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Celebrating

SIXTY YEARS 1952 - 2012

PROUD of our past PASSionate about our future University of Hertfordshire 2012

Annual Review


PROUD of our past PASSionate about our future The Mace Pictured on the cover is the head of the University’s Mace, a historic means of symbolising the corporation. It was commissioned in 1997 from Gold and Silversmith, Martyn Pugh, and is made out of gold, silver and titanium. It is a complex ceremonial piece which incorporates elements that represent both the University’s connections and its specific areas of expertise, particularly aerospace, engineering, and biological and health sciences. The Mace (as pictured here) itself is four feet long. It has a rosewood haft with an English oak band (acknowledging the institution’s origins in Hatfield) and a silver heel. The coat of arms is engraved in the heel and further symbolism representing the arts, humanities, computer science and the biological and pharmaceutical industries are represented.


VICE-CHANCELLOR’S Introduction

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Hatfield Technical College opens. 55 full-time students, 813 part-time students and 870 evening students. The official opening ceremony is performed by HRH Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh

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Contents

Our diamond jubilee year has been a time to celebrate everything that the University stands for.

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Our diamond jubilee

Pages 6-13

We are immensely proud of our achievements over the past sixty years, transforming ourselves from a small technical college serving local industry to a world-class institution, known and valued for our business-facing culture and high-quality research. During this time, higher education has changed considerably as a result of the digital age, internationalisation, and the political landscape. Yet, as we continue to reinvent ourselves, the University’s original vision and values still hold true. We are, though, ever more creative and forward-thinking in how we add value to students, employers and the economy.

Student experience

Pages 14-23

Employability and entrepreneurship

Pages 24-29

Learning and teaching

As we start a new chapter in our history, our priorities are to provide our students with the opportunity to receive a broad education within a truly inspirational and supportive environment, and to strengthen our role in business, industry and the community. We are realising these goals through innovative projects like our Open Herts, Open Minds initiative, our Estates 2020 Masterplan and our involvement in new university-style colleges in the region.

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International engagement

Pages 36-41

Our University has only become the dynamic and thriving place it is today because of the spirit and collective hard work of our students, staff, alumni, friends and supporters. I would like to thank them all, and am confident that with their ongoing commitment we can go on to even greater things.

Research, innovation and enterprise

Pages 42-53

Community

Pages 54-61 Professor Quintin McKellar Vice-Chancellor University information

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Celebrating

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Our diamond jubilee

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Eleanor Lyen of Hong Kong is the first international student to enrol

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Our diamond jubilee

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Our diamond jubilee Alumni awards event celebrates our rich heritage.

Expert views

High turnout for a special series of Chancellor’s lectures.

People power

Posters pay tribute to the faces behind our success.

Sixty years

We publish the story of our history of innovation.

Feeling great

We’re fitter, healthier and happier thanks to a little nudge.

Inspiring

Photographic competition captures our passion for discovery.

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Our success over sixty years in helping individuals, organisations and communities to pursue their interests and realise their ambitions give us a great deal to celebrate. It also inspires us to make the most of what the future holds.

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A series of Chancellor’s lectures, an alumni reunion and a community fête are among the many academic, cultural and social events we hosted during our diamond jubilee year. We also commissioned a special art collection and published a commemorative book telling the story of how we have evolved from a small technical college to a world-class university.

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All kinds of people connected with our University enjoyed many memorable events held to mark our sixtieth anniversary.

Reunited

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REUNITED Our diamond jubilee

REUNITED

At the Diamond Jubilee Alumni Ceremony, old friends and classmates came together to celebrate our University’s rich heritage. This last year marked our sixty years as a further and higher educational institution and twenty years as a university. As part of our celebrations, we invited alumni who graduated between 1952 and 1992 to a special awards ceremony and reunion to officially acknowledge their contribution to the creation and success of the University. Five hundred former graduates attended the event, which took place on a sunny day in early September. Dressed in traditional graduation robes, they were presented with an ‘Associateship of the University of Hertfordshire’ award and certificate, entitling them to carry the initials AUH after their names. The award recognises the role that alumni who graduated before 1992 have played in the University’s history and development. These graduates, from our predecessor institutions including Hatfield Technical College and Hatfield Polytechnic, received their honorary titles in an attractively-decorated marquee on the College Lane Campus.

Vice-Chancellor Professor Quintin McKellar, who shook hands with and talked to each honouree, said: ‘We felt it was important to recognise those students of our former institutions who together have formed an integral part of our educational journey and of the University’s heritage. ‘Being one of our alumni is what each of our graduates has in common with each other. No group of individuals is better placed to inspire our current students than those who have stood exactly where they are now, and we are very pleased to be able to honour them with this Associateship award.’ Following the ceremonies – held in the morning, afternoon and evening – the new Associates enjoyed a celebratory meal with their friends and families, as well as tours and an exhibition looking at the University through the ages. There was also plenty of reminiscing, and oral historians were on hand to record people’s memories for future generations of students and alumni.

Professor Quintin McKellar presenting an Associateship to an alumnus

No group of individuals is better placed to inspire our current students than those who have stood exactly where they are now, and we are very pleased to be able to honour them with this Associateship award.

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The First College RaG day is held


EXPERT VIEWS Our diamond jubilee

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EXPERT VIEWS The Chancellor’s Lecture Diamond Jubilee Series was among the many highlights of the year. The series culminated in December with a thought-provoking talk by the University’s Chancellor Lord Salisbury, who previously served as a Member of Parliament and as Leader of the House of Lords. In The Nation State: history or not? he pondered whether the nation state has an ongoing role and, if not, what in practical terms can take its place. Attendees took part in a lively question-andanswer session and also enjoyed an exhibition of the University’s history.

Engaging with the wider community is an important part of our University’s agenda. It is fitting, therefore, that we marked our sixty years in further and higher education in Hertfordshire by opening our doors for a series of public talks at The Weston Auditorium. High-profile figures in the fields of history, science and politics presented lectures covering topical issues. Our first guest speaker was The Lord Hennessy of Nympsfield, Attlee Professor of Contemporary British History at Queen Mary, University of London. In a lecture entitled Power and the Pursuit of Influence he considered the importance of studying government and parliament. As an award-winning writer and expert on the inner workings of Whitehall, Lord Hennessy delivered a very engaging talk full of fascinating insights.

All the events were very popular and attracted a broad mix of people, including the University Court and Governors, staff and students, local councillors and members of the public.

Lord Salisbury and The Lord Hennessy of Nympsfield

There was a high turnout for the second lecture, The Human Brain: is it up to the job? It was given by Colin Blakemore, Professor of Neuroscience and Philosophy at the University of London, who is also well known for his scientific broadcasts and writing. Drawing on his extensive research, he spoke about how exercising our brains helps them to modify, and that brain capacity is increased by our learning and experiences. It was a highly informative evening and prompted many questions from the audience.

exercising our brains helps them to modify, and brain capacity is increased by our learning and experiences.

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Gordon H. Wright is employed as County Technical Librarian and begins the expansion of the Hertfordshire College Library network

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Professor Colin Blakemore.

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PEOPLE POWER Our diamond jubilee

PEOPLE POWER

Our Changing Faces poster campaign recognises and celebrates people from all walks of life who have helped to shape our University.

Further information about all the people featured in the campaign is published on the University intranet. In this way a very individual history of the University is portrayed.

Celebrating

SIXTY YEARS 1952 - 2012

Changing Faces Honorary Doctorates

Olivia de Havilland 1998

Nick Faldo MBE 1992

Education then... Michael Morpurgo MBE 2005

Michelle Mone OBE 2010

Dr Brian May CBE 2002

David James 2011

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By 1957, there were 3,847 students enrolled at Hatfield Technical College.

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We also owe a great deal to the people who engage with us in business, industry and the community. For example, it is thanks to the enthusiasm and generosity of our benefactors that we are able to fund state-of-

Many of our buildings are named after individuals who have served or had a particularly close association with the University or our predecessor institutions. We are introducing a blue plaque scheme to explain the reasons why.

the-art equipment and facilities, offer student scholarships and pursue ground-breaking research. We are proud too of those people to whom we have awarded honorary doctorates, for their achievements in their own spheres and for sharing their expertise with us. And we took the opportunity to showcase research stars of the future.

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The campaign highlights the contribution of generations of alumni around the world who have made their mark in their chosen field and in society. We also acknowledge the dedication of academic and professional staff past and present. This includes those individuals who have provided direction and leadership over the decades and those honoured with Vice-Chancellor’s awards for being excellent employees.

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A series of nine posters, accompanied by matching postcards, are displayed at various sites around the campus. Each features images from our archive and celebrates a different aspect of our heritage.

A series of nine posters, accompanied by matching postcards, are displayed at various sites around the campus. Each features images from our archive and celebrates a different aspect of our heritage.

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Many thousands of people have played a part in our growth and success over the last sixty years – whether by learning, teaching, discovering, managing or by contributing in other ways. Our internal communications campaign Changing Faces tells the story of their vision and hard work. It focuses on key events in our history and a cross-section of notable people who represent our values, such as creativity, enterprise and innovation.


SIXTY YEARS Our diamond jubilee

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SIXTY YEARS

A commemorative history of our University clearly demonstrates why we have become the vibrant institution that we are today.

As we move forward our University is able to draw on a dynamic past, a strong culture of learning and enduring links with business. That is the key message that comes through in The University of Hertfordshire: Sixty Years of Innovation, published by the School of Humanities to mark our diamond jubilee.

Individual stories and memories also illuminate the experiences of the hundreds of thousands of students who have graduated, and the contribution of academic and professional staff to our record of success.

Researching and writing the book revealed how the history of Hatfield and the University were inseparable.

‘Researching and writing the book revealed how the history of Hatfield and the University were inseparable. It was the dynamism and pool of talent in the local community that enabled us to grow,’ says Owen Davies, Professor of Social History, who devised and edited the publication.

research and teaching, exemplifying what can be achieved by embracing a broad curriculum.

Over its two-hundred plus pages, the book charts the challenges and achievements during our six decades of life in further and higher education. It traces the development of Hatfield College, from its roots in Britain’s pioneering aeronautical industry in the early 1950s, through its designation as Hatfield Polytechnic in 1969, to gaining full university status in 1992. It shows how we have evolved into an internationally recognised leader in both

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While showing how the University has grown and developed through its achievements in the arts, science and the humanities, the book explores how this heritage is helping to shape our future.

The University of Hertfordshire: Sixty Years of Innovation is available to buy through UH Press.

As the story unfolds, it reflects the developments taking place in the higher education sector, particularly the important role that post-1992 institutions have played in advancing knowledge, the economy and the cultural life of the country.

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A Druine ‘Turbi’ two-seater light aircraft built by students of the T.K Flying Group makes its maiden flight

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FEELING GREAT Our diamond jubilee

FEELING GREAT

We’re feeling fitter, healthier and happier thanks to a little nudge from our sports experts.

Many more University staff and students caught the fitness bug in the spring when they joined employees from local companies to take part in Hatfield Business Park’s first-ever charity fun run. The 350 runners, some sporting fancy dress, had the choice of completing either a gentle 1 mile route or a slightly more challenging 5 km course. Impressively, our Vice-Chancellor Professor Quintin McKellar achieved highly respectable results in both distances.

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also helped to organise the fun run alongside Herts Sports Partnership, Hertfordshire Sports Village and Hatfield Business Park owners, Goodman. With the event creating such an enjoyable atmosphere and raising over £2,000 for Sport Relief, the local community is hoping that the fun run will become a bi-annual fixture.

The University provided £3,000 sponsorship as part of our diamond jubilee celebrations, and

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Over three months, the Nudge:Estates project helped fifty members of staff from our Estates Department to achieve dramatic improvements in blood pressure, cholesterol levels and BMI (Body Mass Index). Word of their success quickly spread across the University, so when Nudge:Jubilee was announced for the summer,

Nudge also has a positive impact on people’s working lives, in that they feel more energetic, determined and inspired.

‘It’s clear from the follow-up questionnaires that Nudge also has a positive impact on people’s working lives, in that they feel more energetic, determined and inspired. We’re hoping to extend the programme in the coming months,’ adds Rhian.

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Rhian Crawford, Sports Project Officer (Physical Activity, Health and Wellbeing) says: ‘The Nudge programme is all about helping people achieve their personal goals, whether that’s losing a few pounds or being able to swim a few extra lengths in the pool. It starts with a health MOT and then provides advice on healthy eating and exercise. The team-based physical activity challenges and personal activity monitors really help to keep people motivated.’

many people were keen to get involved. The sixty who were selected soon began to see and feel the benefits.

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The results of a health and wellbeing programme run by staff at Hertfordshire Sports Village suggest that a little nudge goes a long way when people want to make and maintain lifestyle changes.


INSPIRING Our diamond jubilee

Researchers of the past, present and maybe even the future joined in events reflecting our sixty years of innovation. Images of a foot, the view from a moving steam train and caffeine-fuelled hard work were among the winning entries. However, the £2,000 first prize went to Colleen Addicott’s photograph ‘People at their best’. Taken on a cloudy afternoon, it shows silhouettes of individuals, each carrying a prop to represent their profession and jumping for joy in whichever career they find themselves.

Our passion for discovery and new ideas goes back to our very earliest days as a technical college. Today we are delivering original solutions to major global issues like climate change, healthcare and sustainable energy. So our diamond jubilee events would not have been complete without celebrating what makes us a thriving research community. The ‘Reflection on Research’ photography competition certainly shows the imagination of our students, and was so popular that we plan to run it again in 2013. We invited them to enter images that visually represented their own research programmes, and also to describe how they took them.

