The aim students from January to April. The results of the system is to ensure that each and of the NSS are published online at every student has the opportunity to input into http://www.unistats.com in an attempt to shaping the student experience they have spread the word here at the University. You can find the details and help future of your Student Reps and the HSU School students make Officer for your School on StudyNet. the decision Student Reps are supported in their role by a about where and School Student Rep Organiser (SSRO) – what to study. Two very important surveys for the University are:

University staff may also wish to consult students on other matters affecting their Programme, School or the whole student body. In this situation, Student Reps are in an ideal position to go out and gather the opinions of their peers and to feed back their responses to staff. Student Representatives play an incredible role within the University. They ensure that


Student Community | A–Z Guide 2016 33

students’ views are heard and are active in improving the student experience here at the University of Hertfordshire. Whether you’re full-time or part-time; undergraduate or postgraduate; home or international, if you would like more information about representation here at the University of

Hertfordshire, please contact reps@hertfordshire.su. The role of Student Rep is a rewarding opportunity that also has the potential to equip you with an impressive skillset that stands out in the increasingly competitive graduate job market.

Hertfordshire Students’ Union Hertfordshire Students’ Union is an independent charity focused on making student life incredible for all students at the University of Hertfordshire. We offer a broad range of services, from special interest societies, student reps and an advice and support service to a world class entertainments venue, known as The Forum Hertfordshire. Hertfordshire Students’ Union wants all students to get involved, have fun and love their university experience. All students, full or part-time, are members of the Hertfordshire Students’ Union. Consortium College students are associate members so can use our facilities too! More information on our range of services and facilities can be found on our website. Email: contact@hertfordshire.su Website: www.hertfordshire.su

Elected Officers The Students’ Union is led by five full-time Elected Officers who are elected by students at the University of Hertfordshire. Each Officer has a particular job role to fulfil, as well as their group responsibilities of reporting to Student Council, attending meetings on behalf of the University of Hertfordshire students and leading the Students’ Union as trustees. These are the people who represent you, so tell them what you think! They also want to share in your successes and the good times, celebrating and having fun as only students can.

Grainne O’Monghain President Tel: +44 (0)1707 285004 Email: president@hertfordshire.su Shelby Loasby Vice President Communications and Media Tel: +44 (0)1707 285005 Email: vp.comms@hertfordshire.su Ciara Spillane Vice President Education and Welfare Tel: +44 (0)1707 285003


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A–Z Guide 2016 | Student Community

Services run by your Students’ Union Your Students’ Union offers a variety of services to cater for students’ needs, ranging from support to entertainment and from representation to retail outlets.

Student Reps

Student Reps are elected on your course to represent your views on a range of course issues. From timetabling to lecture quality, your Student Reps will work with your course Advice and Support Centre leader to resolve any issues, as well as attend The Advice and Support Centre offers free and Programme Committee Meetings to suggest confidential support. We can help with an array improvements. of issues, including personal, academic, social and health matters. Even if you are just looking For more information on becoming a Student Rep or to find out the name of your Rep, visit for someone to talk to over a cup of tea and www.hertfordshire.su/reps some biscuits, we can offer a listening ear. No concern or worry is too small. Advice and Support Centre Tel: +44 (0)1707 285022 Website: www.hertfordshire.su/advice LetSU: Student Housing LetSU is focused on providing a service tailored specifically for students who may wish to rent in the private housing market. This service is run by staff who understand students’ needs and are concerned about their safety and rights. LetSU is a partner of the Partnership Accreditation for Landlords and is a member of the Tenancy Deposit Scheme. LetSU Tel: +44 (0)1707 286152 Website: www.hertfordshire.su/housing

Students’ Union shops The Students’ Union runs two shops: one in the Forum Hertfordshire and one on the de Havilland Campus. The Students’ Union shop offers a wide range of products and services to meet your needs, including snacks, sandwiches, baked goods, fresh produce, stationery (including computer sundries and exam-approved calculators), bill payments, phone top-ups and everything in between. We also stock a selection of fair trade products. For more information, visit www.hertfordshire.su/shops-and-services

Legal Advisory Service A legal adviser is available on Wednesday afternoons during term time via the Advice and Support Centre. The service provides students with initial legal guidance before going to the expense of consulting external solicitors. This service operates by appointment only. To book please ring the Advice and Support Centre. Advice and Support Centre Tel: +44 (0)1707 285022 Website: www.hertfordshire.su/advice

Student Media Got a passion for music or news? Want to speak your mind? Hertfordshire Students’ Union’s student media group, Trident Media, is run by students, for students, and is a great way to gain experience in media. Present a radio show, write about the latest news or edit video footage: all this is possible from our fully kitted out media suite, open 24/7 on College Lane Campus. For more information, visit www.tridentmedia.org


Student Community | A–Z Guide 2016 35

The Forum Hertfordshire

EleHouse

Where to find us

The Forum Hertfordshire is the home of the most exciting live music and club nights in Hertfordshire – all run by Hertfordshire Students’ Union. Since opening in 2009 the Forum Hertfordshire has been renowned for offering chart topping performances, including Ed Sheeran, Tinie Tempah, Nero, One Direction, DJ EZ , Rizzle Kicks plus many more.

The EleHouse is your local pub on campus! Offering a relaxed atmosphere, where you can find a great range of food and drink served daily.

Our main base is in the Hutton Hub, the building next to the Forum Hertfordshire on the College Lane Campus. This is where you will find your Elected Officers plus other Students’ Union services. This office can provide printing, photocopying and fax services and is a good place to come for general information. We also have an office on de Havilland at the end of The Street where you can join a society, collect an NUS card, print and bind and book an appointment to see an Advisor. We are open 10.00–17.00 Monday to Friday in term time (Thursday until 19.00 on College Lane only) and 10.00–16.00 Monday to Friday in the holidays.

For more information visit www.forumhertfordshire.co.uk

For more information visit www.forumhertfordshire.co.uk/elehouse General enquiries For all general enquiries regarding the Students’ Union, contact the Students’ Union Reception.

Students’ Union Societies

Students’ Union Reception

Everyone has interests and hobbies. Societies are here to cater for all of them. Whether you’re casual or committed, get involved and you will find societies a fantastic way to push away the textbooks, mix with people from other courses, learn and develop skills and try something new.

Tel: +44 (0)1707 285000 or ext. 5000 Fax: +44 (0)1707 286150 Email: contact@hertfordshire.su Website: www.hertfordshire.su

For more information contact +44 (0)1707 286149 or visit www.hertfordshire.su/societies


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A–Z Guide 2016 | Wellbeing

Wellbeing Contents Hutton Hub

38

Student Wellbeing – Counselling, Disability, Mental Health and Health Promotion

39

Student Wellbeing - Counselling

39

Student Wellbeing - Disability

40

Student Wellbeing - Mental Health

41

Student Wellbeing - Confidentiality of services 41 Student Wellbeing - Health Promotion

42

Medical Centre

43

Students who are carers

51

Campus Pharmacy

44

Drugs and alcohol

45

Students who are pregnant, are adopting a child, or are parents

52

Chaplaincy 46

Students who have gender reassigned or are transitioning

53

Religious and other beliefs

47

Biodiversity Walk

54

Sexual orientation

48

Sport (Hertfordshire Sports Village and University of Hertfordshire Athletic Union)

49


Wellbeing | A–Z Guide 2016 37


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A–Z Guide 2016 | Wellbeing

Hutton Hub At Hertfordshire, you never have to deal with your problems alone. We’ve a friendly team dedicated to giving you the help you need, from financial advice to confidential counselling. In 2015, we opened our new Hutton Hub at the heart of the College Lane Campus, right next door to the Forum. It’s a one-stop-shop for all of our student support services, so if you’re ever unsure who to ask for advice, just pop in. Its home to: • Student Centre • Careers, Employment and Enterprise • Study Abroad Office • Campus Pharmacy • University Medical Centre • Student Wellbeing • Occupational Health • Student Support • Students’ Union • Santander bank There’s also the Hutton Lounge where you can relax, meet friends or study as a group. The building’s open daily from 07.00 to 22.00 and you can find opening hours for each support team at ask.herts.ac.uk. Ask Herts

Hutton Hub


Wellbeing | A–Z Guide 2016 39

Wellbeing – Counselling, Disability, Mental Health and Health Promotion Student Wellbeing

Student Wellbeing - Counselling

We are based in the Hutton Hub and deliver a range of professional, specialist services to support you with emotional, mental health, disability and health related issues.

Coming to university can be both exciting and stressful. Counselling can help you with emotional or psychological difficulties that may be preventing you from making the most of your time here.

All of our services are delivered by trained and experienced staff. We take a holistic and multi- What sort of things can counselling help disciplinary approach to the delivery of our with? services within Student Wellbeing to ensure Here are some of the common issues that our that you get the best support possible. students bring to counselling: If you want to find out more about Student • Difficulties with partners, friends or family Wellbeing contact our friendly frontline team • Study problems such as lack of motivation who will be happy to talk you through the or concentration range of services we offer, help you to decide • Feeling anxious, worried or depressed which is best for you and book you an • Being away from home appointment with one of our specialist staff. • Feeling lonely Contact StudentWellbeing@herts.ac.uk • Self-harm or suicidal thoughts Tel: +44 (0)1707 284453 • Problems with food, drugs, sex or alcohol Come to see us in the Hutton Hub building on Quite often you might not know what is the College Lane campus. making you anxious or unhappy and it’s ok to come and talk about that too. We have a range of Counselling services and will direct you towards the most appropriate, for example: •

• Workshops – run regularly throughout the year on topics such as managing stress, anxiety, procrastination and exam preparation. • Mindfulness – we offer both workshops and short courses in this popular technique to help you manage difficult times and conditions. • Group counselling – for issues that might usefully be addressed and supported in a group context where everyone learns together. • WhatsUpp – our online peer support group for all UH students. • Daily drop-in sessions – to talk through an issue that feels urgent, or for more immediate advice and support. We also have a wide range of self-help resources on StudyNet and books for you to borrow so you can seek out support any time of day or night. Further details on all the above can be found on our StudyNet pages.

Contact StudentWellbeing@herts.ac.uk Individual counselling – sessions with Tel: +44 (0)1707 284453 a professional experienced counsellor to Come to see us in the Hutton Hub. talk through in more detail what is troubling you, and find a way forward. This is often short-term work ranging from two to six sessions.


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Student Wellbeing - Disability

• chronic pain and/or fatigue

Evacuation Plan tailored for you.

Experienced staff can offer specialist advice and guidance for students with a diverse range of disabilities and agree adjustments for their studies. Students report that the support is invaluable and enables them as individuals to reach their potential.

• stammer

The information you share with us about your disability will not be passed on to other people unless you give your permission for this to happen. See the Disability pages on StudyNet for more detailed information.

What might be classed as a disability? The definition of a disability is broad and covers an extensive range of conditions, including many that are hidden and not obvious to other people. The condition must be expected to last at least twelve months to be recognised as a disability. It would be impossible to list every possible disability but the following are some examples:

We recognise that not everyone eligible to use our services will think of themselves as ‘disabled’. Please do not let this stop you from approaching us to discuss any support you might be entitled to. Disclosing your disability and agreeing support and adjustments We hope you feel able to tell us about your disability but recognise that for some people this is a difficult thing to do. If you are unsure whether or not you want people, such as your teaching team to know about your disability please seek advice from us.

You can disclose a disability at any time during your studies, but we recommend you do so by speaking with us as early on in your • specific learning difficulties (eg, dyslexia, studies as possible. There are advantages dyspraxia) to disclosing, for example, we can give you useful information and arrange support that • mental health difficulties (eg, long-term could be helpful for you. The support we offer depression, bipolar, personality disorder) ranges from specialist study skills to mentors • long-term medical conditions (eg, epilepsy, and agreeing adjustments for your studies diabetes, heart condition, cancer, HIV and and related activity – this will all be agreed in a MS) Study Needs Agreement written specifically for you by a Disability Adviser. We can also advise • Asperger’s syndrome/autistic spectrum on funding that you might be able to apply conditions for, carry out a risk assessment and where • physical impairments required, develop a Personal Emergency • hearing and visual impairments

Examinations Many of the students we see are awarded adjustments for their exams such as extra time or use of a computer. If you need adjustments for your exams, it is essential that you speak to a Disability Adviser prior to the published cut-off date (normally five working weeks prior to the exam session starting). Cut-off dates are published regularly on StudyNet. Contact StudentWellbeing@herts.ac.uk Tel: +44 (0)1707 284453 Come to see us in the Hutton Hub.


Wellbeing | A–Z Guide 2016 41

Student Wellbeing - Mental Health Our mental health team are trained and experienced to support students with a wide range of mental health difficulties. For example: • helping you to identify different ways to manage your mental health condition and decide which is best for you while you are studying • developing strategies and skills to manage your mental wellbeing within the University environment and all that that entails •

agreeing support and adjustments for your studies to help remove any unnecessary barriers, and recording these in a Study Needs Agreement

helping with your referral to NHS mental health and other specialist teams, liaising with your contacts within those teams, with your consent.

• coordinating crisis situations if and when they occur •

helping you to liaise with other areas of the University such as academic schools, Occupational Health and Housing services where required due to your mental health

• providing general advice and guidance on issues related to mental health and wellbeing.

Student Wellbeing also takes proactive steps to help people at the University understand issues around mental health and to promote positive attitudes. Contact StudentWellbeing@herts.ac.uk Tel: +44 (0)1707 284453 Come to see us in the Hutton Hub.

Student Wellbeing – Confidentiality of services All staff in Student Wellbeing are committed to ensuring that your confidentiality is protected if you use our services. We will not pass on personal information about you (including information on attendance within our services) to anyone outside Student Wellbeing, subject to the following exceptions: 1. When you have given your consent that information may be disclosed. 2. When it is believed that there is a serious risk to the personal safety of you or another person, staff may need to contact additional UH colleagues or external services such as a GP or mental health team. Whenever possible we will discuss this with you in the first instance and seek your permission to do so, but in exceptional circumstances we may have to proceed without your consent. 3. When the member of staff could be liable to civil or criminal court procedure if the information was not disclosed. Student Wellbeing is a part of the Office of the Dean of Students.


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Student Wellbeing – Health Promotion Looking after your health and wellbeing We all need to look after our health and wellbeing – whatever our age, gender or lifestyle. Healthy Students has been developed to help our students live happy and healthy lives and know where to go when they need a little help. Check out our different areas: • Healthy You • Healthy Mind • Healthy Sex • Healthy Body • Staying Healthy • Healthy Support

Healthy Students www.studynet.herts.ac.uk/go/healthystudents

means you are more likely to perform well in your academic study. It can help you to concentrate, improve your memory, focus on the topic in hand and get that assignment written. Visit the Healthy Students site: www.studynet.herts.ac.uk/go/healthystudents Don’t wait until you feel unwell – have a read now and you might pick up a few useful tips you never knew you needed. Ask Herts

Student Wellbeing


Wellbeing | A–Z Guide 2016 43

Medical Centre

Medical and nursing services

All students are strongly advised to register with a GP on arrival at the University.

Fully trained staff are available to offer help and advice. You may want to see us for:

We are a GP’s surgery based on campus and provide doctors and nursing services for our students. We are run to meet the needs of our student population and have been based at the University for a long time so understand the issues our students bring to us.

• help and advice when you are unwell • general health advice, eg diet, smoking and alcohol • contraceptive services • screening for Chlamydia

We strongly recommend that all students living away from home in Hatfield register with us so we can become your doctor. If you feel unwell, the last thing you want to do is travel back home in order to be seen by a doctor. Do not wait until you are unwell to register. This could slow down the support you need.

• advice if you are travelling abroad

It couldn’t be easier to register with us – you can either come in to see us in the Hutton Hub on College Lane or you can do this online at www.herts.ac.uk/medicalcentre.

• Phone 01707 284444

Don’t worry about leaving your home doctor’s surgery. They will transfer all your medical notes so we can see your full history and, if needed, pick up where they left off. When you go home in the holidays you can continue to see your home surgery as a visitor.

