Page 1

the magazine fOr the staff Of the University Of CamBridge

JULy/aUgUst 2009

prepare to party on 18 July the wonder of stem cells

7 unusual ways to see Cambridge

page 6

page 8


snap shOt goodness: Bill and melinda gates were among ten eminent individuals to be awarded honorary degrees by the university in June. As well as founding global giant microsoft the couple are co-founders of the philanthropic Bill and melinda gates foundation that works in poverty alleviation, education and health. They have donated more than uS$24 billion to the foundation.

ring tone: Twelve new bells have been cast and installed in the university Church, great St mary’s, to mark the 800th anniversary. This is the only peal of 12 bells in the ely diocese and it was on the old set that the famous Cambridge Chimes were created, later copied for Big Ben. They were cast in Loughborough and made possible through a donation by dr dill faulkes.

COntents Cover Prepare to party: The largest ever gathering of university staff in living memory takes place on 18 July as part on the 800th celebrations. Come along and enjoy! ➔ for the latest about the party go to www.800. cam.ac.uk/gardenparty. 3-5 What’s new 6 Making a difference Ground breaking research into stem cells 8 new ways to see Cambridge 10-11 behind the scenes Films for the 800th 12 inside the colleges The Head Gardener at Newnham 13 People 14 advertisements

Wood walk: The 800 Wood, planted near madingley to mark the 800th anniversary, is now open. A special woodland path traces the shape of a figure of eight through the wood (pictured), which features 15,000 native tree species. The ten-hectare wood is on land owned by the university farm, abutting madingley Wood.

fly past: All three university service units – the Air Squadron, naval unit and officers’ Training Corps – collaborated to mount a musical spectacular with fireworks at St John’s College in June. Bands from the marines and Queen’s division played and the highlight was a fly past by a C47 dakota and rAf falcons. over 300 students from the university as well as ueA and Anglia ruskin universities take part in military and adventurous leadership training with the units.

2 | july/august 2009 | UNIVERSITY OF CAMBRIDGE NEwSlETTER

15 Prizes and awards 16 back page 800th update

newsLetter

The Newsletter is published for the staff of the university of Cambridge and is produced by the office of external Affairs and Communications. please send in ideas for the content and other ways we can improve the publication. Tel: (3)32300 newsletter@admin.cam.ac.uk Suggestions for articles for the September/ october edition should reach the editor by 20 July. editor (Acting): Charlotte Sankey design: Cambridge Creations printers: Labute printers

newsLetter OnLine

www.admin.cam.ac.uk/univ/newsletter/


what’s new

your comments and contributions are always welcome. please send them to the editor at newsletter@admin.cam.ac.uk The deadline for the next issue is 20 july.

£1m new business fund open to applications do you hAVe a new science-based business idea and need funding? A new university fund has been launched as part of the 800th celebrations, and is now inviting applications. The university of Cambridge discovery fund aims to help bring researchers’ and academics’ science-based ideas to life, and has just announced that it has raised its first £1 million for the fund, of a target of £5 million. The discovery fund is one of three seed funds administered by the university’s commercialisation office, Cambridge enterprise. It differs from the other two in that it has been funded by individual donations from alumni and friends of the university. Cambridge is famous for producing research which has transformed the world. funding the early stages of commercialisation plays an important role in removing risk and attracting management and funding to technology. The fund can help businesses in one of two ways: either to help in the early stages with assessing the market and intellectual property issues, planning marketing, and developing the business plan – support is up to £10,000 and called ‘pathfinder funding’; or to fund businesses at the next stage of development, which is up to £80,000 and called ‘Concept funding’.

Cambridge enterprise seed funds have enjoyed success: every £1 invested by the seed funds in new university companies has, on average, attracted follow-on funding of £45. In 2007/08 Cambridge enterprise earned over £10 million from licensing, consultancy and equity transactions, of which £8 million was distributed back

Celebrate darwin all over Cambridge darwin bicentenary celebrations continue apace with the darwin festival taking place this month July 5 to 10. The week of talks, lectures and events brings together world experts to discuss and dissect darwin’s impact. Also taking part are luminaries such as Sir Terry pratchett, Ian mcewan, AS Byatt and soprano Susan gritton. There are still places for some of the events. other darwin happenings include: l endless forms exhibition at the fitzwilliam Museum looking at darwin’s impact on the visual arts, until october.

l A Voyage round the

World exhibition opens at the university library on July 6, bringing together many items from the Beagle voyage for the first time. l darwin the geologist at the sedgwick Museum features the rock specimens that darwin collected. l exhibition of darwin’s carnivorous plants at the botanic garden. See feature on page 11. ➔ For information and booking visit www.darwin2009festival.com

Cambridge Display Technology, a world leader in screen technologies, is a success story that benefitted from Cambridge Enterprise seed funding.

to university departments and academics. Teri Willey, Chief executive of Cambridge enterprise, said: “The discovery fund provides that critical first funding which can be so difficult for a new company to find.” ➔ More at www.enterprise.cam.ac.uk/ seedfund

the perfeCt shape This object took 12 years to invent and was created in response to a challenge posed in 1995 by the Russian mathematician Vladimir Arnold to create the perfect, self-righting object. Called the Gömböc, it is different to the self-righting Weeble toy, to which it has been compared: it has an even distribution of weight, is made of a single material, and has just one stable and one unstable point of equilibrium. Visiting Fellow Commoner at Trinity College, Hungarian engineer Gabor Domokos, is one of the two inventors of the Gömböc. Creating it involved using precise measurements down to a fraction of a millimetre. ➔ See it at the Whipple Museum of the History of Science, open 12:30 to 4:30pm Monday to Friday. Admission is free and open to all. See also www.gomboc.eu july/august 2009 | UNIVERSITY OF CAMBRIDGE NEwSlETTER | 3


what’s new If you need temporary cover for your department’s service roles, the team at the University’s Temporary Employment Service (TES) can now provide you instant support with a new, improved service and in a larger number of areas. The office, based on Trumpington Street, has always supplied support staff to cover clerical, secretarial and library roles but the service’s remit has now extended to include catering, IT and finance. Combined with a new one-stop-shop approach to streamline services, the TES is expected to be in demand. “At the moment we have 390 temps on assignment and, on average, we provide 82 new temps every month. We have 900 temps on our books,” says Katherine Fahey, Temporary Workers Team Leader at TES. “We appreciate it if departments give us advanced notice but sometimes the request is for the same day. Fortunately we have a pool of temps willing to do that.”

Charlotte Sankey

TES expands its employment service

Katherine Fahey’s team can provide temporary staff at short notice. She is pictured right, with colleague Sophie Davis.

in brief… 13,000 new phones

Strictly winning

The University’s roll-out of a new Voice Over IP (VOIP) telephone system is on target and will finish ahead of schedule. In June 15,000 handsets were in place, out of a total of 15,500 across the University, and the process of decommissioning old equipment has started. New features, including web-based voicemail access, an online dialler and improved call logging information will enhance efficiency. The University’s ballroom dancers waltzed, quickstepped and jived their way to victory at the Empire Ballroom, Blackpool, winning the national universities competition for an unprecedented fourth year running. The 32 dancers in the Cambridge Dancesport Team competed against 80 other groups from 29 universities. Cambridge also beat Oxford at the Varsity match in ballroom dancing for the third consecutive year.

4 | july/august 2009 | UNIVERSITY OF CAMBRIDGE Newsletter

Departments can now request temporary cover online, on the TES website. Simply send the completed form back to TES and they will do the work for you. The team sends a selection of CVs for the department to choose from, or forwards the request to a number of preferred suppliers if they are unable to find suitable candidates. “We save the department time and energy and make sure the University gets best value for money,” says Katherine. Do you need…. l an Events and Marketing Manager l a Pot Washer l a Building Office Coordinator l a Gardener l an Accounts Assistant l an IT Reporting Assistant? ➔ The TES has recently filled all these roles, and can help. Go to www.admin. cam.ac.uk/cam-only/offices/hr/jobs/tes/ requiring.shtml

Cambridge revises standard offer to include A* Following the government’s introduction of the A* for A levels from 2010, the University has revised its standard offer level from AAA to A*AA. The decision was prompted by the difficulties experienced in differentiating between the increasing numbers of applicants who get three As at A-level. It also reflected a desire for greater clarity and standardisation of offers, for the benefit of applicants. The University will continue to make non-standard offers where appropriate – for example, students making applications through the Cambridge Special Access Scheme can expect to have their potential, achievements, and other relevant contextual data taken into account.


Pay a visit to the online edition of the Newsletter: www.admin.cam.ac.uk/univ/newsletter/

New department ensures politics are global A new Department has been created from the merger of two existing departments – the Centre of International Studies and the Department Andrew Gamble of Politics – to bring closer the related subjects of politics and international relations. The Department of Politics and International Studies, known as POLIS, was launched in May. This is the first time Cambridge has had a unified Department in this important academic area, and provides the opportunity for further growth. As well as building on existing strengths in political thought, international security, political economy, European studies and comparative politics, the Department will also develop new research areas, and expand its teaching. The Centre of International Studies has a major postgraduate programme and the Department of Politics a very successful undergraduate course.