Occupational psychologist Colleen is currently doing a research degree at the University and is looking to develop a model to identify where people are at their best at work.

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‘We received a very wide range of submissions from so many different areas of research, and the quality of all the entries was excellent – a great challenge for our judging panel,’ comments Dr Susan Grey, Director of Research Degrees and Director of the Doctoral College.

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The photographic entries are being featured in a publication about future research. They were also exhibited at various events, including a reception and dinner at The Forum for research degree alumni. It was a very special occasion, which reunited old friends and reconnected many graduates with the University.

We also held an open afternoon to inspire the next generation of researchers. About fifty Year 11 pupils from several local secondary schools listened to exciting talks from senior researchers that provided an insight into their work. The young people also viewed interactive stands, covering projects such as video portraiture, astrophysics, and KASPAR, the robot designed to help children with autism.

1960 Hatfield Technical College is renamed Hatfield College of Technology

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INSPIRING

The ‘Reflection on Research’ photography competition certainly shows the imagination of our students, and was so popular that we plan to run it again in 2013.

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Colleen Addicott being presented her award by Professor John Senior

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Celebrating

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Six students race from Land’s End to John O’Groats on a 197cc, two-stroke engine go-kart

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A College team makes its first appearance in the ninety-eight mile London to Leicester Pram Race

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Student experience

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Student experience

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Student experience

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The College is recognised as a Regional College, one of only twenty-five in England and Wales

Art installations bring our graduate attributes to life.

Thrilling job

Olympic highlights for creative arts students.

Rocket to fame

Student-built sports car is faster than a Ferrari.

Role models

New magazine raises teenagers’ aspirations.

Now showing

Students debut their creative skills for charity premiere of Skyfall.

Joint venture

We work together to draw up a new student charter.

Smarter world

The future of the smart age takes shape in our new lab.

Advocacy art

The secrets of court room success are revealed.

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They reward us in how they grow personally and what they achieve in their working lives. Some become entrepreneurs or leaders in business and industry. Others champion change in public services or volunteer in their local communities. Whatever path they choose, we’re confident their contribution makes a positive difference.

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We’re more passionate than ever about giving our students a unique university experience. As well as involving them in shaping their living and learning environments, we encourage them to be active and independent learners. We make time to celebrate their successes and support them long after they graduate.

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A well-rounded education full of opportunities inspires our students not just to find their place in a changing world but to flourish in it.

Expressions

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EXPRESSIONS Student experience

Professor Quintin McKellar with one of the competition entrants

EXPRESSIONS

Inspirational media installations bring our graduate attributes to life.

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The first digital computer at the College is purchased – a National Elliott 803B digital computer, at a cost of £24,010.

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Among other things, we want our graduates to leave us as more accomplished communicators, independent thinkers and culturally agile individuals. Ultimately, this equips them to contribute to society as better

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More than twenty students entered the competition, which was part of a wider

The collection expresses the five key attributes of professionalism, employability and enterprise; learning and research skills; intellectual depth, breadth and adaptability; respect for others; and social responsibility.

The pieces are now being enjoyed by students, staff and visitors for their artistic merits. By making the attributes more ‘visible’, the artworks are also stimulating conversations about how these qualities give our University its unique character and shape our graduates’ approach to life and work.

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In this university-wide competition, conceived and initiated by Dr Andrew Clutterbuck, Pro-Vice Chancellor (Student Experience), we challenged students to express their personal interpretations of the University’s graduate attributes through different media. ‘This represented a wonderful opportunity to showcase talent and to create a legacy within the fabric of the University to inspire people for years to come,’ says Rosemary Allen, Associate Dean Learning and Teaching in our School of Education. ‘Each art installation contributes to the sense of who we are as a University community, embracing and celebrating attributes.’

academics, employees and employers, citizens and neighbours, friends and family members.

programme of art exhibitions and installations on campus marking our diamond jubilee year. Their exciting concepts, ranging from artefacts and films to prints and sculpture, were on show at the annual Vice-Chancellor’s Awards event in the summer. A judging panel of academic and professional staff and students then selected ten artists to realise their designs and create the final pieces. The collection expresses the five key attributes of professionalism, employability and enterprise; learning and research skills; intellectual depth, breadth and adaptability; respect for others; and social responsibility.

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Many more people are talking about what it means to be a University of Hertfordshire graduate, thanks to a new series of thoughtprovoking art installations. These visually stimulating creations, displayed in public spaces across our campuses, are the work of students who took part in our 2012 Graduate Attributes Media Installations Project.


THRILLING JOB Student experience

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THRILLING JOB

Creating giant puppets and pyrotechnics for the 2012 Olympics and Paralympics ceremonies builds valuable skills and contacts.

Students and graduates were involved in creating some of the ceremonies’ most spectacular effects and memorable models. Among these artistic and engineering highlights are the molten metal effects from the large crucible; the huge trampoline beds; the giant Voldemort, Captain Hook and Cruella De Vil puppets; and the sleeping baby at the end of the NHS scene.

During 2012, eight students and eleven graduates had the chance of a lifetime to work with the special effects company Artem in creating major elements of the Olympics and Paralympics opening and closing ceremonies. ‘We do everything we can to help students maximise their chances of employment in this highly competitive field,’ says programme tutor Ian Mitchell. ‘Being involved in the challenges and thrills of such a high-profile and massivescale live event, which was seen by millions around the world, was an amazing experience for these students.

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‘As well as making valuable industry connections, they learnt how technicians

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‘The School of Creative Arts has enjoyed a really outstanding year for work experience opportunities, with sixty of our students undertaking formal and informal placements. In addition to working on the Olympic and Paralympic games in the summer vacation, over thirty Model and Special Effects students worked on major film productions such as Thor:

The Dark World, Batman 3: The Dark Knight Rises and Tom Cruise’s new sci-fi movie All You Need Is Kill. Hence the Model and Special Effects programme has a higher than average employment success rate, with around eightyfive per cent of graduates finding work in the industry within six months,’ adds Ian Mitchell.

Playing a part in turning Danny Boyle’s vision into reality is something that not many people can add to their CVs, and is a great talking point at job interviews.

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produce special effects that are impressive on camera as well as in large stadiums. Playing a part in turning Danny Boyle’s vision into reality is something that not many people can add to their CVs, and is a great talking point at job interviews.’

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More than ever, work experience is an important part of our students’ wider university experience. On our Model and Special Effects programme, for example, students spend up to half of their second year in industry, where they have plenty of opportunity to put classroom theory and skills into practice.

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ROCKET TO FAME Student experience

In less than six weeks they converted a Vauxhall VX220 sports car, fitting it with a large hybrid rocket motor designed to produce over half a tonne of thrust.

ROCKET TO FAME

Final-year aerospace students design and build a full-size, rocketpowered sports car for BBC One’s Bang Goes the Theory.

progressing quickly from model rockets into high-power rocketry. As well as assisting with research and development, these activities help to attract students.

Ray Wilkinson, Principal Lecturer in Aerospace, says: ‘This is an incredible and exciting achievement for our students. The importance of marrying theoretical work with practical work cannot be over-emphasised. A project like this highlights the University’s innovative approach to giving our students the hands-on experience they need to progress into their chosen careers. Hopefully it will encourage more young people to study science, technology, engineering and mathematics.’ The rocket-powered car project is the fourth occasion that the School has been involved with Bang Goes the Theory. Previous projects featured a rocket-powered bicycle fuelled by toffee, a rocket-powered railway vehicle that reached almost two hundred miles per hour, and a tug-of-war between a rocket motor and a jet engine.

Ray Wilkinson with Rahul Kundu, who designed and built the rocket motor for the car.

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Fairshot Hall, Sandridge, becomes the College’s first Hall of Residence

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Our School of Engineering and Technology has been involved in rocketry since 2005,

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Our students undertook the project for the science magazine programme as part of their course curriculum. In less than six weeks they converted a Vauxhall VX220 sports car, fitting it with a large hybrid rocket motor designed to produce over half a tonne of thrust. They also modified it to reduce the car’s weight and installed the necessary safety systems. Bang Goes the Theory presenter Dallas Campbell put the car through its paces on the main runway at Duxford Aerodrome at the Imperial War Museum. These speed tests proved the car to be capable of acceleration from 0 to 60

mph within three seconds, faster than a Ferrari.

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In the first student project of its kind, a group of undergraduates from our School of Engineering and Technology designed and built a full-size rocket-powered vehicle. The car was created for a Bang Goes the Theory article featuring the Bloodhound 1,000 miles per hour car which is being built for a land speed record attempt in 2014. Bloodhound is both a major research project and an international education initiative aimed at inspiring a new generation of scientists and engineers.


ROLE MODELS Student experience

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ROLE MODELS

We work alongside local charity Act for Change to launch a magazine aimed at raising teenagers’ aspirations. As part of their course assignment work, a group of MA students from our Journalism and Media Communications programme have written, designed and edited a series of magazines on behalf of Act for Change. This Radlett-based charity helps young people in the community to improve their own lives and the lives of those around them. The printed and interactive magazines, titled Get Ahead, are now being used by selected schools in Hertfordshire where they have been well received by teachers and pupils.

Emily Iversen, one of the postgraduate students who worked on the magazine, says: ‘Using local role models as examples, the articles explain what skills these youngsters need to succeed and how they can learn them. ‘The project is an amazing opportunity for MA students to get our work published, but more than that, it’s great to be involved in something that helps teenagers who think they have no prospects in the current climate.’

Get Ahead is sponsored by the University’s Outreach and Widening Participation Department.

MA Journalism and Communication student Emily Iverson.

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Norman Lindop joins the college as Principal

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Senior Lecturer in Journalism Sharon Maxwell Magnus explains how the project delivers on several levels: ‘The charity felt it was important that the content was written from a young person’s perspective. Staff and students at our School of Humanities were pleased to be able to provide the input and support needed. The opportunity enabled us to make a tangible contribution to our local community, while giving our students the experience of working on a live project where they could

Providing a mix of inspiration and information, Get Ahead is the first magazine of its kind in the UK written by students for students. The idea behind it is to motivate fifteen-to seventeen-year-olds to learn new skills to secure a better future. Among the topics tackled are: giving something back through volunteering; the dos and don’ts of job interviews; and everything you need to know about apprenticeships.

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polish their team-working and problem-solving skills. Furthermore, students taking this project developed professional industry standard skills in Indesign (DTP software) and used social media to promote the magazine.’

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NOW SHOWING Student experience

NOW SHOWING

Students put their creative skills to work to promote a special charity screening of the Bond film Skyfall.

‘It’s great to see something that I have worked on being shown on the big screen. As a film student, making movies is what I want to do in the future so this was an insight into what’s hopefully to come.’

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Seven students cross the English Channel from Dover to Calais on a specially adapted bed in order to publicise RaG week

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To advertise the event and its sponsors, the students came up with a concept and design for the trailer that played on the famous James Bond gun barrel opening sequence. They then

We wanted the concept to be fast paced and mysterious in keeping with the Bond theme, but in a way that would inform viewers about this exclusive event.

Ben Freeden, one of the students involved in making the trailer, says: ‘We wanted the concept to be fast paced and mysterious in keeping with the Bond theme, but in a way that would inform viewers about this exclusive event.

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As the latest James Bond film Skyfall hit the big screen in October, seven students from our BA Film and Television course put their professional skills to good use. They created a trailer promoting the regional premiere of the film, which was shown at the Odeon Hatfield ahead of its general release, in aid of the Foundation for the Study of Infant Deaths (FSID).

worked alongside their tutor Howard Berry to create and animate the finished video, which was shown before every film at the cinema in the week running up to the charity presentation. FSID held similar screenings up and down the country, raising a total of more than £30,000.

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Hertfordshire is home to major film and television studios and our University has long been recognised for nurturing up-and-coming talent in media production. Through our close links with the studios, our students have the opportunity to work on live industry projects as part of their overall learning experience.


JOINT VENTURE Student experience

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Student Union President Erika Masefield with Vice Chancellor Professor Quintin McKellar

JOINT VENTURE

Our new Student Charter is working to strengthen what our students, the University and the Students’ Union put into and get out of higher education at our University.

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‘Our University’s vision is to put students at the heart of what we do. This Charter is a meaningful contribution towards that aim and towards ensuring that each and every one of our students has the opportunity to fulfil their potential,’ adds Vice-Chancellor Professor Quintin McKellar.

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‘Developing the Charter was a great exercise in working together,’ says Dr Andrew Clutterbuck, Pro Vice-Chancellor (Student Experience). ‘Our students, staff and the Students’ Union came to the project with considerable enthusiasm and clarity about their mutual commitments, rights and responsibilities. The result is a Charter that is clear and fresh, and that speaks about how we want to work together. It’s great to see this reflected in the way in which the Charter is both raised in conversation and is on

It serves as a guide to what we can all expect of each other.

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Hertfordshire County Council approves the use of Bayfordbury Mansion as additional teaching space for the College

DECEMBER

The Charter currently sets out more than twenty commitments. Students, for example, commit to actively participate in their studies, make full use of the facilities and respect the local community. The University’s commitments include listening and responding to students’ needs and providing flexible learning using different technologies. The Students’ Union commits to being an independent and accountable voice for students, and to providing services that make an impact on students’ employability.

The Charter is central to our approach to the student experience, but is by no means set in stone. All parties come together each year to review it and agree any modifications. This way we can all be confident that, in the light of new developments both at our University and in higher education generally, our Charter continues to reflect students’ changing needs and expectations.

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display in so many areas of the University.’

