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The magazine for alumni and friends of the University of Hertfordshire

Spring 2017

IN THIS ISSUE:

Revolution or recession

Alumni thriving in turbulent countries

Celebrating silver

25 years of being a university

Out of the shadows

The latest trend in work experience PLUS News Sports news Alumni Insights Events and reunions Alumni art Yearbook


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CONTENTS 04

Welcome Futures 2017

05

 ews What’s been happening in and N around the University

08

 ports How the University’s netball team is S shaking up the game

09  Revolution or Recession How two alumni

are working through revolution and recession

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18

2 5 years of UH A look back at the University since we achieved university status in 1992

18  Women Returners Alumnus David Sproul's thoughts on new schemes encouraging mothers back to work

20  Creative Art on the Streets from artist Charis Christoforou

14

22  Careers and Employment How work

shadowing is changing the way we look at potential careers

24

 HPress A look at the new book celebrating U Computer Science at the University

26  Supporting UH A look at the University Student Trust Fund

28  Degree Apprenticeships The new government

28

20

29  Alumni Insights The section dedicated to you 30  Reunions and Events A look back at the year’s reunions, plus dates for your diary

32  International Focus An update on our

29 Contact us: Post: Alumni Relations Office, University of Hertfordshire, College Lane, Hatfield, Hertfordshire, AL10 9AB Telephone: +44 (0)1707 281145 Switchboard: +44 (0)1707 284000

scheme demystified – plus details of how UH can help you

international chapters and the past year’s events

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Email: alumni@herts.ac.uk Website: www.herts.ac.uk/alumni Facebook: www.facebook.com/ hertsalumni Twitter: @HertsAlumni

 lumni Yearbook Read the latest news A from your fellow graduates

Editor: Louise Barnes Deputy Editor: Sophia Robertson Editorial Assistant: John Murphy Design: Aubrey Design Cover image: University sign going up, 1992 FUTURES | 3


WELCOME HOME AND AWAY TO SAY IT’S BEEN A TURBULENT YEAR FOR UK UNIVERSITIES – PARTICULARLY ONE AS INTERNATIONALLY-FACING AS HERTFORDSHIRE – IS PROBABLY SOMETHING OF AN UNDERSTATEMENT. BUT DESPITE THE IMPENDING ‘BREXIT’, WHICH WAS TRIGGERED EARLIER THIS YEAR, IT IS CLEAR THAT THE UNIVERSITY OF HERTFORDSHIRE WILL NOT CHANGE ITS INTERNATIONAL VIEWPOINT.

O

ur Vice-Chancellor has said this quite clearly in a statement on our website: “I would like to reiterate that the University of Hertfordshire remains committed to taking an international approach to everything we do. The University will play a vital role as a point of contact for fellow students and researchers around the

world, and I expect us to live up to our role as a beacon of tolerance, endeavour and innovation in the years ahead.” Given the uncertain times we’re living through at the moment, it is reassuring to see that Hertfordshire is dedicated to these values and to see how the University is playing an important role in both local and global communities. When looking through Futures, it is striking how international Hertfordshire has always been – both with students travelling here from overseas and with alumni stretching to every corner of the globe. And what an international alumni community it is, with graduates both returning to their home countries and exploring new opportunities in regions different to those in which they were born and grew up. It is testament to this global viewpoint that we now have over 30 alumni chapters in more than 25 different countries – and that this continues to grow. As well as holding

more international alumni reunions and events over the past year than ever before, it is delightful to see where our graduates have travelled from in order to attend the various UK reunions that have taken place recently. Closer to home, the University has continued to play an active role in the community. Those who lived on campus during their studies will, I’m sure, have special memories of Hatfield town centre. The University is continuing its commitment to supporting and working with the local community and is one of the members of the Hatfield Renewal Project – which looks to transform the town centre through the Hatfield 2030+ project and help to unlock the town’s potential. So despite the uncertainty ahead, I think that we can feel positive about UH and our community, which is continuing to grow and thrive. Louise Barnes Editor

SPECIAL THANKS TO… Jane Housham, Helen Meyer, Claire Crux, Eriana Gormous, Kim Virgo-Sheriff, Harriet Bayliss, Kathleen Fetigan, Ave Vinick, David Sproul, Felicity Bond, Sarah Koniotes, Hazel Foxon, Kate Yiannacou, Caroline Lawrence, Louise Akers, Jane Whitby, Leonidas Kanellopoulos, Gavin Davies, Ken Synnott, Negin Parvizi, Anna Morrison, Max Kelly, Charis Christoforou, John Murphy, Sophia Robertson, Laura Noble and Donald McLeod.

ENERGY

N PRI TED

ING GREE N

US

4 | FUTURES

The University of Hertfordshire is committed to providing a place of work and study that is safe and sustainable and where staff and students take responsibility for themselves and others around them. As part of this Futures magazine is printed on recycled paper stock and using green energy.


UNIVERSITY NEWS NEWS

NEW ALUMNA SCULPTURE UNVEILED A new alumna-designed sculpture has been unveiled next to the Oval and new residences on College Lane. Created by graduate Zoe Lynch, Altocumulus was the winner of the 2015 Birch Student Sculpture Commission. Zoe graduated in 2016 with a BA(Hons) Fine Art and this is her first public commission. The sculpture takes its name from the meteorological term ‘altocumulus’ describing a cloud formation of rounded masses with a level base. The piece of work is an ornate, asymmetric archway, with a complex punctured pattern, and the metal sits comfortably amongst the natural environment of water, grass and trees.

KASPAR ON SHOW AT THE SCIENCE MUSEUM Kaspar, the child-sized, socially interactive robot, developed by the University of Hertfordshire to help children with autism, is part of a special exhibition at the Science Museum, London. The ‘Robots’ exhibition, which is on from 8 February until 3 September 2017, is the most significant collection of humanoid machines ever displayed and charts the 500 year human history of recreating ourselves in robotic form. Kaspar uses realistic, but simplified human-like features to help autistic children learn how to socialise, interact and communicate. The robot can, for example, talk, comb its hair, hold a toothbrush, play the drums, name parts of its body, and even sing nursery rhymes. For more information, please visit the Science Museum website: https://beta.sciencemuseum.org.uk/robots

2017 VARSITY WIN!

In 2017 the University recently won its annual varsity sports competition against the University of Bedfordshire by 13 games to 4. Midway through the day the win was sealed when Women’s basketball won, giving Hertfordshire a 9 game undefeated lead. The score did not show, however, how closely fought the day was. The win puts Hertfordshire 7-1 up in varsity and we remain unbeaten since our one and only loss in 2011. Representatives from the two universities battled it out in 17 different competitive fixtures across the day in sports including netball, badminton, hockey, basketball, tennis, futsal, rugby, football, volleyball and kickboxing. FUTURES | 5


UNIVERSITY NEWS

HRH THE DUKE OF EDINBURGH OPENS NEW SCIENCE BUILDING On Thursday 3rd November 2016, His Royal Highness The Duke of Edinburgh officially opened the new science building. The new £50m building houses laboratories and cutting-edge research technology, and is a key milestone of the University’s 2020 vision and the transformation of the College Lane campus. The Duke of Edinburgh's visit included a tour of the new building, allowing him to observe research projects and the new Simulation Suite. This incorporates a simulation pharmacy and clinical environment, enabling the University to train students for careers in Nursing and Midwifery, Paramedic Sciences, Pharmacy, Optometry and Postgraduate Medicine. Professor Quintin McKellar, Vice-Chancellor at the University said: “We are delighted that His Royal Highness opened our fantastic new science building at the College Lane Campus. The building marks another great development of the campus and will give students and staff a state-of-the-art space for research and learning.” The University has a long-standing relationship with The Duke of Edinburgh and this was his fourth visit to the campus. His Royal Highness first visited in 1952 to open Hatfield Technical College, when we had just over 1,700 students enrolled. The stone plaque that the Duke unveiled can still be seen in the Chapman Gallery on the College Lane campus. HRH visited for a second time in July 1997 to unveil a bronze statue of Sir Geoffrey de Havilland, again at the College Lane Campus, and again in 2003, to open the new de Havilland campus.