POLIS will offer new: ➔ Courses From autumn 2010, new papers in international relations will be available to undergraduates. ➔ Building In 2011 the Department will move into a prestigious new building, to be constructed on the Sidgwick site. ➔ Lectureship in Governance and Human Rights with special reference to Africa. A generous donation from The David and Elaine Potter Foundation has endowed this new post. ➔ Research centres There are plans to create within POLIS a new Centre of Governance and Human Rights under the direction of the David and Elaine Potter lecturer. Plans are also well advanced for a Centre of Political Thought, run jointly with the Faculty of History.

“POLIS is an exciting and timely development, with enormous potential for the future. Our aim is to be recognised in the next ten years as one of the leading centres for the study of politics and international relations,” said Professor Andrew Gamble, Head of Department.

in brief… Are you in danger of a WRULD?

Good posture, taking regular exercise and rest breaks can reduce the risk of developing a Work Related Upper Limb Disorder (WRULD). The University Computing Service runs a free, monthly drop-in service for all University staff and students to help create an ergonomic workstation using a variety of equipment and techniques. Drop-ins are held in the PWF room at the Disability Resource Centre, Keynes House, Trumpington Street, on the last Wednesday of each month, 3pm to 4.30pm. ➔ Contact: Sheena MacRae at sm573@cam.ac.uk.

Madingley ball

The University’s Institute of Continuing Education is holding its first ever summer ball in the lovely setting of Madingley Hall. Open to all, it takes place on 1 August. Enjoy the Big Umbrella Band and Beth Walthew (pictured), dinner, games, activities and fireworks. Dress code is ‘dress to impress’ and tickets £25. All proceeds go to the Arthur Rank Hospice. ➔ To book, call Linda Fisher on 01954 280218.

Help at hand

Anyone working for the University can access a range of practical and emotional support and advice through the Employee Support Helpline. The 24-hours and 365-days-ayear telephone helpline, provided by AXA ICAS Wellbeing, is confidential and offers expert support with a range of issues such as consumer issues, family care, finance and debt management, housing, legal, health and education matters. ➔ Contact the Employee Support Helpline on: 0800 072 7072.

Pure Maths is cleverest

24 teams from University departments recently battled it out to see which were the ‘cleverest’ in a special 800th Anniversary Quiz. The Department of Pure Mathematics and Mathematical Statistics (pictured) emerged victorious in the finals against the Faculty of History, winning 170 points to 110. Physics and the University Library were semi-finalists. The Quiz, organised by the University Quiz Society, was supported by the 2009 Fund, which has supported more than 40 University and College groups in mounting events. The Quiz was hosted by Clive Anderson, Selwyn alumnus and former President of Footlights. ➔ Watch a clip at www.srcf.ucam.org/quizsoc/

Update your data by end of July It is now much easier for you to manage the information stored about you on CHRIS, the University’s HR database, thanks to a new electronic system. Staff can check and update information such as their emergency contact details online. However, this facility is only open until the end of July, so log in now to be sure your data is up-to-date (you need your usual computer log-in details – i.e. your crs ID). The secure, web-based system replaces traditional paper-based methods used in the past. Staff from the Human Resources Division and Management Information Services Division are working together on the project and contacting every member of staff inviting them to participate. All publicly funded universities in

the UK are required to make statistical returns about those they employ (on an anonymous basis) to the Higher Education Statistics Agency (HESA) each year. The data collected by HESA is used to inform university league tables and is provided to other agencies. Staff can get help with the process at the CHRIS Helpdesk. Elizabeth Mackie, Reporting and Projects Manager says: “The initiative has been well received by staff and I am encouraged by the progress. We had just under 3,000 log-ins by mid-June.” ➔ Get help at the CHRIS Helpdesk, tel: (7)60999 or chrishelpdesk@ admin.cam.ac.uk ➔ For more about HESA see: www.hesa.ac.uk

july/august 2009 | UNIVERSITY OF CAMBRIDGE Newsletter | 5


making a difference Advances with stem cells have the potential to make a huge impact on human health. And Cambridge is home to much of this work, with a new laboratory being opened at Addenbrooke’s this June. Here is a layman’s guide to stem cell research at Cambridge

Stem cells: the key to our future? Stem cells have enormous medical potential as they have the astonishing ability to create new cells. This means they may be able to do two very valuable things: cure previously incurable diseases, as well as repair the body after injury. It was in Cambridge in 1981 that the unique properties of embryonic stem cells were first identified, and today the University is recognised as a world leader in stem cell research. Since then, the University has attracted some of the leading international experts and is now the home to the largest group of stem cell researchers in the UK. Cambridge has now the second largest such group in the world after the US, where President Obama has lifted restrictions on government funding of embryonic stem cell research. Just this June a new laboratory opened where scientists working on the biology of stem cells will be able to interact with clinicians, in the hope of delivering advances to patients. Called the Anne McLaren Laboratory for Regenerative Medicine, it is in the new West Forvie Building on the Addenbrooke’s site.

different cell types Embryonic stem cells are taken from four- or five-day-old fertilised eggs unused in IVF treatments. They are important because they can develop into any type of cell in the body. Scientists hope that they may be coaxed into becoming cells that can be transplanted into other humans to replace cells destroyed by disease. Adult stem cells are found in tissues such as brain, bone marrow, peripheral blood, blood vessels, skeletal muscle, skin and liver. They tend only to develop into the type of tissue from which they came. It may be possible to use these ‘mature’ stem cells within the same individual from whom they were taken to generate healthy tissue. They would become ‘super repair kits’ for the body. 6 | july/august 2009 | UNIVERSITY OF CAMBRIDGE Newsletter

What are stem cells? Stem cells play a key role in the development of mammals. They can divide and multiply into limitless identical copies of themselves, and also transform themselves into any cell in the body.

How could stem cells actually cure a person with a disease? They have the unique potential to grow into healthy tissue. It is hoped that by transplanting relevant stem cells into the damaged or diseased tissue of a person, the transplanted stem cells will regenerate the various cell types of that tissue. However it is not yet known how transplanted stem cells will behave inside the body, and there is a risk of causing tumours. This issue needs to be fully explored before trials can take place with humans.

Why is Cambridge making a major commitment to the research? Because important advances are possible in these major areas: 1. Treatments for previously incurable diseases such as Parkinson’s disease, multiple sclerosis, arthritis and Alzheimer’s disease, and some cancers (particularly of the skin, colon and blood). Here faulty cells would be replaced by transplanted embryonic stem cells modified in the laboratory, or by tissue stem cells found within the patient’s own body. 2. New treatments for conditions where only limited treatments exist such as diabetes, cancers, heart and blood diseases. Type 1 Diabetes is currently the biggest target. It is hoped that stem cells

can be turned into insulin-producing pancreas cells to replace faulty cells. 3. The discovery of new drugs for all kinds of diseases. Tissues derived from stem cells may be used to test unique compounds on by pharmaceutical companies. This could reduce the need to use animals in medical research. 4. The creation of sperm and eggs for fertility treatments. 5. Finding vital clues about how disease takes hold. This means medical research may eventually be able to focus on disease prevention rather than treatment.

What have Cambridge researchers achieved to date? Sir Martin Evans identified embryonic stem cells in mice at Cambridge in 1981 and won the Nobel Prize for medicine in 2007. Cambridge scientists are now gaining information about how embryonic stem cells may be used to reprogramme an individual’s own ‘adult’ cells. Having ‘wiped clean’ their memory, they might then be made into cardiac cells, for example. This research involves


simon barber

Useful websites www.cscr.cam.ac.uk www.bio.cam.ac.uk

Research. The University has invested over £16 million in this dedicated facility which is based in central Cambridge and houses laboratories for extracting and cultivating stem cells. By 2012 it is hoped it will accommodate up to 12 research groups. This commitment has led to major financial backing from government institutions and medical research foundations. The new Anne McLaren Laboratory for Regenerative Medicine in the new West Forvie Building is focussing on finding clinical applications for the biological research carried out at the Wellcome Trust Centre. It will house up to 60 researchers, enabling scientists working on the biology of stem cells to interact with clinicians hoping to deliver these advances to patients. This approach is known as ‘bench to bedside’.

Who regulates the stem cell research being done at Cambridge?

the occasional use of rodents. The scientists are also moving to understand how an adult’s own stem cells can be used to repair his or her own body, reducing the need to introduce another body’s stem cells which the patient may reject.

What aspects of stem cell research do Cambridge scientists focus on? Research at Cambridge takes a dual approach. Firstly, biological: the investigation of the fundamentals of stem cell biology; secondly biomedical: researching the potential of stem cells for clinical use. Research is grouped together under the umbrella of the Cambridge Stem Cell Initiative. This enables researchers all around the University to collaborate across disciplines.

How is Cambridge investing in stem cell research? One of the hubs of this Initiative, and of the biological approach, is the Wellcome Trust Centre for Stem Cell

Professor Azim Surani’s work on genetics is a crucial element in the University’s stem cell research.