As with any successful partnership, the University’s relationship with our students is based on mutual commitment and respect, open and honest communication and integrity. To ensure that the student experience is the best it can be, students, staff and representatives from our Students’ Union have got together to draw up a Student Charter. It serves as a guide to what we can all expect of each other, and plays a valuable role in shaping people’s experience both on and off campus.

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SMARTER WORLD Student experience

I’m confident that our graduates will have both the technical knowledge and practical experience needed to be key players in the future of the smart age

Johan Siau

SMARTER WORLD Our new Smart Systems Lab gives students a unique learning and research environment where they can showcase their work. around encryption and security of embedded systems, digital and data communications, and private and cloud-based service aggregation platforms.

and digital worlds continue to converge, I’m confident that our graduates will have both the technical knowledge and practical experience needed to be key players in the future of the smart age,’ adds Johann Siau. Industry and research partners who have provided support in setting up the Smart Systems Lab include the Building Research Establishment (BRE), Samsung, Microsoft, Gemalto and HostEurope, and the Centre for Energy, Environment and Sustainability (CEES) at the University of Sheffield.

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Hatfield College of Technology becomes Hatfield Polytechnic

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‘We now have a highly flexible and resource-rich environment where staff and students can come together with industry organisations to work on commercially funded projects, and where we can run clinics and short courses. As the real

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The well-planned lab hosts speech and gesture recognition technology, as well as multi-touch interfaces, smartphones and tables, sensors and actuators. Its networking infrastructure offers teaching and development opportunities

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Smart Systems Lab leader and Senior Lecturer in Digital Communication Systems, Johann Siau says: ‘We’ve created a highly stimulating and fully interactive workspace for teaching and research, which also supports our Knowledge for Business intern (K4Bi) projects. Students can experience at first hand the challenges and excitement of developing smart devices, systems and services, taking ideas rapidly from conception to proof of concept and reality.’

Students contribute directly to some of the School’s thematic research projects which are taking shape in the Smart Systems Lab. These focus on smart solutions for areas such as homes and buildings, transportation, assisted living and healthcare services. For the InterHome project, for example, computing and network technology undergraduate Chris Griffiths has developed a 3D and mobile home automation and control system using Microsoft PixelSense and Windows Phone, while BSc student Al-Azhar Lalani has created remote vehicle telemetry and tracking for our InterVehicle project.

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1968

In response to growing activity in the marketplace around the development and application of smart systems, our School of Engineering and Technology has set up a highspec laboratory on the College Lane Campus. The Smart Systems Lab’s cutting-edge and comprehensive facilities are helping to attract and develop top engineering talent.


ADVOCACY ART Student experience

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ADVOCACY ART

The secrets of success are revealed at our advocacy training courses. It takes knowledge and specialist skills, as well as confidence and experience, to present a well-constructed and persuasive legal argument. To give our undergraduates and postgraduates a helping hand in developing their capabilities in oral and written advocacy, our Law School is hosting a new range of additional extra-curricular training.

Secondly, training takes place in our state-ofthe-art replica Crown Court room, which is one of the best-equipped simulated courtroom environments of any university in the country. This provides a much more valuable setting in which the students can learn and practise, and thus gain an insight into what it is like to perform in a reai-life courtroom situation.

the students respond so rapidly in applying professional techniques to achieve success in their courtroom. They get a real feel of how barristers function on their feet day in and day out.’

These new courses are run by the School of Advocacy and Legal Studies (SALS), and are taught by leading criminal advocates such as Patrick Upward QC, Kenneth Aylett, and Michael Edmonds, all of 4 Breams Buildings chambers in London.

The courses cover subjects such as case analysis, use of skeleton arguments, how to conduct cross-examination of witnesses, the rules of hearsay and the procedures regarding the admissibility of evidence. The SALS trainers observe students’ oral performance in practice sessions, identify their strengths and then provide a structured approach to develop them further. Participants who successfully complete the course receive a certificate.

‘Integrating theory and practice has always been a priority in our training activities,’ says Neal Geach from our School of Law. ‘These formal advocacy training courses offer students two important advantages. First, they are delivered by distinguished practitioners who are also highly experienced trainers.

Barrister Kenneth Aylett explains: ‘The barristers get a real thrill out of teaching these courses. It is always a joy to watch

More advanced training courses will also be available to solicitors and barristers who are looking to develop their advocacy skills.

It is always a joy to watch the students respond so rapidly in applying professional techniques to achieve success in their courtroom.

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Kenneth Aylett

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Employability and entrepreneurship

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The Astronomical Observatory, housing a sixteen-inch multi-purpose telescope, is formally opened in the grounds of Bayfordbury Mansion


Employability and entrepreneurship

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Employability and entrepreneurship We’re introducing new and innovative ideas to ensure our students build the skills and experience they need to realise their potential in the world of work. Whether they plan to become engineers, physiotherapists, lawyers or fashion designers, or are inspired to start up businesses of their own, our students have a significant advantage. We’re shaping more courses directly around the needs of employers, and expanding opportunities for work placements, volunteering and international exchanges. At the same time, we’re supporting entrepreneurial flair through our incubation centre, professional mentoring, competitions and networking events.

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Sweet success

Entrepreneur of the year award is the icing on the cake.

Talking shop

Students share their enterprise stories with government minister.

Work ready

Practical experience helps students get ahead.

Just do it

Earning while learning makes perfect sense.

All this and more means that our graduates have what it takes to make them the first choice for the top employers. They leave us ready for work and ready to contribute to the economy.

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Two new halls of residence are opened: Butler Hall and Fern Hall

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SWEET SUCCESS Employability and entrepreneurship

SWEET SUCCESS

Winning ‘flare Entrepreneur of the Year 2012’ is the icing on the cake for humanities postgraduate Lucy Clark. Since setting up her bespoke handmade cupcake business Heaven is a Cupcake in 2010, Lucy Clark has worked hard to get her brand widely known. ‘I sell at local fairs and markets and send out regular newsletters, but most orders come via the website so I put a lot of energy into keeping it lively and up to date. I also have a strong following on Facebook and Twitter, and often use these to post special offers which are very popular,’ says Lucy.

Competing against nearly a hundred and eighty other entrants was tough, but also a fantastic experience.

Lucy Clark

Lucy’s enterprising approach has brought in orders from major corporations such as Tesco and Land Rover, and other famous names, including Big Brother, Eastenders, Holby City and Radio 1. Having had her creative flair and exceptional customer service recognised in a number of local and national awards, Lucy is now thrilled to have scooped the top prize in our 2012 start-up competition, flare. ‘Competing against nearly a hundred and eighty other entrants was tough, but also a fantastic experience,’ says Lucy. ‘I had many ideas to improve my business which the judges really liked. Although I’m not a confident public speaker, by the end of the process I was ready to pitch to anyone.’ As well as the prestigious title of ‘Entrepreneur of the Year 2012’ and a £10,000 cash prize, Lucy receives one year’s membership to the Hertfordshire Chamber of Commerce and Industry. She can also take advantage of the University’s Enterprise Incubation Centre facilities, and business consultancy and mentoring from Exemplas. ‘I’ve already bought some new equipment and modernised my kitchen, but the prize package means I can now run cupcake and cake decorating classes which I’ve been wanting to do for a while. Eventually I would like to have small premises, take on an assistant and move into other areas. I’m now making large celebration cakes and hope to continue with this trend, perhaps expanding into tiered wedding cakes as well,’ says Lucy.

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Her top three tips for would-be entrepreneurs are: do something you enjoy; know your competition; and keep it fresh.


TALKING SHOP Employability and entrepreneurship

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MP Mark Prisk with Professor Quintin McKellar and Herts Entrepreneurs

TALKING SHOP

Government minister hears how the University supports student entrepreneurs in getting their ideas off the ground. person property renting platform rentlord.com, also offered advice on how to raise finance.

Hertfordshire MP Mark Prisk learnt at first hand how the University supports budding entrepreneurs when he visited our Business School in February. The then Minister for Business and Enterprise took part in a lively round-table discussion hosted by Herts Entrepreneurs, our student-led entrepreneurial society. The group shared their experiences and discussed how the specialised support available at the University helps them to study in parallel with setting up and growing businesses.

The President of Herts Entrepreneurs Natasha Webb says: ‘With around five hundred members, our society is one of the largest of its kind in the country. Together with the University we provide students with wide-ranging opportunities to network and collaborate, to learn from experts and to expand their business skills. The University’s Incubation Centre, for example, provides students and graduates with designated office space to help them turn their ideas into viable businesses.

The MP for Hertford and Stortford also joined the students in a workshop on business start-up finance and fundraising, jointly arranged by Herts Entrepreneurs and the National Association of College and University Entrepreneurs. Serial entrepreneur Bill Morrow, founder and CEO of Angels Den, Europe’s largest equity funding facilitators, spoke about how to pitch to potential investors. Colin Tan, the brains behind the first online person-to-

‘The meeting with Mark Prisk was a great opportunity for students to talk about the benefits of such events, workshops and facilities. As well as adding a valuable dimension to their university experience, they help them to make the transition from studying to working.’

Among the entrepreneurs Mark Prisk met during his visit was Greg McClarnon, who combines studying for a degree with running his own photography and web development business, and graduate Joseph Lion who started his own graphic design company at the age of fifteen.

Together with the University we provide students with wide-ranging opportunities to network and collaborate, to learn from experts and to expand their business skills.

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Natasha Webb

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WORK READY Employability and entrepreneurship

Kenny England now an interactive producer for Absolute Radio in London, and a freelancer for BBC Radio 1, 1xtra & Asian Network

WORK READY

Practical experience helps students move their careers forward. For Ben Butters, who studied Aerospace Systems Engineering, a year’s placement at missile company MBDA helped to secure a role there as a Graduate Trials Engineer. While his good first-year results were important for MBDA, he believes that it was his extracurricular activities that gave him the edge over other applicants. Ben was a member of the Students’ Union Drama Society, and also acted as a Student Representative, a School Student Representative Organiser and a Student Ambassador.

Our Careers and Placements Service connects students with potential employers.

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The Students’ Union moves into the Hutton Building. A new bar, named The Font, is opened

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Volunteering also benefited Kenny England, who won the Employability Award at our University’s 2012 Student Recognition Evening. Now an interactive producer for Absolute Radio in London, Kenny built up a network of contacts while studying for his degree in Animation and Multimedia Design. As well as devoting hundreds of hours to Students’ Union activities, such as committee work for the campus radio

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It was certainly a positive move for Nikki Wilson, who is in her final year of a Human Resources and Event Management course. Although placement was not obligatory for her studies, she successfully applied for a role as HR Assistant at leading IT firm, Computacenter, where she was involved in a variety of tasks. She says: ‘I’d definitely recommend doing a work placement, as you are able to see if a career is going to be right for you, and it can

station, Crush, and as Head Designer for Bluemoon magazine, he volunteered for the Student Radio Association and at BBC Three Counties.

help you to understand your work in a real-life business environment.’

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The employability of our students has always been a priority, but we are more focused than ever on providing them with employment opportunities. Our Careers and Placements Service connects students with potential employers in a number of ways, including twice-yearly large-scale fairs; easy access to job vacancies and placements on our CareerHub via their PCs and smartphones; and a wide range of workshops and employer events. However, many students also acquire practical experience that can give a real boost to their prospects.


JUST DO IT Employability and entrepreneurship

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JUST DO IT

Earning while learning makes perfect sense for entrepreneur and business studies undergraduate Greg McClarnon.

Greg and his team at Splaat Media go into schools and take photographs, free of charge, during dress rehearsals of productions. At live show performances audiences can then browse displays of the printed images and buy photographs. ‘Parents love what we do,’ says Greg. ‘It gives them a lasting memory of their child’s achievement.’

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Greg recently told his story at a ‘Focus-On’ event run by the Enterprise department,

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With success so early on in his working life, Greg was tempted to focus solely on growing his business rather than go to university. However, a conversation with a student member of the Herts Entrepreneurs society at one of the University’s open days persuaded Greg that it would be possible, and worthwhile,

If you’ve got an idea and you are motivated to be successful, just do it.

Greg McClarnon

1975 Julia Schofield becomes the first totally blind graduate in Computer Science in the UK

april

‘I’ve learnt so much and benefited far more than I would have done if I’d left sixth form to work on my business full time,’ says Greg. ‘The support and facilities at the University for student enterprises like mine are fantastic. They are enabling me not just to run my business successfully alongside my studies, but to grow it. The workshops and mentoring and networking opportunities are excellent. Having office space at the University has allowed me to employ other students and expand the business beyond my home base of Sussex and Surrey into Hertfordshire and surrounding counties. Also, I’ll be able to spend part of my placement year working full time on my plans to develop Splaat Media further.’

where he shared his top tips on starting up a business. His advice for those thinking of taking the plunge is: ‘If you’ve got an idea and you’re motivated to be successful, just do it.’

march

to do both. He is now in his second year of a BA (Hons) degree course in business studies and is convinced he made the right decision.

Having started up his own business while he was still in the sixth form, performing arts and digital media enthusiast Greg McClarnon clearly enjoys a challenge. He took a simple idea – providing school show photography – did it really well, and at an attractive rate, and his business quickly took off.

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Learning and teaching

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Wall Hall and Balls Park teacher training colleges merge to form the Hertfordshire College of Higher Education which was later taken over by Hatfield Polytechnic


Learning and teaching

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Learning and teaching Fresh thinking and new academic partnerships are driving exciting developments in learning and teaching across the University and beyond. We’re creating wide-ranging opportunities for students and staff to develop new skills and engage in activities towards achieving their personal goals. Study programmes with strong connections to work, more support for independent learning and continuing professional development, and innovative use of technology are all having a positive impact.