TOP RESEARCH HEADLINES IN 2016/17 The University continues to deliver ground-breaking research in a range of areas – here are some of the top headlines from the past year. ASTRONOMERS DISCOVER 60 NEW PLANETS BEYOND OUR SOLAR SYSTEM An international team of astronomers, including Dr Mikko Tuomi of the University of Hertfordshire, has found 60 new extrasolar planets orbiting stars close to Earth’s Solar System. OUR COLLECTIVE GUILT IS LEADING TO A RISE IN WEREWOLF SIGHTINGS The collective cultural memory of wiping out the UK’s native wolf population could be behind a spate of recent werewolf sightings in Hull according to Dr Sam George, who was behind the UK’s first ‘International Werewolf Conference’ in 2015. FOOD INDUSTRY AND GOVERNMENT NEED TO DO MORE TO PROTECT OLDER PEOPLE’S FOOD SECURITY A University of Hertfordshire study highlighted the risk of social isolation from well-intentioned efforts to get over-60s to shop online and how supermarkets can better meet older people’s needs. ASTRONOMERS DISCOVER THE ‘BIRTH PANGS’ OF NEWBORN SOLAR SYSTEMS Scientists from the University of Hertfordshire have discovered a large population of ‘newborn’ stars that were previously hidden from view and revealed the ‘birth pangs’ of a new solar system. HEALTH SYSTEM NOT FIT FOR PEOPLE WITH DEMENTIA AND OTHER CHRONIC CONDITIONS The UK’s current health and social care system isn’t fit for purpose when it comes to caring for people living with dementia (PLWD) who also have other illnesses and chronic conditions, according to a new research study in BMJ Open.

6 | FUTURES


UNIVERSITY NEWS

NEW STUDENT ACCOMMODATION OPENED

The last set of new halls on the College Lane Campus were officially opened on Tuesday 25th October 2016, by the prestigious Hertfordshire alumni after whom they are named. The 3,000 bed student accommodation project, developed by Uliving and built by Bouygues UK, brings to a conclusion a three-year £120m redevelopment plan. Our notable alumni joined us on campus to open the buildings that bear their name: Maclean Court, Newton Court and Schofield Court. Diane Maclean, a sculptor and environmental artist, opened Maclean Court. Diane studied Art and Design at the University in the 1980s and is a long-standing supporter of the University. Her stainless steel creation The Mountain, commissioned for the Natural History Museum, sits outside main reception. Diane said “My degree here was amazingly inspirational.

The University provided me with skills to embark on a career in sculpture which I am still doing today. I am extremely grateful and very proud to be part of the University.” Newton Court was opened by Mike Newton, a Computer Science graduate, who has been a major contributor to the development of the computing industry. Mike has worked with well-known companies such as Apple and Dell and is an advocate for technology education. Dr Julia Schofield MBE opened Schofield Court. Julia is a leading technology consultant and champion for utilising technology to meet the needs of people with disabilities. Julia studied Computer Science at the University in the 1970s, the first blind female to do so. The residences were officially opened on the same day as the opening of the Hutton Hub and the renaming of the Oval. The Oval was renamed Sir Stuart Matthews Centre in recognition of alumnus Sir Stuart Matthews and his longstanding contribution to the aviation industry which began at Hatfield Technical College. Most notably Sir Stuart helped build the Comet, the world's first jet airline. The Oval provides sports and social facilities, as well as an information point for students.

GRADUATE EMPLOYMENT AT RECORD HIGH Now ranked 21st in the UK, in 2016 the University of Hertfordshire achieved the best employment rate of graduates in the east of England region – outscoring the whole of the Russell Group including the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge. According to the latest national Destination of Leavers from Higher Education (DLHE) survey, 96.2% of University of Hertfordshire students are in work or further study six months after graduating; well above the national average for the UK (93.9%) and an improvement on the figure in 2015 of 95.2%. Five of the University’s Schools achieved employment rates of above 95% – Health and Social Work, Law, Business, Creative Arts and Education. FUTURES | 7


SPORTS NEWS

GO HERTS THE PATH TO NETBALL SUCCESS THE UNIVERSITY OF HERTFORDSHIRE’S PERFORMANCE NETBALL PROGRAMME IS ONE OF THE MOST SUCCESSFUL AND ESTABLISHED UNIVERSITY NETBALL PROGRAMMES WITHIN THE HIGHER EDUCATION SECTOR.

T

he University of Hertfordshire, having identified netball as a key performance sport, has spent the last five years establishing links with England Netball Regional Performance Academy, external clubs and Hertfordshire Mavericks to continue to develop and raise the profile of the netball programme within both the further education sector and the netball player pathway. Following a competitive play-off campaign in 2014-15, the University's first team was promoted to the British Universities and Colleges Sport (BUCS) Premier South Division for the 2015-16 season. The team enjoyed an excellent first season, narrowly missing out on the premier title, finishing runners up to local rivals, Brunel University. This season, 2016-17, the team has excelled, achieving an incredible feat of winning all 10-league games and securing the BUCS Premier South Championship, an outstanding achievement in only its second year at the top end of university performance sport. The university has three competitive netball teams competing in the BUCS leagues and the success of the first team programme has been matched throughout the club with both the 2nd and 3rd teams achieving BUCS league titles this season and securing back-to-back promotions for the past three seasons. The success of the netball programme cannot be attributed to any one particular action but a planned and resourced strategy which includes a national player recruitment campaign, strength and conditioning, physiotherapy, fitness testing, expert coaching, performance analysis and academic flexibility, all of which ensure that we can deliver a high-quality, flexible programme that meets the needs of our athletes. Director of Netball and First Team Coach, Mel Mansfield, has been responsible for shaping and driving the programme over the last three years and has played a significant role along with the players in the overall success of the programme. “We have such depth in the squad this season that I have been able to mix and match combinations throughout the season as we have such versatility and quality in the team. The cohesiveness and culture we have created amongst the group has contributed to our success.”

8 | FUTURES

Following a hugely successful unbeaten Premier League campaign the Netball 1st team entered the prestigious BUCS National Cup competition involving the top Netball Universities in the country. Following a successful cup campaign beating the likes of Brunel and Leeds Beckett on route, Herts secured a place in the national final for the first time in the University’s Netball history. The final versus Loughborough saw the best two Netball Universities in the country competing for the national title and although Hertfordshire finished runnersup, it was a fantastic achievement and overall season for the performance Netball Programme. Player recruitment continues to be an integral part of the success and development of the Netball programme at the University of Hertfordshire. For more information about the performance driven programme please contact Hannah Darling, Performance Sport and Scholarships Manager, h.darling2@herts.ac.uk

IMONIQUE THOMPSON (BSC(HONS) MENTAL HEALTH NURSING) IN ACTION


ALUMNI PROFILE

REVOLUTION OR RECESSION


ALUMNI PROFILE

IT’S FAIR TO SAY THAT WE ALL FACE TRIALS AND DIFFICULTIES IN OUR WORKING LIVES, HOWEVER MOST OF US ARE FORTUNATE ENOUGH TO EXPERIENCE THESE AGAINST A BACKDROP OF RELATIVE ECONOMIC AND POLITICAL STABILITY. BUT WHAT HAPPENS WHEN THE COUNTRY YOU WORK IN IS TURNED UPSIDE DOWN?