• vaccinations Speak to us If you need an appointment, contact us and we will make sure you are able to see the right person for you (either a doctor or a nurse). • Visit us in the Hutton Hub, College Lane We are open Monday – Friday 9.00 – 17.00 during term time. We open half days out of term time. Appointments are also available on Monday evenings and alternate Saturday mornings at Potterells Medical Centre in Welham Green. While we advise all UH students living in Hatfield to register with us, if you prefer, you are entitled to register with any local practice.

All students are eligible to register with us unless you are an overseas student here for less than six months, in which case we will ensure you are given details of a local medical service who can provide the help you need. See our website for full opening hours and further information www.herts.ac.uk/medicalcentre Urgent advice - out of hours For advice that cannot wait until the surgery reopens, - ring 111 the free non-emergency telephone number. You will be put through to a trained adviser, supported by healthcare professionals. They will ask you a series of questions to assess your symptoms and direct you to the best medical care for you. For a serious medical emergency which requires an ambulance call 999 (ring 01707 285555 if you are on campus). Ask Herts

Medical Centre


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A–Z Guide 2016 | Wellbeing

Campus Pharmacy If you become run down or your allergies start to play up, pop in and speak to our friendly staff at the Campus Pharmacy. Situated in the Hutton Hub, we are the first university in the country to have a campus pharmacy run by its own Department of Pharmacy. The Campus Pharmacy provides an over-the-counter service and advice to students and staff at the University of Hertfordshire.

The Campus Pharmacy offers: • General health and nutrition information • Minor ailments advice • First aid supplies • Travel health advice and clinic • Chlamydia testing and treatment • C-card outlet (free condom supply) • Free emergency contraception • Free ‘stop smoking’ service • Flu vaccination service • Private consultation room • Pregnancy tests • First aid and medical equipment • Private prescription service • Lipotrim weight management programme • Health MOT’s Tel: +44 (0)1707 284054 Website: go.herts.ac.uk/campuspharmacy Ask Herts

Pharmacy


Wellbeing | A–Z Guide 2016 45

Drugs and alcohol Universities are obviously an easy target for the misuse of drugs and alcohol, and concern for the wellbeing of students is paramount. The University authorities and the Students’ Union have developed an anti-drugs strategy which is in two parts. The first and most obvious response is that the abuse of illegal substances will not be tolerated anywhere within the University or Students’ Union. Any drugs found will be immediately confiscated and the police will be informed. The second part of the policy is education. It is understood that students, especially many first years who are away from home for the first time, are subject to all sorts of pressures and temptations which can be difficult to resist. Students with any concerns at all can consult at any time the campus Medical Practice, the Counselling Centre or the Students’ Union Advice Centre to ask for totally confidential help and advice. Alcohol, whilst not illegal, is actually a bigger issue on campus than drugs, and many of the disciplinary cases that occur are alcohol related. The University would in no way want to interfere with anyone’s freedom to enjoy a drink, but it is expected that students will drink responsibly. Being drunk is never an excuse for unacceptable behaviour.


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A–Z Guide 2016 | Wellbeing

Chaplaincy University life isn’t always about studying and working, nor just about parties and socialising. Sometimes you want to go a little deeper, and ask the bigger questions. Who am I? Why am I here? So where do you go to look for the answers? The University Chaplaincy might be one place to start. We are here to help explore the spiritual side of life — the big questions of life, the universe and everything. We work with students and staff of all faiths, and those of none. We are also here for smaller questions, and just to listen if you want to chat. With a multi-faith team for our international university, we can offer advice on where to pray and worship (in the University and in the local community) and can help you explore a wide variety of spiritual traditions (whatever your background). The Chaplaincy is based in a purpose-built, multi-faith centre called The Key on the College Lane Campus -– just above the Forum on the path to the Halls of Residence. There is The Meeting Room, which is a space where you can come and chat, and various religious or cultural clubs and societies hold meetings here. There is also The Rotunda: a circular room for private, quiet reflection and for groups to come together to worship and pray.

The Olive Hall is a flexible space normally arranged as three zones. Zone 3 is our Quiet Space, set aside for those of all faiths and none to take a little time out in quiet reflection, with a simple arrangement of furniture and windows looking out on to the woods. Zone 2 can be used for meetings, study groups or other activities by various groups. Zone 1 is set aside as a prayer space. On Fridays the partitions are moved back to allow a space suitable for the larger numbers attending Jum’ah Prayers. Within the Olive Hall there are dedicated washing areas. The Key also contains the Chaplain’s office. Feel free to drop by! There is a regular programme of events ranging from ‘Worship on Wednesday’ to Buddhist meditation. A variety of groups from different faith communities use The Key as a base. Why not come and see? You can find us on Facebook www.facebook.com/thekeyuh There are a number of Assistant and Associate Chaplains along with Pastoral Assistants who work with the University Chaplain in order to provide a team that represents different traditions and faith communities. Their contact details are on the Chaplaincy StudyNet website.

For further details contact: Revd Dr Allan Smith The University Chaplain Tel: +44 (0)1707 284456 or ext. 4456 Email: chaplain@herts.ac.uk Website: www.herts.ac.uk/chaplaincy StudyNet: go.herts.ac.uk/thekey

Ask Herts

Chaplaincy pages


Wellbeing | A–Z Guide 2016 47

Religious and other beliefs The University welcomes all students regardless of whether you have religious beliefs, other beliefs or no particular beliefs. Our commitment is to ensure equality of opportunity for all students and to promote good relations between students of different religions and beliefs and those who have none.

The University aims to ensure that teaching and assessment is inclusive of all students. If you anticipate clashes between your religious observances and the teaching or assessment requirements of your programme of study, you should:

Please contact any of the following if you have ideas, concerns or need some help: Advice and Support Centre (ASC) in the Students’ Union Tel: +44 (0)1707 285022 or ext. 5022 Email: asc@herts.ac.uk

University is a chance to meet and find out more about people who are different from ourselves, and we aim for an ethos that is inclusive of all, because we value diversity. If any tensions or difficulties occur, we expect everyone to cooperate in resolving these.

• notify your school or department regarding or teaching as soon as possible. Revd Dr Allan Smith • notify the Exams and Awards Office regarding exams. They need to hear from University Chaplain Tel: +44 (0)1707 284456 or ext. 4456 you as early as possible in the academic Email: chaplain@herts.ac.uk year to investigate suitable options, and

Behaviours, remarks or treatments that are discriminatory or cause offence are not acceptable, will not be tolerated and may be disciplinary offences. The University has procedures to ensure that all speakers and services invited on campus agree to operate within our Equality and Diversity Policy.

• provide supporting evidence from a suitable person (eg, vicar, rabbi, priest or imam) so that any requests for reasonable adjustments to teaching or exams may be considered.

The Students’ Union has a number of faithbased societies that welcome students and staff, the University has a multi-faith centre known as The Key and provides a small Quiet Room on the de Havilland Campus 09.00– 17.00 Monday to Friday during term) which may be used for quiet reflection or personal prayer. The University Chaplaincy is available for guidance and support and is open to students of all faiths and none.

you must notify them by the deadlines published on StudyNet.

Our aim is that our services and facilities meet the needs of all students, so please let staff know of any suggestions on how to make these more inclusive.

or Equality Office Tel: +44 (0)1707 284982 / 289362 Email: equality@herts.ac.uk See: StudyNet > Student Support > Personal Life > Equality Office


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A–Z Guide 2016 | Wellbeing

Sexual orientation University offers a time and place where you can ‘be yourself’, and for some students that includes establishing their sexual orientation. The University welcomes students regardless of their sexual orientation and is committed to ensuring equality of opportunity and treatment for all. The Students’ Union Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Trans (LGBT) Society (lgbtas@gmail.com) welcomes students and staff. It offers the chance to meet and make friends, and also represents the interests of LGB and T students to the Union and the University. The LGBT Society, the Students’ Union and Equality Office work together to promote LGBT History Month in February each year. We aim for an ethos that is inclusive of all students and, of course, university is a chance to meet new people, many of whom will be different from you. Sometimes, however, there are tensions and difficulties, and if these occur we expect everyone to cooperate in resolving them. Unacceptable or discriminatory behaviour on grounds of sexual orientation – eg, homophobic remarks – will not be tolerated and can be disciplinary offences. The University has procedures to ensure that all speakers and services invited on campus agree to operate within our Equality

and Diversity Policy. The Equality Office and Dignity and Respect Advisors provide help and support for all students. If you are estranged from your family because of your sexual orientation and this is causing you financial hardship, please contact Wendy Edmondson in the Student Centre who can advise you: W.Edmondson@herts.ac.uk. If you have ideas you want to share to advance equality, you would like information or some help, or you need to speak to a Dignity and Respect Advisor, contact: Equality Office Tel: +44 (0)1707 284982 / 289362 Email: equality@herts.ac.uk or See: StudyNet > Student Support > Personal Life > Equality Office Advice and Support Centre (ASC) in the Students’ Union Tel: +44 (0)1707 285022 or ext. 5022 Email: asc@herts.ac.uk International Student Support Tel: +44 (0)1707 281299 or ext. 1299 Email: iss@herts.ac.uk


Wellbeing | A–Z Guide 2016 49

Sport (Hertfordshire Sports Village and University of Hertfordshire Athletic Union) Students can enjoy top-class facilities at discounted rates at Hertfordshire Sports Village. At our amazing Sports Village you’ll find: • brand new free weights area • 110-station gym • two studios for group exercise classes • twenty-five-metre swimming pool • two squash courts • sports halls for multi sports • cricket hall for multi sports • indoor climbing wall • artificial pitches for hockey and football • grass pitches for football and rugby • netball and tennis courts • physiotherapy and sports injury clinic

College Lane sports facilities – opened October 2014

University of Hertfordshire Athletic Union Sports Clubs

We also boast a gym and artificial turf pitch on the College Lane Campus, which complements the Sports Village and provides state-of-the-art facilities and services for students living and studying on College Lane.

The Athletic Union looks after the competitive fixture programme and representative sports clubs that play against other Universities in the British Universities and Colleges Sport (BUCS) league.

Health and fitness membership is available from only £18.50 per month, with annual options also available to suit all budgets and offers use of both of our gyms, swimming pool and group exercise classes.

The Sports Village is the prominent training facility for sports clubs and hosts home fixtures on a Wednesday afternoon.

Access to other facilities is available on a ‘pay as you go’ basis and there is also the opportunity to join one of our 29 Athletic Union Sports Clubs - (see below)

While studying students will have the opportunity to obtain recognised qualifications in sports coaching, fitness instructor, pool lifeguard and first aid qualifications. We also offer opportunities for internships in sports development and sports therapy as well as paid employment.


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A–Z Guide 2016 | Wellbeing

‘Active Students’

Athletic Union

Sport doesn’t have to be competitive – the Active Students programme is all about having fun, being active, making new friends and building or learning new skills. The free programme is available to all University of Hertfordshire students across both the College Lane and de Havilland Campuses.

The Athletic Union was set up in 2007 with the intention of promoting and encouraging sport at all levels at the University. The Students’ Union and the University work together with the Sports Village to provide opportunities for students to participate in a wide range of sports at both social and elite levels. These include traditional sports such as football, netball, rugby and basketball and also extend to American football, rowing, skiing and snowboarding. The Athletic Union office is on de Havilland Campus next door to the Sports Village main entrance.

Sports Fair, Wednesday 28 September 13.00–16.00. Come to the Sports Fair at Hertfordshire Sports Village on Wednesday 28 September and find out everything you need to know about sports clubs, memberships, Active Students, employment and training opportunities. Visit www.hertssportsvillage.co.uk or www.activestudents.co.uk for further details on sport, health and wellbeing at the University of Hertfordshire. David Connell Director of Sport

Athletic Union Tel: +44 (0)1707 281181 Website: www.hertssportsvillage.co.uk Ask Herts

Sport - get involved


Wellbeing | A–Z Guide 2016 51

Students who are carers Many students have care responsibilities for a relative, partner or friend who, for example: • has a physical or learning disability. • has dementia. • has a mental health problem. • misuses drug or alcohol. • is ill or frail. Alternatively, they may be the parent of a child who has additional needs. We are committed to ensuring fair and equal treatment for students who are carers and to ensuring that our policies, services and facilities are inclusive. At present we don’t ask students to tell us formally if they are carers so we have very little information to plan how best to support students who are carers.

So if you are a carer and you would like to discuss what would enable you to meet both your study and your care commitments, we suggest that you: • talk with an appropriate member of teaching staff about any academic matters. • contact the Equality Office for information and advice and to give us feedback.

Off-campus contact: In addition to the support that the University can provide, there are external agencies that may be useful: Carers in Hertfordshire helps students who are carers with: • a carer’s assessment.

• contact the Student Centre for, for example, advice on student finance and current car parking regulations and permits.

• planning your caring and having an emergency back-up.

The Advice and Support Centre (ASC) and the Counselling Centre may also be useful.

• benefit and legal information.

On-campus contact: Equality Office Tel: +44 (0)1707 289362 / 284982 Email: equality@herts.ac.uk See: StudyNet > Student Support > Personal Life > Equality Office Counselling Centre Tel: +44 (0)1707 284453 or ext. 4453 Email: counselling.centre@herts.ac.uk Advice and Support Centre (ASC) in the Students’ Union Tel: +44 (0)1707 285022 or ext. 5022 Email: asc@herts.ac.uk

• support for you, including respite care. • a chance to talk things through. If you are a student in full-time higher education and there is an adult who depends on you financially, you may be entitled to extra help through the Adult Dependants’ Grant. The amount you can receive depends on your income and the income of your dependants. Carers in Hertfordshire Tel: +44 (0)1992 586969 Website: www.carersinherts.org.uk Student Finance Website: www.direct.gov.uk/studentfinance Carers UK Website: www.gov.uk/carers-uk


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Students who are pregnant, are adopting a child, or are parents We are committed to ensuring fair and equal treatment for all students who: • are or have been pregnant. • are returning from maternity, paternity or adoption absence. • have parental responsibilities.

On-campus contacts: Equality Office for legal rights and information on breastfeeding facilities, etc Tel: +44 (0)1707 289362 / 284982 Email: equality@herts.ac.uk See: StudyNet > Student Support > Personal Life > Equality Office

The College Lane Campus has a nursery for children aged from three months to five years. Facilities for breastfeeding and expressing milk are available at both de Havilland and College Lane Campuses.

Advice and Support Centre (ASC) in the Students’ Union Tel: +44 (0)1707 285022 or ext. 5022 Email: asc@herts.ac.uk

Students are encouraged to let appropriate staff know so they can access help and support in making decisions. This may include, for example:

Medical Centre Tel: +44 (0)1707 284444 or ext. 4444

• accessing health care, either on or off campus.

Counselling Centre Tel: +44 (0)1707 284453 or ext. 4453 Email: counselling.centre@herts.ac.uk

• agreeing a plan which covers all matters relevant to the programme of study.

Student Finance Centre (Student Centre) Tel: +44 (0)1707 284800 or ext. 4800

• any financial concerns or implications. • any visa issues. • return to study. • sharing concerns or worries.

International Student Support for visa requirements Tel: +44 (0)1707 281299 or ext. 1299


Wellbeing | A–Z Guide 2016 53

Students who have gender reassigned or are transitioning University offers a time and place where you can ‘be yourself’, and for some students that includes establishing their gender identity. The University welcomes trans students and is committed to ensuring equality of opportunity and treatment. We aim for an ethos that is inclusive of all students and, of course, university is a chance to meet new and different people. Sometimes, however, there are tensions and difficulties, and if these occur we expect everyone to cooperate in resolving them. Unacceptable or discriminatory behaviour on grounds of gender reassignment – eg, transphobic remarks – will not be tolerated and can be disciplinary offences. The University has procedures to ensure that all speakers and services invited on campus agree to operate within our Equality and Diversity Policy. You may want to make the Equality Office your first contact point if you are thinking about transitioning whilst at University or have any equality concerns about gender reassignment. For example, the Equality Office can help you to discuss and clarify queries or concerns and help you plan what you want to do. The network of Dignity and Respect Advisors, facilitated by the Equality Office, supports all students, including trans students.