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Vital voice

Innovative health promotion forum improves student nurses’ learning.

Delivering

More flexible study programmes appeal to midwives.

Love Herts

Summer schools spark teenagers’ interest.

Tech talent

We sponsor the new-style University Technical College at Elstree.

We’re also making significant strides in bringing higher education to a wider and more diverse audience. Summer schools, more flexible and online study options, together with the opening of new-style university colleges in our region, are capturing people’s interest and encouraging them to become lifelong learners.

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The Students’ Union Social Centre is opened, which soon becomes known as the ‘Elephant House’ due to its unusual design

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VITAL VOICE Learning and teaching

VITAL VOICE

An innovative health promotion forum engages children to improve student nurses’ learning.

The team will use the knowledge gained to develop future modules and hope to involve children in more formal aspects of student assessment.

Sheila Roberts, who ran the health promotion forum with her colleague, Dr Lisa Whiting, says that although the event required a lot of careful planning, it worked well on several levels.

As children are the recipients of care it is important to listen to their voices.

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‘The forum also reinforced our view that children are willing to be involved in health issues that directly impact them and can make informed decisions.

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‘Innovations like this enhance the overall student experience and contribute enormously to ongoing learning, as well as providing staff with professional development opportunities.

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After choosing a topic, such as teeth cleaning or improving levels of physical activity, students individually designed a tool or method to promote that aspect of health and wellbeing. They then received direct feedback from the

‘We would like to acknowledge the support and commitment of the school, and all the children and the students involved in making the event possible.’

All the children enjoyed being involved, with the majority saying that it would positively change their behaviour. Students were equally enthusiastic about learning in the real world of children and spent time thinking about how to apply the experience in their studies and to their future practice.

AUGUST

We invited twenty-six Year 6 children from a local primary school to take part in a module for students in their second year of our Children’s Nursing degree programme. The module aims to help students to understand and participate in promoting health – a vital part of their job role. As children are the recipients of care it is important to listen to their voices.

children about the tool and activities, and the students’ abilities to communicate with them.

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For the NHS, engaging with users is an important part of ensuring the delivery of appropriate services, and our School of Health and Social Work reflects this in learning and teaching. When the service users are children, this can be quite challenging. However, the success of a child health promotion forum in November shows that involving them is not only feasible but highly beneficial.


DELIVERING Learning and teaching

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We’re proud to be able to work with our colleagues in practice, local women and students to ensure that midwifery education at the University continues to respond to people’s learning needs and remains at the forefront of its profession.

The Midwifery Team

DELIVERING

Award-winning idea for educating midwives leads to better recruitment.

Programme Leader Denise Campbell says: ‘We were looking to attract commissions from within and beyond our normal catchment area by providing more flexible ways of studying. This combination of practice placements and e-learning has reinvigorated interest in our programme both among commissioners and aspiring midwives.’

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Students can direct the pace of learning to suit their personal circumstances and commitments, and can choose to study full-

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Since its introduction in 2009, the programme has made a real impact with students and strategic health authorities. Three cohorts of students have now qualified and are working as part of local midwifery teams at East and North Herts, West Herts, and Barnet and Chase Farm NHS Trusts. Feedback from these Trusts is positive, programme recruitment remains buoyant and student attrition levels are low.

On behalf of the team, Francesca Entwistle says: ‘This progress is the result of a truly collaborative effort. We’re proud to be able to work with our colleagues in practice, local women and students to ensure that midwifery education at the University continues to respond to people’s learning needs and remains at the forefront of its profession. We’re all delighted that our fresh approach has received recognition with the RCM award.’

1978 Balls Park mansion is acquired as an additional teaching space

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time over seventy-eight weeks or part-time over two years. Sixty per cent of their time is spent in practice with mentor support. The remaining time is spent studying, primarily via the University’s e-learning platform StudyNet. Students attend the University for a one-week block each semester, and are supported by a personal tutor at their practice site where they engage in trigger and reflective sessions. Their first placement is in community midwifery where there is continuity of mentors and a focus on normal midwifery.

The team behind the development of an innovative and flexible midwifery programme at our School of Health and Social Work was presented with the 2012 Royal College of Midwives (RCM) award for ‘Innovation and Excellence in Midwifery Education’ sponsored by Johnson & Johnson. The award recognises the work of Sally Boyle, Denise Campbell and Francesca Entwistle in creating the UK’s first work-based, distance learning, pre-registration shortened midwifery programme.

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LOVE HERTS Learning and teaching

Jeremy Harwood running the astrophysics session

LOVE HERTS

Teenagers from selected Hertfordshire schools get a taste of university life at our summer schools.

Those that have the potential to succeed but have no familiarity with higher education can start to see that University is within their reach.

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Dr Emma Greening

In 2013 we are running both of these summer schools again, but this time with the added attraction of living on campus in University

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Underlining the importance of this type of event in raising young people’s aspirations and attracting a more diverse cross-section of students, the University’s Head of Outreach and Widening Participation Dr Emma Greening says: ‘Summer schools like ‘Love Herts’ can really break down barriers at a pivotal stage in a teenager’s education. Those that have the potential to succeed but have no familiarity with

The summer schools provided a wide range of academic and social activities to give the students a good feel for what’s on offer at our campus. The Year 10 programme included sessions in astrophysics, business, education, English, law and psychology, together with sessions on student finance. Year 12 pupils took advantage of talks on topics such as choosing a university and completing applications. Everyone had a one-to-one session with a careers advisor, and received guidance on interview skills and compiling personal statements. There was time for fun too, with the students enjoying trips to the London Eye, the theatre and a disco.

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The fifty Year 10 and fifty Year 12 pupils, who were given the opportunity to trial life as a university student, came from eleven different secondary schools across our county. All these schools had previously been identified by the government’s former Aimhigher programme as having a low progression into higher education.

accommodation. We are also planning a new summer school especially for Year 10 and 11 children from care backgrounds.

higher education can start to see that university is within their reach.’

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Our ‘Love Herts’ summer schools for Year 10 and 12 pupils, a first for the University, were a real success in sparking teenagers’ interest in higher education.


TECH TALENT Learning and teaching

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Students divide their time between learning core academic subjects and developing technical and vocational skills by working on reallife projects set by employers.

TECH TALENT

As a major sponsor of the new Elstree University Technical College we’re growing our region’s young talent pool and economy. can sometimes exist between stepping out of education and into the workplace. It presents local young people aspiring to work in these particular industries with a unique opportunity to acquire exactly the skills, knowledge and experience that the region’s employers are looking for.

We are immensely proud to be the university sponsor for the Elstree University Technical College (UTC) which opens its doors for the first time in September 2013. It is one of a new wave of state-funded schools for fourteento nineteen-year-olds, with the emphasis on vocational education. The Elstree UTC specialises in entertainment technologies and crafts, and electronic engineering and digital technologies.

‘Our University has a long and strong association with the creative, film and TV industries for which Hertfordshire is a vibrant hub. We’re collaborating closely with other sponsors such as Elstree Studios and the Ambassador Theatre Group to shape the UTC’s curriculum. We’re also offering the use of the University’s facilities, as well as masterclasses, visiting lecturers and student mentors.’

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A free inter-site bus is introduced to connect Balls Park and Hatfield

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Elstree UTC is expected to have around six hundred students once at full capacity in 2016, but initially it is offering ninety places for Year 10 students and 140 places for Year 12 students.

Dr Stephen Boffey, the University’s Pro ViceChancellor for Regional Affairs, says: ‘The Elstree UTC is a hugely exciting development for Hertfordshire and will help to fill the gap that

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Students divide their time between learning core academic subjects and developing technical and vocational skills by working on real-life projects set by employers. This could be editing films or building set materials. The approach ensures that students are then either ready for the world of work or for further study at college or university.

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The Department for Education is continuing to work with The Baker Dearing Educational Trust, local employers, universities and further education colleges across England with the aim of developing a network of at least a hundred UTCs by 2015.

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International engagement


International engagement

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International engagement At home and abroad we continue to strengthen our reputation as a University that is truly international both in our outlook and reach. Life on campus is culturally diverse, with over ten per cent of our student population coming from outside the UK. Also, compared with the previous year, we’ve almost doubled the number of people studying our programmes through our overseas partners. Adding an international dimension to study programmes, and collaborating with like-minded educational and research organisations around the world, are just some of the many ways we’re broadening the horizons of our staff, students and alumni. This last year in particular, we’ve stepped up our activities in emerging economies in Africa, Asia and South America.

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Standing out

Chancellor’s international scholarships add to campus diversity.

Brazilian ties

We welcome our first intake of Science without Borders students.

Cape creatives

Collaborative project inspires young South African designers.

Going places

Award-winning fashion postgraduate carves out career back home in China.

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Dr John Illston PhD DSc (Eng) CEng FICE is appointed Director of the Polytechnic

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STANDING OUT International engagement

STANDING OUT Every year we recognise and reward the achievements and potential of talented overseas students.

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At a celebratory event in the autumn, hosted by the International Office, awardees received certificates and were congratulated on their achievements by the Vice-Chancellor. Professor Quintin McKellar commented: ‘I was astounded by the talented international students I met. Students come to Hertfordshire from countries all over the world, each bringing their own wonderful perspectives and enriching our University community.’

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Since we introduced the Scholarships in 2007, around six hundred and fifty students have benefited, with the annual number increasing by a third since 2010. In the 2012-2013 academic year, 130 students received awards. They hail from many different countries, including China, India, Malaysia and Nigeria, and the majority are studying at our Business School, the School of

Students come to Hertfordshire from countries all over the world, each bringing their own wonderful perspectives and enriching our University community.

Harnom Zubairu, for example, chose to study here for a BSc in Dietetics as few universities in her native Nigeria teach the subject. With many other Nigerian students on campus, and plenty of social events and societies to get involved with, she found it easy to settle in. ‘The message I would give prospective students is that it is a really great school! You meet lots of different people from different parts of the world and the lecturers are really helpful.’

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Full-time undergraduates and postgraduates can apply for the scholarships which are each worth £2,000, paid as a reduction in tuition fees. The awards are made on a competitive basis to candidates who can demonstrate outstanding academic achievement and the potential to make a significant contribution to University life.

Engineering and Technology or the School of Life and Medical Sciences.

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Being part of our vibrant international community builds multicultural understanding and helps our students to prepare for the global economy. To support this campus diversity and ensure that we continue to attract exceptional students from across the world, we offer a number of Chancellor’s International Scholarships each year.


BRAZILIAN TIES International engagement

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It’s a great opportunity to experience British culture and other different cultures, make new friends and practise my English.

BRAZILIAN TIES

We welcome our first group of Brazilian students under the groundbreaking scholarship programme Science without Borders. and researchers to study at the world’s top universities. Around ten thousand people will be sponsored to study undergraduate and PhD sandwich courses and full PhDs at UK universities for a period of a year, before returning to Brazil to complete their degrees.

For some time, the University has been working to develop ties with leading higher education and research institutions in Brazil. We are, therefore, delighted to be one of around eighty UK universities selected to participate in the Brazilian government’s highprofile Science without Borders (SwB) initiative.

Our own University is offering places on fifty different undergraduate courses across eleven subject areas, as well as ten places on various PhD courses. The six students in our first intake are studying BSc courses in automotive technology with management, environmental management, film and TV production, pharmacology and pharmaceutical science.

Professor Barry Hunt, the University’s Pro ViceChancellor (International), says: ‘As the world’s sixth largest economy and with its growing international influence, Brazil is an increasingly important market for UK higher education providers, and business and industry. The UK’s participation in Science without Borders is estimated to be worth more than £200 m.’

‘This is a promising start to our involvement in this enterprising project, and we’re looking forward to welcoming many more students next year across the full range of subjects,’ adds Professor Hunt.

june

Raíssa Lisboa De Almeida Leme

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february

Raíssa Lisboa De Almeida Leme, who has a place on our BSc Automotive Technology

january

1984

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The programme aims to grow Brazil’s economy by expanding its capabilities in science, technology, engineering and the creative industries. Over a period of four years this ambitious mobility scheme is set to provide more than a hundred thousand scholarships, enabling the most talented Brazilian students

september

with Management programme, says: ‘I’m excited about studying at the University of Hertfordshire and gaining some project-based industrial experience. It’s a great opportunity to experience British culture and other different cultures, make new friends and practise my English.’

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CAPE CREATIVES International engagement

We wanted students to really understand the needs and wants of consumers, and how to put a business plan together and market themselves.

” Tyler Scott, the first South African exchange student

CAPE CREATIVES

A unique project aimed at fast tracking young South African designers into the international business arena exceeds expectations. Our School of Creative Arts has been working with three Cape Town colleges – Cape Peninsula University of Technology, The Design School and Ruth Prowse School of Art – to bring a fresh perspective to students’ learning experience, and develop their entrepreneurship and employability. The Design for Africa project involved sharing learning and teaching practices; collaborating on curriculum content and delivery; and giving students exchange opportunities and hands-on experience of the discipline of commercial design. More than three-hundred students took part in a ‘Creative Entrepreneurs Challenge’ hosted by our University. Cross-curricular teams tasked with developing fictitious products received

1984

mentoring from leading industry professionals from high-profile companies such as Karen Millen UK, L’Oreal South Africa, Ally Capellino, Electrobloom and Big Active

also studying for an MA in graphic design and illustration. ‘Until I visited the UK my studies were limited to lectures and textbooks. Then for the first time I was able to see, in real life, awe-inspiring works in galleries and discuss my ideas with top designers. I’ve been privileged to have this opportunity and now I’m doing what I can to share my experience with design students in South Africa,’ says Tyler, who visits the Ruth Prowse School of Art during his trips back home.

