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Undergraduate Courses


School of Physics, Astronomy and Mathematics

Contents


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Contents Welcome from the Dean of the school

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Our Mission and Student Charter

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Graduate Attributes

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Five Great Reasons to Study with us

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All You Need for an Amazing Career

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Study Abroad: Opening up a World of Possibilities

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Somewhere to live

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How Much Does Student Life Cost?

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Degree Courses Physics and Astrophysics Programmes

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MPhys Physics and BSc (Hons) Physics

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MPhys Astrophysics and BSc (Hons) Astrophysics

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BSc (Hons) Mathematics

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BSc (Hons) Financial Mathematics

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After you Qualify

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How to Apply

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School of Physics, Astronomy and Mathematics

Welcome / Our Mission

Welcome from the Dean of School from being taught by staff with a range of academic and research experience across the physics, astrophysics and mathematics disciplines, and staff are regularly commended by students for being friendly, approachable and helpful. A number of joint staff-student events take place each year to ensure that staff are aware of students’ perceptions of the degree programme and can respond to opportunities to update it and keep it vibrant and relevant. A major programme review, valuably supported by student input, was undertaken in 2010.

Welcome to the School of Physics, Astronomy and Mathematics at the University of Hertfordshire. Physics, Astronomy and Mathematics are three fascinating and closely interlinked disciplines. They continue to be crucial to many scientific and technological advances, and have a wide reach in modern society, underpinning many of the advances in finance, health, climate research and many other fields in addition to the more traditional sciences. Physics, Astronomy and Mathematics graduates are valued by employers for their mastery of mathematics, their ability to apply quantitative analysis skills to a diverse range of problems and for their logical reasoning skills, amongst other attributes. The University of Hertfordshire is proud of our School’s achievements in teaching and research, with the School hosting two of the University’s premier research centres in Astrophysics Research and in Atmospheric and Instrumentation Research. The School was in the top 10 of the UK Physics (and Astrophysics) degrees in the 2014 Guardian League table. The School’s students benefit

We offer four main degrees: Physics, Astrophysics, Mathematics and Financial Mathematics. Whether you are choosing to study these subjects because of a long-held passion for the mathematical sciences, a fascination for the insights that they provide into the working of nature, or out of uncertainty because you don’t yet know the career you wish to pursue, we trust that you will find the School’s staff friendly, interested and supportive, and that you will aspire to join the School’s degree programme that best allows you to develop further your interests and abilities. Best wishes for your studies

Professor Sean Ryan Dean of School


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Our Mission An innovative and enterprising university, challenging individuals and organisations to excel


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School of Physics, Astronomy and Mathematics

Student Charter / Graduate Attributes

Student Charter Professor Quintin McKellar Vice Chancellor

Our Student Charter is designed to guide you through your time at the University to ensure you make the most of your experience. Both the University and Hertfordshire Students’ Union are dedicated to making our students’ time here as enjoyable and fulfilling as possible. We give our full support to the commitments set out in this Charter, wish you every success in your studies and hope that you have a great student experience here at the University of Hertfordshire.

Michael Gillett Hertfordshire Students’ Union President

Our commitments to each other – we will: • Behave professionally, with courtesy and integrity • Respect each other, working collaboratively and in partnership • Work together to develop our University, by asking for and using feedback • Value our collective identity and our individual diversity • Make a personal contribution to our communities within and beyond the University Your commitment to us • To participate fully in your studies and university experience, so you become the best that you can possibly be • To use the facilities, resources and support on offer at the University, asking for help when you need it • To behave in a way that makes you proud of yourself, on and off campus • To respect the places in which you live and study, as well as the local environment and communities around you • To engage proactively with your student representatives, supporting them to ensure your voices are heard • To make the most of the many opportunities to contribute feedback about your student experience

Your University’s commitment to you

Your Students’ Union’s commitment to you

• To provide you with excellent educational opportunities and can to make you highly employable whilst developing a lifelong passion for learning

• To be student focused in everything we do

•T  o enable you to challenge yourself and be challenged to be the best that you can be, by providing an intellectually stimulating environment •T  o provide you with support for your academic, professional and personal development so you can make the most of your university experience •T  o work in partnership with students, student representatives and the Students’ Union, to enable you to contribute to the improvement of university life •T  o provide flexible learning opportunities, using different technologies, to allow you to study in different ways and balance your commitments within and beyond university • To be entrepreneurial and creative in our outlook, and to be innovative and open to doing things differently

• To be accountable in providing relevant services and activities that allow you to reach your full potential • To represent you on campus, locally and nationally in an unbiased way • To provide you with fun opportunities that are safe, diverse and challenging and to celebrate your successes • To be responsible and ensure that, as a charity, every penny we earn goes straight back into services that benefit you • To enable you to get involved with the local community, volunteering and charitable work


Graduate Attributes

The University is committed to providing a culturally enriched and research-informed educational experience that will transform the lives of its students. Our aspiration is for graduates who have developed the knowledge, skills and attributes to equip them for life in a complex and rapidly changing world.

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In addition to their subject expertise and proficiency, the University’s graduates will have the following attributes: • Professionalism, employability and enterprise • Learning and research skills • Intellectual depth, breadth and adaptability • Respect for others • Social responsibility


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School of Physics, Astronomy and Mathematics

Five Great Reasons to Study with us Location Matters The University is based in a lively, safe modern campus in the town of Hatfield, renowned for its association with the aerospace industry. Whether you’re looking for a night out, something new to wear or fancy a bit of culture, you’ll find plenty to do in and around Hatfield and nearby St Albans to keep you busy in between lectures. For those who want more options London is calling! In less than half an hour you can find yourself in the middle of one of the world’s biggest, most vibrant cities - London.

For more information visit: go.herts.ac.uk/placestogo

Five Great Reasons to Study with us

Love Learning, Your Way We know that everyone likes to study in a different way and at different times, so our learning resources are available twenty-four hours a day, seven days a week. So whether you’re a night owl or an early bird, you can access information and use our facilities day or night. You’ll probably be asked to present your work in a variety of ways, and our brilliant equipment and facilities mean you can have some fun at the same time. There’s everything from hightech science labs to video studios and editing suites. In fact we’re always investing in new technology that reflects what you can expect to use in your chosen profession. You’ll also find university computers and Wi-Fi access throughout so you can tap into the internet, use software or find a wide range of online journals and other resources. Don’t forget there’s plenty of support to help you get on, such as learning resources clinics and assistive technology for those with a disability.

Find out more: go.herts.ac.uk/learning


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Supporting You all the Way

Healthy Body and Mind

You may feel a bit homesick, or overwhelmed, or just unwell. But whatever challenges come your way, believe us when we say you’re not alone. We’re always here to help. From financial advice to confidential counselling, we provide all kinds of support and advice. We’ll give you a full guide to our support services when you start, which includes information about our Health Centre, Day Nursery, Chaplaincy and Religion, Counselling Centre, Disability Services and Equality and Diversity.