T

his is the situation two Hertfordshire alumni faced – one working as a teacher during the Egyptian revolution that began in 2011 and the other founding a tech start-up in Greece during the worst recession and economic upheaval the country has ever faced. What is striking about both is that they stayed, despite being presented with mounting problems on a daily basis. Here are their stories so far, as it’s clear that their journeys in Egypt and Greece are far from over. Jane Whitby graduated from the University of Hertfordshire in 2003

10 | FUTURES

with BEd(Hons) in Early Childhood Education and Teaching, and now works as the Executive Founding Principal of the ELM International School in Alexandria, Egypt. Jane is highly qualified, having been part of the Government’s Fast Track to Headship programme and with a career in education that spans over 20 years. She wanted more of a challenge however, beyond what the UK offered. “I wanted to work in a place where I could engage my heart and soul, as well as give a country something that they wouldn’t otherwise have unless a very skilled teacher went there.” Jane decided upon Egypt having

been there on holiday previously and having found Egyptians to be warm and funny, with an amazing culture and history. Although her arrival in the country was without incident, within days of starting teaching the 2011 Egyptian Revolution and Arab Spring began, as protestors clashed with security forces demanding the overthrow of the then Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak. In a way that seems characteristic of individuals who have lived through something life-changing and defining, Jane’s reaction to the start of the revolution is understated. “The revolution was really interesting initially


ALUMNI PROFILE

“ I believe you must always give

your best for the future of the children – even if you are in the worst situations.

and I felt quite adventurous. We often had no water or electricity, and there was no internet for months. Everyone was nervous and I thought at one point that I wouldn’t get paid, but other than that life went on as normal really. There were lots of protests and sometimes it was too dangerous to go out. But the curfews were fun as I met the neighbours in my block and we played games and chatted. The news portrayed it as much worse than it really was, and often you wouldn’t know that a revolution was going on.” Despite the difficult situation, Jane’s commitment and passion to her vocation is clear. There were a range of reasons that led her to stay, even as many in her profession fled the country and its troubles. Jane says, “I stayed because I knew I was needed there. The education of children in Alexandria decreased over the five FUTURES | 11


ALUMNI PROFILE

It is only natural to give back in order to help the community grow, especially in the current economic conditions in Greece.

years, but I was doing a good job in the circumstances and felt appreciated by the children and their parents.” She faced daily battles around constant school closures and a lack of learning materials, which forced her to be resourceful. The main issue, however, was finding quality teachers who were willing to come to the country. To get around this Jane says that “I now fully train my ‘teachers’ according to QTS standards, so that the children get the same as a UK education.” For Jane, providing education for children is absolutely vital, no matter what is happening in their country – as it is through learning that you can change a country’s path.

12 | FUTURES

“What I enjoy most about my job is that I’m changing lives and improving the life chances of all children in my care. Creating leaders for a country and educating them to the highest standard is a powerful thing to do.” Helping to support and educate the next generation is something that speaks strongly to Leonidas Kanellopoulos too. He graduated from Hertfordshire in 2011 with a BSc(Hons) Computer Science and then gained his MSc in Mobile Computing in 2013. The support he received at the start of his career has made him passionate about supporting others. “It is only natural to give back in order to help the community grow, especially

in the current economic conditions in Greece. My team and I are active members of the community, working as mentors to young entrepreneurs. I hope that this might play a small role in changing the current situation, but also give young people with ideas and talent the push they need to make the first step.” As Greece continues with the government-debt crisis that has plagued its economy since late 2009, following the financial crisis of 2007 - 08, Leonidas sees no end in sight to the economic upheavals that have dogged the country. His move into entrepreneurship started smoothly – he set up his first company with fellow Hertfordshire graduate Margarita-Eleni Kontou (MSc


ALUMNI PROFILE

Mobile Computing, 2013) in 2012. Named SimpleApps, it develops tailor-made mobile apps and provides a range of digital marketing services. At their first competition they rolled out their first in-house project, tourismart, a mobile app and IoT solution for hotels. The app proved so successful that it is now used in more than 800 hotels globally, and is an established spinoff company in addition to SimpleApps. Whereas their experiences of setting up a business in the UK felt “easy and very organised”, despite the downturn, when the graduates decided to set up a business in Greece things were very different. Leonidas explains that “entrepreneurship in Greece isn’t easy and has been even worse during the recession.” Whereas the bureaucracy was always challenging, new issues have arisen since the financial crisis, the most striking of which began on 26 June 2015. “Out of nowhere the government announced that they were halting the operations of all banks and establishing capital controls, with a daily withdrawal limit of €60 and no

international transfers. During the first couple of weeks we were not allowed to pay Google and Facebook for services, nor our servers in the Netherlands and UK. We had to find workarounds and used international friends to survive, as many companies halted services to Greek companies. I was forced to spend all my time and resources working out ways to keep the company running, even under these harsh conditions, as well as reassuring our international clients that operations would continue.” These capital controls are still in place, three years later, and Leonidas’ problems haven’t eased and now include sourcing his workforce. “More than 500,000 talented and

highly-educated individuals have left the country since 2010, and so finding employees is impossible. Taxation has also increased to 58% and access to funds and investors is limited because of the situation, which makes a lot of Greek companies move to other European countries.” Both Jane and Leonidas face the issue of trying to find employees who share their passion and determination to succeed despite the issues in the countries in which they work. The resolve and determination of these alumni is inspirational, demonstrating the ability to succeed despite enormous upheaval, unrest and uncertainty – whilst also making a difference and helping to inspire the next generation.

My team and I are active members “ of the community, working as mentors to young entrepreneurs.

FUTURES | 13


AS THE HATFIELD POLY SIGN COMES DOWN…. A NEW ONE TAKES ITS PLACE.

SILVER ANNIVERSARY SPECIAL

SILVER-LININGS ON 29 JUNE 2017 IT WILL OFFICIALLY BE 25 YEARS SINCE HATFIELD POLYTECHNIC BECAME THE UNIVERSITY OF HERTFORDSHIRE. IN CELEBRATION, WE TAKE A LOOK AT SOME OF THE MILESTONES AND DEVELOPMENTS THAT HAVE TAKEN PLACE AT UH. ENJOY!

W

hilst the College Lane Campus has received something of a facelift over the past few years, the main buildings are still recognisable as those opened by HRH The Duke of Edinburgh in 1952. The rest of the University

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however looks entirely different compared to the buildings that were used during the Technical College and Polytechnic years. Here we take a wander through some of the buildings that our students have lived and worked in from 1992 to the present….


TEXTBOOK 1992

Student accommodation is very different now from 1992. The recently rebuilt student residences on College Lane saw the demolition of existing accommodation including Roberts Way. Bedrooms typically now feature luxuries such as fridges, en-suite bathrooms and shared kitchens/communal areas.

1993

In 1993 the merger with the St Albans-based Hertfordshire College of Art and Design was finalised. In 1994 the new School of Art and Design moved into the former British Aerospace Design block in Hatfield and in 1998 a two-storey regional art gallery opened, as part of the purpose-built Faculty of Art and Design. The Film, Music and Media building opened in 2006, housing a film studio, computer suites and photography studio.

FUTURES | 15


SILVER ANNIVERSARY SPECIAL

1994

In 1994 Pembroke Hall, prefabricated buildings that were bought in to provide temporary accommodation for students in 1982, were removed, with Telford Court and Asquith House opening to take its place.

1997

2000 In 2000 work began on the de Havilland campus, which was formerly the site occupied by British Aerospace. It opened in 2003 for students studying Education, Humanities and Business, leading to the closure of the Wall Hall, Aldenham and Balls Park sites.

2003 Any sporty types will remember the opening of the Hertfordshire Sports Village, and its impressive climbing wall, on the de Havilland campus in 2003. A new gym has since opened on College Lane, leaving students with no excuse to not stay fit.

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Does the LRC on College Lane need any introduction? So many students have spent so many hours there since it opened in 1997. Designed by Architects Co. Partnership, Building magazine once said ‘one day, all libraries will be like this’. And in the case of the de Havilland campus, they were right.


SILVER ANNIVERSARY SPECIAL

2008

It was a sad day for many when the Font bar, with its legendary sticky floors, closed its doors back in 2008. The new entertainment venue, The Forum, opened however in 2009 alongside a refurbished Elehouse and has been a firm favourite with students ever since.

2011

Having moved to St Albans in 1995 and taken over the former premises of the School of Art and Design, the Law School returned to Hatfield in 2011, occupying the purpose-built Law Court building on the de Havilland Campus, which includes a mock court room. The building was most recently seen onscreen in the BBC drama Humans (although, as far as we’re aware, there are currently no rogue robots running around campus).

2016 Most recently the new Science Building was opened by HRH The Duke of Edinburgh, marking his fourth visit to campus. The landmark building on College Lane brings together stateof-the-art facilities, including labs and research technology.