‘We wanted students to really understand the needs and wants of consumers, and how to put a business plan together and market themselves,’ says Shaun Borstrock, Associate Dean of our School of Creative Arts, who devised and led Design for Africa. The partnership initiative is clearly transforming students’ aspirations and opening up lifechanging opportunities. Tyler Scott, the first of the South African exchange students to study with us, is enjoying the type of career he thought he could only dream of. Having gained a first-class honours degree in graphic design at our School of Creative Arts, he’s now working as a freelance designer at the University while

The Design for Africa project was originally funded by the UK Department for Business Innovation and Skills and managed by the British Council. The work is evolving through the charitable foundation, Design for Africa – Shaun Borstrock Foundation for the Creative Industries.

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FEBRUARY

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1985

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The Sports Hall on the Hatfield site is opened.


GOING PLACES International engagement

41

Yue Xu and an example of her work

GOING PLACES

Alumnus Yue Xu is making a name for herself in the world of fashion design in her native China.

Yue Xu scooped first prize at ‘the Session Sixth of Creative China’ Art & Design competition. Representing the very best in art and design, the competition showcases the latest developments nationally while promoting Chinese talent to the world. The event sponsor, the Designer Association of China, has invited Yue Xu to become a member. This accolade is normally reserved for more established designers, so it is a real coup for a recent graduate.

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The competition itself focuses on the creative and artistic areas of design, and involves many internationally acclaimed designers in the

december

Yue Xu is now pursuing her own design ideas while lecturing and has applied for a post as a junior faculty member at the prestigious Zhejiang Sci-Tech University. As a result, she has been working freelance for one of China’s leading designers who sat on the interview panel.

My fashion design concentrates on solid shapes and negative spaces.

Yue Xu

april

In her designer statement she says: ‘My fashion design concentrates on solid shapes and negative spaces. In this project I designed a series of ready-to-wear clothing that explores the space between the body and garment. In particular, I focused on the balance of solid structure and the areas or voids that were not solid, in order to create clear silhouettes and elegant details within and external to the garments.’

MA Design Tutor Julian Lindley, together with Annie Shellard and Sally Freshwater, supported Yue Xu during her studies. He says: ‘We’re very proud of her achievements. They demonstrate all the qualities we aim to develop on the course – creativity, professionalism and entrepreneurship.’

march

selection process. Yue Xu’s winning entry was a project she completed while studying at our School of Creative Arts. Called The Imagination of Space, it draws inspiration from Barbara Hepworth’s abstract sculpture.

For many of our international students, gaining a qualification here is a stepping stone to fulfilling their career aspirations at home. This is certainly true of Yue Xu, who graduated in fashion design in 2011. Since returning to China, she has won a major design award with work done during her MA course, and now combines lecturing with freelancing in the fashion industry.

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Research, innovation and enterprise

Research, innovation and enterprise

1987

APRIL

MARCH

FEBRUARY

JANUARY

1987

DECEMBER

NOVEMBER

OCTOBER

SEPTEMBER

AUGUST

JULY

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MAY

Professor Neil Buxton is appointed Director of the Polytechnic


Research, innovation and enterprise Mind matters

Study shows that women with Alzheimer’s deteriorate faster than men.

Battling blight

New DNA techniques may help protect potato production.

First words

Robot ‘chat’ sheds light on children’s early language learning.

Shaw’s corner

Work with the National Trust reveals more about the playwright’s home and interests.

Walk the walk

Mentoring helps develop the next generation of healthcare policy makers.

Career in care

Professor Sally Kendall awarded Queen’s Nursing Institute fellowship.

New neighbours?

Planet discoveries cap an exciting year for our astronomers.

Climate action

We develop tools to tackle climate change in rural areas.

Dracula lives on

Examining the ‘undead’ in literature, art and other media.

Driving standards

A collaborative project to improve automatic number plate recognition.

FEBRUARY

JANUARY

NOVEMBER

OCTOBER

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In partnership with business and industry, our consultancy and Knowledge Transfer teams are also making a genuine difference to people’s lives and the world around us. Testing highperformance nutrition for athletes; developing a gadget to keep computer keyboards germ-free; and improving retail stock control and supply chain management are among many success stories.

1988

High-quality research with realworld relevance has long been a hallmark of our University. Caring for an ageing population, protecting global crops from disease, and investigating climate change are a few examples of the areas where our experts are challenging the status quo and making headway.

44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 DECEMBER

There’s a real sense of creativity and energy across our research and enterprise communities as they work to contribute to the world’s knowledge base and economy.

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MIND MATTERS Research, innovation and enterprise

Alzheimer’s, the most common form of dementia, affects more than 30 million people worldwide.

MIND MATTERS

Our School of Psychology is adding to our understanding of how Alzheimer’s disease may have a more severe progression in women than in men.

1988

FEBRUARY

Hatfield Polytechnic receives accreditation from the CNAA

OCTOBER

SEPTEMBER

AUGUST

Our study has captured the imagination of both researchers and the press. Since first appearing in the Journal of Clinical and Experimental

JULY

JUNE

MAY

APRIL

MARCH

The findings, based on analysing neurocognitive data from fifteen published studies, reveal that women consistently perform worse than men across five cognitive areas examined, even when they are at the same stage of the condition. The researchers looked at the individual’s semantic and memory abilities, verbal skills, understanding of

Capitalising on this interest, Professor Laws plans to take the research forward and says: ‘Clinicians may have suspected that accurate diagnosis and treatment both need to acknowledge the sharper cognitive decline in women. Now we have some solid bases to start thinking about tailoring approaches towards men and women.’

JANUARY

Professor Laws says: ‘There has been some previous, but limited, evidence that females with Alzheimer’s deteriorate faster than males in the earlier stages of the disease. One explanation is the influence of hormones, possibly due to oestrogen loss in women after the menopause, or perhaps a greater cognitive reserve in males which provides protection against the disease process. But further studies are needed to provide greater clarity on these issues.’

Most remarkable is that men fare better in verbal skills. This goes against the general profile for the healthy population, where women have a clear advantage.

1989

Recent research led by Professor Keith Laws discovered that women sufferers show worse mental decline than men, suggesting that men’s brains are better at coping with the ravages of Alzheimer’s.

Neuropsychology in August 2012, it has become the journal’s most downloaded paper. The findings have been covered in publications nationally and around the globe, and were cited by the Alzheimer’s Society in calling for more investigations in this area.

DECEMBER

meanings and concepts, perceptions of spatial relationships and memory.

NOVEMBER

Alzheimer’s, the most common form of dementia, affects more than 30 million people worldwide. More women than men have the disease and they also suffer poorer outcomes, yet surprisingly little is known about the differences between the sexes in the progression of the condition.


BATTLING BLIGHT Research, innovation and enterprise

45

BATTLING BLIGHT

Analysis of late nineteenth-century potatoes reveals more about the spread of late blight.

With global concerns over potential food shortages and climate change, there is an urgent need for growers to understand more about the spread of late blight, and to have access to better tools for rapid detection of the pathogen.

OCTOBER

SEPTEMBER

AUGUST

The research paper has been published in Plant Pathology.

JULY

JUNE

MAY

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MARCH

A recent scientific study led by Bruce Fitt, now Professor of Plant Pathology at our School of Life and Medical Sciences, goes some way to providing answers. The work, with Professor

1989 The Polytechnic is given corporate status, removing it from County Council control

DECEMBER

‘The study’s findings provide the earliest evidence of how the disease may have survived between cropping seasons in England between the outbreaks in the 1840s and those in the 1870s,’ says Professor Fitt, who has more than thirty years’ experience in crop diseases. ‘They also prove that this DNA technique is a very useful tool in plant disease. The technique can be developed to test for other plant diseases which affect food production and food security.’

The technique can be developed to test for other plant diseases which affect food production and food security.

NOVEMBER

Jean Ristaino from North Carolina, involved extracting DNA from 170-year-old potato samples that had been dried, ground and stored in glass bottles by Victorian scientists as part of Rothamsted Research soil fertility experiments. Researchers then analysed the DNA for the presence of the late blight pathogen.

Late blight, which is caused by the microorganism Phytophthora infestans, was a major culprit in the Irish, Highland and European potato famines of the 1840s. More than a century and a half later, despite the use of fungicides, the disease is still a serious threat to worldwide potato production. It can wipe out potato fields within a matter of days, driving farmers out of business and increasing food prices. It also poses a major threat to the organic tomato industry.

Celebrating

SIXTY YEARS 1952 - 2012


FIRST WORDS Research, innovation and enterprise

FIRST WORDS In teaching a robot simple word forms our computer scientists shed new light on children’s early language learning.

1990

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Professor Maureen Lahiff is appointed the Professor of Nursing and Midwifery Studies, the first female Professor at the Polytechnic

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1990

To begin with, DeeChee can hear English speech as a stream of sounds, and produce babble without meaning. This stream of sounds can be broken up into strings of

Lead author of the study Dr Caroline Lyon says: ‘These experiments are analogous to early stages of speech development, in so much as infants are sensitive to frequently heard sounds. Our work with DeeChee shows how this type of sensitivity can be modelled, and can contribute to the learning of word forms by a robot.’

june

The team’s work is part of the European Commission’s four-year iTALK (Integration and Transfer of Action and Language Knowledge in Robots) research project, with the University team led by Professor Chrystopher Nehaniv and Dr Joe Saunders. As well as providing fresh insight into how babies progress from babbling to speaking their first words, the results of these experiments could be an initial step towards developing robots that speak in a more natural, human-like way.

syllables in many different ways, and the task our computer scientists faced was to see how DeeChee could learn to segment the sound stream that it heard and produce proper word forms. The team enlisted people to talk one to one to the robot as if it were a child, and to try to teach it simple words for colours and shapes. DeeChee was programmed to be sensitive to the frequency of sounds that it hears (as are human babies) and was more likely to produce frequently heard syllables. After a few minutes of ‘conversing’, DeeChee adapted its output to the most frequently heard syllables spoken by its human partner and produced word forms like ‘red’ and ‘box’.

may

Innovative experiments by a team from our Adaptive Systems Research Group show that a robot can quickly develop basic linguistic skills. In the same way that an infant picks up the frequency of sounds in speech, a childlike iCub humanoid robot named DeeChee has learnt some simple word forms just by ‘chatting’ with a human.

Our work with DeeChee shows how this type of sensitivity can be modelled, and can contribute to the learning of word forms by a robot.

september

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SHAW’S CORNER Research, innovation and enterprise

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SHAW’S CORNER

Our collaboration with the National Trust is providing new insights for visitors to George Bernard Shaw’s Hertfordshire home.

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1991

University of Hertfordshire PhD student Alice McEwan is currently researching the collection as part of a three-year collaboration with the National Trust. She is exploring how objects such as textiles, furniture, clothing and artworks create an understanding of Shaw’s ideas and writing and the environment in which he lived. For example, the arts and crafts furnishings reflect his lasting commitment to Fabian socialist principles.

june

The project is making significant contributions to knowledge, says Dr Pat Simpson of our School of Creative Arts, who is overseeing the work together with colleague Dr Steven Adams and the Trust’s House Manager Ms Sue Morgan. ‘There have been numerous published articles and conference papers about the research, both nationally and internationally. Findings are also regularly fed back to the Trust’s volunteer guides. This is adding to their job satisfaction and, in turn, the visitors’ experience of the collection and their understanding of Shaw’s complex personality and interests.’

Within the community, information is being used in talks to local history groups, and presented in events organised by the University’s Heritage Hub. The project has influenced policy making within the National Trust, for example, in terms of restoring specific designs by William Morris in some of the furnishing fabrics. Based on the success of the collaboration, a further application has been made to the AHRC for a doctoral project to explore other aspects of Shaw’s rich and varied collection.

Today the Edwardian villa remains much as he left it in 1950.

october

Funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC), the research aims to improve the quality and content of information provided to visitors and their enjoyment of the historic house museum.

september

The playwright, political critic and philosopher George Bernard Shaw occupied Shaw’s Corner in Ayot St Lawrence from 1906 until his death in 1950, when he donated the house and its contents to the National Trust. Today the Edwardian villa remains much as he left it. It contains Shaw’s personal library, memorabilia, clothing, original furniture and fittings, and works of art.

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WALK THE WALK Research, innovation and enterprise

WALK THE WALK

Our mentors have a leading role in developing the next generation of healthcare clinical academic leaders.

Our mentors are among the most experienced researchers and clinical leaders.

Dr Geraldine Byrne

1992

october

september

august

july

The Polytechnic becomes a University. Sir Brian Corby is appointed the first Chancellor of the University

june

may

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january

1992

December

november

Scheme Coordinator, Dr Geraldine Byrne of our School of Health and Social Work says, ‘Our mentors are among the most

Following the success of this event, there are now plans to build a community of mentoring practice, supported by online regional and national events, and linked into other professional research networks.

Currently the scheme has twenty-nine mentors from a range of backgrounds and twenty-six mentees. At a Winter School run as part of the programme, everyone involved had the opportunity to network and strengthen effective mentoring partnerships, as well as develop practical skills and knowledge to advance their careers. For example, both the speaker presentations and workshops on grant applications and mentoring gave participants valuable insights on aspects that will be critical to their work.

april

To deliver the Mentorship for Health Research Training Fellows scheme we are working in partnership with the University of Huddersfield, the Academy of Nursing, Midwifery and Health Visiting Research (UK), the Allied Healthcare Professionals Research Network, Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, Imperial College London.

experienced researchers and clinical leaders drawn from nursing, midwifery, the allied healthcare professions, and clinical scientists. They have ‘walked the walk’ and bring their unique sector knowledge and understanding of the leadership challenges that the research award holders face. We’re delighted that this mentorship scheme provides the opportunity for researchers to maximise their potential and have a positive impact on the lives of patients through the quality of their care.’

march

In May 2012 the Department of Health launched a three-year mentoring initiative aimed at fostering world-class clinical academic leaders within the healthcare professions in England. The scheme, which offers top-quality mentorship to an elite group of researchers, is being run by our School of Health and Social Work in association with our Centre for Research in Primary and Community Care (CRIPACC). Mentees are all highly qualified within their respective fields, having National Institute for Health Research fellowships.