Boasting some of the finest university sports and fitness facilities in the country, our £15m Sports Village really is a brilliant place to work up a sweat.

To find out more call: +44(0)1707 284451

A Forum for Fun Undoubtedly the most popular place on campus is the Forum Hertfordshire. The University’s stunning £38m entertainment venue has only been open a couple of years, but has already earned an impressive reputation for great gigs, classic club nights and stylish socialising. Find out more: forumhertfordshire.co.uk

Our indoor facilities were included in London 2012’s Pre-Games Training Camp Guide for the Olympic and Paralympic Games and we’ve hosted Olympic sports teams from countries as far afield as China and the British Virgin Islands. At the Sports Village, you’ll find all kind of classes, activities and state-of-the-art sports and training facilities and services. The University of Hertfordshire Athletic Union is there too, and offers qualified coaching and inter-university competition through twentyseven sports clubs. Through our Active Students programme you’ll find more than forty sports activities a week, free to you at both campuses.

Find out more: go.herts.ac.uk/sportsvillage


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School of Physics, Astronomy and Mathematics

All You Need for an Amazing Career

All You Need for an Amazing Career We’re here to help you get a job. Not just any job, but a career that excites and interests you, that offers new challenges and deserved rewards. But more than ever before, graduates need to get noticed. Which is why our courses are shaped to help you stand out. The Right Connections We have long-standing links with businesses, industry, the public sector and professional organisations, and these feed into our courses, adding to the student experience and successful employment prospects. Boosting Business Skills Our courses are cleverly designed to boost the skills employers are looking for – even if you don’t realise it. Our School works closely with experienced people in industry to plan our teaching programme. So whatever you’re learning about, you’ll be doing it in a way that makes you an even bigger asset to potential employees. Placements that add Real Value Every year, many of our students are on placement with organisations gaining valuable work experience, giving them a real advantage in the graduate job market.

The Careers and Placements Service Wherever you’re heading next, this is the place to start. Our Careers and Placements Service can provide help and advice on everything from gaining work experience and taking a placement year, through to undertaking further study or securing a graduate job. They’re based on both campuses and run a vibrant programme of events including regularly hosting networking opportunities with employers. Find out more: go.herts.ac.uk/careers-and-recruitment

I am currently working as a Support Astronomer at the James Clark Maxwell Telescope on Mauna Kea in Hawaii for the Joint Astronomy Centre. During my studies I spent a placement year during my BSc in the Netherlands doing research which inspired me to continue on to do my PhD. This resulted in opportunities to go on three observing trips out to Hawaii. I fell in love with the place, the telescope and the idea of being a support astronomer. The University of Hertfordshire encouraged and supported me throughout to get my dream job. Dr Harriet Parsons PhD Astrophysics Working in Hawaii for the Joint Astronomy Centre as a Support Astronomer


Study Abroad: Opening up a World of Possibilities As more and more employers look for graduates with international experience and good linguistic skills we encourage you to spend part of your course studying or working abroad. You will not only have an amazing time, you will also pick up valuable skills and experience which today’s businesses really value. Most of our students have the opportunity to spend time studying at one of our many partner universities overseas. It is an adventure you’ll never forget, boosting your confidence, increasing your independence, introducing you to new people and giving you a fresh perspective on the world. What will it cost? Whatever year you study abroad, you pay no fees to the partner university, and if you take a Third Year placement, you’ll pay no tuition fees to us either. Grants and scholarships are also available, including scholarships from Santander Bank. Where can I go? All sorts of places. We have partnerships with universities in the USA, Canada, Latin America, South Africa, China, Korea, Japan, south-east Asia and Australia. We are also part of the EU Erasmus programme, which gives you the chance to live, study and work in around twenty European countries.

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Do I need to speak the language? Not necessarily. You can study in English at many of our partner universities in non-English speaking countries, learning the local language alongside as a bonus. Being surrounded by native speakers will help you improve quickly and get even more out of your international experience.

Find out more: go.herts.ac.uk/international

I am currently studying abroad at Central Connecticut State University, USA. I love it here. It has been such an amazing experience and I’m so glad I came abroad. I would seriously recommend that more students should do the study abroad scheme - it’s been the best experience of my life so far and has made me more independent.

Jessica Todiwala A third year student from Ilford, Essex


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School of Physics, Astronomy and Mathematics

Somewhere to Live

Somewhere to Live For lots of people, one of the best things about university is the chance to live independently. So where will you live? Many First Year students choose halls of residence - they’re conveniently located and they’re a great way to mingle and meet people. But there are other options available and whichever you choose we’ll support you all the way.


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All About Halls Halls of residence are run by the University. They are spread over both campuses, with some off-campus options too. You don’t have to live on the campus where you’re studying, so the choice is all yours. While places in halls are obviously limited, we’re very good at finding rooms for applicants, especially First Year students. To give yourself the best chance of securing a place, apply before the A level results are out and accept your course offer before 31st August. College Lane Campus This campus has modern, comfortable and well-equipped halls with single study bedrooms, fully fitted kitchens with food lockers and shared bathrooms. There are also plenty of houses and self-contained flats for six to eight students, plus a number of twin rooms. All rooms have University network connections. de Havilland Campus This campus offers self-contained flats for around eleven students. The single bedrooms are all en-suite, with fridges and network connections. Shared kitchens are all fitted out with the latest appliances. Accommodation is available at Ridgeview Lodge in nearby London Colney. University-managed Homes The University leases and manages a number of privately owned properties in Hatfield. Flats or houses typically accommodate four students but may be larger or smaller, and we allocate places just as we do for halls. If you go with this option, you’ll be able to move in earlier.

Private Rented Properties Another option is to move into a privately owned house or flat with other students. We can give you advice and help with where to look, but as these properties aren’t owned or managed by the University you’ll need to deal directly with your landlord. Living with a Local Family Some students choose to live with a local family. It’s a good way to make sure you don’t miss out on your home comforts – some even provide meals. If this appeals, we can give you a list of houses available. Disabled Students We’ll be sure to provide you with a suitable room if you use a wheelchair or have other particular needs. You may be able to stay there after your First Year too, possibly for the entire time you’re studying with us. EU and International Students Joining us from overseas? You’re welcome to apply for a room in halls of residence for your First Year. If you’re from the EU, you’ll need to accept your course place by 31st August, while international students have until 6th September. Find out more: go.herts.ac.uk/accommodation


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School of Physics, Astronomy and Mathematics

How Much Does Student Life Cost?