Research at Cambridge involving embryonic stem cells is overseen by the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority and conforms to their licensing regime. Work with adult stem cells is regulated by the Human Tissue Act. Funding bodies including the Medical Research Council and the Wellcome Trust also scrutinise Cambridge research.

What about the ethical aspects of using embryonic stem cells? Material used in Cambridge research is from fertilised eggs unused in IVF treatments. The use of cells from human embryos is seen by some as a denial of the basic right to life. While acknowledging that controversy does surround the use of fertilised eggs, Cambridge scientists consider them vitally important for research that may lead to new treatments for life-threatening diseases. The unused fertilised eggs would otherwise be discarded.

Why not use adult stem cells instead of embryonic stem cells? Adult stem cells have proved valuable but, unlike embryonic stem cells, they are limited in what they can do. If, however, advances in research continue,

within a few years scientists may no longer have to use embryonic stem cells.

Why is it necessary to test on rodents? If you want to know how a gene works, the best way is to study it in a live animal. Getting information from the whole organism is very important. Work done on cells from rodents is regulated by the Home Office.

If a family member had a lifethreatening disease, are there clinical trials at Cambridge they could be signed up to? No. While the University does conduct some clinical trials it does not do any trials involving stem cell research. It is usually best to contact the charity connected with the relevant disease or condition.

Will stem cell research make it possible to reverse trends in ageing or to create a ‘bionic human’? There will be wealthy people who will seek to use these therapies to try to reverse ageing, whether it works or not. If scientists can find a way to boost or replace your own blood system using your own cells, there may be real benefits to be gained for all.

Who are the key players involved in stem cell research at Cambridge? l Roger Pedersen is Professor of

Regenerative Medicine. He moved to Cambridge from the University of California in 2001 and runs the new Anne McLaren Laboratory. l The Director of the Wellcome Trust Centre for Stem Cell Research at the University of Cambridge is Austin Smith, Professor of Stem Cell Biology. He moved his research work to Cambridge in 2006 from the University of Edinburgh. l The Centre’s Deputy Director is Fiona Watt, Professor of Molecular Genetics. She is also Deputy Director of the Cancer Research UK Cambridge Research Institute. l Azim Surani, Professor of Physiology and Reproduction, works in the field of epigenetics which looks at how genes are activated and silenced.

july/august 2009 | UNIVERSITY OF CAMBRIDGE Newsletter | 7


D

LU

P R IM

V IC T

OR IA

GA RD

PA R K

EN WA LK

H’S RO AD FR E N C

LA ’S ON

ES

H

C

PS OM TH

M PS ON LA ’S

THO

NE PO RT UG AL PL

DY LA ER FO

W I LB

OHN’ S ST J ST

ST

B a c k s

R

4

N

EW N

60

3

FEN

C A U S E WA

Sheep’s Sheep’ Green

ST

HAR DWICK WICK S T

ITY

TRIN

T

EE R

T

E LV

RD

HAM

RIDLEY HALL ROAD

GRO VE

Grove Lodge

William illiam Stone Building W (Peterhouse)

Causewayside University Flats

A

ROAD GRANGE

Fitzwilliam Museum

RO AD

RA G

D E RB Y E NU AV E Y

LE T IS EL

TE

E R M

AD

OW

S

Riv

RD

er

Ca

m

LA

TH

AM

ES

E

AD

RD

GR

er est

CH

Coe Fen

TO N

O E R

N

tch ran

R ST

OW

G To

T AN

Owlstone Croft (Queens’)

CL

S YLV

T h e

ROAD GRANGE

ES TE

R RO AD

S RO AD

N

K IN G’

O

N C L

T

T

O

S

KE

Pem Col

G

BAR

O

N

Peterhouse

Garden House Hotel

Gwen Raverat House (Darwin)

A113

O W LS

RL

Catharine’s St Catharine’ College Sports Ground

T ST

ES TE

MA

H ESTER ROAD

B

PI

ON M E RTO

EE

NTC

M

UM

WAY Y

E

PE

TR

Gonville & Caius College Sports Ground

LA

GO UGH

OL

n

HO

rto

SC

Ba

EE

To

FR

Young Frank Y House (Darwin)

MILL ING T ON

GR

8 | july/august 2009 | UNIVERSITY OF CAMBRIDGE NEwSlETTER

ST

W O R D S W O RTH

NEW MUSEU SITE

N E W N HA H M C R O FT T ST

S.

he was ‘so utterly destitute of an ear, that I cannot hum a tune correctly,’ he very much enjoyed listening to music and would time his walks through town so as to hear the music from King’s Chapel wafting through the air. He said his ‘backbone would shiver’. ➔ Meet at the Tourist Information Centre in Wheeler Street every Saturday for 11am. Prices £5 to £10. Tel: 0871 226 8006.

NE BE

Newnham House (Corpus Christi)

LA

3. see darwin’s meat eaters

2 3

? Did you know? While Darwin claimed l

ET

E

M A LT I N G L A

Lammas Land

South Green Lodge (St Catharine’ Catharine’s)

Pembroke College Sports Ground

1

PL

NEWN HA M WA LK

Fellows’ Garden (Gonville & Caius)

TA

Ridley Hall

Newnham College Sports Ground

N L LA

AN

S IDG WICK AV ENUE

Newnham College

GRA N T C H

Downing College Sports Ground

R

Darwin College

2. make a tOUr Of darwin’s haUnts To mark the 200th darwin anniversary, the Cambridge Tourist Information Centre is running tours of spots closely connected with the great scientist. It includes Christ’s College, where darwin had his student rooms, as well as the College’s Library, dining hall and memorial garden.

RE

G K I N G ’ S PA R A D E

S

MIL

S

SI

T

Y

Cambridge Rugby Football Ground

ST

ID

GAR DEN

SEL LWYN R O A D

K E R OAD

ST

RO

GR

Wolfson olfson College W D

F U L BR OO

H RC

N

SILVER SIL VER STREET/ MILL LANE

Selwyn College

C H A M PN EY S

3

TS

SA

L

Corpus Christi College

NS ’ LA

PINEHUR ST

E

A60

Queens’ College

SIDGWICK SITE

SE LWY N

Queens’ College and Robinson College Sports Ground

➔ A 20-minute tour is £7 per person and a 45-minute is £20 per person. Tel: 858485

Harvey Court (Gonville & Caius)

ER RO AD

34

Laundry Farm

AD WEST RO

Cripps Court (Selwyn)

A E AV

King’ College and King’s Selwyn College Sports Ground

St Catharine’s Catharine’ College

St Chad’ Chad’s (St Catharine’ Catharine’s)

CLAR E R OA D

N R OA

U CH

I N G ’ S LA K IN

A11

P E A RC

E

QU EE

University Rugby Ground

A ARCH W T COUR

1

CL

TRINITY LA

N

Garden Hostel (King’ (King’s)

WA L K

BARTO

EL EY

S

Gonville and Caius College Trinity T rinity Hall OLD ST SCHOOLS MAR SITE Clare College King’s King’ College LA

King’ King’s College School

CL

get a fresh-air guided tour of the city in a ‘pedicab’, which can hold up to three people. you need to book in advance although trips are available at short notice from the bike rank on King’s parade. many of the guides are Cambridge students.

SP EN S

RK

T Trinity College

GARRET HOSTE L

Memorial Court (Clare)

University Library

RO AD

Corpus Christi College Sports Ground

ST UK

1. take a tOUr in a ‘pediCaB’

BU RREL L’S WAL K

Clare Hall

Leckhampton (Corpus Christi)

G H WAY

ROAD

GOU

H EL

EN’S

Robinson College H ER SC

QUE

RO AD

Burrell’s Field Burrell’ (T (Trinity)

DR I V E

H PL

PA

BR

St John’ John’ss College

Trinity Old Field T

C RA NM

N WAY

W

AL

AD D AM A S

PE N A RT

NE

PA R K

N

ST

RC E

LE

E

RO AD

’S

ST

4 13

T

RD

E G A

OD

ST R

KE

4

BU S

EN

EY CL

GE RL

H ED

D

BUL

A

T

ELL

D

E

N

E

ST

N

LA

D

TO

N

A

MP

TO

R

HA

T

ER

PA

RT

AD

University Sports Ground

W OO TT O

AD

T

cleway

DANE

E R O

Arundel House Hotel

Magdalene College

G

RK M AXW

ST

A

CLE

D

M

ROA

T EN

UE

A

K

M A RO RG AD AR E

D

ND

13

ES

CK I RO NG AD HA M

EA

CO

EE

O

Coton footpath/cy

W Court West (Clare Hall)

D

R

N AV EN

’S

L

unusual ways to enjoy Cambridge outdoors

RO

R

John’s St John’ College School

N

ROA

PA

D H

J. J. TH O M SO

R

UN

K SO

O RI A

E

PO

0 3 NO

A

U

The Colony (Clare)

St John’ John’s College Playing Fields AR

VICT ET

Cripps Court (Magdalene)