CAREER IN CARE Research, innovation and enterprise

49

Sally Kendall with Kate Billingham, Chair of the Queen’s Nursing Institute

CAREER IN CARE

A prestigious fellowship award recognises Professor Sally Kendall’s major contribution to community nursing research.

‘It is delightful to see Sally’s dedication and passion about research and her profession being recognised. The Fellowship is so well deserved and we look forward to seeing where Sally takes us next,’ comments Dr Julia Williams of our School of Health and Social Work.

june

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april

A good example of her far-reaching influence is her work on parenting self-efficacy, which has been sought by researchers and practitioners

march

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january

1993

december

november

The user experience is a strong theme in Sally Kendall’s research, which focuses on health in primary and community care settings. Having spent her early career as a nurse and health

The user experience is a strong theme in Sally Kendall’s research.

1993

The Great Hall is renamed The Prince Edward Hall in honour of the visit of HRH Prince Edward to commemorate the new status of the University of Hertfordshire

august

Sally represents community health nursing, particularly from a research perspective, on many committees at both national and international level. In the UK these include universities, professional bodies and NHS organisations. She is a founder member of the Academy of Nursing, Midwifery and Health Visiting Research UK, and co-founder of the Institute of Health Visiting. She also co-chairs the International Collaboration for Community Health Nursing Research, a charity which works to promote evidence-based practice and sharing of research across the globe.

all over the world. The Tool to measure Parenting Self-Efficacy (TOPSE), developed as a result, has proved effective in different cultures and has been translated into seven languages.

july

visitor, her overriding concern is to put the patient at the centre of healthcare practice. Consequently she has established a reputation for academic quality and leadership in this field and for developing programmes that are very relevant to health service users.

Professor Sally Kendall is Associate Dean (Research) in our School of Health and Social Work. Since 2001 she has also been Director of our Centre for Research in Primary and Community Care (CRIPACC), which provides input to National Health Service (NHS) and social care policy and practice in areas such as child and adolescent health and the care of older people. She received the prestigious Fellowship of the Queen’s Nursing Institute award at a ceremony in London in November.

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NEW NEIGHBOURS? Research, innovation and enterprise

Just twelve light years away, Tau Ceti is visible to the naked eye, and is also one of our most Sun-like stars.

NEW NEIGHBOURS? Discovering a potentially habitable planet around one of our closest stars caps an exciting year for our astronomers.

discoveries were made by detecting gravitational wobbles in starlight caused by orbiting planets.

1994

august

july

june

may

The University is named ‘Top New University’ in The Times Good University Guide

april

march

All these discoveries were made by detecting gravitational wobbles in starlight caused by orbiting planets. However, the team also searches for planets transiting stars at infrared

february

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SEPTEMBER

‘Just twelve light years away, Tau Ceti is visible to the naked eye, and is also one of our most Sun-like stars, ’explains Professor Pinfield. ‘It was originally thought to be a lone star. However, our research, based on thousands of observations and using the new methods to detect signals half the size previously possible,

wavelengths, by monitoring small changes in the brightness of distant planets as they pass in front of their host star. Based on observations from a survey using the UK Infrared Telescope in Hawaii, they identified two such planets close-in to stars. Now named WTS1-b and WTS2-b, amongst other things the stars are unusual for their large size.

The refined analysis techniques also revealed a record-breaking nine-planet system around the star HD10180. This is the first time astronomers have discovered a star with more planets than the Sun. Located 130 light years away, the star is not within reach of foreseeable human space travel but is still considered to be in our solar neighbourhood. The researchers also identified a further three planets orbiting the orange star HD40307, doubling the known number of planets in the system. Among them is a SuperEarth – at least seven times as massive as Earth – in the habitable zone.

january

Recently the team has made several significant discoveries, including a potentially habitable planet around Tau Ceti, one of our closest celestial neighbours. The findings came after the researchers developed pioneering data analysis techniques which increased the sensitivity of their searches.

now suggests that it may host five planets. This includes one in the habitable zone, where temperatures could be right for surface water and potentially life.’

1994

Have you ever wondered if any of the stars you see in the night sky may host a planet where life could exist? A team of international scientists, led by Professor David Pinfield of our Centre for Astrophysics Research, is searching for rocky planets around cool stars for exactly this reason, as part of the European Union RoPACS project.


CLIMATE ACTION Research, innovation and enterprise

51

Policy makers need to establish new Rural Development Programmes that demonstrate genuine potential to support the shift to a lowcarbon and climate-resilient economy.

CLIMATE ACTION

Our work helps European governments to assess the best way for rural enterprises to tackle climate change objectives of mitigation and adaptation.

april

january

1995

december

november

october

september

UHArts is launched to raise the cultural profile of the University

march

1994

february

The overall aim of OSCAR is to create a toolkit that enables authorities to weigh up the advantages and disadvantages of various measures to support climate change mitigation and adaptation. The tools developed by AERU so far include a manual, a checklist and flexible, user-friendly software. When used together they provide region-specific guidance on how to best incorporate climate change mitigation and adaptation operations into RDPs. A series of case studies in the

To help guide member states in stepping up to these priority goals, the European Commission’s Directorate-General for Climate Action (DG CLIMA) engaged our Agriculture and Environment Research Unit (AERU) to lead the Optimal Strategies for Climate Change Action in Rural Areas (OSCAR) project.

UK, Poland and France also provides a reality check with examples of the economic productivity impacts and practicality issues. In the autumn, the AERU team presented the outputs of this year-long project to more than sixty stakeholders from twenty-two member states at a DG CLIMA workshop in Brussels. Initial feedback is encouraging and the team is now looking forward to refining the OSCAR tools in line with user feedback and demand.

OSCAR workshop in Brussels – photo of project team, workshop speakers and staff from DG-CLIMA at the European Commission

june

‘This is a collaborative research project between our University, Wroclaw University of Environmental and Life Sciences in Poland and Solagro in France. It’s also a demanding and ambitious project as the relationship between rural areas and climate change is extremely complex, and the study’s outputs involve large numbers of datasets,’ explains Dr Kathy Lewis, Head of the Agricultural and Research Unit (AERU).

may

With Common Agricultural Policy reform underway, governments across Europe face fresh challenges in shaping Rural Development Programmes (RDPs). Policy makers need to establish new RDPs that demonstrate genuine potential to support the shift to a low-carbon and climate-resilient economy in the agriculture, food and forestry sectors. This presents authorities with the opportunity to develop a more holistic approach that tackles both climate and rural issues.

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DRACUla lives on Research, innovation and enterprise

Dacre Stoker giving a talk at Golders Green Crematorium

Dracula lives on

The dark, gothic legacy Bram Stoker was commemorated at Golders Green Crematorium in April, on the centenary anniversary of his death.

1996

june

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march

Lord MacLaurin is appointed Chancellor of the University

FEBRUARY

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Select contributors to the book such as Dr Stacey Abbott, Dr Catherine Spooner and Dr Ivan Phillips were present to talk about their fields of expertise such as celluloid vampires, twenty-first-century Gothic, digital culture, young adult fiction and nineteenth-century vampire narratives.

Dr George said: “We wanted to celebrate the king of vampires in Dracula, holding out against the new ‘sweetie vamps’ of Twilight and the

1996

The crematorium visit was organised as part of the Open Graves, Open Minds Bram Stoker Centenary Symposium. The rest of the event was appropriately held at Keats’ house in Hampstead. Dracula, of course, is the seminal vampire novel; a gripping narrative that dramatises anxieties over sexuality, new technologies, foreignness and modernity.

Dr George leads the University of Hertfordshire’s vampire project, examining the undead in literature, art and other media in relation to gender, technology, consumption and social change. Along with co-author Dr Bill Hughes she introduced their new book, Open Graves, Open Minds: Representations of Vampires from the Enlightenment to the Present Day.

Dacre Stoker’s talk illuminated Bram’s lost Dublin Journal (a transcript of a private notebook belonging to Bram, recently discovered in an attic on the Isle of Wight. The notebook, found by the author’s great-grandson, offers a window onto the life and times of the very private Stoker). Sir Christopher Frayling, author of Vampires: Lord Byron to Count Dracula, gave the centenary address. Noted authors of the genre, including Marcus Sedgewick, Kim Newman and Paul Magyrs, were also involved. Delegates investigated the narrative of the novel and interrogated its relationship to new developments in interdisciplinary research.

december

We wanted to celebrate the king of vampires in Dracula.

Americanisation of the genre, to put British and Irish vampire fiction back on the map.”

Organised by Dr Sam George (School of Humanities), the event launched new books, stimulated great conversations and facilitated eagerly anticipated talks, including one from Dacre Stoker, great-grand-nephew of Bram, and another from Sir Christopher Frayling.

november

A dramatic storm and a full moon contributed to a fittingly dark atmosphere as academics, members of the Stoker family, writers and critics paid their respects to the celebrated author of Dracula. They raised a toast to his ashes and paid tribute to the literary and media phenomena that advanced as a result of his novel.


DRIVING STANDARDS Research, innovation and enterprise

53

Driving standards

The Home Office and Hertfordshire Constabulary are collaborating with the Centre for Applied Technology at the University to work on improving automatic number plate recognition (ANPR).

�

1997 The Science and Technology Research Centre opens

april

november

october

septemBer

august

july

This project commenced in Jan 2012 and has attracted a great deal of attention. In particular Lord Simon, in his capacity as Vice Chairman

“

This project has an impact beyond the national level as the British Standard is currently the international standard.

march

Even at only a year into the project, research work has been published at two conferences of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) and in a journal. The School has showcased the work with CitySync, PHD and EngD research. And Hertfordshire Constabulary have written to the Vice-Chancellor commending the work.

february

 has already been used to form a crucial It element of a report commissioned by the Minister for Crime and Security, James Brokenshire.

january

Other visits to the University have been made by high-ranking Officers from Hertfordshire and other Constabularies, including Assistant Chief Constable Julian Blazeby, the Police Chief responsible for ANPR in the UK.

1997

An Officer and a Senior Systems Analyst from Hertfordshire Constabulary are carrying out research through their EngD programmes. Work has been steadfast and the School has made significant contributions to their work.

december

This project has an impact beyond the national level as the British Standard is currently the international standard too.

of the Parliamentary Advisory Council for Transport Safety and Vice Chairman of the European Secure Vehicle, has both visited the Centre and also invited the University team to meet with him at the House of Lords. Lord Simon is especially keen to see strong relationships develop between Government Departments and academic institutions.

This research is investigating the UK ANPR standards for accuracy and robustness. To this end methodologies for tightening the standards are being proposed.

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Community

1997

The £16 million Learning Resource Centre opens


Community

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Community We are proud of our growing role in the local community, and passionate about making Hertfordshire an even better place to live, study and work. Supporting social enterprise start-ups; mentoring in schools; lending a helping hand to local charities; hosting a lively arts and science events programme; and sponsoring sporting talent are just some of the many and varied ways we’ve been making a difference during our diamond jubilee year. We continue to contribute to the local economy too, not only as the county’s largest employer but through strengthening our connections with the region’s business community. We are listening carefully to what people want from our University and we’re responding in ways that add value not just here and now, but far into the future.

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Then and now

Our Heritage Hub is flourishing.

Raising the bar

Primary school science gets top marks.

All sorted

New centre helps local people and businesses to resolve disputes.

Giving back

More support for student-led social enterprises.

Star attraction

Observatory open evenings are a hit with local families.

Life cycle

Pedal power raises £8,000 for cancer research.

1999

FEBRUARY

JANUARY

1999

DECEMBER

NOVEMBER

OCTOBER

SEPTEMBER

AUGUST

JULY

JUNE

MAY

Exemplas Ltd is established as part of the Business Link initiative to offer skills and business support to local companies

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THEN AND NOW Community

Through a series of collaborative projects we’ve made many new connections.

THEN AND NOW With many new research projects and partnerships our Heritage Hub is flourishing.

Berry is continuing to develop and expand The Elstree Project in collaboration with local volunteer group Elstree Screen Heritage. The Elstree Project aims to record and preserve the stories of those who have worked in the studios of Elstree and Borehamwood over the past hundred years, and gives students the opportunity to learn how to film these interviews, and meet people who have worked in industry on successful productions.

As part of the Hub’s activities commemorating the centenary of the First World War, Reader in English Literature Dr Andrew Maunder recovered a series of long-forgotten war plays, pageants and revues. With the help of the theatre production company Twisted Events Presents, the Hub revived and staged a number of these at different venues around the region.

