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The magazine for alumni and friends of the University of Hertfordshire

Spring 2016

IN THIS ISSUE:

Life in the fast lane

Driving forward with our motorsports alumni

Under the sea

Behind the scenes at the ZSL Aquarium

Paperback writer

The artist turning books into art PLUS News Sports news Alumni Insights Events and reunions Yearbook Alumni businesses


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CONTENTS 04

Welcome Futures 2016

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News What’s been happening in and around the University

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Research The importance of impact

09  Sports News Updates from the AU and Hertfordshire Sports Village

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ADVERT

Postgraduate Open Days

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Driving Force A look at our alumni working in Formula One

15  Trackside gems Meet the alumna designing F1 jewellery

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Creative Images from artist Jo Howe

18  Careers, Employment and Enterprise Service Top tips on starting in a new role

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Profile The alumna working at the ZSL aquarium

22  Comment The Vice-Chancellor’s thoughts on the future of food security

Saturday 2 July 2016

23 Around the world Our international alumni chapters

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Study a postgraduate degree at a world-leading University • Variety of subject areas and flexible study routes to suit your needs • Excellent location – 20 minutes away by train from Hatfield to London • Over 55% of our research has been rated “world leading” and internationally excellent

Book your place go.herts.ac.uk/opendays

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26  UHPress A look at local history 28  Giving The latest fundraising news 30  Alumni Insights The section dedicated to you

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Events and reunions Recent meet-ups and dates for your diary

32  Yearbook Read the latest news from your

24 Contact us: Post: Alumni Relations Office, University of Hertfordshire, College Lane, Hatfield, Hertfordshire, AL10 9AB Telephone: +44 (0)1707 281145 Switchboard: +44 (0)1707 284000

Profile The alumna reprogramming technology in Ghana

fellow graduates

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Email: alumni@herts.ac.uk Website: www.herts.ac.uk/alumni Facebook: www.facebook.com/ hertsalumni Twitter: @HertsAlumni

Alumni businesses A look at some of our entrepreneurial graduates and their discounts Editor: Louise Barnes Editorial Assistant: John Murphy Design: Aubrey Design Cover image: 'Light Relief', by Jo Howe

FUTURES | 3


WELCOME HOW THE UNIVERSITY OF HERTFORDSHIRE IS FACING THE FUTURE. AT THE END OF 2015 THE UNIVERSITY OF HERTFORDSHIRE LAUNCHED ITS NEW STRATEGIC PLAN, WHICH MAPS OUT THE DIRECTION AND VALUES OF THE UNIVERSITY UP TO 2020, WITH THE VISION TO BECOME ‘INTERNATIONALLY RENOWNED AS THE UK’S LEADING BUSINESS-FACING UNIVERSITY’.

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t’s an ambitious plan, which links together education, business, sustainability, research, international, and community and partners. But it goes one step further, putting people at the heart of everything that we do. And this is really telling – in an age when it’s easy for organisations to be faceless, particularly with the rise of social media, it’s refreshing to

see one put a value on being friendly, and to recognise the importance of a supportive and collaborative atmosphere. The five values that the University wants to be identified by – friendly, ambitious, collegiate, enterprising, student-focused – only serve to emphasise this. And it’s no coincidence that together these spell out ‘FACES’. Whilst it’s easy to see the University as being a campus-based collection of students and academics, actually our community is so much broader. Alumni form a huge part of the University community, as do former members of staff, both academic, professional and technical. You help the University to remember its heritage and roots, and your success is the University’s success. Hatfield and the surrounding areas are also an enormously important part of our community, whether you see this

as the staff in the local pizza takeaway, the taxi drivers that took you to the station, the neighbours you lived next to off-campus or your fellow commuters on the way to Hatfield. And although international is another key part of the plan, reading it in the context of people, it shows how the world really has become a smaller place. Our community is a global one that reaches every continent and corner of the world, it’s also more connected than ever before. The strategic plan highlights our international community, and the ambition for all our graduates to have the cultural sensitivity, aspiration and attributes to allow them to succeed anywhere in the world. And when considering you, our alumni, I’d say we’re doing a pretty good job of fulfilling that. Louise Barnes Editor

SPECIAL THANKS TO… Steve Corbett, Siobhan Madaras, Jane Housham, Charlotte Holloway, Wendy Jeffrey, Professor Quintin McKellar, Donald Lush, Claire Crux, Paul Upson, Eriana Gourmos, Kelsey Arif, Hannah Darling, Debbie Raines, Professor John Styles, Lucy Hinton, Rebecca Griffiths, Sarah Koniotes, Kim Virgo-Sheriff, Will Hings, Matthew Prior, Katie Tweedle, Nikki Vasiliadis, Rachel Jones, Jo Howe, Caroline Lawrence, John Corrigan, Lee Stretch, Howard Ash, Louise Akers, Sean Robinson, Debbie Ragless, Felicity Bond, Farida Bedwei, Alyssa Smith, John Murphy, Harriet Mesher, Tom McCullough, Will Amlot, Jemma Robinson, Peter Buckley, Sean Ryan, Laura Copsey, Lisa Roerig, Enrico Piazza, Joan Nunn, Craig Jordan, Giulia Briguglia, William Foreshaw, Steven Barnett, Lizana Latif, Jide Johnson, Nicola Suckling and Holly Paine.

ENERGY

N PRI TED

ING GREE N

US

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The University of Hertfordshire is committed to providing a place of work and study that is safe and sustainable and where staff and students take responsibility for themselves and others around them. As part of this Futures magazine is printed on recycled paper stock and using green energy.

UNIVERSITY NEWS NEWS

HERTS ON ALUMNUS OF THE RISE THE YEAR 2015 During 2015 the University of Hertfordshire has gone from strength to strength, with a rise in the league tables, better employability rates and increased student satisfaction. The Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2016 placed the University 76th in the country, a rise of three places, but also placed it 42nd for graduate prospects. The supplement also revealed 75.3 per cent of graduates went on to secure professional jobs. The 2015 Destination of Leavers from Higher Education (DLHE) survey cemented this position, revealing that 95.2% of alumni were in work or further study six months after graduating. As well as being above the national average for graduate employment (93.2%) four schools achieved scores of 98%: Education, Law, Health and Social Work, and Physics, Astronomy and Mathematics. Further good news about the University’s employability was revealed in late 2015, when Hertfordshire was included in the top 50 of Times Higher Education’s ‘best UK universities chosen by major employers’ rankings.

SOCIAL WORK GRADUATE JAMIE STONE WAS ANNOUNCED AS THE 2015 ALUMNUS OF THE YEAR. Since graduating in 2013, Jamie has worked for Hertfordshire County Council, a key stakeholder in the University's Social Work degree course, supporting adults with a learning disability in the Dacorum area. He won the prestigious national award of ‘2014 Newly Qualified Social Worker of the Year (Adults)’ category. The awarding body stated that his nomination was described by the judges as "beautiful, inspiring, loaded with values and integrity". In selecting Jamie to be the 2015 Alumnus of the Year, the judging panel believed that he is a real inspiration to the University's students, demonstrating that you do not necessarily have to be in a profession for many years to make a real impact on people's lives.

PERFECT PARTNERS An extended partnership agreement has been signed between the University and Santander. The partnership began in 2011 and since then Santander, through its Santander Universities UK division, has funded a wide range of scholarships, travel grants, awards and entrepreneurial activities at Hertfordshire. The University has also received funding for 60 part-funded internship opportunities with small and medium-sized enterprises through its agreement with Santander. The signing of this new agreement means that Santander will continue its collaboration with the University for a further three years, providing additional funding for projects and internships for the University's students. FUTURES | 5


UNIVERSITY NEWS

POLE POSITION

NEWS IN BRIEF From late 2016, Architecture will be taught at the University of Hertfordshire in a new commercial-facing course which will give students the chance to work on projects across the world. The University of Hertfordshire’s Business School has been awarded the prestigious Association of MBAs (AMBA) accreditation giving it international credibility and status.

UHRacing has had another successful season, gaining sixth place at Formula Student Germany. The team beat off stiff competition to come sixth out of almost 100 teams at the international Formula Student Germany (FGS) competition, held at Hockenheim from 29 July-2 August 2015. Months of hard work and late nights for the student engineers paid off as UHRacing was by far the highest placed UK team. Germany saw the team take things up a gear, following a successful race at Silverstone the previous month, in which they came in 26th overall.

Alumnae Kim Little, BSc(Hons) Sports Studies 2011, and Danielle Carter, BSc(Hons) Physiotherapy 2015, were selected for the Scotland and England squads in the UEFA Women’s EURO 2017 qualifiers.

ALUMNI OPEN NEW HALLS OF RESIDENCE BBC television and radio presenter Kate Bellingham and Alistair Spalding, CBE, Chief Executive and Artistic Director of Sadler's Wells Theatre visited the University of Hertfordshire in May 2015 to officially open two new student halls of residence named after them. The new halls, on the College Lane Campus, are the second phase of a £190 million student accommodation project and part of the University's vision to enhance students' lives by creating a fully inclusive living and learning campus environment. These two halls were named after influential alumni who the University felt represented the attributes of Hertfordshire graduates.