The future

The University of Hertfordshire hasn’t yet completed its campus developments, with many more refurbishments planned including a number of schools on College Lane. There will also be a new central boulevard built across campus, linking the residential and academic zones, and there is potential for an events plaza and amphitheatre on the de Havilland Campus. Watch this space!

Did you know….?

• In 1992 the University became the first institution to run its own bus service, named UniversityBus, which became UnoBus in 2005. • The Awards Ceremonies were first held in the Cathedral and Abbey Church of St Alban in 1994. • In 1998 we competed in the first Formula Student Event in the UK, winning the Best Presented Team prize. We’ve continued winning since then and are now one of the most successful teams in Europe. • StudyNet – the student intranet – was introduced in 2001. • In 1994 we were named ‘Top New University’ in The Times Good University Guide. In 2010 we were named as The Times Higher Education supplement’s ‘Entrepreneurial University of the Year’. FUTURES | 17


WOMEN IN WORK

BRINGING

WOMEN

BELIEVING THAT EQUALITY OF OPPORTUNITY IS VITAL TO ITS FIRM’S SUCCESS AS WELL AS THE FOUNDATION OF A FAIR AND INCLUSIVE SOCIETY, DAVID SPROUL EXPLAINS HOW DELOITTE IS WORKING TO CHAMPION WOMEN BACK INTO BUSINESS.

T

he issue of gender balance in the workplace has never been higher in the minds of business leaders across the country. At Deloitte we know it is critical to the long term success of our business and have been working on deliberate actions to ensure that we have a business that is gender balanced. This is by no means an easy task, nor one that can be achieved overnight. We believe that sustainable, meaningful progress will only be achieved by continually challenging the culture within our organisation, alongside interventions aimed at addressing specific issues and barriers. So – from a cultural perspective – we have focused on providing a working environment that supports our people to have a successful career alongside commitments and priorities outside work; we have also focused on ensuring that our working environment is inclusive, with respect at its core – that we judge everyone only on the value they can – or could – bring to our firm. Our interventions have targeted a number of challenges that we know we face as a firm – from ensuring that we are able to recruit an equal balance of women and men to enabling women who have left the workplace to successfully re-enter it through our Return to Work programme. We first launched the programme (which was an industry first) as a pilot in 2015 – we offered a group of talented senior

women – each of whom had been out of the workplace for at least three years – a 12-week paid placement and supported them to relaunch their careers. Five of the eight women (all of whom had taken time out of work for childcare reasons) who participated in the pilot have since gained permanent roles with the firm. In 2016 we expanded the programme to 20 weeks, with 17 women taking part – 10 of these have gone on to permanent or contract roles with the firm. The programme recognises external responsibilities and the importance of balancing these with a career, with participants joining on a four-days-a-week basis, taking half-term off as paid leave, and having access to our emergency backup childcare provision; it also provides tailored coaching and development sessions to equip them with relevant skills to adjust to re-entering the workplace. We are so proud of this programme – through it we have enabled incredibly talented women to re-enter the workplace and build successful and flourishing careers; applications are open for next year’s programme and we are already excited about our next cohort and the value they will bring to our firm.

“ The issue of gender balance in the workplace has never been higher in the minds of business leaders across the country. At Deloitte we know it is critical to the long term success of our business.

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WOMEN IN WORK

BACK INTO THE

WORKPLACE DAVID SPROUL BIOGRAPHY • David is Senior Partner and Chief Executive of Deloitte in the UK. He is also a member of the Deloitte Global Executive.

EMMA CODD, MANAGING PARTNER FOR TALENT AT DELOITTE, WITH THIS YEAR’S RETURN TO WORK PARTICIPANTS.

•B  efore his election to UK CEO on 1 June 2011, David led Deloitte’s Tax function in EMEA and the UK, and was a member of the UK Firm’s Executive and Board of Partners.  reviously, David was Managing •P Partner for Operations at Andersen in the UK until 2002. He then led Deloitte’s Consulting & Advisory business from 2002 to 2004 and Deloitte’s Talent agenda in 2004–2006.  avid has significant experience •D of working with clients on strategic, transaction and taxrelated questions, across many geographies and varied sectors including consumer business, professional services, private equity and real estate.  avid is a proud graduate of the •D University of Hertfordshire and also serves on the University’s Feed the World Campaign Advisory Board. • In addition, David is a member of the CBI President’s Club, The Advisory Board to TheCityUK, the Leadership Council of the NCUB, and Board of Honorary Directors, Royal Opera House.

•H  is interests outside work are travel, cycling, motor racing and family.

FUTURES | 19


CREATIVE

ART ON

THE STREETS

ART HAS ALWAYS BEEN THE WAY THAT ALUMNUS AND ARTIST CHARIS CHRISTOFOROU HAS EXPRESSED HIS FEELINGS AND MADE SENSE OF THE WORLD AROUND HIM.

NO PARKING

WHETHER IT’S SOMETHING THAT MAKES HIM LAUGH, ANNOYED OR PRICKS AT HIS CONSCIENCE, CHARIS USES THE MEDIUMS OF PAINT, GRAFFITI, SCULPTURE AND INSTALLATION TO EXPLORE THE SUBJECT AND TRY TO MAKE SENSE OF IT.

T

his is evident in some of the street art that he has produced in his home city of Paphos, Cyprus, including Unconditional Love and No Parking. He is also interested in the role of technology and how it is taking over modern life – recently highlighted in the Pokemon phenomenon and

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his street-art piece Not registered in POKedex. Charis is severely dyslexic which made art an important medium for him. He begin by drawing birds and then horses. Through his studies at Hertfordshire, he discovered sculpture and then moved towards installations. Charis says that “studying at Hertfordshire and living in London was very different to life in Paphos and allowed me to work with people I wouldn’t have met otherwise. I also noticed things at home which I hadn’t seen before – I’m always observing people and find inspiration for my art everywhere.” He graduated with a BA(Hons) in Fine Art in 2014 and


“ Studying at Hertfordshire and living in London was very

different to life in Paphos and allowed me to work with people I wouldn’t have met otherwise. I also noticed things at home which I hadn’t seen before – I’m always observing people and find inspiration for my art everywhere.

THE RIGHT SIDE

PAY AT THE MACHINE

UNCONDITIONAL LOVE

NOT REGISTERED IN POKEDEX

since then has continued to expand his artistic horizons, increasingly using the influence of street art and graffiti. He has also been experimenting with stencil work, as seen in Pay at the Machine, for his role in Paphos Art in Action, where he is part of a group of artists enhancing existing parts of the city through cultural street art. He says that “in the future I would love to open a gallery in Paphos, although at the moment I’m looking for opportunities to expand my work in London.” You can see more of Charis' work at the Parallax art fair, London where he will be exhibiting from 21 -23 July, 2017. FUTURES | 21


My

CAREERS

IT’S A WELL-KNOWN TRUTH THAT JOBS FOR LIFE NO LONGER EXIST. HELEN MEYER FROM THE CAREERS AND EMPLOYMENT SERVICE LOOKS AT HOW WORK SHADOWING COULD HELP YOU DECIDE WHAT ROLE IS RIGHT AND WHETHER IT’S TIME FOR A CAREER CHANGE.

A

s a Careers Adviser the question I probably get asked the most is ‘what can I do?’. I often joke that my role would be much easier if I could pull a magic 8 ball out, give it a shake and tell whoever is in front of me the perfect role for them. Unfortunately it is not that easy and making a decision about the right career path is based on many factors, including field of study, location, salary, responsibilities, training and progression. It is also a question where the answer changes over time, and the role you went into directly from university is unlikely to be the one you stay in for your entire professional career. The great thing is that some of the tools our current students utilise to help them decide on a career path are equally as applicable whether you are 6 months into your role or 16 years. One of the tools that can prove successful is work shadowing. Not only useful for students, it can also be extremely effective in supporting progression within your current role or to aid a complete job change – whether this is setting up your own business or moving to a new sector. For current students work shadowing is an informal type of work experience where they observe someone in their role

22 | FUTURES

to understand how they do their job. It is usually short term (a few days at most) and unpaid. It aims to provide an insight rather than hands-on experience, and can be as simple as a quick cup of coffee with someone to understand more about their role, develop a professional contact and seek advice. Work shadowing can also help the decision-making process, as observing someone actually doing their job enables an individual to gauge very quickly whether it is something that would be right for them. As an employer, offering work shadowing could allow you to talent spot a motivated individual or provide insight into what would attract the right candidates to your organisation. It can also act as a form of community outreach and boost morale amongst staff, as saying to an employee ‘you’re great at your job and I think you could inspire someone else’ can be a very positive experience. But what about the benefits to someone further on in their career? Job shadowing helps both parties to learn and exchange ideas. It helps in networking, exploring opportunities, giving and receiving feedback, and collaboration with different departments. As you progress in your career, it can be harder to find the time to undertake long periods of work experience,


“As an employer, offering work shadowing could allow you to talent spot a motivated individual INTERNATIONAL PROFILE or provide insight into what would attract the right candidates to your organisation.