Castle Hill

Kettle's Y Yard

IL

13

R

N

T A

ST

E

A1

H

NS

D

AV

LA

TH

ET

N

N S T IO PE LB W TE A RO

Westminster W College

Wolfson Court W (Girton)

Emmanuel College Sports Ground

R

O

RA

S

H

TF

AG

LE

RE

SA

Lucy Cavendish College

CL

LP

ER

M

Shire Hall

W

EA

ROAD

A ST RE

LE ST RE ET

C A RL YL

T

St Edmund’ Edmund’s College

TH

HI LD

SE AR

H

Churchill College

ST

RO

Cavendish Laboratory

University West Cambridge W Residences

A

PL

RB

C

T

OAD

D

New Hall

LY

WGB

R

EL

University Park & Cycle

GLEY

E

N

BE RMUDA T ER RA CE

M

MADIN

ST

SH

Churchill College Sports Ground

N

N ORTH ST R EET

LA

O

RY

A1

D

BU

H ISTON RO A D

G

R

ST

D R LD IE

A H

W

EY OR ST

TF

N

TE

A

U IT

N

LD

Fitzwilliam College

WA Y

B1049

R X FA LI

AY W ’S

AD RO

TI

IE

ET

AD

A

RE

RO

N

TF

ST

NE

U

ES

E

W

’S

H

Institute of Astronomy

for those new to Cambridge – or who would like a fresh way to appreciate the beauty on their doorstep – here are six simple ways to enjoy outdoor Cambridge DO

EY

C

W

R

Madingley Rise House

OR

07

LA

Greenwich House

13

Wychfield Wychfield (Trinity (T rinity Hall)

ST

Bullard Laboratories

A

Trinity Hall T Ground

C

getting praCtiCaL

W West Building

RE E C SC

7

To Huntingdon Road

Gravel Hill Farm

At any time of year the university’s Botanic garden is a wonderful place to visit – a haven of peace and tranquillity in the city centre – as well as one of the oldest botanic gardens in the world. This year, it is holding an exhibition to celebrate darwin bi-centenary.

? Did you know? Darwin got much of his inspiration from the l

founder of the Botanic Garden, John Henslow. ➔ The Garden is open until 8pm on the second Wednesday of the month until 8 July. Tel: (3)36265

TH

A


IE

RR FE

D A

O

Y

AB BE

VI C A R A GE T E R R

T

ET

TE R R

AD

W AR K TE WO RR R AC TH E

LK

LK

CR

G

OS

L

R ES

STREET

6

G WYDIR

E S T

L

RO

ST

ST

PE

IL

RO

EM

WN

CK E R D N Z IE

T ES

GU

IL

VE

NT

GD

N

M M

5

HOOP E R S T

KIN NG G ST ON

3

ET

Pav Pav. Fenner’ Fenner’s Cricket Ground

CO

G

E

A

RD

MA

Hughes Hall

N

C

O

A

60

RD

IL W

RT IM ER

MO

LL VI

RD

E AC PL E

Kelsey Kerridge Sports Centre

IE R

Y S T

LL

L IS

CO

ER

RD

PA

ST

ST

A month after the College may Bumps are the town Bumps. over 90 boats and 800 town rowers take part, many of whom are alumni of the university. In fact, rowing is the largest participation sport in the city. for the uninitiated, the reason for the name ‘Bumps’ is that, while in most boat races teams would race side by side, the Cam is simply too narrow. So boats race in a unique fashion, setting off one after another, 1.5 lengths apart, and each crew tries to ‘bump’ the boat in front while also trying not to be bumped – a dramatic spectacle. ➔ Best places to watch are from the Plough pub in Fen Ditton, south of the river, or on the tow path on the north side, off Fen Road. www.cra-online.net Date: July 21-24, 5.45 - 9pm.

RE N ST U RT O

ST

R

Y CIT

AM

AN

EA

D

ST

EV

E

D RO A

ET ED

AR CL

E AC

RR TE RK

D

A

O

LD

LK BRUNSWICK W WA

RE EN

ST

ST N DO EN

EM

ST EL U N

WA

EET

A

ST

STR

M

AR T

RK

AD

S S T

6. waLk OUt tO CamBridge’s OLdest BUiLding aCrOss the COmmOns

H

ST RE

AD

AD RO AB

RO AD

AS

ON NIS TE

LY ND

EET

I RE

EW O DE R O AD

ON A AV E N UE

ET

Cycle bri

N

S TA T

Plant Growth Facility (PGF)

ION

D

ILW AY STA TIO

ET

T

ROAD

H

RA

Classroom

LS RO

Bot ani c

IL

Cory Lodge G a r de n

IL L

IA M

RD

CL

7

ZW

30

UE

F IT

A1

RO AD

EE

➔ To enter the Chapel make an appointment with the key holder Pam Thornhill who lives next to the Chapel. Tel 01223 241235. www.cpswandlebury.org

R USTAT

ROA O N WAY IFT

CLIFT ON

ND ON

A EN AV

AD Y RO

QU

CL A RE

T ES B UR

RE DR

4. Wandlebury two miles down A1307

S HA F

DE EN

AD

UE

dge

D

AD

A EN AV

A B ER

SWA

Y

N

LA N DS

Barnwell Leper Chapel on newmarket road is probably the oldest complete building in Cambridge and certainly one of the smallest. It was built around 1125 under henry I and was originally the Chapel of an isolation hospital. you can plan a route on foot from the centre of town across Stourbridge, Coldham’s or midsummer Commons.

ON SH

BA

LI

ST

G

RO A D

STR

RN

PL

CAmBrIdge preSerVATIon SoCIeTy

LL

RO

RO ON E

R OA D

SS E

MA WS

AD RO

G

ET

W IC H

S TR EE T EM AN

ID

SO N

ST RE

R EE T IU S ST

N OR

BR

TE NI

IO N

E

M

TE N I S

O N AT

R ST

A

DE V

C

N

’S UL

AD

O

A

D

PA

RO

AD

RU

BA

A

COR

AD

O

IO

RO

R

D

M

AD

A RO

SS

EM

ET

YO

R

EY

3

SOUTHAC

RE

K

ST

Anglia Ruskin University E

ST

AL

ST

RD

The Junction

T Travelodge

7. CyCLe tO a pUB

Cambridge Leisure Park

ER

Fitzwilliam House T N S

CH ER

RY HI NT

TO N

BEC

NEW

TL EY

O K R

AD

RA

TH

MO

HARR

ISON

VE DRIV

Wandlebury – part of the gog magogHomerton downs College on the southern fringe of the city – is a nearby nature reserve with a very special atmosphere. It is excellent for walking, birdwatching and losing yourself in the woods. At all of 243ft, the hill at the centre is one of the highest points in the area – the ‘Cambridgeshire Alps’. It was saved from development by the Cambridge preservation Society in the 1950s, not least because of its history which goes back 2,500 years when it was an Iron Age fort. Look out for the vestiges of earthen shapes in the grass near the car park – remains of the ancient ‘Cambridge giants’.

HA

RO AD

Clare/Clare Hall/Peterhouse Sports Ground

Mary Allan Building (shared with Faculty of Education)

RT

IN G

MA

RS

AD

TO

R N G

HA

B L IN

LL

CO

OV

A RO

GR

E

D

OV

E

To Addenbrooke’ Addenbrooke’s Site

4 7

➔ Open from dawn to dusk every day; located on the A1307 Cambridge to Haverhill Road. Get there by the X13 bus to Haverhill. Tel: 243830

CAmBrIdge preSerVATIon SoCIeTy

RO AD

134 A1

PUR

RO RE

Printing House

Hills Road Sports Centre

BE N

There are many good cycle routes in and around Cambridge and some of the most popular take in a public house en route. The Cambridge Cycle Campaign suggests the following which are close enough to make a round trip of only a couple of hours, including a pub stop:

O

Hills Road Sixth Form College

4. take an earLy mOrning strOLL at wandLeBUry Cambridge University Press

ON RO AD

M

Edinburgh Building

Government Offices (Eastbrook)

TO

H

SU SS EX

E

N

R

RE

ON

OA ON R

IN CL STO OS WE E

N

W

WAY

ES T

W

AD

TE

ST

RV

ST

N

B RO OK

W

LA

BE

O N R

T

I

AD

ED

R

N

EW

AB

EN

SF

HA

PA NT IG ST EL

BR OO KS I DE LA

TRUMPINGT

E

RO

VE

Y ST

Parkside Pool

YMCA

Gonville Hotel

RO

ST

UN

BR OOK S ID

R

H A RV

ABBE

OR

RI

AD RY RO

M

XO

AD

SA

LK ST REE

ST

N O R FO BR

Y S WA

AD

RFO

AD

O E R

Y

H O RT

GE LD

STREET

BRO

Police Sta. Fire Sta.