How Much Does Student Life Cost? Being a student is an investment of time and money. Accommodation, textbooks, going out and food all need a bit of budgeting. Fortunately, there’s lots of financial support available.


15 Do I have to Pay my Fees up-front? You will not need to pay any course fees up-front, a loan from the Student Loans Company (which you will need to apply for) will cover your fees for your course. This loan is added to any other loans you take to cover living costs. This means that no matter what your financial situation is, course fees will not be a barrier to studying for a degree with us. For more information visit direct.gov.uk/studentfinance For International Students If you’re joining us from overseas, you can find all the information you need about tuition fees at go.herts.ac.uk/international

Investing in your Future At the University of Hertfordshire we want to make higher education as accessible as possible to as many people as possible, while ensuring we can continue to invest in world-class facilities and academics. Your education is an investment in your future, something you’ll take with you throughout the rest of your life. Having a degree is the first step to forging a new career and as a graduate you’ll have many more opportunities to earn a good salary and progress in your chosen occupation.

Find out more visit: go.herts.ac.uk/fees Find out more visit: go.herts.ac.uk/scholarships Or talk it all through by calling the student Centre on +44(0)1707 284800


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School of Physics, Astronomy and Mathematics

Physics and Astrophysics Programmes

Physics and Astrophysics Programmes The School offers two programmes in Physics and Astrophysics. They lead to BSc (Hons) or MPhys degrees, over typically 3 years or 4 years respectively (full-time).

They aim to instil in the student an appreciation of the physical world and the remarkable capacity for analytical, observational, experimental and computational techniques to predict and explain its behaviour. Emphasis is placed on practical work in the laboratories, at the observatory and in computer modelling suites.

The BSc (Hons) programme is aimed at students seeking an undergraduate education in physics or astrophysics which covers core physics and mathematics, and which prepares them for a range of physics-related careers. The MPhys programme allows students to study physics or astrophysics to a greater depth and breadth than possible within the BSc programme, particularly for those students interested in pursuing research in the industrial, government and academic sectors, and who are likely to consider undertaking further postgraduate study (MSc and/or PhD degrees). Both degrees are designed to reflect the importance of fundamental concepts and ideas that underpin the physical sciences.

The programmes endeavour to recruit students with a genuine enthusiasm and interest in the subject area. They seek to foster creative spirit in students to help them fulfil their potential, to become creative scientists and to become successful in a wide range of graduate professions where logical and analytical thinking is required.


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Forrest Radio Dish at Bayfordbury Observatory


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School of Physics, Astronomy and Mathematics

Physics

Physics MPhys Physics BSc (Hons) UCAS Codes: F304 MPhys Physics F300 BSc Honours Physics F301 BSc Honours Physics with a Year Abroad F308 Extended degree in Physics (note: this is not the MPhys) For more information visit: BSc Honours Physics: go.herts.ac.uk/F300 Extended degree: go.herts.ac.uk/F308 Professional Accreditation: MPhys Physics: Accreditation by the Institute of Physics (IoP) will be sought in winter 2013. BSc (Hons) Physics: Accredited by the Institute of Physics (IoPa). Graduates are eligible for associate membership of the IoP.

ENTRY REQUIREMENTS MPhys: 340 UCAS points which must include at least grade C in both Physics & Mathematics GCE A2 levels (or equivalent); plus GCSE English, Mathematics and a Science at grade C or above. BSc (Hons): 320 UCAS points which must include at least grade C in both Physics & Mathematics GCE A2 levels (or equivalent); plus GCSE English, Mathematics and a Science at grade C or above. An Extended Degree route is available for students with non-traditional qualifications (see below). A minimum IELTS score of 6.0, TOEFL 550 (213 CBT) is required for those for whom English is not their first language. STUDY OPTIONS MPhys Physics

BSc (Hons) Physics

Full Time

4 years

3 years

Sandwich

5 years

4 years

Part Time

8 years

5 years

After graduating I secured a position with Bravo Solutions as an eSourcing Analyst. This involves sourcing a procurement solution for clients, then maintaining, training and supporting them through the procurement and supply chain life cycle. This work involves a huge amount of IT skill, presentation skills, client-facing skills, and understanding complex principles, which are all abilities I was able to develop during my course at the University of Hertfordshire. Sean Hampson, who graduated with a BSc (Hons) Physics and who is now working for Bravo Solutions as an eSourcing Analyst


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The option to take a year out to apply the Physics learnt during the first two years of my studies provided an incredible eye-opening experience and was hugely beneficial in both consolidating and expanding my knowledge and skill set. Having a greater appreciation of Physics in the workplace and having a developed a stronger work ethic was an ideal platform to really push myself during my final year of study. Daniel Johnson, a final year student of BSc (Hons) Physics, who has secured a job on Frank Hirth’s Graduate Scheme.


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School of Physics, Astronomy and Mathematics

Physics

YEAR ONE Building on A level content, you will learn about more advanced physical concepts and develop the laboratory skills you will need as the course progresses. Group work and computer-based applicants reinforce what you learn in your lectures.

YEAR TWO This provides the opportunity to investigate physical concepts in more detail and study specific topics. You will also develop graduate attributes valued by employers.

Mathematical Techniques 1: Builds upon A-Level Mathematics: differentiation, integration, power series, complex numbers, differential equations, matrices and vectors.

Mathematical Techniques 2: Extend first year module skills to deal with more complex problems. You will learn how to solve multiple integrals, perform vector calculus, expand Fourier series and understand the applications of complex functions.

Contemporary Physics: This module introduces you to the basis of modern physics: Einstein’s theory of relativity and Quantum Physics. You will discover about space-time, the twin paradox, the quantization of energy and photons, the uncertainty principle, and nuclear physics. The Physical Universe: You will study concepts of classical physics and astrophysics which underpin some of the most basic and general laws of nature. Topics include gravity, optics, thermodynamics, the structure of evolution of the universe, planets, stars and galaxies. Applications of Computing: Learn the skills required to program in a high level language and to use computers to implement scientific calculations, solve mathematical problems and present your results. Laboratory Physics 1: Valuable hands-on experience will be gained to help understand concepts met in the lecture room. The appreciation of experimental errors and their analysis will be introduced.

Core Modules

Thermal and Condensed Matter Physics: You will learn how the fundamentals of thermal, statistical and condensed matter physics are applied to our understanding of the natural world, and examine the theory and applications of semiconductor materials and superconductivity. Optical Physics and Electromagnetism: You will study the essentials of electromagnetic phenomena and how light interacts with the material world, encountering topics such as interference, holography, polarisation and Maxwell’s equations. Quantum Physics: The fundamental nature of quantum physics and our experiences of it are investigated through atomic and nuclear systems. Modern developments and wider applications are also explored.