INSPIRATIONAL IS A WORD THAT GETS FREQUENTLY OVERUSED. AND YET, WHEN YOU SPEAK TO SOMEONE LIKE ALUMNA FARIDA BEDWEI, BSc(Hons) COMPUTER SCIENCE, 1992 YOU REALISE THAT SOMETIMES IT IS THE ONLY WORD THAT IS FITTING.

and me

This shows a commitment to your own development and to your current employer, and could put you in a strong position should a senior role become available. Some companies use job shadowing as a tool for leadership development, with aspiring leaders given opportunities to shadow senior leaders and learn from them. So whatever stage of your career you’re at, work shadowing is a valuable, and increasingly popular, way to help you find out if a profession, role or company is right for you, whilst helping you to build connections with individuals that could help you on your chosen path.

particularly if you are already working full time. But if you’re thinking of a career change work shadowing could help you to decide in a short amount of time whether that role is right for you. Even if you aren’t looking to change career, it can also help with professional development. In many companies there are multiple options available for progression, and job shadowing can help you to get a better sense of the existing options and the required competencies for those roles.

The University of Hertfordshire is committed to work shadowing as a means to help students decide on the career path they wish to pursue after graduation. If you are interested in offering a work shadowing opportunity to a current student please email Recruit@herts.ac.uk for more details.

FUTURES | 23


UH PRESS

THE EARLY YEARS OF

GORDON BRAND WAS A MEMBER OF STAFF IN THE DEPARTMENT OF COMPUTER SCIENCE AT THE UNIVERSITY OF HERTFORDSHIRE WHO BECAME DIRECTOR OF THE COMPUTER CENTRE, HAVING BEEN INSTRUMENTAL IN SETTING IT UP. AFTER THIRTY YEARS, FIRST AT HATFIELD COLLEGE OF TECHNOLOGY AND THEN AT THE UNIVERSITY, HE RETIRED IN 1996. AFTER RETIRING, GORDON SET ABOUT WRITING A METICULOUSLY RESEARCHED HISTORY OF THE DEVELOPMENT AT HATFIELD OF BOTH COMPUTER-SCIENCE EDUCATION AND COMPUTING-SERVICE PROVISION, BUT VERY SADLY HE DIED IN DECEMBER 2013 BEFORE HE FINISHED IT. NOW GORDON BULL AND MARK JENKIN, BOTH PAST COLLEAGUES OF GORDON’S, HAVE COMPLETED THE BOOK AND PUBLICATION HAS BEEN MADE POSSIBLE BY GENEROUS SUPPORT FROM THE UNIVERSITY. IT’S A UNIQUE RECORD OF THE EARLY YEARS OF COMPUTING IN A BRITISH HIGHER EDUCATION INSTITUTION.

O

pening in September 1952, by the mid-fifties Hatfield Technical College was in the vanguard of computer-science education, earning a reputation that continues to this day. The first course on computing at Hatfield was a series of ten lectures given in the autumn term of 1956 – ‘Application of Computers to Automation’ – which included elements of both digital and analogue computing. Before the decade was out, the College had received a request from the local computer manufacturer Elliott Brothers (based in Borehamwood) to provide courses for its staff and customers, and had begun to look into the possibility of buying ‘a digital computor [sic] for instructional purposes’. Hatfield was ahead of the field from the start, launching one of the very first undergraduate degrees in Computer Science in the UK in 1965/66. One interesting feature was that studies in Humanities formed an integral part of the course, and modules included, for example, the study of

24 | FUTURES

the social effects of automation. This chimed in well with one of the founding aims of the Technical College, that ‘all technical courses will have an infusion of liberal studies and the social sciences’. The book tells the story of these pioneering years, up until 1971, by which time a thriving Department of Computer Science had been well and truly established. This period of rapid research and development was permeated by an atmosphere of enthusiasm and excitement. Both research and teaching in computing flourished. It was an exciting time, with staff keen to break new ground and there was a great feeling of empowerment. Many courses at different levels were soon designed. As well as courses for undergraduates, there was a ‘Service for Schools’ which included modules on computer programming such as ALGOL specially for school staff and senior pupils, ‘Basic Digital Computing for Civil Engineers’ and even an evening class aimed specifically at ‘housewives’, an


COMPUTING AT THE UNIVERSITY OF HERTFORDSHIRE

COMPUTER CENTRE CP SNOW BUILDING

A GROUP PHOTO FROM THE NCC COURSE IN SYSTEMS ANALYSIS, NOV 1968

‘Introduction to the Computer’ in 1968/9. But before anyone suggests that this was horribly sexist, women filled many roles in the new computing teams and the first director of the computer centre was a woman, Dorothy Nelson. A computing consultancy service to industry was set up. Early projects included a database used to investigate the effects of oral contraceptive therapy on cholesterol levels in women, the processing of questionnaires for a local GP, programmes to enhance the design of glasshouses for the Meteorological Office and National Agricultural Advisory Service, and a statistical analysis of sugar-beet trials for a seed merchant. In his Foreword to the book, the Vice-Chancellor pays homage to ‘the vision and tenacity of those early computer scientists, who laid the foundations for computing in our University and made a lasting contribution to this extraordinary technology’. Gordon’s book records their achievements. Jane Housham

THE FIRST TERMINAL CLASSROOM OF 20 TERMINALS MARCH 1971

ALL BUT TWO OF THE 1969 GRADUATES ON GRADUATION DAY.

SO HOW DID THE COMPUTER SCIENCE DEGREE HELP? … MAYBE IT DEVELOPED A QUESTIONING MIND? MAYBE PEOPLE THOUGHT THAT I MUST KNOW SOMETHING IF I HAD A DEGREE IN COMPUTER SCIENCE, SO IT OPENED DOORS. MAYBE IT JUST SERVED TO BOOST THE CONFIDENCE OF A SHY, MODEST, WORKING-CLASS KID TO BELIEVE I COULD DO THINGS THAT OTHERS DIDN’T SEEM SO ABLE TO DO.

(from one of the first cohort, who graduated in 1969)

FUTURES | 25


FUNDRAISING

THE STUDENT STRUGGLE

THE IMAGE OF ‘PENNILESS STUDENTS’ HAS BEEN WITH US FOR MANY YEARS, AND WE ALL REMEMBER THE DIFFICULTIES OF LIFE ON A LIMITED BUDGET. HOWEVER, IN RECENT YEARS THIS CHALLENGE HAS, FOR MANY, BECOME A REAL STRUGGLE.