E

NO

PET

EW’S

DO PE N CT PL RO KW W OR TH ST

T

M TH AT

E S T

N S T

EE

IDE

CH

TIO

R

N’

U PA

D

EG

NT

AD

RO

SI

R

GE

O T R

CE

Southacre University Flats M

ST

BE

OCC

RK

RE

UR

LEN

D EL

Uni ve r s i t y AU

H

AD Y RO

PA

Gilmour Building

CH

D IS

TO

ST

AN

IG

AB BE

PL

CO

Leys Sports Centre

LE

PR I O

G

ET

IN

IS

Leys School

OS

AR

AF

HN

R

ST

S HIR E ST

W

BR

N CL

S TAFF ORD

N

NN

S A X ON

W AY

R CH

RE

W

ST

A603 Royal Cambridge Hotel

GR

JO PR

ARKET

ST

ET

RA

5. watCh the tOwn BUmps in JULy

6. Leper Chapel 3 4 Road on Newmarket A11 AD near R O junction with Swanns Road

N API ER

ST

O

Downing College

St Peter’ Peter’s T Terrace (Peterhouse)

AY

ST

RE

ST

OLD ADDENBROOKE’S SITE

g )

ST

Parker’ss Piece Parker’

TE

AM LI IL W EET TZ TR S FI

ET

RD

ST

NEWM

NELSO

University Arms Hotel

DOWNING SITE

Cosin Court (Peterhouse)

ER

’S

D

ST

RT OU IS C CE NN RA TE TER

RK

HA RL

R IA

C HR I ST CHU ST REE T

A

Crowne

S T Plaza ST G I IN WN DO

mbroke llege

PA

TO

EW

H

E

EA

V IC

Emmanuel College

DR

C

G

DR UM ST MER

RD

E

ND

AN

EX N

KLA

N LA

AUC

JA M ES ST

T’S IS R

ST

N

W UMS E

G E ST

H C

Grand Arcade

ONA

Christ’ Christ’s College

RY

Lion Y Yard

P A RS

IC K N SW E B RU AC TE RR

FAIR S T

S

N STRRET

U Y C

PA

AY

RIVERS

Cambridge Regional College (city centre campus)

Grafton Centre

ST

BU

Christ’ Pieces

2

AY

W

’S

TH

NUE

Church

FIT ZRO Y

BSO

ST

TT

R

ER

ABE

E AV

T M A LC OL M ST

KING S T R E E T

TE R

a t h o u s e s

EW CAUS MAID’S

HO

ST

R TER

RTH

IN

GA

l

R IA

E

E

Westcott W estcott House

’SS ON BS HO PASS

S AS

o

Midsummer Common

NO

EF

C UT

AR

ELIZ

l

TO

ACR

e

B

W Wesley House

ET

’S EW R

D

LO

M

o

V IC

g

Jesus College

JE SU S L AN

ST

NE ROAD

BELV OIR R OAD

ROAD

C e

Jesus College Sports Ground

Sidney Sussex College

R

RO A D

AN

HU MBER STO

DR

ST

F ER RY PATH

T

P RE TO RI A ROAD

ER

KIM BE R LEY RD

LB

AYL E S T O N E

MON TAGU E

P AT H

RO AD

Y

HERBE RT S T R E E T

A11 ELD

AD

G FI

S PR I N

SE ST

5

E

4

LT O N

Jesus Lock Jesus Green

LAN

DY

13

C

SA N

A1

’S RO A D

3

30

D E F RE VIL LE A E NU E AV

D T RAFALGAR RD

H AM I

Cam iver

RO

ON

T ER

A1

AD

L

MR O

AL

GR E EN

N H TO ER T E ST SC E N E CR

34

CH

T

ES

CH

A

R

GEO R GE ST

RD

➔ The Hole in the Wall pub at Little Wilbraham about 35 minutes one-way, approximately 6 miles ➔ The Sun pub in Waterbeach about 30 minutes, approximately 5 miles ➔ The Bell pub in Bottisham about 35 minutes, approximately 6 miles ➔ www.camcycle.org.uk/

july/august 2009 | UNIVERSITY OF CAMBRIDGE NEwSlETTER | 9


Behind the sCenes research into crows and climate, personality and Wordsworth have been the subjects of an exciting new project that uses new media to take Cambridge out to the wider world

stars of the small screen one of The mISSIonS of the university is to share its intellectual activity with the wider world, and to give a taste of the transformative research being done by academics. But what is the most effective way to reach as many people as possible? An obvious answer is to “go digital” – to exploit the enormous

potential of the internet in reaching audiences in their tens of thousands with specially-produced films and radio pieces about Cambridge. And a way of ensuring audiences are large is to make films and audio of a sufficiently high standard. To this end, to mark the 800th anniversary year, the university’s Commmunications

David Mackay’s film How many light bulbs? compares the amount of CO2 emissions from different human activities – in units of light bulbs. A bath is 5 units while driving 50km is 40. We need to multiply our use of wind and nuclear power x 10, he says.

what kind Of mUsiC dO yOU Like? it Can reveaL yOUr persOnaLity… Did you know that people who like punk music, contrary to the stereotype, tend to be friendly and agreeable, although also introverted? And those who like classical music are open and creative? The new film The Music in Me introduces the work of Dr Jason Rentfrow, Lecturer in Psychology, whose research looks at the link between musical preference and personality. “Music is something just about everybody enjoys, so I think the people I interviewed for the film were happy to talk to me.” Rentfrow took to the streets to recruit volunteers who then met at the University’s Old Cavendish Laboratory where they listened to, and rated, a range of musical snippets. This provided

10 | july/august 2009 | UNIVERSITY OF CAMBRIDGE NEwSlETTER

some of the information Rentfrow uses to demonstrate patterns between personalities and various types of music. An unexpected finding was the way people view themselves differently: “I learned that, while the people I interviewed were happy to say that others’ music tastes reveal information about their personality, they were reluctant to say their own musical preferences did the same.” “Making the film was quite hard work but it was also a lot of fun. I watched the other video podcasts in the series and felt a little nervous when I saw how good they were. I think they are a terrific idea.” Rentfrow was impressed by the


Services team is making a series of high-quality films and audio that feature current research, as well as comment and opinion. “The series is not made specifically for academics, it is made for everyone and is a great way to draw people into the activities of the university, and see its value,” says Lucy Capewell, new media Co-ordinator at the university. Cambridge Ideas is a series of fiveto six-minute video films and 15-minute radio-style podcasts made by awardwinning companies, including Windfall films and Whistledown (of radio 4 fame). They are being released throughout the year, and can be accessed on the university website as well as on iTunesu, youTube, facebook and newspaper websites. The results are already attracting attention and praise from across the media, including industry heavyweight, Broadcast magazine. one of the first videos was How Many Light Bulbs? (see main picture) that attracted 30,000 viewers. The series was made possible by initial funding from the 800th Anniversary Committee. university departments were invited to nominate academics involved in interesting research as subjects. many more videos and audio productions – which can be more in-depth than the films – are planned for the year, with the hope that further funding may allow Cambridge Ideas to continue. ➔ www.800.cam.ac.uk/page/59/ more-cambridge-ideas.htm

“making this fiLm has heLped me Change the stereOtype Of the sCienCe prOfessOr”

People who like punk music, contrary to the stereotype, tend to be friendly and agreeable, although also introverted

What do you get when you cross a Professor of Comparative Cognition, the behaviour of birds and a dance company? Professor Nicky Clayton, of the Department of Experimental Psychology, has applied science to art by taking her knowledge about the way birds’ brains work to the dance floor. She has always been fascinated by the showy dance of clever birds and this has inspired her to think in new ways. Then a serendipitous series of events led to Clayton meeting the Artistic Director of Ballet Rambert, Mark Baldwin. She is now working with him on a new Darwinian-inspired ballet to mark the bicentenary of Darwin’s birth. This is

The film follows the varied aspects of Clayton’s life at Cambridge: she is researcher and teacher by day, and dancer by night all featured in a new film Feathered Tango that can now be viewed on the University’s website. Clayton’s work in the lab investigates how both animals and humans develop cognitive and social abilities, and one

professional structure given to the film-making process by producer Kevin Hull, of London-based Windfall Films, and acknowledges the role good production plays in communicating effectively. He hopes the series will give more people a better sense of what is achieved at the University.

of her projects involves members of the crow family (corvids). Such is her respect for the birds she studies, she calls them “feathered apes”. The film follows the varied aspects of Clayton’s life at Cambridge: she is researcher and teacher by day, and dancer and dance teacher by night. We see her working with the jays and other corvids at Madingley, dancing a salsa and tango in the Great Hall at Clare College and explaining the relevance of birds’ movements to the Rambert Dance Company. Her passion goes further than the mixing of science and art: “I have a dream to inspire other women in

science. Science professors can be stereotyped as white-haired men in white coats, and science is seen as an almost anti-social pursuit. I don’t think I look like an average science professor – I am blonde with stilettos and like fashion!” she says. “Making this Cambridge Ideas film has given me the opportunity to show it is possible to have an exciting profession and pursue other passions like dance. I am able to integrate two very different parts of my life, and I’m loving every bit of it – thanks to the birds.” ➔ www.800.cam.ac.uk/page/59/ more-cambridge-ideas.htm

july/august 2009 | UNIVERSITY OF CAMBRIDGE NEwSlETTER | 11


INSIDE THE COLLEGES He was made the black sheep of the family for choosing gardening rather than groundsmanship, but caring for the University’s open spaces has been in Tony Arnold’s family for generations