21 Optional Modules Choose EITHER Professional Skills: To develop the skills necessary to be able to contribute as a graduate in the world of work. OR Professional Teaching Skills: Practical training for anyone who thinks they may wish to become a physics teacher. PLUS one from the following three modules: Laboratory Physics 2: The module consists of experimental investigations into various physical phenomena in mechanics, optics, electromagnetism, and the solid state. Students will build on the techniques of laboratory practice developed in Laboratory Physics 1. Mechanics: Equilibrium, Newton’s laws, rigid body dynamics, oscillating systems with several degrees of freedom. Differential Equations: A deeper look at different methods of solving differential equations, Laplace transforms and matrix methods. PROFESSIONAL PLACEMENT OR YEAR ABROAD (optional) The opportunity to spend your third year working as a professional physicist in research or industry, or studying physics at another university overseas, puts your studies into a real life context and is valuable experience for your future career. Past students have taken up placements at major establishments such as the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, the National Physics Laboratory and the European Space Agency. Alternatively, you can opt for a study placement at a partner university in the USA or Europe.

YEAR THREE (Year Four for Placement Students) This is the final year for BSc (Hons) students and the penultimate year for MPhys students. It will expose you to the latest theories and applications, with the opportunity to work with our specialist researchers. You will complete an independent investigation in an area of physics of your choice. Core Modules Waves and Fluids: This module provides an introduction to hydrodynamics and the physics of wave phenomena with an emphasis on digital imaging techniques as a learning tool. Topics include ocean waves, acoustics, viscous and turbulent flows and the physics of champagne bubbles. Computational Physics: You will extend your knowledge and understanding of physical systems by computer modelling and experimentation. Specific case studies are used to broaden and deepen your knowledge of physics. Contemporary Quantum Physics: You will gain a knowledge and understanding of the structure of quantum theory and its application to the description of fundamental processes such as the interaction of light and matter, and entanglement. Investigations in Physics: This module will give you the opportunity to plan and undertake an open-ended investigation into a physics topic, under the supervision of a member of the academic staff.


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School of Physics, Astronomy and Mathematics

Optional Modules Choose 1 double module or 2 single modules Quantum Computing (can be taken as single or double module): Study the most modern and cutting-edge application of quantum theory. Basic information processing protocols and schemes for quantum cryptography are studied, as well as applications of quantum algorithms.

Physics

YEAR FOUR (Year Five for Placement Students) This is the final year for MPhys students. It will expose you to advanced, specialist physics topics, with the opportunity to work with our specialist researchers on a major research project which accounts for half of the year’s work. Besides the project, you must complete four other modules from the eight offered. Core Modules

Space Dynamics: Further develop skills in the numeric methods and visualisation protocols used within an interactive programming language, e.g. Matlab as it is applied to orbital dynamics of spacecraft.

Physics Project: Each student works individually on a research topic from physics, either theoretical or experimental, under the guidance of a supervisor.

Nonlinear Systems: Modelling using differential and different equations, phase space, limit cycles, maps, and chaos.

Programming & Statistics: Learn to program in a modern language. Develop statistical concepts, different kinds of distributions and errors, methods for hypothesis testing and error propagation.

Physics of Stars*: The physical properties of stars from birth to death forms the basis of this module. Star formation, stellar physics and evolution are studied using a combination of observatory, numerical and classroom work. Boundary Value Problems*: Boundary value problems arise in several branches of physics. In this module you will learn how to solve them both analytically and numerically. *counts as two modules

Optional Modules Mathematical Physics*: In this module you will address the application of mathematics to problems in physics and develop mathematical methods suitable for the formulation of physical theories. Atmospheric Physics*: Explore energy balance, radiation transfer, convection and phase-transitions. Consider the impact of changes to the equilibrium and the consequences of these factors for climate change. High Energy Astrophysics: This module will develop a deep understanding of the high-energy processes that are important in astrophysics, the key types of astrophysical situation in which they operate, and the methods by which their effects are detected from Earth. Computational Fluid Dynamics Techniques: Review the governing equations of fluid flow, numerical methods of solution, turbulence modelling and meshing procedures.


23 Computational Fluid Dynamics Analysis for Aerospace Applications: Develop knowledge of potential flow theory in aerodynamics prediction, panel method in aerospace and commercial codes to stimulate airflows. Science & Principles of MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging): This module covers the fundamental science and technical principles of MRI, providing a necessary underpinning for considering clinical MRI applications. Science & Principles of CT (Computed Tomography): Study the concepts and principles of CT, safety, and principles of operation including protocols and techniques used for different anatomical areas and the associated risks and benefits.

CAREER PROSPECTS A degree in physics opens doors to a wide variety of careers. As a professional physicist you could work in industry, research or teaching. Equally your high level of numeracy, ability to think critically and communicate complex ideas will be prized by employers in areas as diverse as financial services, scientific research and information technology. Other graduates have gone on to undertake postgraduate research. The national shortage of physics teachers, combined with the opportunity to instil in others your excitement for physics, has made teaching a popular career choice for some graduates.

*At least one of these modules

The Small Ice Detector instruments developed at PAM are used on atmospheric research aircraft Joseph Ulanowski


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School of Physics, Astronomy and Mathematics

Astrophysics

Astrophysics MPhys Astrophysics BSc (Hons) UCAS Codes: F511 MPhys Astrophysics F501 BSc Honours Astrophysics F510 BSc Honours Astrophysics with a Year Abroad F528 Extended degree in Astrophysics (note: this is not the MPhys) For more information visit: BSc Honours Astrophysics: go.herts.ac.uk/F501 Extended degree: go.herts.ac.uk/F528 Professional Accreditation: MPhys Astrophysics: Accreditation by the Institute of Physics (IoP) will be sought in winter 2013. BSc (Hons) Astrophysics: Accredited by the Institute of Physics (IoP). Graduates are eligible for associate membership of the IoP.

If you are fascinated by the wonders of the Universe, studying astrophysics at degree level will deepen your knowledge and understanding of the physical processes that shape the origin, structure and evolution of the stars, planets and galaxies. Our broad and vibrant research programme feeds directly into the curriculum to keep you at the cutting edge of this inspiring subject. ENTRY REQUIREMENTS MPhys Astrophysics: 340 UCAS points which must include at least grade C in both Physics & Mathematics GCE A2 levels (or equivalent); plus GCSE English, Mathematics and a Science at grade C or above. BSc (Hons) Astrophysics: 320 UCAS points which must include at least grade C in both Physics & Mathematics GCE A2 levels (or equivalent); plus GCSE English, Mathematics and a Science at grade C or above. An Extended Degree route is available for students with non-traditional qualifications (see below). A minimum IELTS score of 6.0, TOEFL 550 (213 CBT) is required for those for whom English is not their first language. STUDY OPTIONS MPhys Astrophysics

BSc (Hons) Astrophysics

Full Time

4 years

3 years

Sandwich

5 years

4 years

Part Time

8 years

5 years

The Physics, Astronomy and Mathematics department at the University of Hertfordshire has such friendly and dedicated academic staff, with one of the best staff to student ratios in the country. They gave me all the help and support I needed, throughout my time here, to achieve a first class degree with honours. I’m now pursuing a career path in academia because of the inspiration they gave me. Ian Greenslade, a final year student of BSc (Hons) Astrophysics from Southend-on-Sea, Essex.