Accounting and Finance graduate Belinda Cuffaro became the tenth member of her family to graduate from the University in 2015. Belinda celebrated with 4,000 other graduates and 10,000 guests at the awards services in September, which took place over seven days. The flare awards celebrated ten years in 2015. Graduate Greg McClarnon secured the Best Growth Business award for his company Splaat Media. Other winners were student Samuel Dallimore who won the Most Sustainable Business award for Health Hut Products and graduate Porscha Pernnelle Mbawu, who won the Best Idea award for her company Pernnelle Ltd. Alumnus Lee Ziyang, from Kuala Lumpur in Malaysia, won the flare Ignite Award for his innovative website design project. In January 2016 the University of Hertfordshire was presented with the first-ever Race Equality Charter award. Presented by Professor Laura Serrant, Patron of the Race Equality Charter, the University was recognised for the hard work it undertakes to advance race equality and improve diversity on campus. The University was one of eight universities receiving this new award as part of a trial of the Race Equality Charter, in which 21 universities submitted an application.

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CAMPUS NEWS

On unveiling their plaques for the new halls Kate and Alistair both reflected on their time at the University. Kate said: "I am hugely proud and happy to have an ongoing relationship with the University of Hertfordshire. I am a fan of lifelong learning and I am excited about the University's commitment to encourage more women to study science subjects and I will continue to support this work." Alistair added: "I feel very honoured and grateful to the University for naming this student hall after me. There is no overstating the importance of education in empowering young people and developing them into capable and rounded individuals. “I hope students will enjoy living and studying here and benefiting from the vibrant and stimulating campus environment offered by the University to support their learning and achievements." The new zero-carbon halls have been developed by Uliving, with construction undertaken by Bouygues UK. The first phase of development was completed in September 2014 and provided 700 new bedrooms, two new sports pitches, a campus gym, informal learning and social spaces and a central hub with security and student services. Phase three of the project is due for completion in September 2016.

CAMPUS UPDATES

The Hutton Hub was officially opened in January 2015. It is located at the heart of campus, next to the social facilities of the Forum Hertfordshire, and brings together many of the essential services on offer to students and staff. It encompasses the Student Centre, Careers and Employment Service, Student Wellbeing, the Medical Centre, Campus Pharmacy, Hertfordshire Students’ Union, ID Office and a Santander branch, as well as a juice bar, Zest. Due to open in late 2016, the landmark new science building will bring all our state-of-the-art facilities, including labs and research technology, together under one roof. It will also offer informal learning and social spaces and a coffee bar. FUTURES | 7


SPORTS NEWS

NEWS

GO HERTS

THE IMPACT OF

RESEARCH

WHEN YOU READ ABOUT A PIECE OF RESEARCH CARRIED OUT BY A UNIVERSITY, WHILST IT MIGHT BE INTERESTING, IT CAN ALSO OFTEN LEAVE YOU THINKING ‘SO WHAT’?

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ack in 2009, the government announced that it wanted to try and better measure the impact research makes on the economy and society. Impact itself is a very straight-forward word, meaning to influence, make an impression or to have effective action of one thing upon another. But what about impact in research? The UK Research Councils see this as ‘the demonstrable contribution that excellent research makes to society and the economy'. This might seem straightforward in itself, but when you start to think about some of the research you’ve read about, the waters might seem murkier.

How can you measure the value to the economy of study into small pieces of fabric left by mothers who abandoned their children at the London Foundling Hospital in the mid-eighteenth century? Or the social contribution of particle scattering research, or ‘lost’ World War One plays? There was significant criticism of the very concept of trying to measure research impact when it was announced, not least that the focus on economic and social impact would reduce the value of certain disciplines and subsequently the levels of funding awarded. In addition, there were fears that ‘blue-skies research’ would became undervalued compared to applied research. Nevertheless, the assessment went ahead as part of the Research Excellence Framework (REF) which assessed the quality of research at every university across the UK. The results were published at the end

of 2014, and over 90% of Hertfordshire’s submitted research was judged to be of international quality in terms of originality, significance and rigour. In addition, over 90% of our research was judged to have considerable impact, with over half of this classed as very considerable or outstanding. And what about those Foundling Textiles? A case study based on this work was awarded the maximum 4* rating in the REF – it was a great example of how university research can affect people’s lives in quite unexpected and varied ways. At the end of the day, whether you’re interested in science, new business models, history, effective community programmes, financial markets or the creative industries, if universities like Hertfordshire are helping you to find out about the work and advances that they are making in those fields, it can only be a good thing. Charlotte Holloway, Louise Barnes

HERTS SPORTING SUPERSTARS BUILD ON LAST YEAR’S SUCCESS THIS SEASON THE ATHLETIC UNION CONTINUED TO HAVE SUCCESS IN THE BUCS LEAGUES BRINGING HOME 7 LEAGUE TITLES ALONGSIDE HAVING A RECORD NUMBER OF SIDES COMPETING IN BUCS PREMIER DIVISIONS.

Netball

In their debut season in the Premier South, UH Netball firsts ended their league campaign in second place, while coming through a nail-biting quarter final against Loughborough in the Championship cup (53-52). UH Netball seconds recently completed their dominating season in their league, going unbeaten to claim the title and a goal difference of +280! In addition to a fantastic league result they went on to have a successful run in the cup finally losing out to Brunel by 1 goal in the semi-finals.

FOUNDLING TEXTILES

SILK RIBBONS TIED IN A BUNCH WITH A KNOT, DESCRIBED AS ‘A BUNCH OF 4 RIBBONS NARROW – YELLOW, BLUE, GREEN, & PINK’. THEY ACCOMPANIED A BABY GIRL LESS THAN TWO MONTHS OLD ADMITTED TO THE LONDON FOUNDLING HOSPITAL ON THE 9TH DECEMBER 1743. SHE WAS GIVEN THE NAME PAMELA TOWNLEY AND THE NUMBER 170. SHE DIED ON THE 1ST SEPTEMBER 1746. © CORAM. IMAGE © LONDON METROPOLITAN ARCHIVES.

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The London Foundling Hospital opened in 1741. When babies were abandoned, their impoverished mothers would often leave a fabric token with the child. These small pieces of fabric were kept by the hospital as a means of identifying the children’s parentage. Professor John Styles, a world expert in early modern textiles, curated an exhibition of these textiles, which was seen by thousands of people in the UK and the US. It was the first time the story of these orphans had been told in this way. The exhibition touched many of its visitors, and inspired many people from textiles professionals to poets. A comment in the visitor book at the US exhibition read: “I drove 14 hours just to see it in Williamsburg and hear the talk by John Styles. It. Was. Amazing.”

Basketball

UH Women's Basketball have been unstoppable this season, achieving a +314 goal difference on their way to the league championship, and subsequently winning their promotion playoffs to secure a Premier South spot next season. They also reached the National Trophy final, defeating Cambridge 61-54 along the way. How did they do it? An overview of the 2015/16 wins and successes -W  omen Basketball 1st BUCS SE 1A, Men’s Basketball 1st BUCS SE 2A, Men’s Cricket (indoor) BUCS SE D, Women’s Hockey 1st BUCS SE 3B, Netball 2nd BUCS SE 3B, Netball 3rd BUCS SE 6B, Men’s Ultimate Frisbee BUCS SE 2B.

-M  en’s Rugby 2nd and Women’s Basketball 1st had successful cup runs making it to the finals of the SE Conference Bowl and the National Trophy respectively. -T  his year our Athletic Union Clubs fundraised a total of £4,492.21 for charitable causes. The Futsal and Rowing clubs raised the greatest total with a sponsored London to Brighton cycle ride and a 24 Hour Row-a-thon respectively. -T  welve students gained international recognition this year in their respective sports. -M  edallists at BUCS Nationals were Charlie Boldison (Swimming) Gold and Silver, Kimberly Woods (Canoe Slalom) Silver, Georgia Llewellyn and Roisian Burnell (Trampolining) Silver and Bryony Dunn (Judo) Bronze. This success follows on from the achievements of 2014/15 -B  ringing home the Varsity trophy, beating local rivals the University of Bedfordshire by 31 points to 16. -M  en’s Badminton 1st, Men’s Badminton 2nd, Women’s Basketball 1st, Men’s Football 2nd, Men’s Football 3rd, Women’s Hockey 1st, Netball 1st, Women’s Tennis 1st and Women’s Volleyball 1st all won their BUCS leagues. -B  oth the Men’s 1st Badminton and Women’s 1st Netball teams promoted to the Premier League after winning their final matches, securing Premier South places for 2015-16, after both winning the SE 1A leagues. -W  omen’s Netball 1st won the BUCS 2014-15 National Trophy. -W  omen’s Basketball 1st won the BUCS 2014-15 South Eastern Conference Cup. -A  merican Football reached the final of the BUCS 2014/15 National Championships, narrowly losing out to the University of Stirling at Allianz Park.

