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Epigenetic Regulation and Cell Identity Control For successful development, the information stored in the genome needs to be precisely regulated. During differentiation, each individual cell uses an ever-changing repertoire of epigenetic mechanisms to achieve proper control of gene expression. Our research focuses on understanding how the cell nucleus specifies the identities of the different cell types in the body, and how changes of cell identity are regulated in development. Our group’s interest is in nuclear mechanisms that regulate changes of cellular identity during stem cell differentiation and specify the diverse cell types of the body. Previously, we have used the mammalian dosage compensation process, X inactivation, as an experimentally tractable system for studying the developmentally regulated establishment of silent chromatin. This has put us in a position to apply previously generated tools for studying aspects in stem cell biology.

Separation of epigenetic modifications and gene silencing

Anton Wutz Anton Wutz received his PhD from the Technical University of Graz in 1997 based on his work performed at the Research Institute of Molecular Pathology in Vienna, Austria. After postdoctoral work with Rudolf Jaenisch at the Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research in Cambridge (USA) he joined the Research Institute of Molecular Pathology as a group leader in 2001. In 2009 he moved to the Wellcome Trust Centre for Stem Cell Research at the University of Cambridge. His research activities focus on nuclear mechanisms that regulate changes of cellular identity during stem cell differentiation and specify the diverse cell types of the body. His laboratory has also contributed to the development of genetic strategies for studying mammalian pathways. Anton is leaving for Institute of Molecular Health Sciences in Zurich in 2012.

Key Publications

Funding

Leeb, M., Walker, R., Mansfield, B., Nichols, J., Smith, A., Wutz, A. (2012) Germline potential of parthenogenetic haploid mouse embryonic stem cells. Development 139(18):3301-5. PMID: 22912412

Wellcome Trust

Leeb, M., Wutz, A. (2011) Derivation of haploid embryonic stem cells from mouse embryos. Nature 479(7371):131-134. PMID: 21900896 Ohhata, T., Senner, C., Hemberger, M., Wutz, A. (2011) Lineagespecific function of the noncoding Tsix RNA for Xist repression and Xi reactivation in mice. Genes Dev 25(16):1702-1715. PMID: 21852535

Group Members Asun Monfort Masaaki Oda Agata Kurowski Andreas Lackner Deborah McGee

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Cambridge Stem Cell Institute Brochure 2012  
Cambridge Stem Cell Institute Brochure 2012