The Students’ Union Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Trans (LGBT) Society (lgbtas@gmail.com) welcomes students and staff. It offers the chance to meet and make friends, and also represents the interests of LGB and T students to the Union and the University. The LGBT Society, the Students’ Union and Equality Office work together to promote LGBT History Month in February each year. If you are estranged from your family because of your transitioning and this is causing you financial hardship, please contact Wendy Edmondson in the Student Centre who can advise you: W.Edmondson@herts.ac.uk.

The University embraces staff and students – from whatever background – being ‘out’ in the workplace. It isn’t about being different; it’s about being yourself. Chris Stocks Commercial Manager

If you have ideas you want to share to promote equality for trans students, you would like information or some help, or you need to speak to a Harassment or Bullying Advisor, contact: Equality Office Tel: +44 (0)1707 284982 / 289362 Email: equality@herts.ac.uk See: StudyNet > Student Support > Personal Life > Equality Office Advice and Support Centre (ASC) in the Students’ Union Tel: +44 (0)1707 285022 or ext. 5022 Email: asc@herts.ac.uk


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A–Z Guide 2016 | Student Wellbeing Approximate distance 1.2 miles. Approximate time to walk 30 - 45 minutes. Outdoor walking shoes recommended.

Wellbeing Biodiversity Walk Each circle on the map indicates the location of an interpretation board where you can find information on biodiversity on campus.

1. Wildflower management area Established in 2012 this area is being managed for wildflowers and contains a wide variety of species.

6.

Hazel Grove management Hazel Grove is an oak-hornbeam coppiced woodland and is important as Hertfordshire supports a large proportion of the national total.

2. Wildflower management area Wildflower areas have been proven to be important habitats for encouraging bee, butterfly and other invertebrate diversity. Try and spot some of the species mentioned on the board.

7.

Wildflower management area (behind LRC) Did you know that over 140 different species of flowers, grasses and trees have been recorded on College Lane?

8. Bee Orchid Management Area The Bee Orchid population has declined across England as they have been picked for their attractive bee-like flowers. A single flower is up to 8 years’ growth and if picked, the plant is unlikely to flower and produce seeds again; so 4. Coppicing for Conservation at Hazel Grove please don’t pick them. Woodland Coppicing is a form of woodland management 9. Bee Orchid Management Area The best time to see Bee Orchids is in June to that also extends the life of trees; some early July when their flowers are in bloom. coppiced trees can live up to 500 years old! Follow the path through Hazel Grove between April and May to enjoy carpets of bluebells. This path has an uneven surface and may not To find out about when guided walks are being be suitable for wheelchair users. held, or if you have any queries about biodiversity on 5. Hazel Grove: An Old Hertfordshire Bluebell campus, contact sustainable@herts.ac.uk. Wood Visit this biodiversity board to find out more about Hazel Grove, how it’s managed and what species you can find here. 3. The Key and Sensory Garden The Key has a number of environmentally sustainable features; and please help yourself to some of the herbs in the herb garden.


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Learning Resources Centre

CP Snow

7

8 5

The Wright Building

6

4

2 3 9 The Lindop

The Forum

1


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A–Z Guide 2016 | Student Jobs, Careers and Skills

Student Jobs, Careers and Skills Contents Careers and Employment and Enterprise Service

58

Graduate Attributes

59

Part-time work

60

Volunteering 60 Study abroad: Start the adventure now

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Student Jobs, Careers and Skills | A–Z Guide 2016 57


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A–Z Guide 2016 | Student Jobs, Careers and Skills

Careers and Employment During your time at the University of Hertfordshire, Careers and Employment will support you in achieving your goals. Whether you are looking for work experience, selfemployment advice, further study options, to secure a placement or your first job after graduation, we are here to help. Where to find us We have two offices: de Havilland – M018 (next to Study Abroad in The Atrium) College Lane – LB416 (in the Hutton Hub) We also have a wealth of resources, guides and information online on CareerHub – careerhub.herts.ac.uk. Just log in using your StudyNet details.

What our service can do for you

How to follow us

We have built strong relationships with many employers and we can help you to find the right placement, job or work experience through our vacancy board on CareerHub.

For all the latest news from Careers and Employment, follow us!

We have a central programme of workshops, employer presentations and careers fairs that take place throughout the year, including bespoke events and workshops for those considering self-employment. All of our events are advertised on CareerHub – visit the events page to find full details and book your place. We have a dedicated team that offers one-to-one support for all of your careers, employment, placement and business startup needs. We can help with the recruitment process as well as assist you in exploring your future career path and different job search options. All of our appointments are bookable on CareerHub – visit the appointment pages for more information on timings. Our services remain available to you for up to two years after your graduation ceremony. Please feel free to contact us to see how we can support you, and make sure to log in to CareerHub now!

Facebook: facebook.com/UniofHertsCE Twitter: @UniOfHertsCE Ask Herts

Careers – complete guide


Student Jobs, Careers and Skills | A–Z Guide 2016 59

Graduate Attributes The University is committed to providing a culturally enriched and research-informed educational experience that will transform the lives of its students and equip them for life in a complex and rapidly changing world. This experience should enable our graduates to have the following attributes: Professionalism, employability and enterprise – the University promotes professional integrity and provides opportunities to develop the skills of communication, independent and team working, problem solving, creativity, digital literacy, numeracy and self-management. Our graduates will be confident, act with integrity, set themselves high standards and have skills that are essential to their future lives. Learning and research skills – the University fosters intellectual curiosity and provides opportunities to develop effective learning and research abilities. Our graduates will be equipped to seek knowledge and to continue learning throughout their lives.

Intellectual depth, breadth and adaptability – the University encourages engagement in curricular, co-curricular and extracurricular activities that deepen and broaden knowledge and develop powers of analysis, application, synthesis, evaluation and criticality. Our graduates will be able to consider multiple perspectives as they apply intellectual rigour and innovative thinking to the practical and theoretical challenges they face. Respect for others – the University promotes self-awareness, empathy, cultural awareness and mutual respect. Our graduates will have respect for themselves and others and will be courteous, inclusive and able to work in a wide range of cultural settings. Social responsibility – the University promotes the values of ethical behaviour, sustainability and personal contribution. Our graduates will understand how their actions can enhance the wellbeing of others and will be equipped to make a valuable contribution to society.

Global awareness – the University fosters discussion of complex and evolving world issues. Our graduates will be confident to act effectively in settings where language and culture are not familiar to them and will have an understanding of international traditions and practices both within and beyond their discipline.


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Part-time work

Volunteering

Many students take on part-time work to supplement their student loan/grant/bursary. The University would recommend that, if at all possible, part-time work is limited to twenty hours per week in term time. There are parttime jobs to be found on the campus and with local employers. Visa restrictions currently limit the number of hours international students may work.

From helping charities to being actively involved in your University and Students’ Union, the volunteering service has hundreds of rewarding opportunities for everyone.

Student Jobs Service

Yes, the work is challenging – but it is also incredibly rewarding. You’ll put in as much time as you want, meet new people and have so much fun that you’ll forget the immense benefits of the work you’re doing.

The Students’ Union runs a Student Jobs Service to assist students in finding parttime employment. This service is sensitive to the needs of many students to find paid employment whilst at University, but recognises that their commitment to studies comes first. Student Jobs Service Tel: +44 (0)1707 285024 Ask Herts

Part-time work

No prior experience or qualifications are necessary, and you will leave University with skills, contacts and certificates that are bound to impress employers.

Volunteering Tel: +44 (0)1707 285001 Website: www.hertfordshire.su/volunteering


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Study abroad: Start the adventure now There is a great big world out there and we will help you explore it. Spend part of your course studying or working abroad and you will not only have an amazing time, but you will also pick up valuable skills and experience which today’s businesses really value. With more and more companies working internationally, there has never been a better time to be well travelled. Experience of living in another country – and even better, speaking the language – can make a great impression on future employers. On most of our courses, you have the opportunity to spend time studying at one of our many partner universities around the world. It is an adventure you will never forget – it will help you to be more confident, adaptable and independent, and the new people you meet will provide a global network of lifelong friendships and contacts. When studying abroad you will pay no tuition fees to the partner university, and if you take a sandwich year, you will pay no tuition fees to us either. If you are an a UK or EU national and spend the whole of the second year abroad, you will only pay 15% of the tuition fee to us and no tuition fees to the partner university. If you study abroad in Europe, you will also be eligible for an Erasmus+ grant to help with travel and living costs, and if you venture further afield, we offer our own Global

Scholarships and Santander Universities Scholarships. You can travel all over the globe. We have partners in the USA, Canada, Latin America, South Africa, India, Korea and Japan, South East Asia, and Australia. In addition, you have the chance to live, study and work in one of more than 20 European countries. You can study for a semester or a whole year, depending on your course and where you want to go, and even include a work placement too. We also offer a number of short term summer school opportunities at our partners. You do not need to speak a language to study abroad. You can study in English at many of our partners in non-English speaking countries, and learning the local language alongside is a bonus. Being surrounded by native speakers will enable you to improve your language skills quickly and help you get even more out of your international experience. Start the adventure now. Why not visit us on StudyNet or in person? You can find us in The Atrium at de Havilland or the Hutton Hub at College Lane – we hold hard copy material on all of our partners and you can chat to one of our Student Advisers. Then again, why not see what our students say on Facebook and YouTube? Perhaps even follow us on Twitter.

Further information European and Study Abroad Office M016, de Havilland Campus Hutton Hub, College Lane Campus Telephone: +44 (0)1707 286207 or 286375 Email: studyabroad@herts.ac.uk Website: go.herts.ac.uk/studyabroad Facebook: facebook.com/uhstudyabroad Twitter: @UHStudyAbroad Ask Herts

Study Abroad


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Student Information Contents Useful dates

63

Elective modules

76

Lost property

91

University structure

65

Email

76

Plagiarism and collusion

92

Academic appeals

66

Exams

78

Press and publicity

94

Examination boards

79

Public Interest Disclosure – Whistle-blowing 94

Feedback on coursework and exams

80

Reception Services

94

Fees and finance

80

Doctoral College

95

A. Costs

80

University of Hertfordshire scholarships

95

B. Funding and financial support

81

C. Payments

81

Guidelines to Students, Staff and Module Boards on Serious Adverse Circumstances

96

D. Introduction of card charges

81

Financial policy for new UK/EU students 2016/2017

82

Appeals, complaints and disciplinary procedures 66 Awards ceremonies

68

Attendance monitoring

69

Care leavers

69

Car parking, transport and travel

70

Student parking

70

Students commuting to University

70

Residential parking

70

Catering 71 Certificates 71

Financial policy for new overseas students 2016/2017 84 ID cards

85

How the university communicates with you

72

Council Tax

74

Internet: connecting to the internet and using University online services

86

Data protection

74

Library and Computing Services

87

Student centre

104

Student finance

105

Student loans

106

Students withdrawing

107

Under eighteen at the point of admission

108

University regulations and advice for students’ particular attention – index

109

Wednesday afternoon teaching

112

Your health and safety

113


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Useful dates Please note that, whilst every attempt is made to verify the accuracy of the following dates at the time of publication, the University reserves the right to make any adjustments or amendments whatsoever to published dates. UNIVERSITY OF HERTFORDSHIRE OUTLINE CALENDAR FOR THE ACADEMIC YEAR 2016/2017 The University academic year runs from 1 August 2016 to 31 July 2017. Semester C operates across 2 academic years. Normally most undergraduate programmes use Semesters A and B. Additionally postgraduate programmes and specific undergraduate programmes use Semester C.

DATES OF SEMESTERS SEMESTER A MONDAY 26 SEPTEMBER 2016 - FRIDAY 13 JANUARY 2017 (16 weeks, including exam period and integral Christmas vacation 2 weeks) There will be examinations on Saturday 14 January 2017 for certain students SEMESTER B MONDAY 16 JANUARY 2017 – FRIDAY 19 MAY 2017 (18 weeks, including exam period and integral Easter vacation 2 weeks) There will be examinations on Saturday 6 May 2017 and Saturday 13 May 2017 for certain students.

SEMESTER C MONDAY 22 MAY 2017 – FRIDAY 22 SEPTEMBER 2017 (18 weeks, including exam period and integral vacation weeks determined by programme) There will be examinations from Monday 4 September 2017 – Friday 8 September 2017 for approved programme-specific referred/ deferred assessments and Semester C assessments. DATES OF TERMS For administrative purposes, the dates of terms and vacation periods are

Autumn Monday 26 September 2016 – Wednesday 21 December 2016 There will be examinations from Tuesday 20 Spring Thursday 05 January 2017 – Friday June 2017 – Friday 30 June 2017 for referred/ 31 March 2017 deferred assessments from Semesters A and B. Relevant staff and all students must be available Summer Tuesday 18 April 2017 – Friday 19 to attend exams on any of the above exam May 2017 days.


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UNIVERSITY HOLIDAYS The University will be closed from 16.00 hours Christmas on Friday 23 December 2016 until 08.30 hours Sunday 25 December 2016 on Tuesday 03 January 2017. Monday 26 December 2016 Substitute Bank Holiday The University will also be closed on Tuesday Tuesday 27 December 2016 29 August 2017. PUBLIC HOLIDAYS

New Year The Christmas vacation (with effect from Sunday 01 January 2017 2014/2015) and the Easter vacation (with Substitute Bank Holiday effect from 2009/2010) have been aligned with Monday 02 January 2017 Hertfordshire County Council school vacations. Easter Friday 14 April 2017 Monday 17 April 2017 START OF SEMESTER A 2017/2018

Monday 25 September 2017 (Sunday 24 May Day September 2017 for residential students) Monday 01 May 2017 Spring Bank Holiday Monday 29 May 2017 Summer Bank Holiday Monday 28 August 2017

DATES OF EXAMINATIONS Semester A Examinations: Monday 9th January 2017 – Saturday 14 January 2017 (including Saturday 14 January 2017) Semester B Examinations: Tuesday 2 May 2017 – Friday 19 May 2017 (including Saturday 6 May 2017 and Saturday 13 May 2017) Referred/Deferred Examinations: Tuesday 20 June 2017 – Friday 30 June 2017 Semester C Examinations*: Monday 4 September 2017 – Friday 8 September 2017 *for Semester C Assessment and approved non-standard programmes only Most examinations take place during the day, although they can also be timetabled in the evening during Semester A. Saturdays are utilised when necessary to timetable Semester A and B examinations.


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University structure The University of Hertfordshire is an ambitious university, rated by the Times Higher Education Supplement as being one of the top 100 universities in the world under 50 years old and also recognised as one of the top 100 international universities. It offers excellence in learning, teaching and research facilities and puts students at the heart of its activities. It is a model of a twentyfirst-century university – international, business facing and business-like in approach – making it distinctive in an ever-changing higher education environment. The University of Hertfordshire is one of the region’s largest employers, with more than 2,650 staff and a turnover of almost £233 million. With a student community of more than 27,200, including more than 2,800 students from eighty-five different countries, the University has a global network of more than 175,000 alumni. For more information, please visit http://www.herts.ac.uk/. In an organisation as large as this, there is inevitably a degree of bureaucracy and some jargon that you need to be familiar with, but we will keep this as brief as possible. The University is run on the basis of a set of University Policies and Regulations (UPRs). These are detailed in this A–Z and you are advised to make yourself aware of them.

There are three main campuses: The College Lane Campus is the largest campus and is the base for many of the programmes of study. It is centred approximately three kilometres south of Hatfield and is easily accessible from the A1(M). The de Havilland Campus houses the Business, Humanities, Law and Education programmes of study. The campus is one kilometre north-west of College Lane Campus. At Bayfordbury, near Hertford, is the Bayfordbury Observatory. This is also the base for the Science Learning Centre. In addition, the University has a number of smaller locations in and around Hatfield.