Past, present and future projects are showcased on the Hub’s newly launched website heritagehub.herts.ac.uk

2000

FEBRUARY

JANUARY

2000

DECEMBER

NOVEMBER

A racing car built by students under the guidance of Automotive Programme Tutor Dr Phil Green is featured on BBC2’s Top Gear

OCTOBER

SEPTEMBER

Heritage Hub groups work on a rich variety of projects, many of which provide opportunities for students to participate and enhance their employability. For example, one group has captured an instant oral history of Stevenage Football Club. This involved a ‘parachute’ team of University staff and students recording interviews with around seventy fans, ex-players and staff at the ground. In the school of Creative arts, Senior Film and TV Lecturer Howard

AUGUST

JUNE

MAY

APRIL

MARCH

A major Hub project to benefit from AHRC’s Connected Communities scheme is ‘Partners in History: Collaborations in Regional Heritage’ led by Lecturer in Public History Dr Christine Garwood. Over nine months, a varied and successful programme included ‘Remembering the First World War’ community history events; a vintage festival at Stevenage Museum; and a creative writing project involving children from

Luton schools using Luton Museum’s extensive hat collection as their inspiration. A series of Hub workshops also helped several local groups to secure Heritage Lottery Funding grants for their own ‘All Our Stories’ community projects.

JULY

Our Heritage Hub, which explores history and heritage in Hertfordshire, the region and beyond, continues to attract tremendous interest from people of all ages and walks of life. Reader in History, Dr Sarah Lloyd, who was closely involved in setting up the Hub in 2010, is hugely encouraged: ‘Through a series of collaborative projects we’ve made many new connections with staff and students across the University and with local history and heritage groups. These exciting developments, together with the funding we’ve been awarded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC), mean we have a really solid base from which to expand our activities.’


RAISING THE BAR Community

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RAISING THE BAR By engaging young children in science, more schools are achieving The Primary Science Quality Mark™.

The scheme provides a clear framework that enables schools to work together to share and embed good practice. It also encourages teachers to innovate and progress their ideas independently. The initiative began at the Science Learning Centre East of England at the University of Hertfordshire, in partnership with the Wellcome Trust, Barnet Local Authority and the Association for Science Education.

OCTOBER

SEPTEMBER

JULY

JUNE

MAY

APRIL

MARCH

Since the scheme’s national launch in 2010, five hundred schools across the UK and in British forces schools in Germany and Cyprus have received a PSQM award. In 2011-12 alone three hundred and nine schools gained the award – fifty at gold level, two hundred and four at silver level and fifty-five at bronze level.

AUGUST

Annie Squires from St Albans Primary School in Derbyshire, one of this year’s silver awardees, says: ‘It’s been a whirlwind year where science at our school was flung firmly into the spotlight and remained there. I’ve loved every second of the process and I’ve grown in confidence as well as ability as a result. Staff and pupils have become more enthusiastic and engaged with science.’

More than four hundred schools have signed up to work towards achieving a Primary Science Quality Mark award in 2013. The success of the PSQM project has been recognised by the AstraZeneca Science Teaching Trust which has agreed to form a partnership with the University of Hertfordshire to support the award programme for the next five years.

DECEMBER

By nurturing children’s interest in the subject from an age when they are naturally curious, it is motivating them to carry on learning science.

Jane Turner, PSQM project leader and Associate Director of the Science Learning Centre East of England, says: ‘Gaining this award is a significant achievement for a primary school. It is a year-long process which starts with an audit of current science provision. Supported by professional development, subject leaders develop and implement an action plan to develop the quality of science teaching and learning across the whole school. Subject leaders then write reflections on the impact of their leadership against the twelve PSQM criteria. The standard of submissions for 2012 is extremely high. Science subject leaders, their colleagues, head teachers, children, parents and governors should be very proud.’

NOVEMBER

The Primary Science Quality Mark (PSQM™) award scheme is raising both the profile of science and the quality of science teaching and learning in our primary schools. By nurturing children’s interest in the subject from an age when they are naturally curious, it is motivating them to carry on learning science.

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ALL SORTED Community

With the court system’s emphasis on using alternative dispute resolution and mediation in all levels and sectors, it’s important to train students to be ready to use these techniques.

ALL SORTED

Expert training at our Hertfordshire Mediation Centre helps local people and businesses to resolve disputes. Our Law School has joined forces with InterMediation, a leading mediation services organisation, to offer teaching and training in these valuable skills. The training covers both civil and commercial mediation and workplace mediation, and meets the high standards set by the Civil Mediation Council. Mediation is gaining ground as a means of settling disputes. Less stressful, costly and time consuming than legal action, it gives parties the opportunity to resolve things in a way that is acceptable to all and will stick. So successful is the approach that courts now recommend its use instead of litigation. Courses are held at the purpose-built Hertfordshire Mediation Centre at our £10 m

2001

Speaking at the Centre recently, John Gunner said, ‘It’s fantastic to be back at the School of Law and see at first hand how far it has come since I was a student here. With the court system’s emphasis on using alternative dispute resolution and mediation in all levels and sectors, it’s important to train students to be ready to use these techniques as part of their graduate skills.’

Mediation provides a negotiated solution in a wide range of situations: from legal and business problems through workplace and employment issues to community and family matters. They include planning and development; probate and property; neighbour and boundary disputes; bullying and harassment and professional negligence.

december

november

october

september

august

july

june

may

The Key Centre, a multi-faith, multi-cultural centre is opened

april

march

february

January

In an initiative launched with the Hertfordshire Chamber of Commerce and Industry, the Centre is encouraging Chamber members and other organisations to make mediation their ‘first resort’ when agreeing contracts. Businesses signing up to the scheme will be able to take advantage of mediation training and discounts on services, among many other benefits.

2001

StudyNet is introduced, giving greater access to information and support to both students and staff

2001

Law Court building and are open to University staff and students, as well as people living and working in the county and surrounding area. Under the direction of Dr Stuart Weinstein of the School of Law and John Gunner, InterMediation Director and University alumnus, the Centre is set to become a regional hub for the training and accreditation of mediators.


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GIVING BACK

A new initiative encouraging more student-led social enterprises is good news for the local community.

Social enterprise is already an important priority for us. Through a dedicated unit we help many local voluntary and third sector organisations, providing free advice and resources in areas such as marketing, finance and project management. Hundreds of our students also volunteer each year. Using the £25,000 funding from the UnLtd HE Support programme, we now want to build on these activities and put social entrepreneurship at the heart of the University.

august

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january

2002

To encourage students with with bright ideas to ‘try it, build it and develop it’ we are awarding three types of enterprise funding. The grants of up to £500, £5,000 and £15,000

june

Jana Filosof, Director of the Social Enterprise Unit, says: ‘With this funding not only can we support an even greater number of graduates and students in their quest to become social entrepreneurs, we also plan to gain new insights and develop new ideas from working

We aim to incorporate the learning from this collaboration into our teaching and learning activities and research.

october

The first projects to receive funding include setting up a support group to reduce the isolation felt by women working from home; an events platform for young people to promote their music and gigs online; and out-of-hours support for under and over achieving pupils in primary schools, initially focusing on literacy. In addition, flare, the University’s annual business start-up competition, now features a new social enterprise category, enabling budding entrepreneurs to receive ongoing support and guidance.

within this national network. In addition, we aim to incorporate the learning from this collaboration into our teaching and learning activities and research. Most importantly, we will be able to forge stronger links with our community, as social enterprises give back to society.’

september

will allow them to test feasibility and market potential; get viable ideas off the ground; and further develop enterprises that are already up and running. Applicants will also be able to take advantage of our newly-launched intensive Business Start–up programme.

In August the University was chosen as a partner in a pioneering scheme to develop social entrepreneurship in Hertfordshire. The £2 m Higher Education Support (HE) initiative, funded by the Higher Education Funding Council for England and delivered by UnLtd, gives graduates and students a chance to set up a social venture.

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STAR ATTRACTION Community

Our Bayfordbury astronomical observatory, situated a few kilometres south of Hertford, offers members of the public the opportunity to explore the wonders of the night sky, and chat to our experts about all things celestial.

STAR ATTRACTION

Open evenings at our Bayfordbury observatory are proving more popular than ever with local families and amateur astronomers.

2003

october

september

august

july

Professor Tim Wilson is appointed Vice-Chancellor of the University

june

february

january

2003

December

november

The £15 million Hertfordshire Sports Village complex opens on the de Havilland site

‘In the same way that science never stands still, there’s always something different to see and experience at the observatory. Over the coming months, we’re upgrading our radio telescope facilities, installing a new solar telescope and fine-tuning experiments for atmosphere studies. These and other exciting developments will add a fascinating dimension to a visit,’ adds Dr Sarzi.

The open evenings are part of a much wider outreach programme at Bayfordbury, aimed at inspiring a future generation of scientists. Each year the observatory welcomes several thousand visitors to the site – a mixture of academics, amateur astronomers, community groups, schoolchildren and students.

may

2003

The observatory first opened in 1970 with just one twenty-inch Cassegrain telescope. Now it is one of the country’s largest and bestequipped teaching observatories. Students have use of seven fully functioning modern domed telescopes, all of which are fitted with up-to-date instrumentation, including highsensitivity digital cameras, video systems and spectrographs.

Among the many educational and entertainment attractions on offer at the open evenings are live observations using optical telescopes; tours around the sky in the planetarium; talks by our research staff and postgraduate students on different astronomy topics; and various activities in the Astrolab. Here, for example, visitors can design their own constellations or watch demonstrations about meteor craters. Youngsters, in particular, enjoy using an infrared camera to check how cold their nose is, or taking part in pinhole camera workshops.

april

The observatory’s themed open evenings always draw in the crowds, and the 2012 winter season was no exception. Around two thousand visitors enjoyed a Halloween Spooky Universe evening, Rocketry and Space and Extra-Solar Planets nights, and a special event to mark the European Southern Observatory’s fiftieth anniversary. ‘The January event was a particular highlight, since it was one the events sponsored by the BBC2 stargazing LIVE campaign and our guests could enjoy a wide range of outreach activities provided by the BBC. We were also lucky that it was an

especially clear night, and so our visitors could see very clear images through the telescopes’ says Senior Lecturer in Astronomy Dr Marc Sarzi.’

march

Our Bayfordbury astronomical observatory, situated a few kilometres south of Hertford, offers members of the public the opportunity to explore the wonders of the night sky, and chat to our experts about all things celestial.


LIFE CYCLE Community

61

Ben Harwood, Tom Porter, and Jack Carpenter

whole challenge credibility and helped us to acquire further sponsors like Bikefood, Endura, Kenetic Cycles and Satmap. As well as providing funding, the University continued to support us and helped us to gain coverage in the press and on local radio,’ explains Jack.

Students Ben Harwood, Jack Carpenter and Tom Porter started out from the de Havilland campus one August morning on an incredible physical team challenge. Their aim was to cycle to St Tropez in the south of France, a distance of more than 1,600 km in ten days, to raise money for Cancer Research UK. ‘We have all been affected by cancer in some way, shape or form and the feeling of giving something back to the people affected is fantastic,’ says Tom.

Despite some mishaps en route, including two crashes and a broken bike, which tested the team’s resourcefulness, they arrived on schedule in St Tropez. In the months before the ride they had spent many hours on static bikes fundraising on and off campus. Personal donations from friends and family, events and auctioning off various items such as their Satmap, took the total amount raised to £8,000.

For a venture like this to be successful takes a lot of planning, equipment and, of course, fundraising. As the trio were determined to ensure as much of the money raised went to charity, they purchased their own bikes and associated equipment while also seeking sponsorship from companies to provide other items they needed.

june

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march

february

january

2004

december

novemeber

‘The Hertfordshire Sports Village offered to sponsor us. However, it was the backing we received from the University as part of the diamond jubilee celebrations that gave the

april

‘It was an amazing experience that required absolute teamwork, and we will remember it for the rest of our lives. We cannot thank the diamond team enough. It is fantastic to be part of a University that supports their students and, most importantly, gives them time and advice,’ adds Ben.

2003 HRH Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh, returns again to open the new £120 million de Havilland campus. The sites at Wall Hall, Aldenham and Balls Park, Hertford, are closed and students studying Education, Humanities and Business Studies transfer to the new campus

august

Three students raise £8,000 for cancer research thanks to pedal power and people’s generosity.

It was an amazing experience that required absolute teamwork, and we will remember it for the rest of our lives.

july

LIFE CYCLE

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University Information

2004

august

july

june

may

april

march

february

january

2005

december

november

october

SEPTEMBER

An Innovation Centre offering hi-tech office space for spin-out and start-up companies is opened on College Lane Campus


University Information

63

University Information Over six decades we have created countless opportunities for individuals, businesses and communities to prosper. We too have grown in size and stature – opening with 1,500 students in 1952 and now with a student population of almost 28,000. Today our outlook is broader and our reach is wider than ever before. Our programmes are more accessible, more flexible and more closely connected to the world of work. We also enjoy the many advantages of having a more culturally diverse university community and more international partners. The following pages provide a facts and figures snapshot of the thriving university we are today and of some of the people behind our success.

64 66 67 68 69

Honorary graduates

Our 2012 roll call of people we honoured with honorary degrees and Fellowships for their outstanding achievements, contribution to society or service to the University.

Vice-Chancellor’s awards 2012

Members of staff who received a Vice-Chancellor’s award during our diamond jubilee year.

Who’s who

Our Board of Governors, Chancellor and Office of the Vice-Chancellor.

Student information

A profile of where our students come from and the subjects they study.

Financial summary

A review of our academic year 2011/2012.

2005

june

may

april

march

february

january

2006

december

november

october

september

Lord Salisbury becomes Chancellor of the University

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honorary graduates University information

PROFILES of honorary graduates

Every year we award Honorary degrees and Fellowships to people who have made an outstanding contribution to academic disciplines, charity, professions or public service. In 2012 we honoured fifteen individuals who have made a difference in the arts, education, engineering, healthcare, science, sport, and the community.