26 | FUTURES

Life at university offers so much that is important for the future: the discipline of studying and the pleasure of learning, living away from home and managing your own budget, mixing with people from many different backgrounds. And that’s before you get to the social side of things… Since the introduction of tuition fees in 1998 and, particularly, since the recent fee rise, debt has become almost inevitable before students even start their studies. Many students have part-time jobs to supplement their income, but can be caught in a catch-22 situation whereby working more hours to have the means to stay at university leads to fewer hours actually ‘being’ at university, studying or participating in university life. This is where the University Student Trust Fund can help. Established by the University's Development and Alumni Relations team, the Fund raises money to enable those students in need to be supported. One way the donations to the Fund are used is for the University of Hertfordshire Hardship Fund, for students who are in financial need and even contemplating withdrawing from university due to financial concerns. An award can help them through the hard times so they can continue to study. Donations to the University Student Trust Fund also ensure that our students don't miss out on opportunities to broaden their skills and horizons, such as the opportunity to study in a different country. Study Abroad offers students the unique opportunity to experience and be educated in a different country. The Fund also supports research degree students in attending conferences and other events which allow them to progress their studies, network and move forward in academia. Education should be open to all, regardless of income and background. Without the opportunity to access higher education, young people are losing the chance to develop their full potential. Supporting the University Student Trust Fund will enable talented individuals in the UK to have the opportunities they deserve. Roy Mills is an alumnus, a current employee and a donor to the University Student Trust Fund. ‘I believe education is a right, so it is terrible if it is denied to someone.’ Roy thinks highly of the University of Hertfordshire, as people are here to learn, teach and research. He feels that the University Student Trust Fund can open doors to a journey through life and without this support many are denied the chance to study and develop themselves. ‘I donate a small amount each month, which I don’t miss. Everyone thinks that they will miss those few pounds, but in reality you don’t – particularly when it’s worthwhile and gives you a real feel-good factor to know that you’re making a difference,’ he says. This regular support ensures a reliable source of income for the Fund, so that students can continue to be supported.

For more information about the University Student Trust Fund and how you can provide support, please speak to the Development team on 01707 285850 or email development@herts.ac.uk.


Donation Form Your Details Title and full name _______________________________________________________________________________________________ Address

_______________________________________________________________________________________________

________________________________ Alumni membership number (if known)

Postcode________________________

Email ___________________________________

_______________________________________

□ Yes, I would like to support the University Student Trust Fund Single Donation

I would like to make a gift of £ ________ to the University OR please debit my: Card No.

□ Visa

__ __ __ __

Card Security No.

□ MasterCard

__ __ __ __

__ __ __

__ __ __ __

Start Date:

I enclose a cheque made payable to: “UH Trust”

□ Switch/Maestro __ __ __ __ __ __ / __ __

□ Visa Debit

Issue No __ __ (if applicable) Expiry Date

__ __ / __ __

Regular Gift – Direct Debit I wish to make a monthly/quarterly/annual donation; please send me a direct debit mandate

Gift Aid declaration – for past, present & future donations Please treat as Gift Aid donations all qualifying gifts of money made: (please tick all boxes you wish to apply)

□ Today

□ In the past 4 years

□ In the future

I confirm I have paid or will pay an amount of income tax and/or capital gains tax for each tax year (6 April to 5 April) that is at least equal to the amount of tax that all the charities that I donate to will reclaim on my gifts for that tax year. I understand that other taxes such as VAT and council tax do not qualify. I understand that using Gift Aid means that for every pound I give, the University of Hertfordshire will reclaim 25p of tax on every £1 that I give. Signature: _________________________________________________ Date: __________________________

Leaving a Legacy Leaving a gift in your will to the University will support our future and is a tax efficient way of giving. Please send me further information about remembering the University in my will

Acknowledgment In any public acknowledgments, please list me/us in the following way: _______________________________________________________ I/we wish to be an anonymous donor

Under the Data Protection Act (1998), UH Development and Alumni Relations will hold your personal information securely and in line with the University’s Policies and Regulations (UPRs) in particular UPR IM08 - Data Protection and UPR IM16 - Data Management Policy, and it will not be passed to a third party. The information provided may be used for events programmes, alumni activities, fundraising programmes and for the promotion of benefits and services which may involve an element of direct marketing. If you do not wish your information to be used in this way, please write to: Development and Alumni Relations, University of Hertfordshire, Hatfield, Hertfordshire AL10 9AB. Alternatively, you can email us at: development@herts.ac.uk.

FUTURES | 27


Degree Apprenticeships fast facts

From April 2017, all businesses with a payroll of over £3m need to pay an apprenticeship levy equalling 0.5% of their total payroll costs. At the University of Hertfordshire we have developed new Degree Apprenticeships in partnerships with businesses. Our Degree Apprenticeships are a great opportunity for employees to learn on the job and for businesses to up-skill their existing staff and develop talented employees. The Programme is open to all ages and is open to those who already have a degree or want to gain a masters

£3 million 90% If your payroll costs are less than

the government pays for

Apprenticeship funding can be used to train existing and new employees with high level, industry-specific skills. For individuals, it’s a flexible, tuition fee-free way to gain a degree-level qualification while earning.

of the training.

meaning a degree could cost a business as little as £2,700 in total.

The levy you pay is put in a fund for you to spend on apprenticeship training. If you don't use your fund it will expire after ....

24 months

FREE Training can be

if your business has less than 50 employees and you take on an apprentice aged aged 16-18 or 19-24*. *If the individual holds an Education Health & Care Plan or is a care leaver.

28 | FUTURES

For businesses, it’s a great way to invest in people and improve staff retention. Existing Hertfordshire courses include the BSc(Hons) Digital and Technology Solutions and BA Chartered Manager. Coming soon* Degree Apprenticeships for Construction Management, Law, Engineering and Cyber Security. *Subject to validation To find out more please contact our Business Development team: be@herts.ac.uk +44 (0) 1707 286406 @UHBusiness Go.herts.ac.uk/degreeapprenticeships


you

ALUMNI INSIGHTS

THE SECTION DEDICATED TO

Being one of our alumni is what each of you has in common. Even though your experiences and memories of your time studying with us will be different – whether you were at the University, ‘jolly Poly’ or Technical College – we are here to help you stay in contact. Please let us know if you’d like our support organising a reunion or visit to campus, and we’ll ensure that you stay up to date with

news and events from the University and your fellow graduates. In this issue: • Reunions and events • Dates for your diary  ur international chapters •O and community

• Alumni Yearbook

What is Go Herts? You might have read the phrase ‘Go Herts’ throughout Futures magazine. Created in 2016, Go Herts is an initiative by the University of Hertfordshire that aims to encapsulate our community spirit, both on and off campus, whilst celebrating our success. What success does Go Herts celebrate? All of our achievements! From the amazing sporting victories of our Athletic Union, to the ground breaking discoveries made by our researchers, not to mention the outstanding achievements of our enterprising students, alumni and staff. How is Go Herts represented? Go Herts has an independent identity that is separate from the University’s corporate brand. The logo uses the iconic image of the hart, an adult male deer and the ancient symbol of the county of Hertfordshire. Can I get involved with Go Herts? Everyone within our community is already part of Go Herts, including alumni! You can get onto social media and tag your success posts with #GoHerts, come along to one of the Athletic Union’s matches or purchase Go Herts merchandise from an on-campus shop or www.uhshop.co.uk.

JULIE NEWLAN, PRO VICE-CHANCELLOR (BUSINESS AND INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT), AND OUR ALUMNI EZZA JALANI AND YI WEN NG CELEBRATING ‘GO HERTS’ IN MALAYSIA!

FUTURES | 29


ALUMNI INSIGHTS

REUNIONS & EVENTS 2016 WAS A BUMPER YEAR FOR REUNIONS WITH MANY NOTABLE ANNIVERSARIES BEING CELEBRATED. THE MOST SIGNIFICANT WAS THE VISIT FROM THE FIRST EVER STUDENTS AT THE HATFIELD TECHNICAL COLLEGE, FONDLY KNOWN AS THE DE HAVILLAND APPRENTICES.

De Havilland Aeronautical Technical School reunion Our group, which includes a number of the first University alumni, paid a nostalgic visit to the College Lane Campus on 2 October 2016. For most of us this was the first opportunity for such a visit since we enrolled as students at the then Hatfield Technical College when it opened in September 1952. We were received with VIP treatment by the University and a tour of the Campus site which has grown so much since our early days so long ago. We are a group of ex-De Havilland Aircraft apprentices who started at Hatfield in 1952 and 1953 on a five year course and carried out our engineering studies on part-time release at the Technical College. Now we hold annual reunions on a weekend in October which includes a Sunday visit to a place of particular interest. This visit in October 2016 proved to be an outstanding success. We totalled some twenty alumni members together with wives as a group of 35. The University Campus has expanded greatly since our early days. The low speed wind tunnel on which we worked is still there, as are the classrooms in which we studied. This was an emotional day to reflect on the beginning of our careers and how much this equipped so many of us to lead enjoyable and successful careers in which we were able to achieve so much. Max Kelly

30 | FUTURES

Reunion round-up

In June 2016, UH celebrated 15 years of the Sports Therapy course with the aptly named Sports Therapy Showcase and Reunion. The event attracted 80 delegates, listening to five successful alumni talk about their work and research since graduation and of course ended up with drinks in the Style bar!