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Academic appeals All programmes of study are assessed either by examination, the submission of coursework or a mixture of both. A student attending and/or attempting an assessment is deemed to have declared themselves fit for that assessment (with only very rare exceptions). A student not attending/ attempting an assessment must submit to the Board of Examiners (before that Board meets) an explanation of the serious adverse circumstances that caused the student to miss

the assessment. The explanation must be supported by appropriate evidence. For further guidance see the section of this A–Z headed ‘Serious Adverse Circumstances’. If a Board of Examiners does not accept these serious adverse circumstances, the student will fail the assessment. If that does happen, there are a limited number of circumstances under which a student can appeal, firstly to the Dean of School and subsequently to the Vice-Chancellor.

Appeals of this nature MUST be submitted on the appropriate Appeal Pro Forma (form). Appeals in any other format will not be accepted. Please see link to Ask Herts pages below for more information. Ask Herts

Academic Appeals

Appeals, complaints and disciplinary procedures The Office of the Dean of Students is responsible for academic appeals, complaints and the implementation of the student disciplinary procedures. The University wishes to be as free and open as possible, but some rules and regulations are necessary. These rules and regulations are detailed in the UPRs. The full documents are available upon request at the Office of the Dean of Students and on the University website. These have been devised for the good of all rather than for the restriction of individuals. When you enrol, you are agreeing to abide by these regulations, so if you are unsure in any way, do please ask.

Academic Appeals (also known as the Review of Assessment Decisions)

of Serious Adverse Circumstances which are then not accepted are at risk of failing that assessment. Students who decide to sit or Most assessments proceed in a perfectly to submit are considered (with only very rare normal manner, but on some occasions events exceptions) to have been capable of sitting beyond the control of the student can affect that examination (or similar) or submitting performance. On these occasions, a student that coursework. Students not submitting may decide not to sit an examination (or Serious Adverse Circumstances who then fail similar) or not to submit a piece of coursework an assessment can appeal after results are and may choose instead to submit a claim released, but the grounds for such an appeal for Serious Adverse Circumstances to the are very limited. Full details are given in UPR Board of Examiners before that Board meets. AS12 Appendix I; see also the section in this Students will be given guidance with regard to guide headed ‘Academic Appeals’. the University’s view of what will be accepted as Serious Adverse Circumstances. Students who decide not to sit or submit on the basis


Student Information | A–Z Guide 2016 67

Complaints

Office of the Independent Adjudicator

In the main, students enjoy their time at the University, but in an organisation of this size things sometimes can go wrong. If that should happen, the University would always advise that efforts should be made to resolve the issue informally and at a local level. If that is not possible, a formal complaints procedure exists. Full details of the formal complaints procedure can be found in UPR SA16.

If, at the end of any of these procedures, you are dissatisfied, you have the right to raise your case with the Office of the Independent Adjudicator (OIA). The University will advise you of the details of the OIA at the appropriate time.

Disciplinary Procedures If a student breaks the University regulations, this could result in disciplinary procedures being invoked. The vast majority of students never have any involvement with disciplinary procedures, but if you should find yourself in that position, guidance can be sought from the Students’ Union https://hertfordshire.su/advice-and-support. Full details of the disciplinary procedures can be found in UPR SA13. Information on these procedures can be obtained from the University’s Student Procedures Coordinator, Governance Services, Tel: +44 (0)1707 285028 or ext. 5028 Email: studentprocedures@herts.ac.uk Further information is available via StudyNet Help and Support: Appeals, Complaints, Discipline and/or ask.herts.ac.uk/

• Is busy with other things and doesn’t feel they have time to speak to the University themselves. • Is out of the country. It might be appropriate to approve a third party request if a student:

Office of the Dean of Students Tel: +44 (0)1707 284451 or ext. 4451 Email: deanofstudents@herts.ac.uk

• Is experiencing significant mental distress – for example, due to a recognised mental health condition or illness.

Requests for a third party to act on behalf of a student

• Has been through a significantly traumatic experience.

Only in exceptional circumstances does the University allow a third party to act on behalf of a student or provide a third party with information about the student. A third party might be a family member, guardian, friend or fellow student.

• Has a disability which impacts on their ability to liaise directly with other people.

It is unlikely to be appropriate to approve a third party request if a student: • Has not understood what has been said to them and wants someone else to gather information – for example, feedback from a lecturer or information about a University debt. • Is experiencing a general level of stress – for example, because of poor results or too much work.

The University reserves the right to refuse requests for a third party to act on behalf of a student. A copy of the procedure and further guidance is available through the Office of the Dean of Students.


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Awards Ceremonies The University holds awards ceremonies each year for eligible students who have graduated with an award. Students may register their attendance via the ceremonies website and receive two tickets for their guests; many choose to wear ceremonial dress for the occasion. Ceremonies are held at the Abbey in St Albans and on the University’s de Havilland Campus.

The website below contains all of the details needed for our graduating students. Exams & Awards Office: Tel: +44 (0)1707 281111 Email: exams@herts.ac.uk Website: www.herts.ac.uk/ceremonies Ask Herts

Awards Ceremonies


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Attendance monitoring The University has a responsibility for the pastoral care of students. It also has a number of legal and contractual obligations to monitor students’ progress and inform certain external bodies of a student’s temporary or permanent absence from their programme. Students may be required to fulfil particular academic attendance regulations for their programme. These are specified in the programme regulations which can be obtained from the appropriate administrator. The University has an electronic student attendance monitoring system known as ‘Check-in’. This enables students to record their attendance by swiping their student ID card on readers placed around campus, in both communal areas and teaching rooms. The check-in points are clearly identified with signs.

Irrespective of whether their programme has formal attendance requirements, all students must ‘check in’ once a week to record their attendance on their programme. Failure to do so may affect their academic progression and, where relevant, any entitlement to support from the Student Loan Company or other award, such as a bursary or scholarship that the student is entitled to, or international student visas. Students will be notified by their School of Study if they are required to check in more frequently than once a week. Part-time students should check in on each day they are required to be at the University.

Care leavers If you have ever spent time in local authority care and would like to access additional support, Lindsey Rigby is here to help.

Tel: +44 (0)1707 281307 Email: l.rigby@herts.ac.uk

In addition to the weekly recording of attendance, Tier 4 international students are required to record their attendance on a more regular basis to ensure active engagement with their studies. This includes termly visa checkpoints to ensure that passport and visa information is up to date. For research students’ attendance information please refer to the Research Students’ Handbook. The grey readers will display your name. If a check-in point does not record correctly, please try again, if necessary using another check-in point. If you are unable to make your card work successfully, please report this to your School Administration Office.


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Car parking, transport and travel Student parking

Residential parking

Students commuting to University

There is no parking for students living on the de Havilland Campus except for students who hold a blue badge for a personal disability.

Car parking at the College Lane Campus and de Havilland Campus is very limited and is available for permit holders only. There is very limited parking for non-permit holders in the multi-storey or in Car Park F. Uno provides an extensive network of bus services (http://www.unobus.info/), all students are therefore advised not to bring their car onto campus. However, there is a convenient park and ride service for students who are commuting to the University. The University has developed a Transport Plan strategy that sets out travel options for staff, students and visitors to the University. Details can be found at http://www.herts. ac.uk/about-us/our-environmental-policy/ transport. Details about the e-car and Ubike hire schemes can also be found here. Student Eligibility for parking permits can be found online at ask.herts.ac.uk or in the Student Parking leaflet available from the Student Centre. Daily payment must be made and car park users will need to comply with all regulations contained with the Student Parking Leaflet. Student Centre: Tel: +44 (0)1707 28480071

A very limited number of residential permits are available for students living on the College Lane Campus, and information on this is contained within your accommodation portal. These permits are purchased on an annual basis and will entitle the holder to park in the residential car park only. The University operates an extensive network of bus services which are provided by its own bus company, Uno, with its distinctive pink and purple livery. Most services operate from the newly opened bus interchanges at the Forum, College Lane and the Western Perimeter Road at de Havilland Campus. A free student shuttle operates every ten minutes between the Forum and de Havilland during the week and every fifteen minutes at weekends. Full details of Uno bus times (and special fare deals for staff and students) are available from www.unobus.info. The site also contains details of the Uno bus network and a list of frequently asked questions.


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Catering de Havilland Campus FoodHertfordshire, the University’s catering department, provides catering facilities on each On the de Havilland Campus the restaurant campus. See www.herts.ac.uk/food. is near the residences, next to the Sports Village. You can get your Starbucks fix inside You are never too far from a catering outlet – the Sports Village, or if you prefer you can ranging from full restaurants to little cafés. grab a coffee in the Law Courts building. Both College Lane Campus cafés are open throughout the week and in the evenings. Elsewhere there are cafés in The On College Lane you will find the Forum, with Atrium and the LRC for a quick pick-me-up its large restaurant and Starbucks café – this during your studies. is the place to go for your meals during the day and in the evenings. There are other cafés located near main reception, the Gallery, the LRC and the Health Research building – all serving a wide selection of premium coffees, juices, fresh smoothies and snacks.

Club de Havilland – a fun and lively student venue where food, drink and entertainment are available seven days a week. Regular offers and discounts are available. Meals are available from 11.00–21.00 Monday to Thursday, 11.00–18.00 Fridays and 12.00–18.00 on Saturdays and Sundays. Ask Herts

Food and Drink

Certificates Students’ certificates are produced by the Exams & Awards Office after an Exam Board has met to agree a student’s qualification. Certificates will either be given out at the Awards Ceremonies or sent in advance to a student’s home address. It is important to make sure this address is kept up to date on your student record. There is no student access to the Exams & Awards Office. Therefore, all enquiries should be made via either telephone or email.

It is important to note that students’ names appear on their certificates according to how they were registered at the time an Exam Board meets. If a student wishes to discuss the possibility of changing their registered name, they must contact the Student Centre before the Exam Board meets. Certificate names must still remain the student’s legal name. More information is provided on the Exams & Awards Office website (see go.herts.ac.uk/awardcertificate).

Exams & Awards Office Tel: +44 (0)1707 281111 Email: exams@herts.ac.uk Ask Herts

Certificates


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How the university communicates with you The University will send you messages, information and news in several ways as summarised in the guide opposite. What you need to do: • Keep your contact details up to date on your Student Record throughout the year, including your personal email address and mobile phone number. • Check StudyNet every day for messages and for updates in your Activity Stream (www.studynet.herts.ac.uk). • Check your email every day for University messages. You can also use StudyNet Mobile and set up RSS feeds

for alerts from StudyNet.

For more University information and notifications download HertsMobile – search for ‘Ask Herts’ in your app store.


Student Information | A–Z Guide 2016 73

How the University communicates with you The messages …

… and how you receive them

Adverse weather arrangements, University emergencies and campus availability

Daily updates on: • Emergency webpage www.uhemergency.co.uk • StudyNet News • University of Hertfordshire website www.herts.ac.uk

Urgent health information

• StudyNet News • Email to all students

Urgent personal messages

The University will make every effort to contact you by all means possible including telephone, email, via your tutor, finding you in class

Your modules including: any class, assessment, timetable, lecturer or room changes; specific careers and other events

• StudyNet module information and news • ‘My Course’ recent activity alerts in StudyNet • Email • Your tutor/lecturer in class • Sync ‘My timetable’ to your Smart/iPhone calendar

Receipts and confirmations: ` for payments, appointments, bookings, etc

• Email

Exam timetable, arrangements and regulations* including: conduct; calculators; car parking

• View ‘My exam timetable’ in StudyNet • StudyNet News and Help and Support section • Your tutor / lecturer in class

Your marks and exam results

• Your tutor/ ecturer in class/with returned coursework/online in your StudyNet portal • Exam results online in your Student Record (via your StudyNet portal)

University events and activities including: careers and employment; UHArts; Students’ Union; sports; competitions; community

• StudyNet News/Events/News Digest • News screens on campus • Twitter: @UniofHerts

Online systems and services: notice of planned work and service availability

• StudyNet News • Posters at entrance to LRCs • University weekly ‘at risk’ time: Tuesdays 07:00 – 09.00 and Fridays 07.00–10.00

Updates on new buildings and campus developments

• StudyNet News/News Digest • News screens on campus

* Please note that you are personally responsible for ensuring you are familiar with your exam arrangements and regulations.


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Council Tax Once you have registered on your course you may be eligible for Council Tax exemption. Information and frequently asked questions can be found via Ask Herts.

Requests for Council Tax exemption certificates should be made online via the ‘Updates’ section of your Student Record. Please ensure that you have clicked on your current course/year of study. Certificates are provided electronically, directly to the council and yourself.

Ask Herts

Council tax

Data protection Use of Student Record information and compliance with Data Protection Act 1998

Information from students’ records is used in a number of ways, including but not confined to:

The University maintains records relating to its students in both manual and electronic forms. These include correspondence with and relating to students, current, potential and past; electronic records for applicants created from information supplied during the admissions process; and information on current and former students, including photographs, collected during the admissions process, at initial registration, or subsequently added as a result of processing within the University, which may be both during or after the completion of the student’s period of study. These records are subject to the University’s Data Protection Act Policy, full details of which are available within the Corporate Governance section of the University’s website: www.go.herts.ac.uk/uprs

• Administering the University’s courses and examinations and the financial and quality assurance processes that support them. This includes University systems and services for learning, teaching, research, management and administration, such as StudyNet, learning resources, payment services and identity cards. • Supporting security systems in University buildings, and systems designed to ensure students’ safety and compliance with University regulations. These systems include CCTV, access control and monitoring of car parking, both on and off campus. • Recording and providing information on students’ attendance, academic progress, fitness to study/practice (where applicable),

and information relating to non-academic student issues (where relevant to a student’s progression and/or the University’s duty of care for that student and/or the public) and awards to the Student Loans Company, employers, and other sponsors and professional associations that have legitimate and/or contractual rights to the information. This can include: • Where requested by a student, reference information about that student provided to third parties. • Information on admissions and student performance given to institutions at which students have previously studied, both in the UK and overseas some of which maybe outside the European Economic Area, which may not be governed by UK or equivalent Data Protection law.


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• Providing the basis for information published for or circulated at the University’s degree award ceremonies, including those held overseas. • Transferring personal information about the authors of written assignments to the Plagiarism Detection Service (‘the Service’) and, where appropriate, the onward transmission by the Service of extracts from this information to members of academic staff at other institutions using the Service, some of which are located in countries outside the European Economic Area which may not be governed by UK or equivalent Data Protection law. • For recruitment and internal marketing purposes, possibly involving collaboration with overseas agents some of which maybe outside the European Economic Area, which may not be governed by UK or equivalent Data Protection law. • For academic and administrative purposes, for arrangements with overseas institutions, some of which maybe outside the European Economic Area, which may not be governed by UK or equivalent Data Protection law, including but not confined to students studying abroad, exchange programmes, placements and international academic or research collaborations.

• By the Alumni Office and the University of Hertfordshire Students’ Union to publicise and provide information in support of their respective membership activities and facilities. • The University is a member of a Data Protection Partnership arrangement with Hertfordshire Police, under which they are supplied with addresses at which students living off campus are resident. This information (which does not include the names of residents at these addresses) can be used by the police – for example, where particular areas of high student concentration in Hatfield are being targeted by burglars, to allow warnings to be passed on via StudyNet (in a similar fashion to the way information is fed into Neighbourhood Watch networks). • To provide the basis for official returns based on both individualised information and corporate level statistics required by the government, the Higher Education Funding Council for England and other statutory agencies, which the University has a contractual obligation to report to. • Information within Student Records may also be analysed for internal management purposes and/or approved research projects. Where the results of such work are published, it will not be possible to identify particular individuals from them.