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The planetarium inside Bayfordbury Observatory

I am a PhD student in Astrophotonics at the University of Sydney and the Australian Astronomical Observatory. My research includes the application of photonic devices (lenses, fibre optics, etc.) for use in telescope instrumentation to push the boundaries of astronomy. This builds on the Astrophysics degree I obtained from the University of Hertfordshire, and also the research placement year I did at the University of Sydney in Astrophotonics. Without the placement year I would never have had the opportunity to be involved in such ground-breaking research. Samuel Richards, who graduated with a BSc (Hons) Astrophysics and who is now studying for his PhD in Astrophysics at the University of Sydney and the Australian Astronomical Observatory


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School of Physics, Astronomy and Mathematics

Astrophysics

YEAR ONE Your studies will build on material taught at A level and introduce you to more advanced physical concepts. Observatory-based projects develop the skills and techniques you will need as the programme progresses, while group work and computer-based applications reinforce what you learn in lectures. You will develop strong observational skills using our unique observatory at Bayfordbury, gaining hands-on experience of telescopes within a few weeks of beginning your degree.

YEAR TWO You will investigate a number of astrophysical concepts in more detail, supported by modules in key physical and mathematical topics. The professional teaching skills module offers the chance to gain hands-on experience as a school teacher: a career of growing importance to Astrophysics graduates. You will also explore a number of topics of great current interest and deepen your insight into physical processes through problem-based learning in the laboratory.

Mathematical Techniques 1: Builds upon A-Level Mathematics: differentiation, integration, power series, complex numbers, differential equations, matrices and vectors.

Core Modules

Contemporary Physics: This module introduces you to the basis of modern physics: Einstein’s theory of relativity and Quantum Physics. You will discover about space-time, the twin paradox, the quantization of energy and photons, the uncertainty principle, and nuclear physics. The Physical Universe: You will study concepts of classical physics and astrophysics which underpin some of the most basic and general laws of nature. Topics include gravity, optics, thermodynamics, the structure of evolution of the Universe, planets, stars and galaxies. Applications of Computing: Learn the skills required to program in a high level language and to use computers to implement scientific calculations, solve mathematical problems and present your results. Laboratory Physics 1: Valuable hands-on experience will be gained to help understand concepts met in the lecture room. The appreciation of experimental errors and their analyses will be introduced.

Mathematical Techniques 2: Extend first year module skills to deal with more complex problems. You will learn how to solve multiple integrals, perform vector calculus, expand Fourier series and understand the applications of complex functions. Quantum Physics: The fundamental nature of quantum physics and our experiences of it are investigated through atomic and nuclear systems. Modern developments and wider applications are also explored. Solar System Physics: This module will provide you with an understanding of the physical principles of solar and planetary science. At the observatory you will conduct webcam, CCD, radio mapping and spectroscopy experiments. Optical Physics and Electromagnetism: You will study the essentials of electromagnetic phenomena and how light interacts with the material world, encountering topics such as interference, holography, polarisation and Maxwell’s equations.


27 Optional Modules Choose EITHER Professional Skills: To develop the skills necessary to be able to contribute as a graduate in the world of work. OR Professional Teaching Skills: Practical training for anyone who thinks they may wish to become a physics teacher. PLUS one from the following three modules: Laboratory Physics 2: The module consists of experimental investigations into various physical phenomena in mechanics, optics, electromagnetism, and the solid state. Students will build on the techniques of laboratory practice developed in Laboratory Physics 1. Mechanics: Equilibrium, Newton’s laws, rigid body dynamics, oscillating systems with several degrees of freedom. Differential Equations: A deeper look at different methods of solving differential equations, Laplace transforms and matrix methods. PROFESSIONAL PLACEMENT OR YEAR ABROAD (optional) The opportunity to spend a year working as a professional astronomer in industry or research, or studying astrophysics at another university overseas, puts your studies into a real life context and is valuable experience for your future career. This can be at an international observatory e.g. in La Palma or another research institute in Europe or further afield. Alternatively, you can opt for a study placement at a partner university in the USA or Europe.

YEAR THREE (Year Four for Placement Students) This is the final year for BSc (Hons) students and the penultimate year for MPhys students. It will expose you to the latest theories and applications, with the opportunity to work with our specialist researchers. You will complete an independent investigation in an area of astrophysics with the assistance of a supervisor from our internationally renowned research group. Physics of Stars: The physical properties of stars from birth to death forms the basis of this module. Star formation, stellar physics and evolution are studied using a combination of observatory, numerical and classroom work. Cosmology and Large Scale Structure: This module explores the origin, structure and evolution of the Universe, developing and challenging current theories. Topics covered include the cosmic microwave background, dark energy, galaxies and the large-scale structure of the Universe. Computational Physics: You will extend your knowledge and understanding of physical systems by computer modelling and experimentation. Specific case studies are used to broaden and deepen your knowledge of physics. Investigations in Physics: This module will give you the opportunity to plan and undertake an open-ended investigation into an astrophysics topic, under the supervision of a member of the academic staff.


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School of Physics, Astronomy and Mathematics

Optional Modules Choose 1 double module or 2 single modules Rocket Performance and Propulsion: Introduction to flight dynamics of rockets and their propulsion systems. Quantum Computing (can be taken as single or double module): Study the most modern and cutting-edge application of quantum theory. Basic information processing protocols and schemes for quantum cryptography are studied, as well as applications of quantum algorithms. Space Dynamics: Further develop skills in the numeric methods and visualisation protocols used within an interactive programming language eg Matlab as it is applied to orbital dynamics of spacecraft. Contemporary Quantum Physics: You will gain a knowledge and understanding of the structure of quantum theory and its application to the description of fundamental processes such as the interaction of light and matter, and entanglement. Nonlinear Systems: Modelling using differential and different equations, phase space, limit cycles, maps, and chaos. Waves and Fluids*: This module provides an introduction to hydrodynamics and the physics of wave phenomena with an emphasis on digital imaging techniques as a learning tool. Topics include ocean waves, acoustics, viscous and turbulent flows and the physics of champagne bubbles. Boundary Value Problems*: Boundary value problems arise in several branches of physics. In this module you will learn how to solve them both analytically and numerically. *Counts as two models