Charlotte Sankey

In the blood and bonemeal

“The University’s always been there. I grew up with it from day one. As a child I used to go and play at the various sports grounds my family were working at. I never really got that involved with helping, but if you wanted a bit of pocket money you might dig a few daisies out in a little measured area I was given.” Tucked away in his office in a quiet part of Newnham’s gardens, with only the noise of birdsong to disturb him, Head Gardener Tony Arnold reflects on how the grounds and gardens of the University have been a constant presence

“‘There’s no future in being a gardener, boy,’ I was told. ‘You want to get yourself a sportsground’ “

POTTED TONY

Born: Cambridgeshire born and bred Age: Old enough to know better than to tell Best bit of job: Seeing people appreciate the garden Worst bit of job: Paperwork! Favourite bit of Newnham garden: Wild garden Not a lot of people know that: “If there’s a bird or dead animal in the garden I have to ask one of the other guys to pick it up – I can’t bear to. I’m a real wimp when it comes to that.” 12 | july/august 2009 | UNIVERSITY OF CAMBRIDGE Newsletter

in his life, and further back even than the 40 or so years he himself has been working for the University. Three generations of his family have worked on the grounds or gardens of Cambridge. His great grandfather was a Groundsman for Trinity Hall, his grandfather Groundsman for Trinity, and while one of his great uncles was at Peterhouse, another, Cyril Coote, was Head Groundsman at Fenners for 40 years – at a time when its wickets rivalled those of the Oval, Lord’s and Edgbaston. You could say that working the land, in one form or another is in Tony’s blood. He admits, however that he fought it for a while, flirting with an apprenticeship in engineering before deciding that his real love was, in fact, for the outdoors. He left to work for a market gardener, but after finding that work repetitive, he eventually fell into the footsteps of his forebears with spells working for the estate management at the University, then contracting for various Colleges before getting a job as a gardener. He was Gardener at Trinity, then moved to Newnham as Head Gardener 21 years ago. One might imagine his elders would be pleased that the young Tony was, at last, carrying on the family tradition. However it seems that his radical departure into gardening from groundsmanship was actually a bone of contention (albeit friendly): “My uncle at Fenners made me the black sheep of the family over it, because they were all groundsmen. I was told: ‘There’s no future in being a gardener, boy. You want to get yourself a sportsground, no future in being a gardener at all.’ Well, he liked cricket, and I can’t stand it…” What was cricket’s loss was clearly

Newnham’s gain. As Head Gardener he leads the team looking after Newnham’s extensive grounds. Although he is not far off retirement, he is keen to get stuck into new projects. Top of the list is Newnham’s plans to restore the Mound – a grassy hillock in the College grounds. There are discussions about the possibility of creating a knot garden on the Mound. Fundraising for the whole project got underway last month with a special Women’s Garden Conference. Tony speaks with enormous enthusiasm about the garden, and is keen to accomplish as much as he can before he goes. He says of Newnham: “It’s a little oasis in the middle of the town really. A garden’s not just about having pretty flowers, it’s about creating an atmosphere.” Unfortunately, when Tony leaves, the unbroken family line will come to an end. None of his three children have followed in his footsteps, working instead in printing, demolition and retail management. While he respects their choices, in his spare time Tony chairs the Professional Gardener’s Guild, and the lack of young people prepared to go into gardening as a career is a concern. Perhaps his legacy, alongside the revamped Mound at Newnham, might be to encourage a few more young people to ‘dig a few daisies’. Who knows where it might lead?


people People coming

Professor Steve Young has been appointed Pro-ViceChancellor for Resources and Planning, taking over from Professor Tony Minson. He is also Professor of Information Engineering in the Information Engineering Division and was Chair of the School of Technology 2001 to 2004 and a member of the University General Board. He was an elected member of the University Council 2006 to 2009. His research focuses on spoken language systems, including speech recognition, speech synthesis and dialogue management.

A Houston A Houston Caroline Penn

Joelle du Lac takes up the post of Director of External Affairs at the Judge Business School, taking over from Rebecca WhittinghamBoothe. Joelle comes from King’s College where she has been Director of Development for nearly three years. Before that, she was at INSEAD. She was the first professional fundraiser in the role at King’s and during her tenure the level of donations to the College increased significantly. She was responsible for a variety of innovations including the launch of a website dedicated to King’s members.

charlotte sankey

Mr Mike Williams has recently taken over as head of the University Dental Service, which provides NHS treatment for students, and private treatment for staff and postdoctoral students. He has extensive experience in hospital dentistry and previously owned his own dental practices and held clinical management roles for Boots and the Nottingham Primary Care Trust. Williams is on a specialist list for oral surgery and a part-time clinical teacher at Guy’s Hospital, London.

People going Professor Dame Marilyn Strathern retires in October as Mistress of Girton College, a post she has held since 1998. Girton was the College she studied at as an undergraduate – as did her mother and daughter. Professor Strathern is a renowned anthropologist and was William Wyse Professor of Social Anthropology 1985 to 2008. Stimulated by fieldwork in Papua New Guinea, her research questions the universality of concepts such as the individual and society. Recently, she has focused on issues of accountability, reproductive technologies and ethics. Dr Melissa Lane is leaving the Faculty of History to be Professor of Politics at Princeton University. She has been at Cambridge since 1994. She supervised students in Philosophy, Classics and English as well as History. She is also Associate Director of the Centre for History and Economics at King’s where she is a Fellow. She played many roles within the University, creating the annual Cambridge Gender Studies Symposium – seed of the new Cambridge Centre for Gender Studies – was active in the Cambridge Programme for Industry and on the University Council. Professor Dame Sandra Dawson completes her 10-year term as Master of Sidney Sussex College in August 2009. She continues as KPMG Professor of Management at the Judge Business School, where she was Director 1995 to 2006. Her research concerns leadership and organisational change, as well as health management and policy. She is also a Deputy Vice-Chancellor and chair of the Cambridge India partnership. Professor Tony Minson retires this summer as Pro-Vice-Chancellor with particular responsibility for planning and resources. He was appointed as one of the first of five Pro-Vice-Chancellors of the University and is the most senior. He received his first degree in Birmingham, and has done research into viruses ever since. In 1991, he was appointed Professor of Virology. As Pro-Vice-Chancellor he has dealt with the move to devolve budgets to individual departments and schools to make planning more strategic. “In reality I have spent much of my time getting people to reach consensus on difficult issues,” he says. He remains Professor of Virology. Ray Symonds has retired from the Department of Zoology after 45 years. There were two strands to his career dedicated to the study and preservation of animals. He began in 1964 as electronics technician, creating many pieces of electronic equipment. In 1985, he moved to the Museum of Zoology, becoming collections manager and finishing his career as a specialist registrar. He developed an unrivalled knowledge of the Museum collections and left a legacy in the shape of the digitised catalogues of the Museum. july/august 2009 | UNIVERSITY OF CAMBRIDGE Newsletter | 13


advertisements Advertising on this page is open to University staff. The cost is £15 for a single insertion or £75 for six insertions (six for the price of five). The deadline for the July/August issue is 29 July. Maximum 70 words; we reserve the right to edit. Send your copy to the Editor at newsletter@admin.cam.ac.uk or call 32300. Houses to rent ➔ Argentina, Buenos Aires Spacious three bedroom flat (110 m2) in San Telmo. Next to Plaza Dorrego and very close to Puerto Madero and Costanera Sur Nature Reserve. Surrounded by numerous restaurants, bars and milongas. For two to four people (two double beds, plus single). Modern amenities, plenty of light and beautiful views of Rio de la Plata from the 11th floor. Contact: fmot2@cam.ac.uk or visit www.tangoflat.com ➔ Cornwall, southwest Traditional granite cottage in peaceful countryside between St Ives and Penzance. Sleeps 5 in 3 bedrooms, with comfortable sitting room, kitchen-breakfast room and bathroom. Sunny garden and parking. Ideal for families and couples. Near beaches and coves, coastal path, historic and prehistoric properties. For pics www. tinminerscottage.co.uk. Contact Penny Barton on pb29@cam. ac.uk or 01638 507192. ➔ France, Nice, Cote D’Azur, flat Available now to rent, fully furnished, one bed, living room, kitchen, bathroom, 1 double bed, 1 single put-u-up, 2 balconies facing south-east, fifth floor with lift. Easy access to airport, daily market, sea and surrounding countryside. £300 per week. For more information: shimis2003@ yahoo.fr ➔ France, Vienne 3 cosy gîtes, Les Ecuries 1 & 2 and La P’tite Boulangerie, each sleeping 4, in courtyard of old mule-breeding farm in countryside. Ping-pong, boules, sun-loungers, 10 x 5 metre swimming pool May-Sept. For couples/young families. Pets welcome. Village with bakers 2 miles. Convenient, off RN10 between Poitiers (Ryanair - 3/4 hour) and Angouleme. Open all year. Contact & Information: www. lacharronniere.com ➔ France, Provence Large comfortable flat (80m2) in idyllic resort of Carry-le-Rouet between land and sea wildlife reserves and close to Camargue and Marseilles. Seafront, beach and coves within 50-100m. Scuba diving, snorkelling, sailing, walking and cycling. Near Provencal treasures. Sleeps 6 comfortably. 20 min Marseille’s airport. 30 min from MarseilleTGV station. Avail August and other times. Contact: Anita Ogier, ao10001@cam. ac.uk ➔ France, Prades Lovely holiday house for rent near Prades, French Pyrenees. Sleeps 2- 6.