When students and alumni are asked to provide specific additional information beyond the core requirements above, they will also be asked, via a Declaration, to consent to the collection, recording and use of that information. Where appropriate, provision will be made for students to opt out of such processing. Where students wish to authorise the University to pass information about them to a third party (possibly, though not always, in connection with applications for housing or part-time employment), they should obtain and complete a copy of the DPA authority form from the Student Centre in the Hutton Hub on the College Lane Campus. This document is also available on StudyNet, at Student Support > Student Centre > Student Registry Kathleen Kwan Director of Legal Services and University Solicitor Tel: +44 (0)1707 284904 or ext. 4904 Email: k.kwan2@herts.ac.uk


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Elective modules If you are a full-time student (in other words, you are studying at least ninety credits of modules during Semesters A plus B), you are also able to register to study up to thirty credits of additional modules that are not part of your normal programme of study. These elective modules can be taken from any discipline area in the University, subject to availability and module prerequisites (see below). For instance, these modules could be in subjects allied to your own degree studies, or they could be from a totally different subject area. A list of the available modules is available on StudyNet. Once you have identified an elective module on which you would like to register, contact your programme administrator who will arrange for this to happen. Please take advice on the suitability of these modules

before you register. Many modules assume prior knowledge in a subject, particularly those at academic levels five, six and seven, and academic staff are not able to provide any additional support to those who do not meet the prerequisites. Also, some modules are timetabled in rooms which limit their availability to additional students, and at times which may clash with your existing timetable. The academic School delivering the module will be able to advise you of availability. It is also worth noting that studying elective modules will add to your total study load, and this additional workload will not be considered by an examination board when grading your performance (neither will they contribute towards the classification or credit requirements for your award). The

University therefore encourages students registering on elective modules to take them in an attendance-only mode (rather than requiring assessment to achieve a module grade), in which case these modules would appear with an AT grade against the module on your transcript. Unless you have indicated otherwise, it will be assumed that you are registering on elective modules in an attendance-only mode. Whichever mode you choose, the grade will appear on your final transcript (whether it is an AT grade or a numeric grade). In view of the restrictive and specialist nature of some programmes, Schools reserve the right not to offer certain modules on an elective basis.

Email When you join the University, we will use the email address you give us on your application form to send you University messages and information by email throughout your course. Your email address will appear on your Student Record. It will be your responsibility to check that your email address is correct and to keep your contact details up to date in your Student Record.

Your email address

• Choose the personal email address that you want to use for receiving University email. If you need to set up a new one, you can choose from a number of free email service providers to do so, including Google Gmail, Microsoft Hotmail and Yahoo.

All University email will be sent to you at the personal email address that you provide on your Student Record.

• Use a professional-looking email address based on your own name (eg, Jane.Brown@gmail.com), rather than any

Check your Student Record through your StudyNet portal > Online Services. Tips for managing your email to and from the University


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nickname or other description you may choose to use socially or in other contexts. • Keep your Student Record up to date with your chosen email address. Go to www.studentrecord.herts.ac.uk and select the Profile tab, then follow the instructions. Emails TO YOU from the University You will receive quite a lot of University communications by email. The guide to ‘How the University communicates with you’ is in the A–Z Student Guide and on StudyNet. • Check your email regularly for University messages. • Check your junk email too to make sure you haven’t missed any University messages.

Important: do not reply to any suspicious emails. We will never ask you for your username and password.

• Please note your @herts.ac.uk email address may not be used in your Student Record details.

Emails FROM YOU to the University and to individual University staff

• Any emails sent to your Outlook email account will be redirected to the personal email address you have entered on your Student Record.

The University welcomes messages from you by email unless you have been specifically asked to respond or provide information in another way for a particular purpose. But we always need to know who you are.

• Find out more about Office 365 for everyone in StudyNet.

Requests for your email address as proof that you are a University of Hertfordshire • Always use your chosen personal email address when sending emails to the student University and to individual staff. An email address can never be proof of • In your email settings, set up an automatic identity. However, some suppliers may ask you for a University email address as proof of your signature to be included in every email eligibility for certain services or for educational that clearly states your name, course and discount on purchases such as software. University student member number.

• Do not send confidential information • In your email settings, add ‘herts.ac.uk’ (eg, credit card details) to the University by to your safe senders list to help prevent email. University email going into your junk folder or Your Office 365 Outlook email account being treated as spam.

• If you are asked to provide a university email address when purchasing a discounted product or for a specific service, please enter your username@herts.ac.uk address, eg, an16xyz@herts.ac.uk.

• Your lecturers and other University staff will all use your chosen personal email address for both individual emails and any group-list emails to you.

• You will receive any confirmation emails about your purchase to your normal chosen personal email address as shown on your Student Record.

• The University will not send you official confidential information by email (such as exam results), as email is not a secure means of communication.

• All students have an Office 365 account which includes a personal Outlook email account with an individual University email address username@herts.ac.uk. This is an additional University email account for you to use.


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Exams Students are reminded they must be available to attend exams throughout the whole exam period as exams can occasionally be moved to alternative dates or times. This could include evenings and Saturdays.

Please ensure you arrive at your exam location 30 minutes before the published start time if your exam is taking place in the de Havilland Sports Village Main Halls 1, 2 or 3, de Havilland Sports Village Cricket Hall.

Students’ personal timetables are available via StudyNet four weeks before the first exam in the Semester A and B exam sessions and one week before for the Referred/Deferred exam session.

For all other locations please make sure you are at the venue at least 15 minutes before the published start time.

Students are reminded that for every exam they attend they need their student ID card and Exam Number (obtained from your Student Record). Entry to an exam is not permitted after the published start time.

Further information about exams can be accessed on StudyNet (see Help & Support/ University and Students’ Union Service/Exams and Awards Office). It includes information on topics such as: • Dates of future exam sessions • Makes and model of calculators permitted • Instructions for candidates • Additional exam requirements due to disability or infirmity • Mobile phones, ‘smart’ watches and other electronic devices • Religious observance • Check list • Maps • Rules and regulations

During the main exam periods temporary exams offices are set up in room B162 on the College Lane Campus and room N212 on the de Havilland Campus to assist students. Outside of exam sessions all enquiries should be made either via telephone or email. Exams & Awards Office: Tel: +44 (0)1707 281111 Email: exams@herts.ac.uk


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Examination boards Programme Boards:

have been appointed, and can offer advice on good practice and how to enhance the • consider the eligibility of students for awards. quality of those programmes/modules. They • recommend the conferment of awards and are also able to offer an informed view of how standards compare with the same or similar the classification of such awards. awards at other UK universities of which they • make decisions on the progression of have experience. students. Each External Examiner provides an annual There are two types of Boards of Examiners: • decide on any award of compensatory written report to the University, providing Module Boards and Programme Boards. credit – see UPR AS14 para D 4.4 invaluable independent feedback to the See UPR AS14 C2 (Module Boards) and C3 (undergraduate students) para D 4.5 University at module and programme level. (Programme Boards) for more information. (postgraduate students). The University recognises the importance Module Boards: of the role of students in the management If you wish to appeal against the decision of a of academic standards and quality, and so • confirm and report the grade a student has Board of Examiners, you will need to consult External Examiners’ reports are made available achieved in each module. the UPR AS12 Appendix 1 section 5 which to Student Representatives as part of the sets out the timescales and procedures • decide on changes to grades because of annual monitoring process. If you are not a proven serious adverse circumstances (see that must be followed. Please also refer to Student Representative and you would like the ‘Appeals, complaints and disciplinary UPR AS14 C2.8 and also the guidance on to request a copy of the External Examiners’ procedures’ section on pages 66-67 of this pages 96-103 of this guide). reports relating to your programme, a list guide. of External Examiners, by subject area, is • decide the penalties to be imposed in External Examiners available via this site: at proven cases of cheating, plagiarism, go.herts.ac.uk/externalexaminers collusion or other academic misconduct (see The University appoints External Examiners, UPR AS14 C2.9 and also the guidance on mainly from other universities but also from Please note that contacting External Examiners plagiarism and collusion on pages 92-93 of industry and/or the professions. They are regarding any aspect of your programme this guide). qualified and experienced in the subject, have of study is prohibited. The University has an understanding of the academic standards appropriate internal mechanisms in place if you • monitor the performance of students from required for the award and are independent wish to raise a concern using the complaints different programmes studying a module. of the University of Hertfordshire. As such, or appeals procedures (see page 67 of this they are able to provide carefully considered • issue grades to students. guide). advice on the academic standards of the Ask Exam Boards programmes and/or modules to which they Herts Boards of Examiners meet at the end of each Semester to confirm the grades a student has achieved for each module studied, and to make decisions on progression through their programme and awards at the end of their programme of study, or when exiting the programme for some other reason.


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Feedback on coursework and exams Coursework

Exams

You will receive a mark and feedback on all your coursework within four weeks, unless there is a valid reason for it to be delayed.

You are entitled to request feedback on all your exams. You can find out how to request this feedback in your programme handbook or from the programme tutor.

Fees and finance A. Costs Before you come to the University you should ensure you can afford your tuition fees and living costs. Your fees will vary according to the type of course, details of which are available at www.herts.ac.uk/apply/fees-and-funding. Fees Tuition fees vary depending on the nature of your course and whether you are considered to be a Home/EU or an International student. For detailed information please visit www.herts.ac.uk/apply/fees-and-funding and click on the appropriate link. The fees you pay will change if you decide to change your mode of study, for example if you switch from full to part time or vice versa. If you are considering changing your study pattern please contact Student Finance in the Student Centre (Hutton Hub) for advice on the implications on your fees and your funding arrangements.

Fees are payable in line with our fee liability dates. Full details of our liability dates for the academic year 2016/2017 can be found at www.herts.ac.uk/apply/fees-and-funding/refunds and also in the Financial Policy sections of this guide. Please note therefore that if you stop studying with us for whatever reason, you may still be liable for unpaid tuition fees, or not be entitled to a refund of tuition fees you have already paid. Your course fees may increase for future years, for example because it is costing us more to run a course, and if this happens we will tell you as soon as possible. You may also be asked to pay additional course-related expenses, such as materials or for field trips, although we try to keep these to a minimum. Where this happens you will be told about these costs in advance.

Accommodation costs The full range of our accommodation and associated costs can be viewed at www.herts.ac.uk/university-life/accommodation. Accommodation costs vary according to the type of accommodation you choose. If you are staying in private accommodation, the costs will be as agreed with your landlord/letting agency. Materials fees Most course materials are provided on the University’s information system ‘StudyNet’, but in some cases your School of study may charge a small fee for materials.


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B. Funding and Financial support

C. Payments

D. Introduction of card charges

UK students

There are a variety of ways in which fees can be paid. Full details can be found via go.herts.ac.uk/feepayment.

A 1.5% charge will be made for in-person transactions made by credit cards and non-UK debit cards.

• Please check the latest information by visiting the website of Student Finance England (Student Loans Company) at www.gov.uk/studentfinance. • Most banks offer interest-free overdrafts to students. • The University has a UH Hardship Fund that you may apply for once you have started your course, should you experience financial hardship. • Students on NHS-funded courses pay no fee but may receive grants/bursaries from the NHS. EU students EU students may apply to Student Finance England for a tuition fee loan. Overseas students No UK funds are available and you must ensure you have sufficient funds to meet all your costs.

Students can avoid these charges by using other methods of payment, including UK debit cards, which most would consider to be the best alternative. Online payments will attract a charge of 1.5% for credit cards and non-UK-issued debit cards. IF IN DOUBT, RING THE STUDENT CENTRE ON +44 (0)1707 284800 or EXT. 4800.


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Financial policy for new UK/EU students 2016/2017 Financial planning

Payment of fees

Payment by a sponsor

You should budget for the full cost of your programme and living expenses before joining the University. Although the University is sympathetic to cases of unexpected financial hardship caused by the late arrival of student loans you should ensure you have enough money to live on until your student loan arrives. Hardship funds are available for eligible home students who are in receipt of a tuition fee loan from Student Finance England. Further information is available from the Student Centre in the Hutton Hub on the College Lane Campus.

If you choose to pay your tuition fees yourself, the University recommends that the fee is paid at registration. By agreement with the University, you may pay your fees in line with your fee liability dates as outlined below. Fees can be paid online at www.pay.herts.ac.uk/ open, in person at the Place2Pay in the Student Centre in the Hutton Hub on College Lane or by bank transfer.

If your costs are to be met by a sponsor, it is your responsibility to ensure that the sponsor makes payment at registration. You should provide written evidence of your sponsor’s intention to pay, either by letter or completion of the Employer/Sponsor Agreement form available via go.herts.ac.uk/sponsored-fees. If your sponsor fails to pay, you will be liable for your fees. Sponsors may be government agencies, education providers or private companies, but not private individuals or family members.

Tuition fee loans As a full-time UK/EU undergraduate student studying at university for the first time you should be eligible for a tuition fee loan. You should apply for a loan through Student Finance England before you start your studies. If you have any questions about your eligibility for a tuition fee loan you should contact Student Finance England https://www.gov.uk/student-finance.

Payment for accommodation Accommodation charges can be paid in three termly instalments in line with your maintenance grant/loan or by monthly payment. We require a payment plan to be completed online either by direct debit or debit/credit card. An accommodation deposit of £400 is payable when accepting the offer of a place in University accommodation. This will be refunded at the end of the academic year, less any charges/fines incurred.


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Liability dates

Penalty for non-payment

Outstanding debt

You become liable for your tuition fees in three stages.

In the event of non-payment of tuition fees you will lose access to study resources and be required to leave your course. As a last resort, the University will refer debts to a collection agency or the courts to ensure their recovery. This will incur further interest and charges.

The University will not permit progression to the next year of study if there are tuition fee debts outstanding from the current year.

• 25% on or after 10 October 2016 • 50% on or after 5 January 2017 • 100% on or after 18 April 2017 Please note, if you have been approved for a tuition fee loan, the SLC will make payments to the University shortly after these dates. Once paid, no refund will be made in the event of withdrawal. Self-funding students will be refunded any balance paid in excess of the liability quoted above. NB These dates apply to September entry. For other start dates please contact the Student Centre.

Results and conferment of awards

The University reserves the right to withhold formal notification of results if you have In the event of non-payment of outstanding tuition fee debts to the University. accommodation charges, your licence may Candidates will be notified of referrals/deferrals be terminated which will mean you will need and will be permitted to submit for such to leave your room. As a last resort, the University will refer debts to a collection agency examinations/assessments. However, the University reserves the right to withhold formal or the courts to ensure their recovery. This will notification of these results if you have debts to incur further interest and charges. the University. Reinstatement The University reserves the right to withhold On payment of outstanding tuition fees before the conferment of an award if you have outstanding debts to the University. In such the end of the academic year in question, the University may permit your reinstatement on to circumstances you will not be invited to the awards ceremony. your programme of study. However, if you are behind with your work, you may have to repeat parts of the programme, thereby incurring additional fees.


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Financial policy for new overseas students 2016/2017 Confirmation of place

visa to enter the United Kingdom (appropriate documentary evidence will be required) or if Once you have met the academic and financial you fail to meet academic conditions. conditions of your offer, you will be sent a You are required to register by the end of the Certificate of Acceptance which can be used second week of the academic year (week for your visa application. commencing 10 October 2016). If you do not Financial planning register or you subsequently withdraw from the University, there is a non-refundable element of You should have sufficient funds for the full cost of your course and living expenses before the tuition fee as follows: joining the University. The University cannot • 25% on or after 10 October 2016 offer to reduce tuition fees or rent, and the • 50% on or after 5 January 2017 University has no hardship funds available to overseas students. • 100% on or after 18 April 2017 Payment of tuition fees NB These dates apply to September entry. For other start dates please contact the Student Payment of your tuition fees may be made Centre. online via www.pay.herts.ac.uk/open, by bank transfer or banker’s draft in the currency Payment for accommodation of pounds sterling and made payable to ‘The University of Hertfordshire’. Full details can be Accommodation charges can be paid in three found at go.herts.ac.uk/feepayment. termly instalments or monthly. We require If your fees are to be paid via a representative, payment details to be completed online by debit/credit card. a receipt will only be issued by the University when the University of Hertfordshire has received the funds from that representative. You are, therefore, advised to obtain a receipt from the representative in the interim.