15 YEARS OF SPORTS THERAPY REUNION

ENGINEERING CLASS OF 1976

APPLIED BIOLOGY CLASS OF 1966

In July, we welcomed the Engineering class of 1976 back to campus. The organiser in chief was David Eames who incredibly tracked down 30 of his classmates from his base in Charlottesville, USA! On a glorious summer day they enjoyed lunch in the Elehouse followed by a tour of the Engineering department from the then Dean of the School, Reza Sotudeh.


ALUMNI INSIGHTS 2016 proved to be the year of the Applied Biologists as two cohorts celebrated the 30th anniversary of graduation in 1986 and the 50th year of first meeting in 1966. Del Singh had taken on the job of bringing together the class of ’86 and after meeting in the Style bar for drinks, they returned to a local hotel for a meal and disco. Del is already planning the 35th! John Finch (Applied Biology) did a remarkable job of bringing together 18 of his fellow 1966 starters in November. The group enjoyed a meal in the refectory followed by a tour of the incredible new Science building and a chat with current staff. The day was topped off with a buffet in the New Chapman Lounge and hours of reminiscing about the good…and not so good old days!

In late 2015, Tom Chrysostomou set himself the unenviable task of bringing his Psychology course mates together and in October his efforts came to fruition when they reassembled 30 years after first setting foot on campus. They enjoyed a tour of College Lane and then a reception in the School of LMS with Shivani Sharma and other staff from the School. Tom gifted the School a framed picture taken in 1986 and everyone marvelled at how little they had all changed… Other events that happened this year included the traditional yearly Wall Hall Teacher Training meet up, a 50 years Civil Engineering reunion led by Christine Wheeler and a 45th HND Civil Engineering gathering led by Jim Westcott.

If you would like to arrange a reunion, email us on alumni@herts.ac.uk and we will be delighted to help.

UPCOMING EVENTS The University of Hertfordshire has a large programme of events coming up. Here is a selection of upcoming dates for your diary… Headlines – Creative Arts End of Year graduate show Location: College Lane Campus Date: 30 May – 2 June, 2017 Formula Student launch and engineering showcase – a special event to celebrate 25 years of Engineering and Technology at the University, with TV presenter Vicki Butler-Henderson Location: de Havilland Campus Date: 7 June, 2017 Friends Society garden party – this newly established society is exclusively for former and retired staff of the University and its predecessor institutions. For more information email friends@herts.ac.uk Location: College Lane Campus Date: 9 June, 2017 Undergraduate and Postgraduate open days Date: 17 June, 2017

PSYCHOLOGY 1986 AT THE ELEHOUSE

The Vice-Chancellor’s Annual Lecture Location: de Havilland Campus Date: 25 October, 2017 The Chancellor’s Lecture – with guest speaker Nicholas Negroponte, founder of the MIT Media Lab Location: de Havilland Campus Date: 2 November, 2017

DE HAVILLAND AERONAUTICAL TECHNICAL SCHOOL REUNION

For more information, please contact: www.go.herts.ac.uk/eventslisting events@herts.ac.uk +44(0)1707 284121 FUTURES | 31


INTERNATIONAL ALUMNI

NEWS ROUND-UP WE HAVE HAD A BUSY AND EXCITING YEAR ACROSS THE GLOBE, WITH 11 INTERNATIONAL ALUMNI EVENTS TAKING PLACE ACROSS FOUR CONTINENTS! HERE ARE SOME HIGHLIGHTS… MALAYSIAN ALUMNI ASSOCIATION The University of Hertfordshire Alumni Association for Malaysia (UHAAM) held a Gala Dinner on 26 November 2016 to celebrate 25 years of the UH in Malaysia. The dinner was hosted by the Vice-Chancellor, Professor Quintin McKellar CBE and Pro-Vice Chancellor (Business and International Development), Julie Newlan MBE, and attended by 150 alumni and 10 UH staff. The evening was a great success with wonderful food, raffles, singing and dancing. If you live in Malaysia and would like to join the UHAAM, please email Indrani Kuppusamy, Alumni and Partnerships Manager in our Kuala Lumpur Office – i.kuppusamy@herts. ac.uk Over the next few months we are looking forward to running some new events in Kuala Lumpur, such as an industrybased professional networking evening and a ‘Welcome Back to Graduates’ event. More details to follow…

Our INTI alumni Our alumni who studied for UH degrees at INTI College in Malaysia are warmly welcome to join the UHAAM. INTI hosted an event on 24 May 2017 to celebrate their partnership with UH and the success of our UH INTI alumni. Please email alumni@herts.ac.uk to join UHAAM. BEIJING ALUMNI CHAPTER We are delighted to announce a new Beijing alumni chapter, managed by our new alumni ambassador, Miyee Woon (International Business, 2003). 2016 also saw the opening of the new UH Beijing Office, set up to promote UH business partnerships and student recruitment in the region. UH’s closer ties with China were consolidated and celebrated at a business focused event on 17 March 2017 at the British Ambassador’s Residence in Beijing, showcasing UH’s commitment to our students’ global employability and strengthening entrepreneurship opportunities in China. 15 of our alumni attended the event.

SHANGHAI ALUMNI CHAPTER Our Shanghai alumni chapter – run by our three alumni ambassadors, Shuang Zhang (Law, 2013), Jasper Zhang (Business, 2003) and Tangent Xia (Financial Maths, 2015) – continues to grow. 2016 saw two events for our Shanghai alumni; a reunion dinner on 12 June 2016 was attended by 45 alumni and hosted by Pro-Vice Chancellor, Julie Newlan and was followed by a networking reception held on 4 December 2016 attended by 65 alumni.

32 | FUTURES


INTERNATIONAL ALUMNI NIGERIAN ALUMNI CHAPTER Our Nigerian alumni chapter held its first Professional Networking Event on 20 January 2017. Focusing on Law and Business, a panel of four alumni experts in their field discussed their career and top industry tips with fellow alumni and new graduates. The event was hosted by Penny Carey, Associate Dean (International) and Ernestine Ndzi, Senior Lecturer, both from the School of Law, Political Science and Criminology, who enjoyed meeting some of their past students and making new connections with our Nigerian alumni.

HONG KONG ALUMNI CHAPTER Our Hong Kong alumni chapter held their third event on 15 July 2017, a dinner which over 20 alumni attended, alongside Hong Kong students with places to start at UH for September 2017. U.A.E ALUMNI CHAPTER Our colleagues in the School of Pharmacy hosted an alumni reception in Dubai on 8 March 2017, hosted by Mrs Zoe Aslanpour, Head of Postgraduate Pharmacy and Public Health Practice. The group enjoyed remising about their days as students at UH and hearing about the latest news.

USA EAST COAST ALUMNI CHAPTER We have a newly formed US Chapter on the East Coast of the States. Please get in touch with us: alumnhi@herts.ac.uk and we will put you in contact with our new Alumni Ambassadors. COMING UP…. We are looking forward to holding events in Malaysia, Greece, India, Nigeria, Singapore, Pakistan and Hong Kong later in the next year. We are also looking into running our first event in France. If you live in any of these countries and can help suggesting venues or with organisation, or would like to run an event in your region, please get in touch! alumni@herts.ac.uk

HUGE CONGRATULATIONS TO: Farida Bedwei, Ghana (Computer Science, 2005) and Serter Varol, Turkey (Business Studies, 2009) who were both chosen by the British Council as Finalists in the Entrepreneurship category of the British Council Alumni Awards 2017, due to their innovative and highly successful businesses. The highly prestigious global awards received over 1,200 nominations from 125 UK universities. Shahrzad Atai, UK and Iran (LLB, 2011) – for her two top industry awards for her work in cross border transactions – Acquisition Finance UK Cross-Border Lawyer of the Year, and Winner of the Global Law Experts Annual Awards 2016.