Astrophysics

YEAR FOUR (Year Five for Placement Students) This is the final year for MPhys students. It will expose you to advanced, specialist astrophysics topics, with the opportunity to work with our specialist researchers on a major research project which accounts for half of the year’s work. Besides the project, you must complete four other modules from the eight offered. Core Modules Astrophysics Project: Each student works individually on a research topic from astrophysics, either theoretical or experimental, under the guidance of a supervisor. Programming & Statistics: Learn to program in a modern language. Develop statistical concepts, different kinds of distributions and errors, methods for hypothesis testing and error propagation. Optional Modules Galaxy Formation & Evolution*: This module will cover current observational and theoretical developments in this field, using the known properties of local galaxies as a benchmark. High Energy Astrophysics*: This module will develop a deep understanding of the high-energy processes that are important in astrophysics, the key types of astrophysical situation in which they operate, and the methods by which their effects are detected from Earth. Atmospheric Physics: Explore energy balance, radiation transfer, convection and phase-transitions. Consider the impact of changes to the equilibrium and the consequences of these factors for climate change. Computational Fluid Dynamics Techniques: Review the governing equations of fluid flow, numerical methods of solution, turbulence modelling and meshing procedures.


29 Computational Fluid Dynamics Analysis for Aerospace Applications: Develop knowledge of potential flow theory in aerodynamics prediction, panel method in aerospace and commercial codes to stimulate airflows. Science & Principles of MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging): This module covers the fundamental science and technical principles of MRI, providing a necessary underpinning for considering clinical MRI applications.

CAREER PROSPECTS Your technical and analytical skills will be valued in many sectors and roles. Recent graduates have gone on to secure employment or undertake postgraduate research in international observatories, research institutions, engineering, financial management, training and education. The national shortage of physics teachers, combined with the opportunity to instil in others your excitement for physics, has made teaching a popular choice for some graduates.

Science & Principles of CT (Computed Tomography): Study the concepts and principles of CT, safety, and principles of operation including protocols and techniques used for different anatomical areas and the associated risks and benefits. *At least one of these modules

16� Meade telescope at Bayfordbury Observatory


30

School of Physics, Astronomy and Mathematics

Mathematics

Mathematics BSc Honours UCAS Codes: G100  For more information visit: go.herts.ac.uk/G100 Professional Accreditation: Accredited by the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications (IMA) for which graduates are eligible for graduate membership.

Mathematics is a vital practical skill. Its deep insight holds the key to advances in virtually all areas of our daily lives – from finance to computing to design, logistics to medicine, travel to weather forecasting. If you want a career that involves shaping technological or scientific progress, then a degree course in mathematics could be a good choice for you. We offer two degrees that are designed to develop mathematics skills for modern business and industry. Both degree courses share a common first year. The BSc Honours Mathematics is a general degree with the widest choice of modules to meet your unfolding interests, while our BSc Honours Financial Mathematics is a specialist degree leading to dynamic and varied job prospects. We have approachable and enthusiastic staff who use a variety of teaching methods – lectures, tutorials, practicals, teamwork and project work – to bring the topic to life. Assessment is also varied, enabling you to demonstrate your strengths and knowledge. ENTRY REQUIREMENTS 280 UCAS points which must include at least a grade C in Mathematics GCE A2 level (or equivalent); plus GCSE English and Mathematics at grade C or above. A minimum IELTS score of 6.0, TOEFL 550 (213 CBT) is required for those for whom English is not their first language. STUDY OPTIONS Mathematics Full Time

3 years

Sandwich

4 years

Part Time

5 years


I thoroughly enjoyed studying Mathematics at the University of Hertfordshire. The level of support I received from the staff and especially my personal tutor was brilliant. During my third year I studied at Oklahoma State University, which was also a fantastic opportunity that I would strongly recommend. I am now going to travel for a while before using the analytical skills I have gained to help me find a great career.

Simon Cass, a final year student from Witham, Essex

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School of Physics, Astronomy and Mathematics

YEAR ONE Content builds on material taught at A-level and introduces more abstract and advanced mathematical concepts. Using mathematical and statistical software, you’ll develop skills needed later in the programme, while group work and computer-based applications reinforce what you learn in lectures. Mathematical Techniques 1: Reinforces and builds upon A-Level Mathematics; differentiation, integration, power series, complex numbers, differential equations, matrices and vectors. Linear Algebra and Analysis: Sets, functions, number systems, limits, systems of linear equations and eigenvalues. Applications of Computing: Learn the skills required to program in a high level language and to use computers to implement scientific calculations, solve mathematical problems and present your results. Basic Statistics: Data analysis, the mean, standard deviation and variance, probability, statistical distributions, the use of a statistical and the use of the data for inference and decision making. Financial and Actuarial Mathematics: Bonds, shares, trading, returns, risk, web-based information sources. Application of Mathematics: This module introduces you to applications of mathematics in the area of mechanics.

Mathematics

YEAR TWO A wide choice of mathematics and statistics options allows you to focus on your areas of interest. You also have the chance to gain hands-on experience as a school teacher: a career of growing importance for many graduates. Core Modules Mathematical Techniques 2: Extending on the first year module, skills to deal with more complex problems are developed. You will learn how to solve multiple integrals, perform vector calculus, expand Fourier series and understand the applications of complex functions. Real Analysis: Theory of calculus, including limits, continuity, differentiability and integratiability, mathematical reasoning, and logic. Differential Equations: A deeper look at different methods of solving differential equations, Laplace transforms and matrix methods. Optional Modules Professional Skills: To develop the skills necessary to be able to contribute as a graduate in the world of work. OR Professional Teaching Skills: Practical training for anyone who thinks they may wish to become a mathematics teacher. Choose two from the following in Semester A: Statistical Modelling: Design of experiments, regression and analysis of variance. Number Theory: Number theory is one of the oldest branches of mathematics and is concerned with the properties of integers. Algebra: Linear algebra and abstract algebra. Numerical Methods*: Rounding errors, direct and iterative methods of solving mathematical problems numerically and programming in a high level language.