We strongly recommend that you do not bring cash to pay your tuition fees.

A deposit of £400 towards your accommodation charges is payable when accepting the offer of a place in University accommodation. This will be refunded at the end of the academic year, less any charges/fines incurred.

The tuition fee deposit will only be refunded in the event that you do not obtain your student

Please refer to your Room Contract for conditions regarding date of occupancy.

Payment by a sponsor If your costs are to be met by a sponsor, it is your responsibility to ensure that the sponsor makes payment at registration. You should provide written evidence of your sponsor’s intention to pay, either by letter or completion of the Employer/Sponsor Agreement form available via go.herts.ac.uk/sponsored-fees. If your sponsor fails to pay, you will be liable for your fees. Sponsors may be government agencies, education providers or private companies, but not private individuals or family members. Penalty for non-payment In the event of any payments to the University being dishonoured, you will be required to leave either your accommodation or your course or both. As a last resort, the University will refer debts to a collection agency or the courts or both. This will incur further interest and charges. Withdrawal from a course by the University owing to non-payment of tuition fees also has visa implications: we are obliged to notify the Home Office and your leave will be curtailed. Reinstatement On payment of outstanding tuition fees before the end of the academic year in question, the University may permit your reinstatement on to your programme of study. However, if you are


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behind with your work, you may have to repeat Results and conferment of awards parts of the programme, thereby incurring The University reserves the right to withhold additional fees, which must be paid in full at formal notification of results if you have registration. outstanding tuition fee debts to the University. You will be notified of referrals/deferrals and will Outstanding debt be permitted to submit for such examinations/ The University will not permit you to progress assessments. However, the University reserves to the next year of study if there are tuition fee the right to withhold formal notification of these debts outstanding from the current year.

results if the student has tuition fee debts to the University. The University reserves the right to withhold the conferment of an award if you have tuition fee debts to the University. In such circumstances the student will not be invited to the awards ceremony.

ID cards It is a University requirement for members to be in possession of a University of Hertfordshire Member ID card. The ID card is the property of the University of Hertfordshire and must be carried/worn at all times while on University premises. Member ID cards are issued during registration, although in some cases they may take up to 2 working days after registration.

You will be notified about the collection of your Member ID card at the point of registration. On collection, you may be asked to provide proof of photo identity, such as a passport or driving licence. Lost/stolen Member ID cards If your Member ID card is lost or stolen, you must report it to the ID Office (located on the College Lane Campus). You can do this by calling the ID Office on +44 (0)1707 284722. The incident must also be reported to the Helpdesk at your Campus LRC. The University operates 24-hour security and, out of hours, lost cards can be reported to your Campus Security Office on the following telephone number:

At registration, your photograph will be taken, and for clarity purposes you will be asked to remove baseball caps, sunglasses, etc. This does not include items that are worn for reasons of faith, such as turbans or headscarves. If a photograph has been uploaded at Stage 1 of registration, the photograph will only be used for the ID card if it de Havilland and College Lane Campuses meets the guidelines provided. Tel: +44 (0)1707 281010 or ext. 1010

Lost cards are replaced at the discretion of the ID Office. There is a fine for replacement of a lost ID card. ID cards that have been wilfully damaged will also incur a fine. The fine is waived on stolen cards on presentation of a police crime reference number. The ID Office opening times are: Monday–Thursday: 09:00–17:00 Friday: 09:00–16:00 Tel: +44 (0)1707 284722 or ext. 4722 Email: idoffice@herts.ac.uk Ask Herts

Replacement ID


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Internet: connecting to the internet and using University online services You have free unlimited access to the internet at the University of Hertfordshire. There are three ways to get connected:

Your use of the internet and the University’s online services is subject to the following conditions:

1 Log in to a University computer with your • Your use of the internet must comply with University IT Regulations (See A-Z section University username and password. Library and Computing Services) and the 2 Get on the wireless network Acceptable Use policy of the national Joint Academic Network (Janet). View available networks on your device. Select UHWifi and then click ‘Connect’. Open your web browser to get the login screen. There are two Wifi options: the eduroam service (recommended) or ‘UHWifi’ service. Select the eduroam link and follow the instructions to set up wifi without having to log in every time. Or Select the student tab and log in each time with your University username and password. 3 Plug your device into a free University desktop datapoint using your own network cable Open your web browser to get the login screen. Select the student tab and enter your username and password.

• You must maintain up-to-date antivirus protection on your computer and appropriate operating system updates (Windows updates, Apple security updates, etc). Further information and links to free antivirus software are available on StudyNet. • Weekly service ‘at risk’ periods are 07.00–09.00 on Tuesdays and 07.00–10.00 on Fridays. ‘At risk’ means that work may be carried out on University networks and systems, which may result in downtime of the service. • The University routinely monitors network connections. • Network access may be restricted or disconnected in the event of any threat to network security or to the interests of the work of the University or of any unusual activity.

If you need help with resolving any problems in connecting to the internet and University online services, please contact the Helpdesk (https://ask.herts.ac.uk/helpdesk).


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Library and Computing Services The University provides extensive information, computing and audio visual services and support for your learning and research needs, including an online library and printed book collections in LRCs; a comprehensive online learning environment (StudyNet); over 400 software applications; and internet access throughout the University. Using University library and computing services Anytime, anywhere – online and on campus. IT Regulations at the University of Hertfordshire The following is a very brief summary of the main points of the IT regulations. You are expected to be familiar with the full regulations, which are available at University Policies and Regulations (UPRs) http://www.herts.ac.uk/ about-us/corporate-governance/uprs •● Governance Don’t break the law, do abide by University of Hertfordshire Policies and Regulations (UPRs), and do observe the regulations of any third parties whose facilities you access. •● Identity Don’t allow anyone else to use your University login account, don’t disguise your online identity and don’t attempt to obtain or use anyone else’s.

•● Infrastructure Don’t put the institution’s IT facilities at risk by introducing malware, interfering with hardware or loading unauthorised software. •● Information Safeguard personal data, respect other people’s information and don’t abuse copyright material. Remember that mobile devices may not be a secure way to handle information. •● Behaviour Don’t waste IT resources, interfere with others’ legitimate use or behave towards others in a way that would not be acceptable in the physical world. If you have any problems with your password please go to https://www.pss.herts.ac.uk For further questions or help please Email helpdesk@herts.ac.uk or Tel: +44 (0)1707 284678

StudyNet is your University online www.studynet.herts.ac.uk It provides you with a personal portal to your interactive online learning environment and all University online services, wherever you may be, twenty-four hours a day. Your personalised online services include: • Your course modules, timetable, exam timetable, discussions and groups • Your profile, Student Record, blog and favourites, • Your StudentStore U: drive file storage for saving your work and study-related documents • You can also customise your portal to suit your preferences. Access to University information and online services: • Online library with more than 38,000 journals and 375,000 ebooks • Past exam papers • Jobs and careers • University news • Personal messaging • Help and support


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Computing and software Use any University computer in the LRCs or computer labs, and make use of over 400 software programs. Or use your own device. Everyone at the University has an Office 365 account; you can use Microsoft Office and other Office 365 tools on University computers and your personal devices. Get connected There are three ways to connect to the internet and University online services: 1. Log in to a University computer with your University username and password. 2. Get on the wireless network. 3. Plug your device into a University datapoint using your own network cable. For details about how to connect and conditions of use please see A-Z section: Internet: connecting to the internet and using University online services

Finding and using information for your course In StudyNet you will be able to find information on library services including online library resources. To search for journal articles and similar information sources

For help For further guidance on information sources for your subject go to your Subject Toolkit. You will find further links on how to reference your information sources, improve your information searching, write essays and much more on the StudyNet library pages.

Enter the keywords describing your topic in the You are expected to comply at all times with Library Search box. Be as specific as you can the University policies and regulations for the to get the best results. use of learning resources and online services. To find a specific book In the Library Search box you can also search for the title of a book. Enter the title or the author or the subject to find both printed books and ebooks in University library book collections.

Whilst the University will be able to provide the learning resources to meet most of your study requirements, you will need to pay for your own printing, photocopying and media consumables, and to buy books that are designated essential for use throughout your course.


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On campus Your Learning Resources Centres (LRCs) The two LRCs, on the College Lane and the de Havilland Campuses, are open 24/7 except for a few days at Christmas, Easter and in late August. You will need to show your UH ID card to gain entry. All in one place for your convenience The LRCs house the University’s library collections of printed books of more than 500,000 volumes, and provide around 3,000 study seats with more than 1,200 University computers, all with internet and software applications, StudyNet, online journals, ebooks, printing and other online services that you may need for your studies. You may also bring your own laptop and use the WiFi or desktop plug-in points. Choose the right space for how you want to work There are many different spaces in the LRCs so it is important that you choose the right one for HOW you want to work. Some are for groupwork, some for social learning, some for individual study, some for Silent Study; there’s an assistive technology suite and Café Study for working over a coffee or lunch. You can use all the services in every space.

Please be considerate to others studying in the LRC.

Printing and copying

Your University login also controls your personal online printing and copying account – you need to put funds into your account through the online payment service before Book lending service you can use it. Just follow the Print & Copy Borrow or return a book using your UH ID card Payments link in StudyNet or go to at the self-service machines in the LRCs. Make https://www.print.herts.ac.uk. sure you note the due return date and retain Printing and copying is self-service from your receipts. You can also login to StudyNet University computers, from your personal and check your book lending account so that laptop or using the copiers in the Media you know when your books are due back. Preparation Area in each LRC. You can You can book a Group Study Room at https://www.studyrooms.herts.ac.uk

Fines are charged for late return. So please return your books on time or renew your book loans online through StudyNet. If you do incur fines, you can pay online through the Library Account links on the Online Library page in StudyNet.

choose black and white or colour, from size A4 to A0, single or double-sided. Please make sure your copying complies with the copyright guidance displayed by the copiers.


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Get help if you need it Step 1: Help yourself StudyNet > Help & Support for 24/7 online help, guides and instructions Step 2: Contact the Helpdesk

Step 3: Make an appointment to see a specialist To book an appointment, call +44 (0)1707 284678 or email helpdesk@herts.ac.uk.

✓ Use the KnowHow guide

Personal appointments with a Helpdesk Customer Service Adviser are available during Helpdesk service hours.

For a useful introduction to using the learning resources and services: www.studynet.herts.ac.uk/go/knowhow

Our Helpdesk team will assist you with your queries, deal with fault reports, provide on-the- Getting started: your checklist spot help if possible and arrange appointments ✓ Your University login for specialist support. When contacting us, please include your University username and Member number as shown on your ID card.

Use your University username and password for all University online services including StudyNet.

Tel: +44 (0)1707 284678 Email: helpdesk@herts.ac.uk Pick up the phone at any LRC Information Point Online via www.studynet.herts.ac.uk/go/helpdesk

Keep it confidential and safe!

Details of opening hours are available on StudyNet. LRC CLOSED DAYS 2016-2017 Christmas closure: from 16.00 on Friday 23 December 2016 until 08.30 on Tuesday 3 January 2017 Easter closure: Friday 14 – Monday 17 April 2017 inclusive Summer bank holiday closure: Saturday 26 August – Monday 28 August 2017 inclusive

be able to participate in online discussions and group work, and submit coursework online.

To change your password or if you forget it, go to https://www.pss.herts.ac.uk ✓ Log in to StudyNet www.studynet.herts.ac.uk

✓ Check how the University communicates with you Details are in this A-Z guide and on StudyNet. Please check StudyNet and your email regularly for important University messages. ✓ Make sure your contact details are correct on your Student Record www.studynet.herts.ac.uk > Online Services > Student Record System You must provide your email address and telephone number.

This is your University online – you’ll be using Updates to this information will be published StudyNet all the time as a student at UH. on StudyNet during the year. ✓ Use your personalised portal in StudyNet to find your modules and timetable When you are fully registered on your course, your StudyNet portal will be personalised with the modules you are studying, including timetables. You will also


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Lost Property Lost property items handed in to the Reception areas of College Lane, MacLaurin, de Havilland, Meridian House and the Bio Park are logged. For items where it is possible to identify the owner, the Reception staff will send that person an email. These items will be kept for six months and one day. Any items where it is not possible to identify the owner will be kept for a maximum of four weeks. After these time periods, any unclaimed items will be disposed of to charity or for recycling.

If you find any articles of lost property, please pass them, along with details of the location where they were found, to a Reception Desk or a member of the Security Team, who will deliver the item to a Reception Desk. Lost property from the LRCs at College Lane and de Havilland is also delivered to Main Reception and de Havilland Reception (as appropriate) on a weekly basis. Ask Herts

Lost Property


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Plagiarism and collusion What is academic integrity?

Achieving good academic practices involves:

Academic integrity is fundamental to the values promoted by the University. It is important that all students are judged on their ability, and that no student is allowed unfairly to take an advantage over others, to affect the integrity of the assessment process, or to diminish the reliability and quality of the University of Hertfordshire degree.

• developing your own independent evaluation of academic issues

The University is a ‘learning community’ in which students and staff learn from each other, from their peers and through original research. In maintaining this learning community, the concept of academic integrity is fundamental. Academic integrity means that both staff and students conduct all aspects of their academic work in accordance with the accepted conventions of good academic practice in written work and creative practice. Good academic practice involves students understanding how to use the work of academics and other students to develop their own insights into a particular area of study and to generate new ideas. In particular, it is never acceptable to use the words of others or their creative output (whether published or unpublished, including material from the internet) without explicit acknowledgement.

• drawing upon research and evidence from academics in your field of study • discussing and evaluating existing concepts and theories • demonstrating your understanding of the key literature • developing your own arguments.


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Good academic practice means developing:

Some suggestions to help you to develop good academic practice

• study skills (eg, reading, note-taking, summarising, paraphrasing, research)

• When you take notes from sources, make sure you do so in ways that identify where you are making your own observations based on what you are reading, where you are paraphrasing and where you are recording direct quotations. This will be particularly important if you are taking notes and then reviewing them at a later stage.

• critical enquiry and evaluation (eg, balanced opinion, reasoning and argument) • referencing and bibliographic citation skills (ie, when and how to reference).

Bad academic practice or academic dishonesty (plagiarism, cheating, fraud, etc) is often caused by failing to understand what is expected and what is allowed. Acting with academic integrity enables students to demonstrate their own knowledge, skills and understanding of the subject and then to receive feedback to help them to progress. Failure to act in this way means that a student will not be developing the skills which are essential in the longer term to personal and academic growth. The feedback received on the student’s work will not help them to improve as it will not be a genuine reflection on their knowledge and abilities.

• Plan your study time, be aware of deadlines and leave plenty of time for writing to avoid the need to take ‘short cuts’ which could lead to bad academic practice.

work should be informed by, and refer to, the work of others in the field or to discussions with your peers and tutors. However, such contributions must always be acknowledged in accordance with conventions appropriate to the discipline. This requires more than a mention of a source in a bibliography. You should acknowledge, as they arise in your work, another person’s ideas, artworks or words using the appropriate referencing conventions. It is important to make clear which are your words, ideas or artworks and which have been taken from others.

• It is often helpful to discuss ideas and approaches to your work with your fellow students. However, work submitted for assessment should always be • Avoid including large amounts of entirely your own except where clearly acknowledged pasted material, or overspecified otherwise in the instructions quotation from external sources, as this of the assignment. In some instances, is likely to detract from the quality and working in groups will be required, and originality of the work and is therefore there may be occasions when work is unlikely to secure good marks. To submitted from the whole group rather demonstrate your knowledge and ability than individuals. In these instances effectively in assignments you need to use the instructions will make it clear how your own words. individual contributions to the joint work • The purpose of assessment is to enable should be identified and will be assessed. you to develop and demonstrate your If you are in any doubt, check with the own knowledge and understanding of person setting the assignment. the area of study. It is expected that your


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Press and publicity The University has a Media and PR Team based in Marketing and Communications which manages the University in the news. The Team has journalistic and PR experience and is available to give advice on matters concerning the press. This may come in useful if, for example, you were to be approached by a reporter for any reason, or if you wish to seek publicity advice relating to your work.