Vimal Maisuria, India (PhD Microbiology, 2014) was awarded the William and Rhea Seath Award for Outstanding Professors. Based at McGill University, Canada, Vimal received the award for his innovative technological ideas with potential for commercialisation. Megan Webber, Canada (PhD History, 2015) was awarded the 2016 Pollard Prize by the Institute of Historical Research. Many congratulations, we are very proud of you! Have you received industry recognition or career success? We’d love to hear from you! Please update us alumni@herts.ac.uk

FUTURES | 33


ALUMNI INSIGHTS

1990s

1970s

Pargat Singh Calay 1979 Mathematics 1983 PhD

I have retired from my full time work in September as Academic Group Leader for Mathematics from London Metropolitan University. Since obtaining my PhD I did Post-Doctoral work, at Oxford University followed by a Management job for British Gas and then I took up teaching at Southbank Polytechnic followed by Polytechnic of North London (London Metropolitan University). I work on Political Problems of Modern World with a Mathematician’s solution by applying Nankonian Political Philosophy. I do a lot of community work by serving as Chairman of the Sikh Education Council UK.

Martin Spencer 1990 Mechanical Engineering with Vehicle Options

Worked initially in vehicle structural engineering at International Automotive Design, then at Autoliv UK, testing and optimising airbag/seat belt systems. From 1998, I've been Technical Manager at The Caravan Club overseeing consumer advice to 1m Club members. In a typical month, I might be writing a technical advice column for our Club Magazine, travelling to Brussels for an FIA meeting, developing new British Standards, working on road safety matters with Highways England or judging motorhomes at a consumer show. At heart, though, I'm still an engineer!

2000s

Shanaka S P Kalpage 2007 Digital Systems and Computer Engineering

During 10 years at Sony I have worked for Sony’s PlayStation division. Over the last 10 years, I have worked on prototype hardware learned a lot about hardware iteration cycles and software and have become an Automation

ALUMNI

YEARBOOK

FIND OUT WHAT YOUR FELLOW GRADUATES HAVE BEEN UP TO SINCE LEAVING HERTFORDSHIRE

1980s

Tushar Shah 1989 Electrical and Electronic Engineering

Worked in the USA for 5 years as a Global Product Manager. Became Global account director for Huawei looking after Vodafone. Chartered Marketer (MCiM), Fellow of the IET Currently the Global Account Director for Lenovo looking after Vodafone worldwide. Level 2 cricket coach! Steven George Pratsides 1981 Applied Biology

Went on to do a 4 year Diploma in Osteopathy and have worked as an Osteopath in private practice since qualifying in 1986. Based in Southgate, North London, also practising in Chelmsford, Essex.

34 | FUTURES

Scott Christie 1995 Computer Science

Upon leaving, I landed a job in a small company - Clifford Thames. Apart from a short sabbatical with another company (just to see what a bigger company would be like) I'm still there and have been intimately involved and proud to grow the company to a global business, culminating in joining with two other senior managers to undertake a successful management buyout. Every single day, I still draw upon my university experience as well as course content to help the business and our teams grow. Colin Evison 1990 Civil Engineering

I am having a great career in Civil Engineering since graduating. Currently in my 20th year with BAM Nuttall and now have the role of Head of Innovation.

expert. I am however at a turning point in my career, as I am preparing to leave Sony and join a start-up company working on hardware to optimise neural networking for AI. Leroy Lawrence 2004 Music Technology

Unexpectedly the skills I took away from my course were the improved maths, communications and physics. In 2008, my second attempt at a career was setting up my own stockbrokers in the city of London before moving onto become a CEO of an investment bank in Switzerland 4 years later. I am now CEO of Quadron Capital, which is a hedge fund business and I sit on the board of numerous companies including a museum in London.


ALUMNI INSIGHTS (A telecom operator). Later I joined CMPak (A telecom operator) as an Executive Engineer in RAN Planning and Optimization. I have two beautiful sons and a wife.

connection with the Royal Courts of Justice in August 2017 called "Brixton on Trial", involving local students aged 14-16 to encourage disadvantaged students to pursue careers in law.

Luke Medland 2004 Computer Science

Kate Steiner 2016 Illustration

Head of Deployment Engineering for Google Cloud EMEA, Google. Ayoola Bandele 2008 Statistics with Business Studies

Worked in the retail industry for over 10 years and moved into the charity sector. I have just returned with a team of 20 from climbing Mount Kilimanjaro in aid of getting children out of poverty through Compassion UK. So far the team of 20 has raised an incredible ÂŁ19,085 and seen 45 children sponsored!

Wow... 2016 was a year of incredible changes for me! Not only did I graduate with distinction from UH but I have started my own yoga portrait business based in Vienna in Austria! Thanks to the great staff and fellow colleagues, I was able to achieve this completely remotely ... this truly was a year of growth and expansion. Check it out at www.katesteiner.com

Dr Tom Mallinson 2007 Paramedic Science

Worked for the London Ambulance Service NHS Trust before completing an MBChB Medicine degree at the University of Warwick. I am now a doctor and a member of my local mountain rescue team and have become a Fellow of the Academy of Wilderness Medicine. My degree from Hertfordshire has also enabled me to undertake research influencing national clinical practice and to publish in peerreviewed journals. Rikki Kotecha 2009 Accounting and Finance

I worked for a FTSE 100 company on and off since graduating and completing my CIMA qualification. I have taken time off travelling the globe and now I manage a mid-range lodge in Malawi. I manage 25 staff and run the lodge, bar, restaurant, water sports and even drive the boat. The accounting degree and then CIMA has opened up doors to not just work in finance which is great. Malik Abdullah 2009 Electrical & Electronic Engineering

Left the beautiful university and came back home to Pakistan. Joined Motorola as a trainee engineer, worked there for 5 months and then joined Mobilink

2010s

Mayank Saini 2010 Biotechnology

Well it’s been an amazing journey since I graduated from UH in 2010. I came back to India after my degree and started my career as Senior Research Fellow in a reputed research institute in India. After 2 years, I moved to GSK and utilized my biotechnology skills which I have learned during my study. I am currently working in the vaccine industry in China and developing new vaccines for human use. Twanieka Alcindor 2010 and 2012 LLB and LLM

I am working in both criminal and civil litigation firms as a case worker and paralegal. I received a scholarship from the Inner Temple for the BPTC and was called to the bar in 2015. In 2014 I set up my own pro-bono clinic at the Brixton Soup Kitchen called "Lawyers in the Soup Kitchen" and now manage a team of 10 law student and practitioner volunteers who provide weekly free advice sessions and telephone advice. We are also putting on a mock trial in

James Hutchison 2011 Psychology

I studied as a mature student whilst working as a Personal Trainer. In January 2016 I opened a new Personal Training gym in North London with a colleague. The gym is called pH.7 Life in Balance, www.ph7gym.co.uk . Studying at Herts gave me the confidence to push myself to start a business. For a working class boy working in a part of North London surrounded by high achievers, academics, and lots of privately educated graduates - it was just what I needed to feel I could make the step. Rebeccah Robinson 2015 Graphic Design

I am an in house senior designer for a financial consultancy and am currently working through a brand refresh project. And I had a baby a few months after graduating who is keeping me very busy! FUTURES | 35


THE UNIVERSITY’S RESIDENT ORCHESTRA SINCE 1969 Sunday 18 June: 7.30pm Mozart – Don Giovanni Overture Mozart – Exsultate Jubilate Strauss – Morgen Mahler – Symphony No 1 Soloist Natasha Page (soprano) Sunday 8 October: 7.30pm Brahms – Academic Festival Overture Mendelssohn – Violin Concerto Brahms – Symphony No 2 Conducted by Robin Browning Weston Auditorium, de Havilland Campus, Hatfield Tickets at www.uharts.co.uk or Box Office 01707 281127

Profile for University of Hertfordshire

Futures Magazine - Spring 2017  

Futures Magazine - Spring 2017  

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