Find out more about Hertfordshire's sporting success at http://www.uhsport.co.uk/.

Sporting benefit Don’t forget that all alumni are eligible for the alumni membership rate at the Hertfordshire Sports Village. This includes unlimited use of the heated 25m pool, state-of-the-art 110 station gym with large free weights area and all studio classes, for only £42 per month. Simply present your alumni membership card at reception to receive your exclusive rate!

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ALUMNI IN F1

THE NEED FOR THE UNIVERSITY OF HERTFORDSHIRE HAS A LONG HISTORY OF SUCCESS IN PRODUCING TALENTED AND KNOWLEDGEABLE GRADUATES WHO ARE HELPING TO SHAPE THE MOTORSPORTS INDUSTRY. AUTOCAR’S ROAD TEST EDITOR AND MECHANICAL ENGINEERING ALUMNUS MATTHEW PRIOR HITS THE ROAD TO CATCH UP WITH OUR ALUMNI WORKING IN SOME OF THE TOP TEAMS.

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ow does the cliché go? ‘Mighty oaks from little acorns grow.’ Little acorn: it’s 1998 and the University of Hertfordshire is making its first entry into Formula Student, in which students make a racing car and compete against other universities. It isn’t going terribly well. The car wins the ‘best presented’ award, but nothing more. Today, UH Automotive Engineering alumnus Tom McCullough, who worked on that first car, remembers it well. “It was a bit last minute, and it wasn’t the best” he says. He can smile about it now, because today things are rather different; rather more ‘mighty oak’ for all concerned. McCullough is now chief engineer at the Sahara Force India F1 team and will lead the team through the 21 races on the 2016 F1 calendar. One of McCullough’s UH teammates from the Formula Student project, Pete Bonnington, will follow a similar regime: he’s now a race engineer at Mercedes-AMG Petronas F1 for reigning world F1 champion Lewis Hamilton. UH has always had a strong engineering hub and a fine reputation in the field, stemming from its first days when it was established as Hatfield Technical College on land donated by the de Havilland Aircraft Company.

THE 2015 E23 LOTUS F1 CAR (CREDIT: LOTUS F1® TEAM)

Its reputation is what led McCullough to Hertfordshire in the first instance. “I was keen to work for an F1 team,” he says, and so he wrote to major race teams before embarking on a university course. Reynard Motorsport, of Brackley, said they’d offer McCullough an industrial placement in his third year. “They pushed me towards Hertfordshire, because they’d had some impressive graduates from there in the past.” “I thought the course was really good,” says McCullough now, of what has since become an increasingly diverse and specialised range of automotive courses UH offers. McCullough’s year, 1998, was the first whose certificates bore the phrase ‘Automotive Engineering’ rather than the stuffier, old-school ‘Mechanical Engineering (Vehicle Option)’. Today you can specialise further: there are also courses in Automotive Technology with Management, Automotive Engineering with Motorsport and Motorsport Technology. But whatever the course, McCullough thought that UH prepared him well for the demands of top-level motorsport, “not just on the theoretical side, but even the non-engineering side like managing resistance to change and so on,” he says. Even today, when advising on team matters that aren’t necessarily within his direct area of expertise, he’s calling on experiences he had 20 years ago.

SPEED... “ I’ve applied so many of the topics that I studied at UH to my short career in F1, and I regularly find myself reaching for those notes from five years ago!

LEE STRETCH, VEHICLES DYNAMIC ENGINEER, FERRARI F1 TEAM, ITALY


ALUMNI IN F1

ALUMNI IN F1

“ It may seem obvious, but hard work really is a key to success. ” JOHN CORRIGAN, ALTRAN LEAD CONSULTANT AT THE LOTUS F1 TEAM

THE FORCE INDIA VJM08, USED TO COMPETE IN THE 2015 FORMULA ONE SEASON (CREDIT: SAHARA FORCE INDIA FORMULA ONE)

He isn’t alone in thinking that the UH course served him well in what’s an exceptionally tough and competitive working environment. John Corrigan, Altran Lead Consultant at the Lotus F1 team and a BSc(Hons) Motorsport Technology graduate in 2010, agrees: “I considered a number of courses at a few different universities,” he says, “and the UH course looked like it was the best all-round one. The extracurricular activities, such as Formula Student, are an essential part of development for a young engineer.” But all the education in the world counts for nothing in motorsport if you aren’t prepared to be diligent. “It may seem obvious, but hard work really is a key to success,” says Corrigan, of

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a career that makes demands like few others: long hours, endless travelling, massively tight deadlines and the finest of lines between winning and losing. “But it’s worth it,” says Corrigan: “I put a lot of effort into my degree to achieve first-class honours. I carried that work ethos into industry, where I’ve lost count of long days and maximum work effort. The effort comes with reward of responsibility and moving forward in your career.” It’s an ethic the University follows, and which has paid off. Once there was a time when buses drove around Hatfield bearing an advert boasting that there was one UH graduate at every British F1 team. Today, UH’s alumni are rather more commonplace in F1, not just throughout the UK, but overseas too.

“I was head hunted by Ferrari for my current position, which was as flattering as it was hard to believe!” says Lee Stretch, who obtained his MEng in Automotive Engineering with Motorsport in only 2011, and last year moved to the famous Italian team. “Having spent three rewarding years at Mercedes-AMG Petronas F1, culminating in the 2014 World Championship, the prospect of a fresh challenge amid Ferrari’s recent struggles was one I could not resist,” he says. The UH Formula Student programme was again key to his success: “It was actually a friend of mine at Ferrari, who I met at Formula Student, who recommended me,” says Stretch, who calls his time at Herts “unforgettable”.

SAHARA FORCE INDIA F1 DRIVER NICO HÜLKENBERG AND ALUMNUS TOM MCCULLOUGH (CREDIT: SAHARA FORCE INDIA FORMULA ONE)

2015 MALAYSIAN GRAND PRIX (CREDIT: SAHARA FORCE INDIA FORMULA ONE)

How does the course relate to work today for him? “I’ve applied so many of the topics that I studied at UH to my short career in F1,” he says, “and I regularly find myself reaching for those notes from five years ago! Despite working in a relatively specialised group of vehicle performance [Stretch is a vehicle dynamics engineer], the needs vary from a sound mechanical understanding, to thermodynamics, to practical design considerations…” While he’s explaining, Stretch inadvertently busts one popular myth we might all remember about engineering students: that they could understand mathematics and physics, but not people. “Communication is paramount above all,” Stretch says of his role in F1. Expressing an idea well, FUTURES | 13


ALUMNI IN F1 so that it’s acted on quickly and correctly, is paramount to success, “so all the report writing, presentation and teamworking skills from the final two years of my degree were hugely beneficial.” Stretch agrees, though, that: “Engineering is hard work! No matter at which university one studies engineering, it is one of the busiest and most demanding degree schedules, and I’ve learnt this generally translates to employment too,” he says.

ALUMNI PROFILE

TRACKSIDE GEMS

2015 MALAYSIAN GRAND PRIX (CREDIT: SAHARA FORCE INDIA FORMULA ONE)

SILVERSTONE STERLING SILVER STUDS

J

THE FORCE INDIA VJM07 USED TO COMPETE IN THE 2014 FORMULA ONE SEASON

Few fields in engineering ask for more effort than motorsport’s top tier, where annual budgets run to hundreds of millions of pounds and yet lap-time differences are measured to the thousandth of a second. UH ably prepares those to become the mighty oaks of the F1 world. And Formula Student? That’s not doing so badly either. Today UH is the most successful British Formula Student team of all time.

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FIND OUT MORE ABOUT UH RACING THROUGH ITS SOCIAL MEDIA CHANNELS ON FACEBOOK AND YOUTUBE, AND BY FOLLOWING @ UHRACING ON TWITTER.

ust like adding bacon to pancakes and maple syrup, there are lots of combinations that, on paper, shouldn’t work, but are actually a brilliant collaboration. One of these is motorsports and jewellery. Not the most obvious of partnerships, but one that celebrity jeweller and alumna Alyssa Smith, BA(Hons) Applied Arts with Marketing 2008, has proved is a real success. Collaborating with presenter Suzi Perry, to create the smith&perry line, Alyssa is now on her second motorsport collection which features track charms, cufflinks, earrings and necklaces. “Creating a collection together was something that Suzi and I had talked about for a few years. When she got the job as a new motorsport presenter, it seemed the perfect time to collaborate and come up with a range of jewellery that reflected her passion for the motor industry, and my creative talents as the jewellery design and maker.” In creating the collection, Alyssa relied upon feedback from her customers

and motorsport fans to ensure that her designs hit the mark. “I’d love to be able to entirely take the credit for the collections, but a lot more goes into the designing of them than you would think! Brainstorming with customers is essential; who better to help me design jewellery pieces than

Alyssa Smith in her studio

Monaco charm

the people who will be buying them?” The collection is a philanthropic one and all profits go to Promise Dreams, of which Suzi is a Patron, raising money for children who are seriously or terminally ill, providing treatment, help and support. “We’ve raised over £10,000 for Promise Dreams children’s charity, which we are over the moon about! When we were working on the original designs, we thought it would be great to donate profits from each piece sold to a children’s charity, as it’s really important to give something back. Now, everyone who wears a piece from the collection can also say that they’ve helped support something really great.” The future looks bright for smith&perry with more designs planned for the collection, as well as a potential move into soft accessories and widening to include other sports. As Alyssa summarised: “When the world is your oyster, why would you ever want to stop?” www.alyssasmith.co.uk FUTURES | 15


CREATIVE

THE ART OF

READING FOR ARTIST JO HOWE, BA(HONS) GRAPHIC DESIGN 2004 AND MA GRAPHIC COMMUNICATION 2005, A BOOK IS SO MUCH MORE THAN WORDS ON A PAGE.