Louise Akers Media, PR and Communications Manager Tel: +44 (0)1707 281269 or ext. 1269 Email: l.akers3@herts.ac.uk Or contact a member of the news team on: Tel: +44 (0)1707 285770 or ext. 5770 Email: news@herts.ac.uk

Public Interest Disclosure – Whistle-blowing Raising and escalating concerns about a placement is related to malpractice and wrongdoing. If you wish to raise a concern about your support whilst on placement, please use the School complaints procedure. This can be found on the University Governance website.

The University’s whistle-blowing/raising and escalating concerns procedure is contained under Appendix 1 of the Bribery and Corruption policy (version 03.0 UPR GV12). Section 2 of this procedure refers to students and paragraph 2.5 specifically outlines how students should raise concerns whilst on placement. This includes a whistle-blowing hotline number.

If you need to raise a concern/whistle-blow about your placement, it has been agreed with placement providers that you must inform your mentor/practice teacher/practice educator and follow the placement provider’s raising and escalating concerns/whistle-blowing process. You must also inform your programme tutor or University placement link tutor as soon as possible. If your programme tutor is unavailable you must inform your personal tutor.

The staff at the Desks will be able to help with all general queries. These can include local area information, directions about campuses, local travel information and timetables.

Behind the Reception Desk at College Lane is the University Switchboard for the main University telephone number.

Reception Services The Reception Services Team manages the Reception areas at College Lane, de Havilland, Meridian House, MacLaurin and the Bio Park.

The Reception Desks also manage lost property (see separate section).


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Doctoral College The Doctoral College is located in the MacLaurin Building on the Hatfield Business Park, opposite the de Havilland Campus in Hatfield. Research students are supported and guided from a variety of sources within Schools, including supervisors, research tutors and research degrees administrators.

The Doctoral College provides a further level of support and guidance in all aspects of research degrees. Whether your query is about fees, exams, how to book one of our Researcher Development Progamme sessions, or just interpreting the regulations, one of the friendly staff can offer advice.

For further information please see our Research pages on StudyNet. General enquiries Tel: +44 (0)1707 284984 or ext. 4984 Email: research-degrees@herts.ac.uk Ask Herts

Postgraduate degrees

University of Hertfordshire scholarships To acknowledge the high standards reached by our students, the University and our commercial and professional partners provide scholarships. University of Hertfordshire graduates may also benefit from a graduate scholarship if they continue to a taught Master’s programme at the University.

The University of Hertfordshire offers the following scholarships: Undergraduate scholarships:

International scholarships: • University of Hertfordshire Chancellor’s international scholarship

• Beds, Bucks and Herts Society of Chartered • University of Hertfordshire family scholarship Accountants scholarship Bursaries and scholarships information is correct at the time of going to press. It • University of Hertfordshire sports is possible that it will change during the scholarships Academic year 2016/2017. • Talented Athlete Scholarship Scheme Postgraduate scholarships: • University of Hertfordshire graduate scholarship • University of Hertfordshire Professional Qualification Scholarship for alumni • Brian May scholarship

Ask Herts

Scholarships


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Guidelines to Students, Staff and Module Boards on Serious Adverse Circumstances 1. What are ‘serious adverse circumstances’? 2. Principles 3. Process for submission of serious adverse circumstances in relation to assessed work 4. Serious adverse circumstances and attendance at lectures/seminars, etc 5. Serious adverse circumstances and non- attendance at an examination/in-class test 6. Serious adverse circumstances and failure to submit coursework by the due date 7. Serious adverse circumstances and attendance at an examination/in-class test or the submission of coursework 8. Serious adverse circumstances and students with a disability 9. Table of serious adverse circumstances and actions

1. What are ‘serious adverse circumstances’? ‘Serious adverse circumstances’ are significant circumstances beyond a student’s control that would affect the student’s ability to perform to their full potential if they were to submit or attend assessments at the appointed time. The table on pages 100103 sets out the guidance to be followed by Assessment Panels and Module Boards. It provides as many examples as possible of the types of circumstance that the University considers to be sufficiently serious, along with some examples of what would not be sufficient.

2. Principles i The University allows students to draw to its attention any significant circumstances beyond the student’s control that mean their performance would be prejudiced if they were to submit or sit an assessment at the appointed time in the academic session. However, if a student, despite such circumstances, decides to sit/ submit an assessment, the University will not accept a claim that the student has serious adverse circumstances in respect of the assessment. This principle is in line with the University’s aim of making its students fit for the world of employment; one such skill involves taking responsibility for one’s own decision making. This principle operates subject to two highly exceptional circumstances set out in paragraph 7. ii Programme staff will advise students on what an Assessment Panel/Module Board is likely to regard as a serious adverse circumstance, but the decision whether to sit/submit or not to sit/submit will lie with the student alone. iii Where a claim of serious adverse circumstances is submitted by a student, the following principles will be adhered to by the Assessment Panels and Module Boards: a Where a student has proven serious adverse circumstances, the University does not


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award grades on the basis of what the student may have achieved had the circumstances not existed/occurred. Instead, the University grants more time or repeated opportunities in order for the student to demonstrate their knowledge and abilities. b The University will treat information about a student’s serious adverse circumstances with sensitivity and respect, regardless of the level of perceived severity. c The University will treat a student’s reported circumstances with as much confidentiality as is practically possible. In very sensitive circumstances, a student may request that the circumstances are only disclosed to the Chair of the Assessment Panel, the Chair of the Module Board and the external examiners (UPR AS 14 C2.8.7).

3. Process for submission of serious adverse circumstances in relation to assessed work If there is a serious adverse circumstance that has affected an assessment (or assessments) of a student, the student must communicate details to the University using the form provided by the School, with appropriate evidence. All Schools have a system of recording the receipt of such forms and evidence and acknowledging receipt to the student. The details must be submitted to the Module Board, normally through the designated programme administrative office or programme administrator, prior to any meeting of the Board as described in the University’s Policies and Regulations (UPR AS14 paragraph C2.7; AS12 Appendix 1 paragraph 5.4.2). Students are informed that submission should be no later than ten working days before the meeting of the Board, but where the relevant assessment is within twelve working days of the Module Board, any serious adverse circumstances must be notified no later than two working days after the assessment.

4. Serious adverse circumstances and attendance at lectures/seminars, etc If students are required to attend a lecture, seminar, practical or other type of timetabled class and they are unable to do so due to illness, they must self-certify to this effect. If, however, the illness extends beyond seven successive working days and attendance is required, students should obtain a medical certificate verifying that they are not fit to attend. 5. Serious adverse circumstances and non-attendance at an examination/in- class test If a student is not sufficiently fit to attend an examination/in-class test they should notify the appropriate staff in their School before the scheduled start time, and their doctor or other registered medical professional/ counsellor (where appropriate) as soon as possible. It is important to note that the University Medical Practice is not prepared to give retrospective certification after the date of the examination/in-class test. Certification can only be provided if a doctor or nurse has been actively consulted by a student during their illness.


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7. Serious adverse circumstances and 6. Serious adverse circumstances and failure to submit coursework by the due attendance at an examination/in-class test or the submission of coursework date If a student is unable to submit coursework by the due date, in the first instance they should apply to the designated member of staff of the programme for an extension (if available). Once the period for extensions has expired, students must complete a serious adverse circumstances form following the procedure set out in paragraph 3 above.

Except in the two circumstances outlined below, students who sit/submit an assessment deem themselves to be sufficiently able to undertake the assessment and cannot later claim to have suffered ‘serious adverse circumstances’ to explain poor performance. Exceptions: i Where at the time of sitting/submitting the relevant assessment, it is established that the student was not capable of understanding that their performance was likely to be affected seriously by ill health and/or its treatment and this view is supported by a doctor/psychiatric practitioner or the University’s Disability Services.

This ground will be a very rare occurrence as in most circumstances students will be in a position to decide whether their serious adverse circumstances are likely to affect their performance in assessments. Examples may include the death of a close family member within a day or so of the examination/in-class test; being involved in a serious car accident on the way to an examination and suffering post-traumatic stress; or being unaware of the likely effect of a serious mental illness on assessment performance. The student will be required to lodge a claim of serious adverse circumstances using the normal procedures (see paragraph 3 above). In addition, they will be required to take a special letter to their doctor/psychiatric practitioner or the University’s Disability Services in which the health professional is asked to certify to the effect that at the time the student took the assessment they were not capable of understanding that their performance was likely to be affected seriously by ill health and/or its treatment.


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If the claim is upheld, the original mark will 8. Serious adverse circumstances and be null and void. If the claim is not upheld, students with a disability the recorded mark will stand. i Whilst it is acceptable for Schools to accept evidence of a medical disability from a ii Where a student suddenly becomes unwell doctor, it is not appropriate for Schools to during an examination or in-class test and accept a diagnosis of a specific learning they decide to leave without completing the difficulty without consulting Disability assessment. In this event, they must notify Services. the invigilator before leaving the examination room of the serious adverse circumstances ii Where a School Assessment Panel (SAP) which necessitate their leaving, unless it considers that a serious adverse is impractical to do so (eg, the student is circumstance is linked to a disability and the unconscious or being violently sick). School has received no information from Disability Services, the SAP should obtain If, having left the examination room, the consent of the student in question to the student decides to rely on serious refer the evidence to Disability Services. adverse circumstances and they submit a form requesting a deferral and their iii Before accepting cases of serious adverse circumstances are approved, the original circumstances on the grounds of disability, mark will be null and void. If the claim is Boards of Examiners should check with not upheld, the recorded mark will stand. Disability Services whether the evidence of disability provided by the student to the Board is satisfactory. This includes cases where the student has alleged that they have not received appropriate support from Disability Services. iv Students submitting serious adverse circumstances for a reason related to disability support should ask a member of Disability Services for a written statement to support their claim.

v Disability Services may submit evidence on behalf of a student under exception (i) in paragraph 7, where appropriate.


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1

Main types of serious adverse circumstance (SAC) reported

Evidence required

Medical (serious – not a recognised disability). Examples: broken limb, problem with eyesight, influenza, vomiting or migraine at time of assessment, infectious condition.

Medical certificate (self-certification for the first seven days of illness is only permitted if the student provides evidence that it is the policy of their GP practice not to issue medical certificates), or evidence from the invigilator’s log.

Notes:

a. Influenza (‘flu’) does not refer to the common cold or conditions with similar symptoms. b. Some conditions may be able to be accommodated by separate arrangements (eg, the use of an amanuensis for a student with a broken arm) if they are reported before the cut-off date for adjustments published on StudyNet. 2

Medical (minor). The following conditions are considered to be minor (unless, in the case of an examination/in-class test, the symptoms are so bad on the relevant day that the student is too unwell to attend, in which case the condition will be treated as serious as in 1 above): • Self-limiting respiratory infections – eg, cold, sore throat, earache, cough, sinusitis • Other short-term infections – eg, cystitis, gastroenteritis • Asthma • Mechanical pain such as lower back pain, sprains and tendonitis – eg, writer’s cramp/RSI • Tension-type headaches • Period pains • Irregular irritable bowel syndrome • Hay fever • Stress or anxiety when this is exclusively related to examinations

For students registered with the University medical centre, please see paragraph 5 of the guidance.

Not applicable.

Action (levels 0,4,5) Deferral.

Action (levels 6, 7) (if level 6 referral is allowed, the Board can use advice for levels 0,4 and 5)

Deferral. If, however, the student has acceptable serious adverse circumstances which prevent him/her from sitting the deferral until the same time in the following academic session, the Programme Board has discretion to offer Final Compensatory Credit with or without penalty (for a total of thirty credits) subject to the limitations set out in UPR AS14 D.4.1.

Not an acceptable SAC.


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3

4

Main types of serious adverse circumstance (SAC) reported

Evidence required

Action (levels 0,4,5)

Disabled students A diagnosis of a disability (as opposed to a reason related to a diagnosed disability) is not valid grounds for a SAC. A reasonable adjustment, agreed through a Study Needs Agreement (SNA), more than four weeks prior to the exam period is not an acceptable SAC. Late disclosure of a disability with a valid reason/ request for disability adjustment (after the cut-off date for agreeing adjustments published on StudyNet). Adjustments will only be made if failure to do so would disturb other candidates and/or endanger the candidate themselves if left in the main exam room. Extra time will not be given. The student has the choice of whether or not to sit/submit, but if they decide to sit/submit they cannot claim to have serious adverse circumstances. Unforeseen effect of a disability-related occurrence – eg, (a) when the effect of a disability is not anticipated, such as an epileptic seizure or unexpected episode of mental ill health; (b) when a reasonable adjustment agreed through an SNA has not been implemented.

Not applicable.

Not an acceptable SAC.

Not an acceptable SAC.

Not applicable.

Not an acceptable SAC.

Not an acceptable SAC.

Confirmation in writing from a member of Disability Services that the SAC is valid.

Deferral.

As circumstance 1; the Module/ Programme Board will consider the seriousness of the condition and the extent of the student’s control.

Confirmation in writing from a memDeferral. ber of Disability Services that the SAC is valid.

As circumstance 1; the Module/ Programme Board will consider the seriousness of the condition and the extent of the student’s control.

Death in immediate family (grandparent, parent, sibling, child, grandchild, first cousin, aunt, uncle, spouse, partner, parent-in-law) or close friend within the semester (or for an extended time period in exceptional circumstances).

Death certificate, additional information (location of funeral, any religious observance requirements for mourning, etc).

As circumstance 1; the Module/ Programme Board will consider the timing of the death, the responsibilities of the student and the closeness of the relationship.

Deferral.

Action (levels 6, 7) (if level 6 referral is allowed, the Board can use advice for levels 0,4 and 5)


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Main types of serious adverse circumstance (SAC) reported

Evidence required

Action (levels 0,4,5)

Action (levels 6, 7)

5

Attendance at a funeral at the time of the assessment.

Death certificate, additional information (location of funeral, any religious observance requirements for mourning, etc).

Deferral.

As circumstance 1; the Module/ Programme Board will consider the timing of the death, the responsibilities of the student and the closeness of the relationship.

6

Death of a relative or friend outside the semester, or the funeral is not at same time as assessment.

Not applicable.

Not an acceptable SAC.

7

Serious illness in family (particularly where the student has duty of care; ‘family’ defined as in circumstance 4).

Medical certificate.

Deferral.

As circumstance 1; the Module/ Programme Board will consider the timing of the illness, the responsibilities of the student and the closeness of the relationship.

8

Commitment outside of the student’s control As appropriate (eg, letter from (eg, an emergency, including unexpected loss of employer or nursery). childcare) on the date when the student is required to attend for an assessment.

Deferral.

As circumstance 1; the Module/Programme Board will consider the seriousness of the event and the extent of the student’s control.

9

Work commitments (part-time students only) (eg, heavy workload at the time an assessment is due).

As appropriate (eg, letter from employer).

Deferral.

10 Serious transport problem (ie, exceptional circumstance such as a serious rail delay or road traffic accident, snow causing serious delays to traffic).

As appropriate (eg, copy of ticket, compensation slip from rail company, traffic report).

Deferral.

11 Routine type, predictable or partly predictable transport problem (eg, traffic jams, late train or bus, tyre puncture, etc).

Not applicable.

Not an acceptable SAC.

(if level 6 referral is allowed, the Board can use advice for levels 0,4 and 5)

As circumstance 1; the Module/Programme Board will consider the severity of the transport incident and the extent of the student’s control.

12 Misunderstood examination timetable.

Not applicable.

Not an acceptable SAC.

13 Overslept.

Not applicable.

Not an acceptable SAC.


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Main types of serious adverse circumstance (SAC) reported

Evidence required

Action (levels 0,4,5)

Action (levels 6, 7) (if level 6 referral is allowed, the Board can use advice for levels 0,4 and 5)

14 Religious reasons, where not working is a requirement

Requests must be notified to the University at least two weeks in advance, with appropriate evidence, or by the deadline published by the Examinations Office in the case of examinations.

