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UNHEMMED

ISSUE III

Gordon Holden Underground London Mana Contemporary Dutch Girl Hansy

Timo Weiland Girls in Geller Robert Geller Golden Statement DJ Brendan Fallis

Twiggy Billy Yarbrough Channeling Chapman The New Male Runway Oscar de la Renta


253 South Main St, Providence,


editors


Editors-in-Chief // Dominik Halas + Sally Luu Executive Layout Editors // Yeon Hak Ryoo + Lukas Eigler-Harding Creative Director // Christine Soo-Yeon Han Managing Editor // JoVaun Holmes Art Editors // Ashwini Natarajan + Sean Posila Beauty Editors // Amanda Beaudoin + Courtney Kobren DIY Editor // Jenny Bui Editorial Director // Sarah Bochicchio Layout Editors // Anna Weyant + Grace Yoon Menswear Editor // Jacob Pharoah Junior Menswear Editor // Ingrid Zippe Music Editors // Shannon Sotomayor + Jason Mandel PR Director // Catherine Jeong Social Media Editors // Kaivan Schroff + Jack Shipka Street Style Editor // Sabrina Chin Womenswear Editors // Marcy Huang + Taryn Riemer Web Editor // Lynn Tachihara Executive Business Director // Morgan Brown Business Editors // Vicky Ding + Elaine Zhao Amsterdam Editor // Eline Benting Chicago Editors // Quincy Jones Los Angeles Editor // Matthew Cross New York Editor // Sean Kwon Contributors // Jake Moffett, Rebecca Broderick, Britanni Taylor

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CONTENT

Gordon Holden Underground London Aritsts of Mana Contemporary The Return of the Mischievous Richard D. James Dutch Girl Hansy Timo Weiland Girls in Geller


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An Interview with Robert Geller Golden Statement Twiggy Interview with Brendan Fallis Billy Yarbrough Channeling Chapman The New Male Runway Remembering Oscar de la Renta


A Letter from the Editors


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We’ve come a long way, but we’re still going -- and not stopping for anything. This landmark issue marks the first time Unhemmed will ever be in print. We are getting tougher on ourselves and constantly pushing for a better product. We have chosen quality over quantity. Shoots with Robert Geller and Timo Weiland? That’s the stuff dreams are made of; dreams that are now becoming realities. We are finally honing in on our true selves, the real image and spirit of Unhemmed, and this is your first taste. Enjoy.


Gordon Holden

by Ashwini Natarajan


Artist and designer Gordon Holden is known for his visual puns on common pop-culture themes and symbols, and for bringing internet art and memes to life. Casually interrupting his photo-editing session, Unhemmed’s Arts Editor Ashwini Natarajan had a phone conversation with Holden about his whereabouts, current works, and bath soap. So, what were you up to before I called? I was just sitting on the couch, I think I was just editing some photos for this magazine in Italy. I think it’s called Cactus, or Cactus Digital, or Cactus Magazine or something like that. You’re base is back in Hartford, your hometown. But now you’re working on some projects in L.A. Care to enlighten us? I’m working on a bunch of paintings right now. I’m represented by Paul Loya gallery in L.A. and I came out here because there’s a collector that wanted some pieces to be made. I actually ended up making a bunch more and then Paul was like, we’re going to do a little show in Chateau Marmont in Beverly Hills, just like a one-night thing. They’re these candle paintings that I did. I’m actually in San Diego right now. I’m like 200 yards away from the beach, so that’s really nice. It’s a nice change of scenery from Hartford, CT. I’m actually from Westport, CT. Are you in school, right now? Well I go to Brown, but I grew up in Westport.

That’s cool, so did you go to Westport High School? No, I went to Staples. It’s like the local public school there. Cool, I actually grew up outside of Hartford, in Glastonbury. Very nice. So how do you feel the East coast and the West coast are different? I don’t know, I actually lived out here about 5 years ago. It was just right out of school and I worked for this fashion company called Insight. When I moved back I lived in Providence. You know the Whole Foods on north main? I lived right behind there for probably eight months. But my take on East coast vs. West coast ...When I was out here, I always had this thought asking why the West Coast is there. And it made me think of people on the East coast who couldn’t survive are motivated to go West —like oh, we don’t have anything going on here. So they become the pioneers I guess. Like England went to the East coast and