S

he sees books as sculptural objects, and has focused her practice upon reworking old manuscripts to allow ‘readers’ new experiences of these familiar objects. Text is difficult to read, if not entirely absent, in the resulting unique and beautiful sculptures, allowing Jo to create new meanings and alternative narratives from the selected books. The act of reading is important in Jo’s work, and she plays upon this personal experience: “Reading is an act of coauthorship. When you pick up a book and read it, what you bring to that process is your own personal history. “I select materials carefully by considering the aesthetic quality of text and relevance of the book’s title. Working with old manuscripts that bear the physical imperfections and aromas of past human handling, and thus retain their human presence, is essential.” As well as being an artist, Jo also works in schools and co-runs the Funky Pie Company, which delivers courses for young people with special needs, utilising a range of skills, including stop motion and digital animation, photography and creative journaling. She is also a Director and Trustee for Digswell Arts Trust. www.howeunique.co.uk

MEMORY

CAN YOU HEAR ME NOW (PHOTO COURTESY OF ROGER DOREY)

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OXYMORON

ECHOES OF FRAGRANT VOICES

A SPOONFUL OF SUGAR

“ I select materials carefully by

considering the aesthetic quality of text and relevance of the book’s title. Working with old manuscripts that bear the physical imperfections and aromas of past human handling, and thus retain their human presence, is essential.

FUTURES | 17


CAREERS AND EMPLOYMENT

NEW BEGINNINGS WHATEVER STAGE OF YOUR CAREER, STARTING A NEW JOB BRINGS WITH IT EXCITEMENT AND TREPIDATION. TO HELP YOU GET OVER THE INITIAL PITFALLS, DONALD LUSH FROM THE CAREERS, EMPLOYMENT AND ENTERPRISE SERVICE SHARES HIS TOP TIPS FOR A SUCCESSFUL FIRST SIX MONTHS. AT THE BEGINNING OF MY CAREER I WORKED FOR THE LORD CHANCELLOR’S DEPARTMENT. ONE MORNING, EARLY IN MY TIME THERE, I ACCIDENTALLY PUNCHED A HOLE IN AN ORIGINAL WILL.

So, how can they be avoided? The exciting moment when you are offered your ideal job is not an ending, it’s a beginning. Your first task is to learn your new role. Make that your priority in the first six months and you stand a good chance of avoiding most of the traps. Does your new employer use software you’ve never seen before? Will you be meeting customers or partners who want clear presentations in the house style? Are there administrative processes that are unfamiliar to you? If there’s something you’ll need to do but don’t know how, start learning, as fast as you can. In any new job your colleagues will act, almost from your first day, as though you know how the organisation works. By this I mean who’s important, how decisions get taken, who you can approach and who to avoid. This goes under the general umbrella of “culture” and the best definition I’ve seen is “how things get done around here”. This is not usually written down. Even if it is, there is usually an unofficial culture that will be the “real” way things get done. Talk to lots of people and listen carefully and it will soon become clear. This will help you work without offending sensibilities or attempting the impossible. Don’t be afraid to ask for help either. The single worst

mistake is pretending you know things you don’t. You will quickly get caught out. Ask questions, a lot. As a newcomer, you have the benefit of a new pair of eyes and your questions should be as valuable to your new employer as they are to you. You also need to know what’s expected of you. What are your goals and targets? When should they be delivered and how will be they measured? It sounds obvious but if you don’t know what you’re supposed to do, you are very unlikely to do it. Misery loves company and it’s easy to join in with office gossips. Remember – if they are grumbling about other people they will soon be doing the same about you. Don’t engage in this negative and destructive behaviour. If you have a problem, discuss it confidentially with your manager or someone you trust. How about the future? Think about moving on from your lovely new job. This may sound odd, but it’s a way of understanding its value. If you know where you are going next you are likely to be clearer about what you need to learn in the role, making your experience rewarding and enjoyable. And finally, make sure you know what you’re doing before you pick up that hole-punch!

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colleague saw what I had done and reacted as though I had committed murder, burglary and fraud all at once. I was bemused – why the concern about a small hole in a piece of paper? I quickly found out why it was important: a hole in a Will might suggest that, at some point, there was a document attached that changed it. Auntie’s millions might have been destined for someone other than the Battersea Dogs & Cats Home after all. To fix the problem I had to write an affidavit (essentially, a confession of my crime) and swear an oath so the Will could not be challenged. Needless to say, my embarrassment was thoroughly exploited by my new colleagues and it took me some time to live it down. This was my second job after graduating and despite all I had learned at university and in four years working with a local authority, this experience taught me a valuable lesson: joining a new organisation, at any point in your career, can still have its pitfalls.

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“ The exciting moment when you

are offered your ideal job is not an ending, it's a beginning. Your first task is to learn your new role.

FUTURES | 19


ALUMNI PROFILE

IN AT THE

END DEEP

THERE’S A SAYING ALONG THE LINES OF ‘FIND A JOB YOU LOVE AND YOU’LL NEVER HAVE TO WORK ANOTHER DAY IN YOUR LIFE’. AS I STAND BEHIND THE SCENES OF THE AQUARIUM IN ZSL LONDON ZOO TALKING TO ALUMNA RACHEL JONES: BSC(HONS) ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES, 1992 THAT QUOTE COMES TO MIND. RACHEL IS ENTHUSIASTIC, PASSIONATE AND INSPIRING AND I QUESTION WHETHER I’VE EVER MET SOMEONE WHO CARES AS MUCH ABOUT THEIR WORK AS SHE DOES.

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achel is the team leader at the Zoo’s Aquarium, a fearless campaigner for conservation and an Environmental Studies graduate of Hatfield Polytechnic. After graduating in 1992, Rachel spent a short time working in marketing “to pay the bills” but it was her Masters degree at Imperial College London that marked the beginning of her career with ZSL London Zoo. “The course at Hatfield was so well respected nationally and that enabled me to get into Imperial – everyone else was from Oxford, Cambridge or St. Andrews. I did my masters research project at the ZSL Institute of Zoology and I got friendly with the bug people here. They secured a contract to breed native crickets and I was hired to work on the project for the summer. A permanent position then came up as a trainee keeper and 19 years later, I’m still here!”

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A typical day for Rachel starts with a 7.30am arrival before she briefs her team of seven keepers at 8am to discuss the day ahead. She then begins her daily walk around the Aquarium, studying every tank and animal for signs of health issues: “Working with animals is amazing but it takes a particular type of person to do it because you see the same thing every day, yet you have to be able to notice any changes, even tiny ones.” Built almost 100 years ago, the Grade II listed Aquarium is home to over 300 different species across three conservation themes: rare freshwater fish, native seahorse species and corals from the Indian and Pacific Oceans (the Aquarium boasts the largest and most diverse coral collection in the country). “Many of the species we have in the

Aquarium are endangered or extinct in the wild so my day also involves making sure that there are enough fish of any one species and deciding whether we need to create new populations. Their future depends on us and we have to make sure the next generation comes through every single year.” As our conversation progresses to the subject of animal endangerment, Rachel reinforces the fact that although the Zoo is for enjoyment, its core purpose is conservation. “It’s something our organisation has been doing for hundreds of years and we do it well. Entertaining is part of what we’re about but the bottom line is that we’re making a difference to the lives of endangered species and trying to get other people to help us do that.