The University will make reasonable attempts to make adjustments to the assessment timetable. Deferral is an option where work is prescribed on a particular day for a particular faith group. If there is doubt as to whether work is prescribed then the University will be guided by the advice of the University Chaplain who will consult with appropriate sources. In all cases the University’s decision is final. Boards of Examiners should consult the University Chaplaincy for guidance on acceptable religious circumstances (chaplain@herts.ac.uk). For the 2016/2017 academic session, a calendar of recognised prescribed days has been issued.

15 Serious personal problem not medical (eg, separation from spouse/partner, victim of crime) within the semester.

As appropriate (letter from counsellor, landlord, crime reference number, etc).

Deferral.

16 Financial.

Not applicable.

Not an acceptable SAC.

17 Holidays.

Booking information.

Deferral. Only acceptable if the booking is made prior to acceptance of the University of Hertfordshire offer.

18 Computer problems (eg, breakage, viruses, lost work etc).

Not applicable.

Not an acceptable SAC.

19 Complaints about University of Hertfordshire staff (eg, supervision).

Various (diary of missed meetings or classes, etc).

To be dealt with through Module Board.

Deferral. If, however, the student has further acceptable serious adverse circumstances that prevent him/ her from sitting the deferral until the same time in the following academic session, the Programme Board has discretion to offer Final Compensatory Credit with or without penalty (for a total of thirty credits).

Ask Herts

Serious Adverse Circumstances


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Student Centre The Student Centre is located within the Hutton Hub on the College Lane Campus. There are self-service information points for accessing online services and information via Ask Herts in the Hub Lounge. Within the Student Centre, Frontline Services operates an Information Desk where you can obtain information, services and impartial advice. The Frontline team provides a courteous, friendly and efficient service and has the knowledge to respond promptly to the majority of enquiries, without referral to the specialist teams. Place2Pay and the ID Office are also located in the Student Centre.

It undertakes the following functions:

We will ask you to:

• Information on courses and eligibility with guidance through the application process

• Keep the personal information on your Student Record up to date (for example, if you change your address)

• Admissions and Student Records

• Communicate with you clearly

09.00–16.00 Friday

• Student Finance and Place2Pay

• Provide accurate and complete information

• Residential Allocations

• Enable you to access and navigate student administrative functions, either online or in person

Tel: +44 (0)1707 284800 Email: ask@herts.ac.uk Search ‘Student Centre’ on ask.herts.ac.uk

• Processing applications to courses • Registering students throughout the year • Offering financial services and advice • Administering scholarships and bursaries

• Give us correct, complete and timely information • Ensure that your account with us is up to date, thus enabling us to provide services to you

• Raising invoices and collecting payments for When contacting us by email, we will respond tuition and accommodation fees to you within two to five working days. When • Processing accommodation applications visiting the Student Centre, the average waiting and allocating accommodation time is likely to range between five and fifteen When visiting the Student Centre, most queries minutes. At particularly busy times, such as the can be resolved on a ‘drop-in’ basis. However, • Issuing of ID cards start of term, you may find you have to wait a we do offer an appointment system to see • Offering advice and support to our little longer. a specialist when required, or when greater international community privacy is needed for your enquiry. Opening times for the Student Centre are: • Issuing car parking permits and bus passes The Student Centre includes student 09.00–17.00 Monday to Wednesday to staff and students administration services for the following 09.00–19.00 Thursday departments: We will:

• ID Office • International Student Support

Ask Herts

Student Centre


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Student finance The University recognises that financial and associated problems can and do affect students’ ability to perform well and achieve the results they are capable of and to which they aspire. Student Finance within the Student Centre provides staff with whom students can discuss both straightforward and complex financial issues relating to their attendance at University. The range of assistance, help and advice provided covers: • Tuition fees • University of Hertfordshire accommodation payments • Hardship funds • Personal budgets • Scholarship schemes

Students seeking financial advice and/ or assistance are requested to call into the Student Centre, telephone with an enquiry or make an appointment to see a Student Adviser for a confidential meeting. Enquiries are regularly made about: • Requests for money towards childcare, travel or extra course costs • Problems with the Student Loan Company • Funding problems relating to transfer, withdrawal or repeat-year study • Debt counselling with regard to University of Hertfordshire indebtedness Students are reminded that their full-time student status normally prevents them from claiming other benefits. Any students who are unclear about their entitlement should enquire at the Student Centre. Personal debt counselling and advice is also available through the Students Union ASC service.


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Student loans Undergraduate Students

Postgraduate Students

Student loans are available to full-time and part-time students studying for their first undergraduate degree, and for postgraduate teacher training courses (PGCEs) to help with tuition and living expenses.

From September 2016, you will be able to apply to the Student Loans Company for a loan of up to £10,000 to study for a postgraduate Master’s degree.

What’s on offer: • Maintenance loans: Repayable loans can help cover tuition fees and costs for food, accommodation and travel. Student loans are available for full-time university students. • Maintenance grants: From September 2016, maintenance grants will be combined with maintenance loans for new students. • Tuition fee loans: Repayable tuition fee loans are paid directly to the University. You don’t have to pay the loan back until you earn more than £21,000 a year.

The Postgraduate Loan will be paid directly to you and will be non-means tested. You will decide how to spend your loan so you can choose whether it will cover part or all of your fees or go towards your living costs. For further information on both part-time and full-time funding, visit www.gov.uk/studentfinance Student Centre Tel: +44 (0)1707 284800 or ext. 4800 Email: funding@herts.ac.uk


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Students withdrawing There are many reasons why a student may decide to withdraw from the University. However, there are also certain circumstances in which the University may decide to withdraw a student. These can include academic failure, debt, disciplinary reasons and factors that may jeopardise the University’s UK Visa and Immigration sponsorship requirements.

Students considering withdrawal are advised to consult with their Programme Tutor. Alternatively, the Office of the Dean of Students is available to provide support for those considering withdrawal or going through the withdrawal process; this can include counselling and advice on procedures. You can also contact;

The detailed regulations on withdrawal can be found in the Academic Regulations for Undergraduate and Taught Postgraduate Programmes in UPR SA14 via StudyNet > Student Support > Academic Life. The last date for withdrawal from modules is the end of teaching week 4 for Semester A and for Semester B it is the end of teaching week 3.

Counselling Service Email: Counselling.Centre@herts.ac.uk Telephone: +44 (0)1707 284453 If you require any other support; Email: deanofstudents@herts.ac.uk Telephone: +44 (0)1707 284451

The Students’ Union can provide independent advice and support: Email: asc@herts.ac.uk Telephone: +44 (0)1707 286154 or 285022 Ask Herts

Withdrawing


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Under eighteen at the point of admission The University does not have an upper or lower age limit for admission. However, if you are under the age of eighteen at the time of admission, the University does have extra responsibilities and therefore some additional systems are in place. In particular, if you are under eighteen at the time of admission, you will be required to provide the University with details of a UKbased parent or guardian whom the University can contact in the event of an emergency.

The University will not be able to progress your registration without details of a UK-based parent or guardian. You may be issued with a slightly different ID card. This card can be exchanged on your eighteenth birthday. If you are under sixteen at the point of admission, the University will not be able to offer you accommodation in the halls of residence as they do not meet the required standard for minors of that age.

More information can be found in UPR HS07 ‘Children, Young People and Vulnerable Adults’.


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University regulations and advice for students’ particular attention – index (Amendments to version 08.1, UPR SA07 are shown in italics.) 1 INTRODUCTION 1.1 As a condition of their registration, all students of the University of Hertfordshire are required to comply with the University’s rules, regulations and procedures. 1.2 These rules, regulations and procedures are published in a series of documents called ‘University Policies and Regulations’ (UPRs). 1.3 The University requires that all students consult these documents which are available online, on the UPR website, at: http://www.herts.ac.uk/secreg/upr/

Copies may be obtained from Governance Services (Telephone: 01707 285126; e-mail: a.courtney@herts.ac.uk).

1.4 The UPR series includes the Student Code of Conduct (UPR SA01), which explains the University’s expectations of students and its responsibilities to them, as well as the University’s policies and regulations governing Student and Applicant Complaints (UPR

requirements. Students should refer to the relevant Programme Specification which is available on StudyNet or contact their Programme Tutor.)

SA16). Further information concerning both of these documents is available on the Dean of Students’ website, on StudyNet). 2

ACADEMIC REGULATIONS FOR UNDERGRADUATE AND TAUGHT POSTGRADUATE STUDENTS

2.1 The index in section 3 of this document includes the UPRs that contain the academic regulations of particular relevance for undergraduate and taught postgraduate students. These are: 2.1.1 Structure and Assessment Regulations – Undergraduate and Taught Postgraduate Programmes – UPR AS14

which explains: how modules are graded; how a degree is awarded and classified; the rules relating to progression; module failure; serious adverse circumstances; cheating and plagiarism;

(Note: Programme Specifications may also identify additional requirements that apply to an award and/or its classification, for example, because of Professional Body accreditation

2.1.2 Schedule of Awards – UPR AS11

which explains the credit requirements for each of the awards that the University confers;

2.1.3 Assessments and Examinations (Undergraduate and Taught Postgraduate) and Conferments (University-delivered provision) – UPR AS12

which explains: the coursework assessment and examination regulations (further information is available on the Exams and Awards Office website, on StudyNet); how to appeal against the decision of a Board of Examiners (section 5, Appendix I, UPR AS12) (further information is available on the Dean of Students’ website, on StudyNet); and the coursework assessment and examination regulations for disabled students (Appendix II, UPR AS12).


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A–Z Guide 2016 | Student Information

2.2 Important information concerning changes to the University’s academic regulations for undergraduate and taught postgraduate regulations and the implications of these changes for students can be accessed via the following link: http://www.studynet2.herts.ac.uk/ ptl/common/studentcentre.nsf/ page/98370E73AE82CA218 02577E60057CE00x 3

REGULATIONS AND ADVICE FOR STUDENTS’ PARTICULAR ATTENTION – INDEX The University wishes to draw students’ particular attention to the following documents within the UPR series. It should be noted that the University may amend or withdraw any of the regulations and procedures listed in section 3 of this document at any time and reserves the right to introduce new regulations and procedures at any time during the Academic Year for the proper administration of the University or the provision of education.

A

Admissions - Research Students

SA02

Admissions - Undergraduate and Taught Postgraduate Students

SA03

Assessments and Examinations - Candidates with Disabilities or other Additional Needs (Partner Organisationdelivered provision) AS13 Appendix II Assessments and Examinations - Candidates with Disabilities or other Additional Needs (Universitydelivered provision) AS12 Appendix II Assessments and Examinations Regulations for Candidates (Including Requests for the Review of Examination Decisions (Appeals Procedure)) (Partner Organisation-delivered provision) AS13 Appendix I Assessments and Examinations Regulations for Candidates (Including Requests for the Review of Examination Decisions (Appeals Procedure) (Universitydelivered provision) AS12 Appendix I Assessments and Examinations (Undergraduate and Taught Postgraduate) and Conferments (Partner Organisationdelivered provision) AS13

Assessments and Examinations (Undergraduate and Taught Postgraduate) and Conferments (University-delivered provision) Assessment Offences

AS12

AS14 Appendix III

B Bullying and Harassment

EQ10

C Careers Education, Information and Guidance

SA09

Children, Young People and Vulnerable Adults

HS07

Closed Circuit Television (CCTV) Code of Practice

HS04

Code of Practice – Children, Young People and Vulnerable Adults HS07 Appendix I Computer Network Management Policy IM01 Appendix I Computer Networks, Security of Information Systems and the Protection of Information Systems from Computer Viruses IM01 Confidentiality Agreement (Text) Appendix II

CA04


Student Information | A–Z Guide 2016 111

D

Medical Emergency Procedures

Data Protection

IM08

Drug and Alcohol Misuse by Students

SA11

EQ03

Equality and Diversity Policy

No Smoking Policy

HS06

P

F Fitness to Practise

SA15

Freedom of Speech

EQ04

I CA04

Intellectual Property

CA04 Appendix I

Internet, On-Line Communications and Social Media

IM19

L Learning Resources

MPhil/PhD by Approved Programme of Supervised Research (1998) AS07 N

E

Intellectual Property Agreement (Text)

HS03

SA12

M Master’s Degrees by Approved Programmes of Research Training AS05

Parking and Traffic Management

ET01

Personal Relationships Between Staff and Students TL02 Protection of Information Systems from Computer Viruses, Spyware and Malware IM01 Appendix III R Regulations and Advice for Students’ Particular Attention – Index

SA07

S Security and Public Access

Security of Management and Administrative Information IM01 Appendix II Software and On-Line Resources

Research Misconduct

RE02

IM13

Statement of Responsibilities and Commitments SA01 Appendix I Structure and Assessment Regulations – Undergraduate and Taught Postgraduate Programmes AS14 Student Attendance Regulations

SA06

Student and Applicant Complaints

SA16

Student Code of Conduct

SA01

Student Discipline

SA13

Student Mental Health

EQ07

Student Withdrawal Regulations

SA14

Studies Involving the Use of Human Requests for the Review of Examination Participants Decisions – Research Degree Candidates AS16 Research Degrees – Generic Institutional Regulations AS10

HS05

Mrs S C Grant Secretary and Registrar Signed: 1 August 2016

RE01


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A–Z Guide 2016 | Student Information

Wednesday afternoon teaching The University recognises that a student’s first priority is to their studies, but there are endless opportunities to engage with the sporting, cultural, social and political life of the University. The University also recognises the pressure on students’ time and it therefore has a longstanding custom and practice of avoiding, as far as is possible, academic activity on Wednesday afternoons to allow time for other activities. The University cannot guarantee this at all times, but all staff are asked to avoid Wednesday afternoons wherever possible, and when it is not possible, to try to provide an alternative session at another time. Postgraduates and students on placement are excluded from this tradition because of the different demands of their programmes of study.


Student Information | A–Z Guide 2016 113

Your health and safety The University would like to bring the following health and safety information to the attention of all students.

The University emergency number is 5555 or +44 (0)1707 285555 from a mobile. Fire

Students of the University, while on University premises, field trips, etc, are required to conduct themselves with regard for their own health and safety and that of others who might be affected by what they do or fail to do. Students are required to follow University policy, in particular Safety Guidance provided by their School of Study and, by cooperating fully with staff on local safety and emergency procedures at all times.

On discovering a fire: Sound the alarm. Call points are situated on exit routes from buildings.

It is important to report any accident, incident or near-miss event to a member of University staff so that the University can ensure that any necessary actions can be undertaken. Accidents/incidents and near-misses can be reported via the online reporting system available on Ask Herts.

If you require support to evacuate the building, please speak to your Disability Adviser.

Action in emergency These emergency procedures operate across the University. Please read them carefully so that you understand the procedures well enough to be able to respond without delay. The response to emergencies is achieved by channelling information through the Security Control Room which is operational twenty-four hours a day, seven days a week.

On hearing an alarm: Leave the building immediately by the nearest escape route, closing all doors behind you. Report to your nearest assembly point. Do not take any risks. Do not return to the building until authorised to do so by the fire marshal, fire warden or security officer. Do not use lifts.

Accident or Illness In the event of illness or a personal injury accident: 1. Please ring security on 5555 or +44 (0)1707 285555 who will be able to provide you with a first aider. Calls direct to 999 can result in significant delays for ambulances reaching your location on campus. 2. Give brief details of the illness or accident, your location and, if possible, a telephone number. Any questions please email Safety@herts.ac.uk. To report an accident/incident or near miss event, please go to Ask Herts and use the online accident/incident/near-miss report form. Ask Herts

Near Miss Reporting


114

A–Z Guide 2016 | Notes

Notes


Notes | A–Z Guide 2016 115


To find out more please contact us using the following methods: t. 01707 284451 e. deanofstudents@herts.ac.uk w. www.herts.ac.uk

GA15906/DC/09_16

University of Hertfordshire Hatfield AL10 9AB

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