In its own secluded valley, 6 acres of grounds. V comfortably furnished. Stunning views. Perfect for quiet study or relaxation. Perpignan airport one hour. http://web.me.com/simonbanner for details; mention this ad for discounts on two weeks or more. ➔ Italy, Casa Menicaglie Restored traditional Umbrian stone farmhouse situated above Lake Corbara, below medieval village of Civitella del Lago. 90 min north of Rome; 2 hr south of Florence; only 20 min from the Autostrada del Sole. Sleeps 5 with room for two on sofa-bed. King size bed, single bedroom. Double has own entrance and shower room. Internet. 2009 rates: £850 sterling a week April to Oct incl (off-season rates also). Brochure and enquiries: Carolyn Lyons carolyn@carolynlyons.co.uk . +44 7867 970 458. ➔ Italy, Amalfi Coast Small B&B in peaceful traffic free mountain village above Positano. Ideal for those seeking quiet mountain retreat with mod cons. All rooms ensuite with panoramic views of Amalfi coast. Good for walks. On famous Sentiero degli Dei. English speaking host. Double room and breakfast 50 euros per night. Easyjet flights to Naples from Stansted. Photos available. Contact: Penny Marrone 01954 210681 or email Penny.Marrone@ btinternet.com ➔ Italy, Tuscan Apuan Alps High in the Tuscan Apuan Alps 16thcentury Italian monastery owned by University physicist available for conferences, workshops, schools and meetings. Fully-equipped lecture theatre and extensive computer facilities, accommodation onsite. Mountaineering, caving, canyon walking, city tours, swimming, art classes and restaurant trips organized on request. Memorable location. For photos and reviews:www.vallico. net/tti/tti.html ➔ Italy, Tuscany 18th century farmhouse with east-facing studio available Sept to May. Restored to high standard, with writers, artists and academics in mind. Central heating; mod. cons and broadband. Beautiful location above small hamlet 10 miles from Lucca. Sleeps 5. Long term discounts. Photos available. Contact: jmg47@cam.ac.uk ➔ North Yorkshire Moors, cottage Low Mill, Farndale, with sitting room, dining rooms, playroom, kitchen, 4 beds, 2 baths, garden with lovely views. Sleeps 7. All mod cons. Fabulous walks. Near Rievaulx,

14 | july/august 2009 | UNIVERSITY OF CAMBRIDGE Newsletter

Castle Howard, Runswick Bay. 2009 rate: £370/week. Contact Horace or Miranda Barlow on tel: 366618/333867 or hbb10@ cam.ac.uk. ➔ Perth, Scotland Scandinavian-style 4-bed house in quiet area in Perth for holiday lets. Beautiful secluded garden, safe for dogs & children. Sleeps 6/7, lounge/dining room with TV, video, DVD, 2 baths with showers, 1 double bed downstairs, large conservatory. Beautiful forestry 1 mile , Scone Palace, Gardens nearby. Perth Theatre and Concert Hall, swimming pool, Noah’s Ark & Beatrix Potter centre in Dunkeld. £350-£550 a week.   Contact: mornaknottenbelt@ hotmail.com ➔ Portugal, Lagos Individual, superb 4 bedroom/4 bathroom villa with pool set amongst the tree lined links of the Western Algarve’s premier golf and leisure resort Parque da Floresta. Near Costa Vincentina Nature Reserve, historic port of Lagos, pristine beaches and quaint fishing villages. Luxury accommodation sleeps 8/10. Contact: Graham (gb313@admin. cam.ac.uk) or Lyn (lb334@medschl. cam.ac.uk) ➔ Spain, villa 2 bed, 2 bath villa with airconditioning in Nerja, Costa del Sol, 45 mins Malaga airport. Wonderful sea views, south-facing terrace and garden, large communal pool. Near mountains, cliffs and sandy coves. Granada one hour, Seville and Cordoba two hours. £395 per week, £690 per fortnight. Contact 01494 436636 Contact mornaknottenbelt@ hotmail.com ➔ Suffolk, Southwold Coast 10 mins, Snape and Aldeburgh 20 mins, Cambridge 80 mins! Leman Cottage – rural idyll, 17th century 3 bed farmhouse, 2 baths, ideal for couples or family. Beams, bread oven, woodburning stove, underfloor heating. Sunny garden, barn owl nearby. Local pubs and churches. Short breaks, any start day. Contact: www.suffolkcoastalcottages. co.uk ,trish@wenhaston.net or tel:01502 478078 ➔ USA, Orlando, Florida Spacious high quality six-bed (sleeps 12) five bath villa. 12 mins from Disney, golf courses etc.  Large 30ft south-west facing private pool and spa. Fantastic games room. A perfect place to enjoy a stay in the ‘Sunshine State’. For info and photographs: www.floridafabulousvilla4rent.com

➔ House-sit wanted For part or all of Michaelmas Term 2009, visiting scholar from Netherlands will do plants/ garden/post and look after your house, in return for modest rent. Dates flexible (pref. 15/9-15/12). References available. Contact: hgj.kaal@let.vu.nl / +31614420049 ➔ Coastal apartment, Algarve, Portugal Spacious, family-owned apartment sleeps 4/5.in idyllic fishing village. Private patio &, roof terrace; shared pools. Picturesque beach 5 mins walk. Restaurants in village. Tennis, golf, waterparks & shopping close-by. Beautiful walks. Perfect for family or quiet break. Stunning, quiet location. Faro airport 45 mins. Short/long breaks. www.benagilapartment.com or haneedham@talktalk.net or tel: 01332 862509 House for sale ➔ France, Montelimar Lovely house close to Montelimar, a group of fieldstone buildings built around a courtyard. Set in the countryside only 20km from the future Montelimar TGV and La Valdaine golf course. Full 120m2 of carefully renovated living quarters, includes three beds, living room, bathroom, toilet, cellar, workshop. Separate room with mezzanine, woodshed, outdoor bread oven and well, barn.  Approx. 200 m2 just waiting to be renovated. Owned by a Swiss family. Best offer (estimated €450’000). Call 0041.21.781.12.12 or robrist@ bluewin.ch for images and further information Services Private English Lessons Cambridge Classroom offers private tuition in English with experienced and highly-qualified tutor, from preparation for tests and examinations to simple conversation. Also skills like pronunciation or writing. All kinds of learner are welcome: visiting scholars, grad students or anyone wanting to brush up their English. www.cambridgeclassroom.co.uk or info@cambridgeclassroom.co.uk Skiing Skiing of yesteryear at Les Deux Alpes, at prices to match. Charming family-run hotel where the guests are everything. Situated in trad French Alpine village with rapid access to resort and glaciers, 3,600 metres. Excellent home cuisine and all mod facilities. Discounts on skipasses, ski school and

equipment, in-house guiding. www.hotel-venosc-deux-alpes.fr or contact me for enthusiastic advice. Bob Butcher rjb2@cam.ac.uk ➔ Salsa every Friday SalsaBravo classes for all levels 7:30-9:30 at St Paul Centre, Upper Hall (Hills Road). 10:00 to10:30 a bonus class of Merengue, Bachata or Cha Cha Cha. 10:30 party till late (friendly atmosphere, great music). Class+club: £8, club: £4. You can book SalsaBravo for hen parties, birthdays and corporate events. Private salsa lessons and gift vouchers avail. www.salsacambridge.com tel: 077 298 298 06 or info@salsacambridge.com Volunteers needed ➔ “Bridge the Gap” stewards needed The “Bridge the Gap” charity walk will take place on Sunday 13 Sept 2009. Friendly volunteer stewards are required to direct walkers around a scenic College route. 2,500 walkers take part to raise over £40,000 for local charities. Contact emma.wenborn@admin. cam.ac.uk or (3)39666 ➔ Expecting a baby? If you are pregnant and your baby is due to arrive between Nov 2009 and early March 2010, you may be interested in taking part in a programme in which medical students learn from expectant mothers. Over the last seven years more than 800 women have helped student doctors develop a wider understanding of pregnancy. (No physical examination involved). Contact: Mandy Williams on 01223 769285 / 769288 or mw480@medschl. cam.ac.uk or pfp@medschl.cam.ac.uk ➔ Stroke research Healthy volunteers sought for a study investigating stroke recovery. Participants should be: native English speakers (British English only), right-handed, age 60 and above and no serious medical problems. Takes place at Addenbrooke’s. Participants will have a functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) scan and be reimbursed for participation and travel. Contact Sharon on: 274383 or sg469@cam.ac.uk ➔ Lip-reading If you are interested in teaching lip-reading or leading a lip-reading class of around 10 people, please get in touch. Contact: anh1000@cam.ac.uk or am148@cam.ac.uk The University of Cambridge accepts no responsibility for the advertisements or their content.