“We’re at the beginning of the sixth mass extinction event in the planet’s history and we’re losing species incredibly quickly. If you want people to change their behaviour and support the conservation of animals and their habitats then you’ve got to get them involved and you’ve got to enable them to see animals up close, watch them and get excited about them.” Rachel’s progression from a keeper to team leader has meant that her job now involves more overseas fieldwork. Last year Rachel was in Turkmenistan collecting DNA samples from a blind cavefish and in 2010 she was instrumental in the successful campaign to have the Chagos Archipelago declared a protected marine reserve, a project she is incredibly proud of and has led her to an additional role as Trustee of the Chagos Conservation Trust. Looking back on her time at Hatfield, Rachel has fond memories: “I had a great time. I met friends who are still my main group of friends today and I’m lucky because I do the thing that I’m most interested in. My degree taught me skills that I still use every single day.” Siobhan Madaras

ALUMNA RACHEL JONES IN THE AQUARIUM AT ZSL LONDON ZOO (PHOTOS COURTESY OF WILL AMLOT)

FUTURES | 21


COMMENT

FOOD FOR THOUGHT WITH THE WORLD'S POPULATION RAPIDLY INCREASING AND DEMAND FOR FOOD SET TO DOUBLE BY 2050, THE FUTURE OF FOOD SECURITY IS A VERY REAL ISSUE. VICE-CHANCELLOR PROFESSOR QUINTIN MCKELLAR CBE EXAMINES SOME OF THE KEY ISSUES AND SOLUTIONS. IN EARLY 2015 IT BECAME APPARENT THAT ALDI AND LIDL HAD OUTPERFORMED THEIR MORE EXPENSIVE COMPETITORS IN THE PREVIOUS YEAR, AND IMPORTANTLY OVER THE CHRISTMAS PERIOD.

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oincidentally commodity prices, including wheat and rice, had spiralled downwards on the back of plummeting oil costs, and farmers were receiving 22 pence a litre for their milk; less than they did ten years previously and enough to drive 60 farmers out of the dairy business each week! What does this mean? Well, it could be fair to conclude that consumers buy ‘cheap’ and that quality is a secondary consideration. It could also be fair to suggest that we need not worry about going short of food as we can buy what we need cheaply on the international markets and transport it efficiently to our shores. Five years ago milk was selling in our supermarkets for 67.4 pence a litre, and Perrier sparkling water for 94 pence per litre. Milk is now 44 pence a litre and Perrier sparkling water £1.30 per litre. There is a particular perversity to

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this since it takes 1,000 litres of water to grow the food and supply the drink for a cow to produce each litre of milk – just as well she doesn’t drink Perrier! Of course, this could all change very quickly: in 2008 a drought in the great bread baskets of the world, the US prairies, the Ukrainian steppes and the Brazilian Mato Grosso, caused a spike in food prices, inciting riots in 15 countries across the globe and causing at least one government to topple. According to the Met Office there is a 70% chance that the world will experience ‘El Niño’ this year. The climate changes associated are likely to affect southern Hemisphere countries most, and thus the products we derive from these markets such as palm oil, rice and sugar, and, of course, we might expect coffee to double in price! Our own ‘just in time’ supply chain means that we have about 12 days of grocery supplies in our shops, and if it takes eight days between first shortage and first riots, as has been suggested, then the opportunity for calamity is very real. So what should we do about it? Hedge our bets, maintain the great trade in food stuffs which provides the variety and competition essential to our markets and groceries, but also become

the world’s technological hotbed of agricultural production. We must grow the crops and rear the animals to which our climate, latitude, terrain, soils and workforce are best suited, and do it better than anywhere else. To do this we shall have to harness the intellect of next-generation agriculturists, give them the vision, spark their curiosity and ignite their dynamism. That is what the Sustainable Agriculture and Food Security degree programmes at the University of Hertfordshire will do. Please join us in this endeavour.

INTERNATIONAL ALUMNI

NEWS ROUND-UP THE PAST YEAR HAS BEEN AN EXCITING TIME FOR OUR GLOBAL ALUMNI COMMUNITY, WHICH COMPRISES OVER 25,000 ALUMNI IN 180 COUNTRIES SPREAD ACROSS THE GLOBE. Since June 2015 we have held 11 international alumni events, and have a further 5 coming up in 2016. LAHORE AND ISLAMABAD, PAKISTAN:

Over 70 alumni and friends attended two dinners in Pakistan hosted by Stuart Smith, Head of International Recruitment, and Akif Khan, Marketing Manager for Pakistan.

February 2016

23

January 2016 DELHI, INDIA:

12 alumni and friends attended a dinner held in Delhi and hosted by Dr Shivani Sharma from the School of Life and Medical Sciences, and Rajat Jhalani (MBA, 1996), Hertfordshire Alumni Ambassador for India.

14 alumni and friends met up for a dinner event at the EKO Hotel in Lagos, hosted by one of our International Recruitment team, James Perrin.

October 2015

October 2015

NEW DELHI, INDIA:

LAGOS, NIGERIA:

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09

9 alumni and friends joined Donald McLeod, Deputy Director of Marketing and Communications, at a meal for alumni.

Professor James Jenkins, Associate Dean International for the School of Life and Medical Sciences, hosted a dinner for 14 alumni in Hong Kong.

December 2015

November 2015

20 alumni met in Kuala Lumpur hosted by Mimi Tessier, Associate Dean International for the School of Humanities, and Peter Thomas, Mass Communications Programme Tutor.

HONG KONG, CHINA:

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14

KUALA LUMPUR, MALAYSIA: The Centre for Agriculture, Food and Environmental Management combines internationally-recognised expertise from four partner institutions – the University of Hertfordshire, the Royal Veterinary College (RVC), Rothamsted Research and Oaklands College – to lead research into some of the most pressing issues affecting every aspect of food production, from farm to table, as well as educating the next generation of agriculture and food chain specialists. For more information on Food Security, including how you can support it, please email development@herts.ac.uk.

08 12

20 May 2015

SHANGHAI, CHINA:

Dr Lynn Trodd, Associate Dean (International) and Leo Chivers (Senior Lecturer) from the School of Education were hosted at English restaurant ‘Notting Hill’ by a group of 15 recent graduates.

ARE YOU INTERESTED IN AN EXCITING AND REWARDING VOLUNTARY ROLE, REPRESENTING ALUMNI FROM YOUR COUNTRY? JOIN OUR GLOBAL COMMUNITY OF INTERNATIONAL ALUMNI AMBASSADORS TO: • stay in contact with alumni in your country • grow your social and professional networks • expand your career opportunities • give back to UH with your time and local knowledge • meet prospective students from your country INTERNATIONAL WORK PLACEMENTS FOR CURRENT HERTFORDSHIRE STUDENTS We are looking for international alumni who live outside the UK and are able to offer within their organisation, or know of an organisation who would be able to offer, a year-long placement (minimum 36 weeks) to a current Hertfordshire student as part of their degree course. If you would like to discuss this opportunity further please contact Felicity Bond (details below). CONGRATULATIONS TO: Emmanual Adejoh (Electrical Engineering, 2011, Nigeria) whose business, Novateur Integrated Solutions was awarded the International Star for Quality (ISAQ) Award for leadership, quality and excellence in Geneva on 19th September 2015. Anna Skodbo (Fashion, 2010, UK/Norway) whose clothing line Phannatiq Ltd was featured in Vogue, Glamour, the Evening Standard and numerous other nationwide publications after launching her online shop last year. Wilson Yuen (Applied Computing, 1997, Hong Kong) whose company TFI Digital Media has been included in the Technology and Digital section of Debrett’s Hong Kong Top 100. Lee Zhiang (Dexter), (Mass Communications, 2015, Malaysia) Winner of the Ignite Flare Award for his outstanding final year website design project. For all queries regarding our international alumni programme, please contact Felicity Bond, Alumni Relations Officer (International). f.bond@herts.ac.uk tel: +44(0)1707 284 587

FUTURES | 23


INTERNATIONAL PROFILE

TRANSFORMATIONAL

TECHNOLOGY INSPIRATIONAL IS A WORD THAT GETS FREQUENTLY OVERUSED. AND YET, WHEN YOU SPEAK TO SOMEONE LIKE ALUMNA FARIDA BEDWEI, BSc(Hons) COMPUTER SCIENCE, 1992 YOU REALISE THAT SOMETIMES IT IS THE ONLY WORD THAT IS FITTING.

IN TODAY’S CROWDED MARKETPLACE, SETTING UP A SUCCESSFUL, ETHICAL TECHNOLOGY BUSINESS THAT IS COMMITTED TO DELIVERING ION CAPT TECHNOLOGICAL SOLUTIONS TO FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS ACROSS GHANA AND THE SUBSAHARAN AFRICA IS PRETTY IMPRESSIVE.