33 Portfolio Risk Management*: Behaviour of portfolios of securities, risk management and interest rate modelling. Choose two from the following in Semester B: Mechanics: Equilibrium, Newton’s laws, rigid body dynamics, and oscillating systems with several degrees of freedom. Numerical Methods*: Rounding errors, direct and iterative methods of solving mathematical problems numerically and programming in a high level language. Portfolio Risk Management*: Behaviour of portfolios of securities, risk management and interest rate modelling. *This is a double module so if you choose this in Semester A, you must also choose it in Semester B

PROFESSIONAL PLACEMENT OR STUDY ABROAD YEAR (optional) A year of paid employment in business or industry, putting your skills and knowledge into practice, or studying mathematics at another university overseas, is a valuable experience for your future career. Students have previously undertaken professional placements in organisations such as: • RFI Global Services Ltd • National Audit Office • Barclays Capital • Microsoft • Glaxo Smith Kline • HMRC • IBM


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School of Physics, Astronomy and Mathematics

YEAR THREE (Year Four for Placement Students) The modules in the final year build on the topics studied in the previous years and allow you to develop the skills required of a professional mathematician. In particular you spend time working on a piece of independent study as part of your final investigation. Core Modules Complex Analysis: Complex variables, complex functions and complex integration. Investigations in Mathematics: Directed study of a topic you choose from a shortlist, culminating in a professional report. Option Modules Choose combinations equivalent to 6 modules from the following double and single modules: Boundary Value Problems*: Sturm-Liouville systems, Green’s functions, numerical solution of boundary value problems and integral equations. Linear Optimisation*: Model formulation, primal and dual linear programming, integer programming and post-optimal analysis. Non-linear Systems: Modelling using differential and difference equations, phase space, limit cycles, maps and chaos. Quantum Computing (can be taken as single or double module): Study the most modern and cutting-edge application of quantum theory. Basic information processing protocols and schemes for quantum cryptography are studied, as well as applications of quantum algorithms. Multivariate Statistics: Multivariate Statistics introduces techniques for examining relationships among a group of variables, and a number of multivariate statistical methods are introduced.

Mathematics

Space Dynamics: Spacecraft dynamics is studied using core physical ideas, case studies and modelling techniques. Local space industry contacts will enhance the learning experience through visits and talks. Waves and Fluids*: This module develops the basic physics required to understand core topics in wave and fluid physics. *Counts as two modules

CAREER PROSPECTS As a mathematics graduate your expertise in problem solving, processing information, rational thinking and working logically will be in high demand and be a sound basis for many careers. Accountancy, business or financial services, economics and teaching are popular student choices, but many go on to secure jobs in areas such as computing, consultancy, engineering, the environment, medicine, research and telecommunications.

I am currently working as a Curriculum Data Administrator for the University of Hertfordshire in the department of Academic Services. The current project I have been working on is with the new timetabling system for the next academic year. This requires lots of data management and IT skills particularly in Excel; This uses the skills I honed during my studies at the University.

Victoria Raman, who graduated with a BSc (Hons) Mathematics and who is now working for the University of Hertfordshire as a Curriculum Data Administrator


35

Line integrals of Wigner flow. Image credit: Dimitris Kakofengitis, PhD student


36

School of Physics, Astronomy and Mathematics

Financial Mathematics

Financial Mathematics BSc Honours UCAS Codes: GN13  For more information visit: go.herts.ac.uk/GN13

The explosive growth and inherent variability of financial markets has fuelled demand for highly skilled mathematics graduates with an in-depth knowledge of this fast-moving sector. This specialist degree focuses on developing both your understanding and practical application of the sophisticated mathematical modelling techniques and information communication technologies that financial institutions rely on to price financial options, manage risk and optimise investment portfolios as market data unfolds. ENTRY REQUIREMENTS 280 UCAS points which must include at least a grade C in Mathematics GCE A2 level (or equivalent); plus GCSE English and Mathematics at grade C or above A minimum IELTS score of 6.0, TOEFL 550 (213 CBT) is required for those for whom English is not their first language. STUDY OPTIONS Financial Mathematics Full Time

3 years

Sandwich

4 years

Part Time

5 years


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38

School of Physics, Astronomy and Mathematics

YEAR ONE Content builds on material taught at A-level, and introduces more abstract and advanced mathematical concepts. Using mathematical and statistical software, you’ll develop skills needed later in the programme, while group work and computer-based applications reinforce what you learn in lectures. Mathematical Techniques 1: Reinforces and builds upon A-Level Mathematics; differentiation, integration, power series, complex numbers, differential equations, matrices and vectors. Linear Algebra and Analysis: Sets, functions, number systems, limits, systems of linear equations and eigenvalues. Applications of Computing: Learn the skills required to program in a high level language and to use computers to implement scientific calculations, solve mathematical problems and present your results. Basic Statistics: Data analysis, the mean, standard deviation and variance, probability, statistical distributions, the use of a statistical and the use of the data for inference and decision making. Financial and Actuarial Mathematics: Bonds, shares, trading, returns, risk, web-based information sources. Application of Mathematics: This module introduces you to applications of mathematics in the area of mechanics.

Financial Mathematics

YEAR TWO A choice of modules builds upon your first year studies, developing the ideas of mathematical finance. In particular, Portfolio Risk Management gives you experience in constructing and balancing share portfolios and making the same kind of judgements traders make. Core Modules Mathematical Techniques 2: Extending on the first year module, skills to deal with more complex problems are developed. You will learn how to solve multiple integrals, perform vector calculus, expand Fourier series and understand the applications of complex functions. Portfolio Risk Management: Behaviour of portfolios of securities, risk management and interest rate modelling. Numerical Methods: Rounding errors, direct and iterative methods of solving mathematical problems numerically and programming in a high level language. Optional Modules Choose EITHER Professional Skills: To develop the skills necessary to be able to contribute as a graduate in the world of work. OR Professional Teaching Skills: Practical training for anyone who thinks they may wish to become a physics teacher. Choose EITHER Number Theory: Number theory is one of the oldest branches of mathematics and is concerned with the properties of integers. OR Algebra: Linear algebra and abstract algebra.


39 PLUS one from the following: Differential Equations: A deeper look at different methods of solving differential equations, Laplace transforms and matrix methods. Mechanics: Equilibrium, Newton’s laws, rigid body dynamics, oscillating systems with several degrees of freedom.

PROFESSIONAL PLACEMENT OR YEAR ABROAD (optional) A year of paid employment in business or the financial world, putting your skills and knowledge into practice, or studying at financial mathematics at another university overseas, is valuable experience for your future career.

Statistical Modelling: Design of experiments, regression and analysis of variance. Real Analysis: Theory of calculus, including limits, continuity, differentiability and integratiability; mathematical reasoning and logic.

I am currently working at Rolls-Royce Plc as a Financial Analyst. The main requirements of my job are to produce financial analyses, forecasting and reports. I have also been given the opportunity to start studying towards a Management Accounting Professional Qualification. During my studies I developed skills in applying financial theory and mathematical logic which I have been able to implement in my work. My next post at Rolls-Royce will be in Treasury where the skills I learnt at University of Hertfordshire in financial markets and instruments will feature heavily. During my studies I was also given the opportunity to go on a placement year which I spent at Rolls Royce, which in turn got me my graduate job.