Dr Sebastian Faulks CBE Dr Sebastian Faulks received the honorary degree of Doctor of Letters in recognition of outstanding contribution to literature, literary criticism and research. He is widely regarded as one of the most impressive writers of his generation. As well as being a best-selling author he is an accomplished journalist and broadcaster and has worked in collaboration with our School of Humanities.

Mrs Patricia Lott Mrs Patricia Lott was elected a Fellow in recognition of outstanding contribution to the development of Human Resources Management at the University of Hertfordshire and a leading role in developing Human Resources arrangements across Higher Education in the UK. Patricia joined us in 1988 and became the University’s first Director of Personnel until her retirement in 2006.

Mr Syd Nadim Mr Syd Nadim received the honorary degree Doctor of Letters in recognition of outstanding work in the development of business and entrepreneurial education. He created one of the country’s top one hundred digital marketing agencies and has not only helped young entrepreneurs but also supported the University’s Business School in providing work placement opportunities and mentoring our students.

Mr Sebastian Conran Mr Sebastian Conran received the honorary degree of Doctor of Arts in recognition of outstanding work in the promotion and support of the creative industries and inspiration to others in the field of design. The School of Creative Arts has enjoyed the privilege of working with product, industrial and interior design specialists from Sebastian Conran Associates.

Mr David Sproul Mr David Sproul received the honorary degree of Doctor of Letters in recognition of outstanding achievement having been appointed as the youngest ever Chief Executive Officer and Senior Partner of Deloitte LLP. Having studied accountancy at one of our predecessor institutions, Hatfield Polytechnic, in the late 1970s he is now one of the University’s most successful alumnus.

Mr Graham Blyth Mr Graham Blyth received the honorary degree of Doctor of Science in recognition of his long and distinguished career in audio engineering and his leadership in advancing mixing console design. Graham brought widespread recognition and jobs to Hertfordshire when he sold his company. This company now supports our School of Engineering and Technology, with Graham himself providing lectures and valuable contributions to the design and delivery of future programmes.

Mrs Cheryl Beattie Mrs Cheryl Beattie was elected an Honorary Fellow in recognition of her contribution to raising awareness of people with learning disabilities whilst triumphing over own disabilities. Cheryl has played an important role in shaping and establishing our University’s new Centre for Learning Disability Studies.

Sir Roger Moore KBE Sir Roger Moore received the honorary degree of Doctor of Arts in recognition of outstanding contribution to the UK film and television industry for more than 50 years and, in particular, film & television production in the county of Hertfordshire. Starring in many films, he is most famous for playing the iconic role of James Bond. He is also known for his role as a special representative for UNICEF.

Mr Michael Beaman Mr Michael Beaman was elected a Fellow in recognition of outstanding contribution to both pharmacy practice and education in the UK for more than 40 years. He is now a Visiting Fellow at the University and has shown tremendous support for the School of Pharmacy, including passing on his expertise to staff and students.

2006

june

may

april

march

FEBRUARY

january

2007

december

november

october

spetember

august

JULY

The School of Film, Music and Media is established


HORORARY graduates University information

Sir Graham Wynne Sir Graham Wynne received the honorary degree of Doctor of Science in recognition of outstanding contribution to the protection of the environment. He was the Chief Executive for the Royal Society for the Protection of Birds (RSPB) and retired in 2010. In 2008 the Independent on Sunday ranked him among Britain’s top 20 environmentalists.

65

Mr Bob Forrest Mr Bob Forrest was elected a Fellow in recognition of his unique and leading role in the development of astronomy at the University’s astronomical observatory at Bayfordbury. He was the Principal Technical Officer from the mid-1980s until his retirement in 2010.

Mrs Anne Dunbar Mrs Anne Dunbar received the honorary degree of Master of Science in recognition of outstanding contribution to the development of radiography education in the Thames Valley Region. From 2006 till March 2012 she was the Radiology Manager at the John Radcliff Hospital in Oxford. For some time she has contributed greatly to the overall development of radiography at the University.

Commander Sarah West RN Commander Sarah West received the honorary degree of Doctor of Science in recognition of outstanding achievement in becoming the first woman to command a frontline warship, HMS Portland, in the 500-year history of the Royal Navy. She studied for a mathematics degree at the University, graduating with first-class honours, and is an exceptionally worthy winner of the University’s 2012 Alumnus of the Year award.

Ms Karen Middleton CBE Ms Karen Middleton received the honorary degree of Doctor of Science in recognition of her outstanding contribution to the advancement of Health Professions within the UK. She is the Chief Health Professions Officer at the Department of Health and is at the forefront of radical reforms taking place in the National Health Service. Ms Middleton has been an active supporter of the University’s School of Health and Emergency Professions.

Mr Jody Cundy MBE Mr Jody Cundy received the honorary degree of Master of Science in recognition of outstanding contribution to the advancement of the profile of Paralympic sport. He is a University Alumnus having studied with us for his Engineering degree. Mr Cundy is one of Great Britain’s most-decorated male Paralympians and winner of five gold medals. Most recently he won a bronze medal in the men’s individual C4 pursuit race at London 2012.

2007

april

march

february

january

2008

december

november

october

septemver

august

july

The University enters the first ever Hydrogen-Powered Formula Student Racing Car in the UK Formula Student event

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VICE-CHANCELLOR’s awards 2012 University information

VICE-CHANCELLOR’s AWARDS 2012 The Vice-Chancellor’s Awards are an annual staff recognition scheme.

Excellence in Learning and Teaching

Business School Dr Heather Thornton – School of Health and Emergency Professions

Highly commended Penny Carey – School of Law Andree Sheehan-Evett – Enterprise and Business Development

Employee of the Year (student choice) Winner James Stanley – Faculty of Health and Human Sciences

Winner Professor Ranjeet Sokhi – School of Physics, Astronomy and Mathematics

Highly commended Mark Edgar – Office of the Dean of Students Genean Warren- School of Humanities

Highly commended Professor Ralph Stacey – Hertfordshire Business School

Alumnus of the year

Excellence in Engagement with Business and the Professions

Winner Commander Sarah West RN

Winner Pharmacovigilance Team

Providing an outstanding service

Green impact award

Highly commended Lesley Glass – Hertfordshire Business

The Fielder Centre

Excellence in Community Engagement

School Housing out of Hours team – Department of Estates, Hospitality and Contracts

Strategic Business Unit of the year

Winner Julie Allen – Hertfordshire Sports Village

Excellence in the Advancement of Student Experience and Graduate Success

Winner Finance

Highly commended UHArts team

Winner Celeste Jones – Hertfordshire Business School

Highly commended School of Pharmacy School of Engineering and Technology

2008

Highly commended Midwifery Team Lewis Stockwell – School

JANUARY

2009

DECEMBER

OCTOBER

SEPTEMBER

NOVEMBER

Hertfordshire Sports Village netball team wins the Netball Super League Grand Final

of Humanities

AUGUST

Highly commended Professor Arne Holdo

Highly commended Sally Graham – School of Education

Winner Michele Charles – School of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work

JULY

Highly commended Alan Peacock – School of Creative Arts Professor Mark Russell – School of Engineering and Technology

Excellence in Research

Highly commended Sally Graham – School of Education John Hil – Hertfordshire

JUNE

Winner Majid Ali- School of Pharmacy

Winner Muditha Cooray – Hertfordshire Business School

Winner Dr Joy Jarvis – School of Education

MAY

Tutor of the year

APRIL

Highly commended Nicola Bates – Academic Registry Dale Murphy – Department of Estates, Hospitality and Contracts Liz Wray – School of Humanities

Excellence in International Engagement

MARCH

Winner Phil Lenten – School of Education

FEBRUARY

Colleague of the Year


WHO’s WHO University information

Board of Governors Independent Members

Chancellor

Member nominated by the Academic Board

Mrs J L Connell (Chairman) His Honour Judge Baker Ms Y Batliwala Mr P L Block Professor M Elves (to 31/08/11) Mr D J Goodridge Mr C J Gordon Mr A P Graham Mr J K Heywood Mr N F Matthews Mr G Morrison Mr J F H Park Lady Staughton (to 31/08/12)

Dr L Karstadt (to 31/08/12)

Students’ Union Ms E Masefield (from 1/07/11)

The Most Hon The Marquess of Salisbury KCVO PC DL

Co-opted Members Professor Sir Graeme Davies Mr R I N Gordon Mrs S D Harrison-Barker Miss J L McCue Dr L Mitchell Dr D A Neil

The University Court The court is a non-executive body that advises and supports the University in developing and achieving its objectives. It reviews our progress and our impact upon the wider community. The composition and membership of the University Court is flexible to enable and facilitate consideration of a broad range of relevant matters.

Vice-Chancellor Professor Q A McKellar

Professor Quintin McKellar Vice-Chancellor

Professor Graham Galbraith Deputy Vice-Chancellor

Mr Philip Waters Secretary and Registrar

Mr Alistair Moffat Group Finance Director

Dr Andrew Clutterbuck Pro Vice-Chancellor (Student Experience)

Professor John Senior Pro Vice-Chancellor (Research)

Dr Steven Boffey Pro Vice-Chancellor (Regional Affairs)

Professor Barry Hunt Pro Vice-Chancellor (International)

Mrs Julie Newlan Pro Vice-Chancellor (Enterprise) and Director of Marketing and Communications

FEBRUARY

JANUARY

2010

DECEMBER

NOVEMBER

OCTOBER

The University is named as the Times Higher Education Supplement ‘Entrepreneurial University of the Year’

SEPTEMBER

2010

The new entertainments venue, The Forum, is opened on the College Lane Campus

AUGUST

2009

JULY

JUNE

Office of the Vice-Chancellor

MAY

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student information University information

STUDENT Board of Governors information For the academic year 2011/2012

Mode & Level of Study

Subject area 2011/12

Gender 2011/12

%

15,270 11,960 27,230

56% 44% 100%

England Wales Scotland N Ireland Guernsey, Jersey and the Isle of Man Other EU Non EU Total

Ethnicity 2011/12 12,910 4,390 5,190 1,570 2,020 1,160 27,230

White Black or Black British - Caribbean Asian or Asian British - Indian Chinese Other (including mixed) Unknown/Information refused Total

% 47% 16% 19% 6% 7% 4% 100%

AUGUST

JULY

JUNE

MAY

2011/12 1330 570 410 300 280 220 190 130 110 90 27,230

China Nigeria India Pakistan Malaysia Saudi Arabia Ireland Sri Lanka Cyprus (European Union) Bangladesh Total

Professor Quintin McKellar is appointed Vice-Chancellor of the University

APRIL

% 80.2% 0.4% 0.2% 0.1% 0.1% 3.2% 15.9% 100%

Students from outside the UK - Top 10 countries

2011

MARCH

2011/12 21,830 110 60 40 20 860 4,330 27,230

Geographic Region

% 4.9% 2.1% 1.5% 1.1% 1.0% 0.8% 0.7% 0.5% 0.4% 0.3%

FEBRUARY

Female Male Total

JANUARY

Grand Total

% 21.7% 7.4% 0.1% 1.5% 1.0% 5.8% 6.6% 0.3% 2.8% 5.5% 20.5% 0.4% 2.7% 0.9% 10.7% 7.6% 4.5% 100%

2011

1,450 630 2,020 7,070 27,230

2011/12 5,910 2,010 30 420 270 1,570 1,800 90 750 1,500 5,580 110 740 240 2,910 2,070 1,230 27,230

DECEMBER

First degree Foundation Other Undergraduate Total

Subjects allied to medicine Biological sciences Agriculture & related subjects Physical sciences Mathematical sciences Computer science Engineering & technology Architecture, building & planning Social studies Law Business & administrative studies Mass communications & documentation Languages Historical & philosophical studies Creative arts & design Education Combined Total

NOVEMBER

230 2,400 15,760 940 840 20,160 320 2,650

OCTOBER

Part-time

Postgraduate Research Postgraduate Taught First degree Foundation Other Undergraduate Total Postgraduate Research Postgraduate Taught

SEPTEMBER

Full-time and Sandwich


financial information University information

69

Financial information

For the academic year 2011/2012

2012 2011 Notes £’000 £’000 Income Funding council grants 1 63,614 66,595 Tuition fees and education contracts 2 103,914 99,035 Research grants and contracts 3 8,354 8,323 Other operating income 4 61,308 80,481 Endowment and investment income 5 637 298 Total income 237,827 254,732 Less: Share of income from joint ventures continuing operations

(679) (23,898) (4,312)

Less: Share of income from joint ventures discontinuing operations

Net income 232,836 230,834 Expenditure Staff costs Other operating expenses Depreciation Interest and other finance costs

6 8 8 10

114,252 110,747 84,459 89,464 12,747 18,147 3,834 3,468

Total expenditure 8 215,292 221,826

Surplus after depreciation of tangible fixed assets 17,544 9,008 at valuation and before tax

2011

DECEMBER

NOVEMBER

OCTOBER

SEPTEMBER

AUGUST

JULY

JUNE

MAY

APRIL

MARCH

The Law Court building opens on de Havilland Campus

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“Even for a vigorous and forward-looking institution as we hope we are, an occasional backward glance is not necessarily out of place� Sir Norman Lindop, Director of Hatfield Polytechnic (1975)

2012

2012

december

november

october

september

The University celebrates 60 years of higher education in Hertfordshire.

august

july

june

may

april

march

february

January

2012

The University opens its own Campus Pharmacy, run by staff from the School of Pharmacy


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GA_13027/DC/05_13

University of Hertfordshire Hatfield AL10 9AB +44 (0)1707 284800 herts.ac.uk uherts.mobi facebook.com/uniofherts @uniofherts


University of Hertfordshire - Annual Review 2012