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owever, when the co-founder and Chief Technology Officer also has cerebral palsy, particularly in a country where disability is stigmatised, you start to understand the strength, resolve and passion that fuels Farida. For Farida, computers were a lifeline whilst she was still a child. ‘Because of my disability I had difficulty writing. Before computers were widely available I used a manual typewriter, which meant that as computers became more commonplace, I was already able to type.’ Technology continued to be an enabler for Farida, even as she set about making her mark in a male-dominated field, in a country where persons with disabilities are stigmatised. ‘Having a disability was more problematic for me than being a woman. However, I did what I needed to in order to achieve my goals. I had to work harder – but physically, not mentally. In that way computers evened the playing field, as there was no need for physical strength.’ As technology advanced, so did Farida’s interest and she began studying Computer Science at the University of

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Hertfordshire, having already completed two diplomas and after five years’ work experience as a developer. She explains: ‘Despite my skills and knowledge, these weren’t recognised in Ghana – I needed a degree. Having my qualification put me on a higher level and really boosted my CV.’ Despite all of the positives that technological advancement can bring, Farida is wary of losing the human interaction. ‘Even though the world has become a smaller place through technology, we have to ensure that we don’t lose touch. It’s too easy when you’re sitting in an office to email someone, rather than to get up and see them.’ Farida is passionate about using technology to help support those who are economically disadvantaged, and her values are woven into her company, Logiciel, which seeks to help the rural poor and low-income earners through transformational technology. She believes that knowing why you want to start a company is crucial to all entrepreneurs. ‘If you want to set up a company just to make money, then stop. It has to be about contributing positively to help improve society.’ She also believes that you have to know both yourself and your clients well in order to be successful. ‘You must know who your target market is and understand it, as you are not going to be your own client. Plus, not everyone can be an entrepreneur – you have to know what is best for you.’ Part of Farida’s vision is to have a cashless society, and she is committed to developing new solutions and ideas to support the financial needs of everyday Ghanaian people. By supporting the micro-financing industry, Farida hopes to reduce fraud and

ensure that loans get to the people who really need them. Her ‘side job’ continues to be promoting the rights of those with disabilities and trying to remove the stigma that surrounds them. The publication of her 2010 book, Definition Of A Miracle, was part of that. The fictional story of Zaara and her family, who move from the UK to Ghana when she is eight,

“You must know who your target market are and understand them, as you are not going to be your own client. Plus, not everyone can be an entrepreneur – you have to know what is best for you.

has many parallels with Farida’s life and experiences. ‘I was tired of the perceptions of disability and wanted to do something to change them, as well as inspire others. I hope I achieved it.’ If others’ views are anything to go by, then Farida is certainly on the right track, as she was named as the winning candidate for Ghana in the 2013/14 Africa’s Most Influential Women in Business and Government Awards. It remains to be seen what 2016 holds, but if her past achievements are anything to go by Farida’s success knows no boundaries. Louise Barnes FUTURES | 25


UH PRESS

LOCAL HISTORY WHAT DOES ‘LOCAL HISTORY’ MEAN? IS IT THE HISTORY OF THE AREA IMMEDIATELY AROUND YOU – WHAT’S

LOCAL TO YOU? THAT’S CERTAINLY ONE INTERPRETATION OF THE TERM BUT IT CAN ALSO REFER TO WHAT’S LOCAL TO OTHER PEOPLE. ACADEMIC LOCAL HISTORY IS CONCERNED WITH LIMITED GEOGRAPHICAL AREAS, SOME AS SMALL AS A SINGLE VILLAGE.

UH

Press specialises in both sorts of local history. We publish many books on Hertfordshire’s history, of which a key text is the Historical Atlas of Hertfordshire (2011). It contains more than 80 articles on aspects of the county’s history, each accompanied by a revealing map. From the bedrock of geology, the Atlas builds up, layer by layer, into a detailed survey: boundaries, buildings (including ice-houses, prisons and cinemas), roads, population, work (from straw-plaiting to the pharmaceutical industry), religion, culture and war. How many books tell you about the history of rabbit warrens alongside that of local convicts sent to Australia and the Civil War? A look through the Historical Atlas could send you off to explore other areas of Hertfordshire history: perhaps to Eileen Wallace’s Children of the Labouring Poor to read about how children as young as seven or eight were exploited in nineteenthcentury Hertfordshire. Or if you’re more interested in the history of places, you might dip into Hertfordshire: A landscape history, a superb study by Anne Rowe and Tom Williamson.

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Meanwhile if you’re interested in what lies buried in the soil, we have just published Archaeology in Hertfordshire: Recent research, edited by Kris Lockyear, an archaeologist at UCL and Director of Welwyn Archaeological Society. Defining an area of interest quite precisely opens up opportunities to explore changes over time or to take a holistic view of the way that different influences combine to create change. If a single town or area can be studied in great detail, it may be possible to link up, say, political, social, economic and cultural history in a highly rewarding way.

W. G. Hoskins is widely regarded as the 'father' of local history as an academic subject in the UK. His book, The Making of the English Landscape, first published in 1955, is still much read today.

Recently published in March 2016 is The Peaceful Path, a new history of Hertfordshire's Garden Cities and New Towns by Stephen Ward. Letchworth and Welwyn Garden City are unique as the only two towns to be built under the direct influence of Ebenezer Howard and his vision of towns where homes, workplaces and green spaces would be in harmonious balance. Stevenage and Hatfield also have fascinating histories as New Towns founded after WWII and underpinned by a belief in planning as the way to overcome the problems of London’s inner-city slums.

Hoskins encouraged the use of source material such as parish registers and probate inventories to reveal details of 'ordinary life' and was in the vanguard of social history's move away from a focus on the upper classes. He was also instrumental in bridging the gap that had opened up between 'amateur' historians and professional scholars within universities. The rift had grown up during the second half of the nineteenth century, when many new universities were built and history evolved rapidly as an academic discipline, moving away from its roots in the private researches of 'antiquarians'. These were individuals who indulged a passion for investigating the history

of their own places, often as a way of adding gloss to their families and homes. University scholars turned to 'bigger' issues of nations, wars and politics while antiquarians were lampooned as parochial old fools. 'Local' history was tainted by association with the antiquarians and it took around a century for academic interest in the activities of ordinary people in towns and the countryside to be fully established. From deserted villages to the food and drink consumed by medieval monasteries; from Essex during WWII to hop cultivation in Kent (all topics we’ve published books on), local history is an exciting – and closely focused – lens on the past. For full details of all our local history titles, please visit our website at www.herts.ac.uk/uhpress. Jane Housham

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FUNDRAISING

EMEDY

ROBOTIC

IN RECENT YEARS A KEY FUNDRAISING PRIORITY FOR THE UNIVERSITY OF HERTFORDSHIRE HAS BEEN KASPAR – A CHILD-SIZED, SOCIALLY INTERACTIVE ROBOT THAT ENHANCES THE SOCIAL AND EDUCATIONAL DEVELOPMENT OF CHILDREN WITH AUTISM, ENABLING THEM TO FULFIL THEIR TRUE POTENTIAL. With new data indicating that 1 in every 100 children in the UK is on the autistic spectrum, it really is an essential area of work. Whilst phase one of the project came to a close in 2015, there is still a way to go to ensure that KASPAR can continue to be used to support individuals with autism around the world. The focus now is to see the use of KASPAR by teachers and parents themselves, enabling long-term engagement for children. However, KASPAR is just one example of how University of Hertfordshire researchers are using robotics to tackle some of the key issues in society today. The University of Hertfordshire’s Adaptive Systems Research Group focuses its work on artificial life and rehabilitation and assistive robotics, with expertise in neuro-rehabilitation robots, robot-assisted play, and socially assistive robots. The University’s application of such robotic technology in therapy impacts upon a wide range of people with differing needs, enabling them to lead more independent lives. In addition to KASPAR, there are two other priority projects using robotics in therapy: •R  obotic stroke rehabilitation glove: A glove that stroke sufferers can use in their own home to support rehabilitation and personal independence in receiving therapies. •R  obin the Diabetes Robot: A robot programmed to display the symptoms of diabetes to teach young children recently diagnosed with diabetes how to manage their condition themselves. This important work requires funding, however. This is where you could make a real difference. Supporting the University’s Robotics in Therapy campaign will

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Donation Form

Please complete and return this form to: Development and Alumni Relations, University of Hertfordshire, Hatfield, Hertfordshire AL10 9AB.

Your Details Title: ____________________________________________

Name: __________________________________________

Address: ________________________________________

Telephone: _______________________________________

________________________________________________

Email: __________________________________________

________________________________________________

Date of birth:_________________________________________

________________

Postcode:

Alumni No: _______________________________________

Yes, I would like to give to the University of Hertfordshire. Please direct my gift towards: Food Security

Robotics in Therapy

Enterprise Fund

University Student Trust Fund

Where most needed

Single Donation I would like to make a gift of £ ________ to the University of Hertfordshire. I enclose a cheque made payable to: “UH Trust” OR please debit my:

Visa

MasterCard

Switch/Maestro

Card No. Start Date:

/

Expiry Date:

/

Visa Debit

Issue No. (if applicable)

Card Security No.

Signature: ________________________________

Leaving a Legacy

enable innovative healthcare solutions to be developed, securing care and therapy for future generations. For more information on how you could support the University of Hertfordshire’s Robotics in Therapy campaign please call 01707 285850 and speak to one of the Development team, or email development@herts.ac.uk. WHY I GIVE It’s funny, I never thought of myself as a big charity giver or as “philanthropic” per se. I now give back, via both my money and my time, to be part, once again, of this exciting and successful venture, to feel reconnected and to feel rewarded. It’s a great feeling knowing your contribution enables others to achieve their goals and even dreams. Although my contribution is small, I am sure that the cumulative impact of the donations of time and money to the more discretionary activities of the University is enormous. I want to ask you, my fellow graduates, to join me and help support the University and its key projects, in any way you can. In life, you don’t get many chances to be part of something so fulfilling and gratifying, especially for institutions that mean so much to you too. Darren Mark Noyce, BSc(Hons) Combined Studies, 1991

Leaving a gift in your Will to the University and joining the Sir Geoffrey de Havilland Socity will support our future and is a tax efficient way of giving. Please send me further information about remembering the University in my Will.