Roberto Tella, who graduated with a BSc (Hons) Financial Mathematics and who is now working for Rolls-Royce Plc as a Financial Analyst


40

School of Physics, Astronomy and Mathematics

YEAR THREE (Year Four for Placement Students) Core Modules Investigation in Financial Mathematics: With the help of your personal tutor you investigate a relevant area of your choice in Financial Mathematics. Financial Optimisation: Solution of the minimum-risk portfolio problem, maximising portfolio returns. Mathematics of Financial Derivatives: Modelling options, futures and derivatives, Black-Scholes model, stochastic calculus and binomial model. Optional Modules Choose 1 double module or 2 single modules Linear Optimisation*: Model formulation, primal and dual linear programming, integer programming, and post-optimal analysis. Non-linear Systems: Modelling using differential and difference equations, phase space, limit cycles, maps and chaos. Complex Analysis: Complex variables, complex functional and complex integration. Linear Modelling: Linear modelling brings together regression and analysis of variance into a single modelling approach based on matrix algebra and extends these methods to include category response variables. Multivariate Statistics: Multivariate Statistics introduces techniques for examining relationships among a group of variables, and a number of multivariate statistical methods are introduced. Further Algebra: Builds on the previous Algebra module focusing on topics including polynomial rings, field extensions, Galois Theory, finite fields, applications in cryptography and permutation groups. *Counts as two modules

Financial Mathematics

CAREER PROSPECTS With increasingly strong demand for these integrated skills, opportunities for graduates are excellent. Many go on to enjoy careers in high-profile institutions, working as traders in currencies, commodities, futures, options, shares and bonds, or as financial advisers in banks, large accountancy firms, insurance companies and finance houses.


I am currently working at the University of Hertfordshire over the summer on a research project in Financial Mathematics which is an extension of my final year project. I am also currently looking for jobs in the city and have had interest from graduate recruitment consultants as well as interest from my own applications. I would say that the university has taught me not only skills in Mathematics, such as the ability to analyse and problem solve, but also how to be more professional and hard-working in order to succeed. Taking Financial Mathematics at university was one of the best decisions that I have made and would encourage anyone thinking about it to do so.

Alex Phillips, a final year student of BSc (Hons) Financial Mathematics from Ely, Cambridge

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42

School of Physics, Astronomy and Mathematics

After you Qualify

After you Qualify Our courses help you develop the skills you will need for your future career and with a degree from the University of Hertfordshire you will have a head start in today’s challenging and competitive workplace. Whether your sights are set on teaching, working in the financial services, starting a career in information technology, or even making scientific breakthroughs, your time with us will help you achieve your ambitions. You will develop a multitude of skills – communication, decision-making, leadership, problem-solving, presentation, team-working, to name but a few – that are prized by employers and will empower you for success in any career or setting. Focusing on your future The following list shows some examples of companies where our recent graduates from the School of Physics, Astronomy and Mathematics have begun their careers after finishing university: - Account Manager at MindShare - Art Restoration Tate Gallery - Associate Editor of magazine ‘Astronomy Now’ - Campaign Analyst at Centrica (British Gas) - Controller at Nestle Rowntree - Data analysis and numerical modelling for Network Rail - Electrical Project Designer at EDF Energy - Financial Accountant at Airmiles (BA) - Graduate Analyst at Royal Bank of Scotland - Graduate programme at Barclays Capital - International Equity Settlement Analyst at Goldman Sachs - Investment Banking at HSBC

- Junior Strategist (Equities Desk) at Fimat - Logistics Manager at Network Rail - Portfolio Management Administrator at Bank of America - Secondary School Teacher at Simon Balle, Hertford - Technical Graduate at Three Valleys Water - Underwater weapons and countermeasures at Defence Science and Technology Laboratory Postgraduate Research Degrees The following list shows postgraduate research degrees offered by the University of Hertfordshire for Physics, Astronomy and Mathematics. These are internationally recognised degrees signifying high levels of achievement in research. • PhD in Astronomy (PhD) • PhD in Mathematics (PhD) • PhD in Physics (PhD) • Research Degrees: Astronomy (MSc by Research, MPhil, PhD) • Research Degrees: Astrophysics (MSc by Research, MPhil, PhD) • Research Degrees: Atmospheric Sciences (MSc by Research, MPhil, PhD) • Research Degrees: Mathematics (MSc by Research, MPhil, PhD) • Research Degrees: Physics (MSc by Research, MPhil, PhD) Our recent graduates from the School of Physics, Astronomy and Mathematics have also taken postgraduate degrees at other universities including: MSc University of Groningen (Huygens Fellowship) PhD Astronomy University of Hawaii PhD Physics Imperial College


43

How to Apply For any full-time degree course, please apply through UCAS online at www.ucas.com Ideally you should apply between 1 September and 15 January for courses starting the next academic year. Make sure you use the UCAS code for the University of Hertfordshire which is HERTS H36, and the UCAS code for your chosen course – you will find this listed at the start of each course description. The entry requirements listed for each course are based on a typical offer at time of printing; please see the course website to confirm the most up-to-date information. If you are interested in a part-time course apply online at go.herts.ac.uk/apply

Disclaimer Although every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that the information contained in this document was accurate at the time of publication (July 2013) the University of Hertfordshire does not warrant or represent its accuracy and disclaims any liability to any person anywhere in the world (except for death or personal injury arising from the negligence of the University of Hertfordshire) for any liability whether in contract, tort, negligence, breach of statutory duty or otherwise for any economic loss, (whether direct or indirect) damages, costs or expenses suffered as a result of the use or reliance upon the information contained in this document to the maximum extent permitted by law. This disclaimer shall be interpreted in accordance with English law.


UK Location Nottingham

From its central location in Hertfordshire, the University of Hertfordshire can be reached easily by road, rail or air. M1

- Just off Junction 3 of the A1(M) - 5 minutes from the M25 motorway Junction 21a - 10 minutes from the M1 motorway Junction 7 - 20-30 minutes from London Luton and Stansted Airports - 25 minute rail journey from London Kings Cross

Leicester

Peterborough

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Birmingham

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M6

Northampton

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AL10 9AB

T: +44 (0)1707 284800 Tel: +44 (0)1707 284 000 Fax: +44 (0)1707 284 115 E: admission@herts.ac.uk W: go.herts.ac.uk/pam

Milton Keynes

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Stansted

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M10

Watford

University of Hertfordshire

St. Albans

AL10 9EU

M25

Kings Cross

M1

M4

Reading

M25

Liverpool St.

Euston M4

M4

Heathrow

LONDON M25

M26

M20

M3

Gatwick

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M23

Brighton

Dover

GA13465/BP/07_13

mobile site:

Ipswich

A1

M40

de Havilland Campus Hatfield Herts

Tel: +44 (0)1707 284 000 Fax: +44 (0)1707 284 115

Cambridge Bedford

M1


Physics, Astronomy and Mathematics Undergraduate Courses