Prizes, awards & honours Nine Royal Society Fellows elected Nine of the 44 new Fellows elected to the Royal Society this year are from Cambridge. The Fellowship recognises their exceptional contributions to society in the fields of science, engineering and medicine. Fellows are elected for life through a peer review process. As Fellows of the UK’s national academy of science, they join famous Cambridge names such as Isaac Newton, Charles Darwin and Stephen Hawking. The new Fellows are: Professor Ross Anderson, Professor of Security Engineering at the Computer Laboratory. Professor Jennifer Clack, Professor and Curator of Vertebrate Palaeontology in the Museum of Zoology. Professor David Glover, Arthur Balfour Professor of Genetics in the Department of Genetics and a Fellow of Fitzwilliam College. Professor Christine Holt, Fellow of Gonville and Caius College, Professor of Developmental Neuroscience in the Department of Physiology, Development and Neuroscience. Professor David Mackay, Fellow of Darwin College, Professor of Natural Philosophy in the Department of Physics. Professor Wolfram Schultz, Fellow of Churchill College, Professor of Neuroscience in the Department of Physiology, Development and Neuroscience and Wellcome Trust Principal Research Fellow. Professor Henning Sirringhaus, Fellow of Churchill College, Hitachi Professor of Electron Device Physics in the Department of Physics. Professor John Todd, Fellow of Gonville and Caius, Professor of Medical Genetics, Director of the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation/Wellcome Trust, Diabetes and Inflammation Laboratory in the Cambridge Institute for Medical Research. Professor Burt Totaro Lowndean Professor of Astronomy and Geometry in the Department of Pure Mathematics and Mathematical Statistics. ➔ Professor Alison Richard, ViceChancellor of the University of Cambridge, has been named an International Member of the American Philosophical Society. The Society is the oldest learned society in the United

Professor Christine Holt

Professor Robert Kennicut

Naked Scientists

Professor Athanassios Fokas

States and it honours and engages distinguished scientists, humanists, social scientists, and leaders in civic and cultural affairs through elected membership. It also supports research and discovery, and serves scholars with a library of manuscripts and collections internationally recognised for their enduring historic value. * Professor Richard has also been honoured with an Honorary Degree from Yale University where she served as Provost for nine years, 1994 to 2003. At the graduation ceremony she was awarded an honorary doctorate of Humane Letters. ➔ Professor Robert Kennicut, Director of the Institute of Astronomy, is one of three recipients of this year’s Gruber Cosmology Prize for his work in determining the age of the universe, around 14 billion years old. Sharing the prize with astronomers Wendy Freedman and Jeremy Mould, his work for ten painstaking years has helped resolve the decades-long dispute about the value of the Hubble constant, one of the most important measures in astronomy. ➔ Cambridge University’s Naked Scientists, led by Dr Chris Smith (Department of Virology), have won the first European Podcast of the Year Award for their world-leading weekly science radio programmes. The Naked Scientists were picked as one of five winners by an international panel of judges who selected from a field of over 750 nominations from ten participating nations. ➔ Professor Sir John Meurig Thomas, Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, is the 2009 winner of the Ahmed H Zewail Gold Medal for Distinguished Work in the Physical and Biological Sciences. The award, presented annually at Wayne State University in the USA, honoured his seminal work in catalysis, materials science and solid-state chemistry. Professor Thomas (Master of Peterhouse 1993-2002) evolved strategies for the design of advanced catalysts for the production of a number of industrially important chemicals, but under environmentally benign conditions, ranging from vitamins to commodities such as nylon, and building blocks used in the manufacture of fragrances and perfumes.

Student awards

➔ Conor Farrington, PhD student at King’s College and the Department of Geography, has won an award for the best essay by a PhD student in the field of Latin American studies. The Harold Blakemore Prize is awarded by the Society of Latin American Studies. His essay draws upon the political philosophy of Jürgen Habermas to explore politics and society in Ecuador and citizen participation in the municipality of Quito, Ecuador. ➔ Talal M. Fael Al-Mayhani, a PhD student supervised by Colin Watts in the Department of Clinical Neurosciences, Cambridge Centre for Brain Repair, has been awarded the Hoshino award for young investigators. The award recognises the best scientific paper presented to the 3rd Quadrennial Meeting of World Federation of Neuro Oncology held in Yokohama, Japan. ➔ Office Cadet Fern Adams, a second year medical undergraduate at Newnham College, has been recognised by the MOD’s Directorate of Aviation Regulation and Safety with an award that is thought to be the first ‘green endorsement’ to a University Air Squadron Cadet. It recognised her exceptional flying skills in handling an aircraft emergency, where she was confronted with a numerous cockpit faults on only her second solo flight. ➔ HivioSense, a business conceived by students from the Masters in Bioscience Enterprise Programme, was successful in a recent international business plan competition based in the Netherlands. HivioSense aims to commercialise a novel HIV detection system that can detect HIV in patients just three weeks after infection. Tests currently on the market can take up to three months for an accurate result.

➔ Professor Athanassios Fokas, chair of Nonlinear Mathematical Science, has been selected Guggenheim Fellow for 2009 by the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation. Guggenheim Fellows are appointed on the basis of exceptional achievement and promise for continued accomplishment. Professor Fokas will receive a grant to support his research on ‘Integrability, Boundary Value Problems and Medical Imaging’.

july/august 2009 | UNIVERSITY OF CAMBRIDGE Newsletter | 15


800th anniversary update

The word on the streets: did you guess the dates? Nobody can have missed the colourful streetlight banners displayed around the city marking the 800th anniversary of the University. A total of 200 banners were erected, and once they are finished with they will be reused and made into bags. The dates listed on the reverse of each banner have been the subject of much speculation. Earlier this year there was a competition to guess the significance of the dates in a contest run by the 800th Anniversary Team. We are delighted to announce that the winner is Dr Bill Colledge of the Department of Physiology, Development and Neuroscience. He correctly guessed all nine dates, which all relate to the printed word, and won a hamper of 800th goodies. Thanks to all members of staff who took part in the contest. The dates are: 1209 The foundation of the University. 1381 The Peasants’ Revolt. A mob led by the

city’s mayor stormed Corpus Christi College, burning books, records and manuscripts. 1446 Founding charter of King’s College. 1584 The Cambridge University Press, first established in 1534 by Henry VIII, publishes its first book: Two Treatises of the Lord His Holie Supper. 1687 Isaac Newton, of Trinity College, publishes his laws of motion and universal gravitation in his book Philosophiae Naturalis Principia Mathematica. 1787 William Wordsworth arrives at Cambridge and publishes his first poem. 1859 Christ’s College graduate Charles Darwin posits his theory of natural selection in his ground-breaking book On the Origin of Species. 1988 Stephen Hawking, Lucasian Professor of Mathematics, publishes his best-selling book A Brief History of Time. 2009 The University of Cambridge celebrates its 800th Anniversary.

Have you written your letter to the future? Staff are reminded that they can still take part in the Letters to the Future project. You are invited to write a letter to your counterpart in 100 years time, and it will be stored in the University Library unopened until 2109, the University’s 900th Anniversary. The project has garnered plenty of interest from across collegiate Cambridge. University and College staff are invited to take part in this unique project, along with students, local children, alumni and representatives from other universities. ➔ Contact the 800th Anniversary Team on (7)61672 or 800@admin.cam.ac.uk.

Standing room at Prom: tickets £5 each

Final party prep at the Botanic Garden The original Botanic Garden gates – the large ones on Trumpington Street – are being refurbished in time to be used as the entrance for the Summer Garden Party on 18 July. Peter Leavens of EMBS paints the gates, which date back to the 18th century, in their original green. These gates have not been used as the main entrance as they are not a suitable location for a kiosk. EMBS have also created a new bridge across the Rock Gardens, that is wheelchair accessible, although this area will not be open during the party.

Second only to the Last Night of the Proms, the Cambridge Prom celebrating the 800th anniversary has become the fastest-selling concert of the season. All tickets for the concert on 22 July at the Royal Albert Hall have now been sold, but, as with all Proms concerts, up to 1,400 standing room tickets will be available on the door on the day for just £5. The concert will be broadcast live on Radio 3, and can be heard ‘on demand’ for seven days on the Proms by Day pages, and BBC iPlayer.

Friends of the Botanic Garden

Spec 80 ial

0 The Botanic Garden is offering everyone working for the University offeth r 18 months membership of their Friends scheme for the price of 12. Benefits include free admission, lectures and tours and newsletters. To claim, email friends@botanic.cam.ac.uk or tel: (3)36271. Or, if you are coming to the party at the Garden on 18 July, visit the Friends tent on the Main Walk and join on the spot.

Staff Newsletter - July/August 2009  

University of Cambridge’s staff magazine

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you