Acknowledgment In any public acknowledgments, please list me/us in the following way: _________________________________________________________________________ (if different to above) I/we wish to be an anonymous donor.

Gift Aid declaration – for past, present & future donations Please treat as Gift Aid donations all qualifying gifts of money made: (please tick all boxes you wish to apply) Today

In the past 4 years

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I confirm I have paid or will pay an amount of Income Tax and/or Capital Gains Tax for each tax year (6 April to 5 April) that is at least equal to the amount of tax that all the charities that I donate to will reclaim on my gifts for that tax year. I understand that other taxes such as VAT and Council Tax do not qualify. I understand that using Gift Aid means that for every pound I give, the University of Hertfordshire will reclaim 25p of tax on every £1 that I give on or after 6 April 2008.

Signature: _________________________________________________ Date: __________________________ !

Under the Data Protection Act (1998), UH Development and Alumni Relations will hold your personal information securely and in line with the University’s Policies and Regulations (UPRs) in particular UPR IM08 - Data Protection and UPR IM16 - Data Management Policy, and it will not be passed to a third party. The information provided may be used for events programmes, alumni activities, fundraising programmes and for the promotion of benefits and services which may involve an element of direct marketing. If you do not wish your information to be used in this way, please write to: Development and Alumni Relations, University of Hertfordshire, Hatfield, Hertfordshire AL10 9AB. Alternatively, you can email us at: development@herts.ac.uk

FUTURES | 29


ALUMNI INSIGHTS

THE SECTION DEDICATED TO YOU Being one of our alumni is what each of you has in common. Even though your experiences and memories of your time studying with us will be different – whether it was at the University, jolly Poly or Technical College – we are here to help you stay in contact with Hertfordshire. We offer a range of benefits and discounts to you, some of those from your fellow graduates are displayed later on in this section. Let us know if you want to organise a reunion or come back on to campus, and we’ll keep you up to date with the latest news from the University and your fellow alumni. Keep in contact – we’d love to hear from you! IN THIS ISSUE: • Reunions and events • Alumni Yearbook • Alumni business and discounts

Alumni Insight Network Interested in supporting our students in the first stage of their career? Through the Alumni Insight Network you can share your knowledge and experience of the job market and talk about your current role. You can give back and help students in a range of ways, depending on what suits you and your availability. Let us know if you’re interested in:

ALUMNI INSIGHTS

REUNIONS &

EVENTS

Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia reunions – October 2015 Over 20 alumni who studied Mass Communications met for a tea in Kuala Lumpur hosted by Mimi Tessier, Associate Dean International and Peter Thomas, Mass Communications Programme Tutor, both from the School of Humanities.

• speaking to students at subject or sector careers talks and events, or as part of course modules • speaking to prospective students at open days • offering placements, internships or work shadowing/ experience • recruiting students and recent graduates

Were you a student at Wall Hall in the 1950s?

Find out more about getting involved by emailing alumni@herts. ac.uk or calling us on +44 (0)1707 281145.

Canoe Club 45th anniversary For many of us the legacy of being a student at the University of Hertfordshire was not only academic; many lasting friendships, and in some cases families, started in Hatfield and other associated campuses. The University of Hertfordshire Canoe Club, or as many of us more fondly remember it, the Hatfield Poly Canoe Club, has supported this by organising regular reunions over the years that link the generations of students from the originators in the late 60s through to the current intake. In 2015 we celebrated the 45th anniversary of the club and this was marked with a reunion held at the Baskerville Hall Hotel near Hay-onWye. A large group of ex and current students made the journey to meet old friends, share a few drinks, spin tall tales of epic river journeys and, more poignantly, to remember some no longer with us. A group paddle on the River Wye was organised on the Saturday and

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although it wasn’t the high-octane white water that we may have done in the past, a more sedate journey was probably more apt for many of us. Some wet suits and buoyancy aids were definitely a bit tighter than we remember. The weekend was a great success but it does rely on staying in contact with older members. The next one will be the 50th so we want to make it as big as possible. If you were connected to the Canoe Club and would be interested in receiving details of future events please contact HPCCUHCC@ gmail.com. In memory of Rosie Cherry and Paul West.

Lagos, Nigeria reunion November 2015 14 alumni and friends met up for a dinner event at the EKO Hotel in Lagos. The event was hosted by James Perrin, University of Hertfordshire International Officer, and Karo Ughwubrusi (MSc Management, 2012), Alumni Ambassador for the region.

Joan Nunn (formerly Moss), who studied at the Wall Hall campus from 1955-1957, recently organised the 17th reunion of her classmates at the Grosvenor Hotel in London. The group met to reminisce about the good old days, share photos and talk about their lives since graduation. Of the fifteen that made the event, 5 had become deputy or head teachers which is testament to them and the education they received! Joan is already looking forward to the next meeting on 15th March 2017 when many of them will be celebrating their 80th birthdays. If you studied with Joan at Wall Hall and would like to get in contact with her, please email alumni@herts.ac.uk

DATES FOR YOUR DIARY School of Creative Arts’ End of Year exhibition 31 May – 3 June 2016 15 years of Sports Therapy conference and reunion 10 June 2016 Applied Biology Class of 1986 – 30 year reunion 16 July 2016

FUTURES | 31


ALUMNI INSIGHTS

1960s

equipment, working on mobile phone test systems. My son also graduated Professor Bryan from the University too with a 1st class Walker – Head degree in Games & Graphics Hardware of Pharmacology, Technology. A lot has changed since my 1964 time at Hatfield Poly but it was great too 15 years as Head to see that one or two of my lecturers of Pharmacology, are still teaching! six years as Her Majesty's Janice Nichola Taylor (nee Powell) Inspector of Industrial Engineering, 1986 Higher Education, two years as a It has been a long time, but I have Director of an International Director of married and become the mother of an International Engineering company, one daughter. Started out working then 20 years in Africa, Asia and Europe as a graduate engineer, had a few job as an aid worker with Oxfam, UN changes until I decided to study again and VSO. Now I write humanitarian and start my own business, Blue Sky literature for websites and other books. Career Consulting, coaching and I would love to hear from students and training with adults who want to move colleagues of those days (1964 - 1984 forward with their careers. walkerun@gmail.com).

ALUMNI INSIGHTS Andrew Males Computer Science, 1994

In April 2015, I had my humorous novel "26 Miles to the Moon" published by Britain's Next Bestseller. Inspired by the three marathons I've run, it's a far cry from my current job as a Business Analyst. Fame and fortune await. Or maybe just obscurity!

helped another artist Chris Dilger to publish a comic art book called Fag Art to raise money for Harlington Hospice. Still exhibit with my wife Yvonne who graduated along with me at UofH. Malcolm Chalk Humanities, 2002

I have become a registered nurse and work in the emergency department in Weston General Hospital. In December 2014 I volunteered and was part of the second deployment to Sierra Leone as an NHS nurse looking after confirmed Ebola patients at the Kerry Town Ebola treatment centre for Save the Children.

ALUMNI

YEARBOOK

FIND OUT WHAT YOUR FELLOW GRADUATES HAVE BEEN UP TO SINCE LEAVING HERTFORDSHIRE

1970s

John James Stuart Computer Science, 1972

Went to work for ICL at Stevenage, got moved to Manchester in 1975. Worked on test/support software for all 'New Range' systems until 2002 when, following a serious illness I moved to Warrington (Company had by now adopted owner Fujitsu's name) working on Application Packaging for Windows systems. Expecting to retire later this year (after 43 years with the same Company!).

1980s

Maxine Bromyard Computer Science, 1980

I’ve spent 21 years developing data communications software. For the last 14 years I have been with Anritsu, manufacturer of test and measurement

32 | FUTURES

1990s

Stephen Bowes-Phipps Business & Computing, 1993

Travelled the world implementing software, worked for banks and payment processing organisations, jumped into the dot-com boom of 2000-2001 and fell out the other side with a two year spell of redundancy. Worked at UH for 7 years and now working as a leading expert on Green IT and Data Centres at a consultancy in London.

Jeries Sarji Civil Engineering, 1999

I worked as a Civil Engineer for three years. In 2003, I decided to start managing special projects with foreign companies. I am married to my beloved wife and have one boy and two daughters. I now work in an international company and I am proud to tell people I went to the University of Hertfordshire!

2000s

Ian Nimmo Watson Fine Art, 2002

Some years of teaching mainly with adults with difficulties and disabilities and also with schools workshops in papermaking and sculpture. Helped establish an artist network group called Hillingdonartists. Published some illustrated children's books. Recently

Katie English Electronic Music, 2004

Professionally I work for Northern Broadsides Theatre Company and also write and perform music in various bands as well as my solo work under the name Isnaj Dui. My solo work was recently featured in Wire magazine. I moved from London to West Yorkshire at the start of last year and am really enjoying it! Janareddy Mandadi Pharmacology, 2005

Worked as a product development scientist in Pfizer CRC and as assistant manager in United Health Groups. Working as a pharmacist in Peckmans pharmacy in New Jersey. Chris Williams Business Studies, 2005

Initially fell into recruitment after graduating and progressed to recruiting for LOCOG (the organising committee for the London 2012 Olympics). Took a "perm" role within their HR team in 2009 and stayed through to the dissolution of the organisation in 2013.

Championship in 2015. Since then have been working for the organisers of the 2015 Rugby World Cup! Debra Lalloo Computer Science, 2008

I have changed fields twice since graduating as I was an Immigration Officer for approximately three years. After which I joined the Foreign Service in my country and currently hold the position of Foreign Service Officer.

2010s Sarah Rya LLB, 2010

I found a job at a legal education charity on the Uni's job search page which at that time was called jobsnetplus. I started there within a month of finishing my degree. I then trained as a barrister at the University of Law (BPTC course) and I'm now employed in private practice specialising in Commercial, Civil Litigation and Employment. I have never been unemployed since graduating from Herts!

Intan Farhani Binti Mohd Fadzil Mass Communications, 2013

I'm currently a full-time Radio Announcer in Malaysia's Leading Cable network (Astro) as well as a TV presenter. Robyn Lovell Nursing (Learning Disabilities), 2014

Got a job as a Community Nurse! So pleased as I wanted that job all the way through my training! Charlotte Morgan Film and TV Production, 2014

I am currently working at a production company in a full-time position as a Project Coordinator. The company currently has a multi-million contract with Sky and we specialise in creating Motion graphics/animations in advertising. We have completed adverts for Sky Betting & Gaming and Sky Broadband.

Chinwendu Mbelu-Okorodudu LLM Maritime & Telecomms Law, 2010

Most important would be becoming a mother and a wife. It’s quite ironic to me that being married and having a child has taught me stuff I wish I had known while I was in Herts but hey, no regrets. Career wise - worked in the diplomatic corps for 3 years and 8 months. Currently between jobs as my family had to relocate due to rising insecurity as well as better opportunities elsewhere. It has been an awesome ride with the highs and the lows and it's only just beginning. Peace & love fellow alumni. Oliver Wickens Economics, 2012

Since graduating I have worked in Motorsport Sponsorship and Marketing for a small Sports Marketing agency primarily focussing on Formula 1. Alongside this role I also manage Nicolas Hamilton, brother of Formula 1 World Champion Lewis Hamilton, who will become the first disabled driver to compete in the British Touring Car

Martika Taylor BioScience (Pharmacology), 2014

Since leaving university I have moved abroad to the Isle of Man to take up a job working in Pharmacovigilance. I moved solely for the job and visiting the Island for my interview was the first time I had ever been there, I was offered the job on the same day and accepted. I moved to the island three weeks later and haven't looked back. Nyi Soe Thet Electrical Engineering, 2014

After finishing my final exam, I came back to my country, Myanmar. I worked for an international company for 1 month. I plan to start an engineering group with some classmates from Hertfordshire. Please feel free to contact me if you want to know more about it. Thanks! FUTURES | 33


ALUMNI INSIGHTS

ALUMNI BUSINESS AS PART OF THE RANGE OF BENEFITS AVAILABLE TO ALUMNI, MANY ARE OFFERED BY GRADUATES WHO HAVE SET UP THEIR OWN COMPANIES. HERE IS A SELECTION OF THE DISCOUNTS AVAILABLE.

Alyssa Smith Jewellery

Aniboxx

Alyssa Smith a BA(Hons) Applied Alyssa Smithgraduated graduatedinin2008 2008with with a BA(Hons) Arts. HerArts. company, which launched 2010, hasingone Applied Her company, which inlaunched from strength, winning multiple awards and 2010,strength has gonetofrom strength to strength, winning gaining and partnerships. multiplecelebrity awards endorsements and gaining celebrity endorsements

a BA(Hons) Jide Johnson Johnsongraduated graduatedinin2010 2010with with a BA(Hons) Digital a multi-award Digital Animation Animationand andlaunched launchedAniboxx, Aniboxx, a multiwinning animation advertising agency, in the same year. award winning animation advertising agency, in the Since company hascompany expandedhas andexpanded now counts same then year. the Since then the and Google, Mr Men, O2 Telefonica, Sky, PwC and Sony now counts Google, Mr Men, O2 Telefonica, Sky, PwC Playstation amongst its clients.

Discount: 20% off all full price items – enter and partnerships. promotional code 'uniofherts20' (all one word) Discount: when paying.20% off all full price items – enter

promotional code 'uniofherts20' (all one word) www.alyssasmith.co.uk when paying. www.alyssasmith.co.uk

BENEFITS ALUMNI INSIGHTS

Lizana Latif Alyssa Smith- Contemporary Jewellery Counselling Alyssa Smith graduated in 2008 with a BA(Hons)

Aniboxx Scott Bags Maxwell

alumni membership number when asking for a quote.

promotional code 'uniofherts20' (all one word) Discount: First session free – mention UH alumni when paying.

Discount: 10%off discount all services – provide Discount: 15% – quote on alumni membership number. alumni membership number when asking for a quote.

www.aniboxx.com

www.alyssasmith.co.uk

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and Sony Playstation amongst its clients.

Discount: 10% discount on all services – provide alumni Discount: discount all services – provide membership10% number whenon asking for a quote. www.aniboxx.com

Applied Arts. Herincompany, launched in Lizana graduated March 2013which with an MA in Contem2010, gone from strength She to strength, winning poraryhas Therapeutic Counselling. is a psychodynamic counsellorawards and registered with celebrity the Britishendorsements Association of multiple and gaining Counsellors & Psychotherapists (BACP) and bound by the and partnerships. Ethical Framework. She has a private practice which offers Discount: 20% off all full price – enterspace. weekly one-to-one counselling in aitems confidential

Founded in 2002 by William graduated Jide Johnson graduated in Forshaw, 2010 withwho a BA(Hons) with BA(Hons) Business Studies inAniboxx, 2000, Maxwell Digital Animation and launched a multi-Scott Bags reinterprets the art of leather craftsmanship award winning animation advertising agency, in the for theyear. modern After a vacation in same Sinceday. then thespending company has expanded and Italy, William decided to set up his own company and now counts Google, Mr Men, O2 Telefonica, Sky, PwC started importing leather briefcases and luggage to the and Sony Playstation corporate world in Italy.amongst its clients.

when booking.

www.maxwellscottbags.com

Lizana@contemporary-counselling.com

Holly Francesca

Hotels in Palermo, Sicily

LONDON notions creative agency

Nicola Suckling Fine Bone China

Holly Paine graduated in 2009 with a BA(Hons) Applied Arts. A winner in the 2012/13 flare competition, Holly Francesca produces original and bespoke art prints inspired by worldwide iconic landmarks. The company continues to grow and stockists include notonthehighstreet, Tower Bridge and the National Gallery.

Enrico Piazza was at Hertfordshire University in 1993 for his Erasmus project and graduated from the University of Palermo, Sicily with a degree in Economics in 1995. He is now CEO of The HotelSphere, a small, luxury independent hotel chain.

LONDON notions creative agency was founded in 2013 by Steven Barnett who graduated with a BA(Hons) Marketing in 2012. As well as having launched his own start-up, which employs a number of Hertfordshire alumni, he's also written a biography, ‘Outside the box’.

Discount: 15% off all purchases – enter ‘alumni15’ at the checkout.

Discount: 15% discount on best available rate for the day for Hotel Plaza Opera/ Hotel Principe di Villafranca – enter code HERTSALUMNI in the promotional code field of booking engine.

Discount: 25% discount for six months of social media and management - please reference 'Monaco' on contact.

Nicola Suckling has always loved the look of blue and white china. After graduating with a BA(Hons) in Graphic Design and Illustration in 2011, this passion became her business. Nicola Suckling Fine Bone China launched in 2013 with the support of the Prince’s Trust, and her collection of contemporary and unique designs continues to grow.

www.hollyfrancesca.co.uk

www.thehotelsphere.com

34 | FUTURES

www.londonnotions.com

Discount: 10% off all purchases – enter code UH2015 at the checkout. www.nicolasuckling.co.uk

FUTURES | 35


Launching Autumn 2016

New Chapman Gallery showcasing the University of Hertfordshire Art Collection First Floor, Main Building, College Lane Campus

Art Collection herts.ac.uk/uharts

Image Credit: Zibra, Caroline Achaintre, (2011, handtufted wool), presented by Contemporary Arts Society, 2015

Futures - 2016  

University of Hertfordshire.

Futures - 2016  

University of Hertfordshire.