the East coast went to the West coast. The West coast is sort of like the final frontier. You can’t go any further. From what I’ve heard, the West coast is similar to NYC, at least in places like San Francisco and L.A., but it’s not as high stress and high energy. Everything is just a lot more chill. Yes, it’s very relaxed. The mentality is totally different. If you take L.A. vs. NYC, NYC people seem very driven, and always have to be doing some– thing. And L.A. people are like yeah, it’ll happen, cool, which can be super frustrating if you’re used to the NYC pace. It’s a cool scene though. Do you see yourself as more of a West coast or an East coast person? Uh, definitely East Coast. I think I identify more with the East coast. Your work encompasses photography, collages, sculpture, clothing, installations and other platforms. How would you describe what your role is, as a creator? I think the root of it is sharing. You don’t necessarily have to be like oh, I’m a painter and that’s all I do. That worked pre-internet era, but now you can do anything that’s kind of an idea or that has a spark behind it. Or it might be created out of boredom too. I’ll lose that sense of excitement if it doesn’t feel new. Then I’ll segway into something that’s totally different but based off of similar ideas. Oftentimes the meanings behind your works are pretty philosophical and deep. Do you create your work with these intentions in mind?

Yeah, definitely. Because it all comes from an idea, and the idea has to be of relative importance for me to transpose it into something more than just a thought. If I’m going to make it into a painting or into a photo set it has to have meaning. I mean, everything has to have meaning if you want to do it. If you’re doing it without meaning, you’re doing it for the wrong reasons. I’ve noticed that you incorporate a lot of text in your work, so how do you feel like this adds to the meaning of your work? Sometimes you create plays on pre-existing brands, but you also write original text on your photos as well. I haven’t been doing a lot of textbased stuff recently, but I think text is a good jumping off point for what it is that your trying to relay to your audience. If there’s text in it, it guides your thoughts and catches your attention faster. So you recently wrote a piece for Opening Ceremony’s blog called “How Do We Consume Cool?” That’s really rad. How did that come about? I did a show in the summer that was these split-image posters, part of a series called “Coming of Age.” [Opening Ceremony] did an article about it and then the editor was like, do you want to do some writing pieces for us? And I was like, sure.


I’m going to give you a list of pairs, A or B, and you have to chose from one of them. Digital or Film? Film. East Coast or West Coast? East Coast. Coffee or tea? Tea. Instagram or Twitter? Twitter. Bar Soap or shower gel? Bar soap. That’s the train, can you hear it? Yeah. It’s fucking loud.


REBECCA BRODERICK

UNDERGROUND LONDON

Sasha Keable is one of many talented young female artists in London now, like Ella Eyre and Katy B, but she stands out because she’s a bit more street and unique than her peers. Her music is teeming with raw emotion, but is methodically presented through clean synth and bass. Keable delicately places her tender R&B lyrics, delivered smoothly and gracefully, onto beats inspired from the electronic music from 1980’s and 90’s. Opposed to lingering in these eras, she updates their retro sound, showing the maturity in her voice as

a musician. Music serves as her therapy, the majority of it inspired by heartbreak or emotional turbulence; it’s tender and uncompromised, but refined and disciplined. She creates a world rooted in the past, but pristinely curated and executed, which is also reflected in her clothing. In the video for “Careless Over You,” she’s combines the vintage with modern designers, like clean-cut Acne and edgy Christopher Kane, with accessories from old R&B.


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SASHA KEABLE


ONLY REAL

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Only Real, née Niall Galvin, encompasses numerous genres, drawing major influence from 1990’s garage music to disco, like Earth, Wind and Fire. Lyrically, his patterns and delivery have been compared to The Streets, but there’s a bit more haze around his pronunciation, demonstrating his lax personality. While behind the slurred rap lies the heavily prevalent psychedelic, garage influence. Combined, the outcome produced is one of youthfulness; not simplicity of adolescence. His music is ideal for summer, encouraging one to relax into the world and genuinely enjoy oneself, as seen in the video for “Backseat Kissers” with images of his friends and him hanging out behind psychedelic filters. The easy-going nature emphasized in his music also trickles into his sense of style. His wardrobe primarily consists of colorful tees, retro flat-brimmed hats, and Nikes. Thrown together in such a way that it seems as if he grabbed what was on hand, these ensembles still show a bit of intent behind the combinations.

ONLY REAL

about the gravity of life, but embracing the


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Archy Marshall, known as King Krule, stands out immediately because of his voice; it has a depth and texture that no one else can produce without the medium of software. His music is drawn out of the abstract, pulling inspiration from feelings and colours; it is the combination of his senses that eventually KING KRULE

form into cohesive audio. This voice and process intertwine in the final product, capturing and quantifying the vastness of the world. The lyrics have such weight to them they almost fall through the music, slowly dropping from Marshall’s tongue and right into the listener’s mind, pulling them into Marshall’s darker world. This quality is also reflected in interviews, where Marshall speaks with the same brilliant layering that one hears in his music. Meanwhile, his persona as King Krule never leaves his side.


UNDERGROUND LONDON

KING KRULE


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Dublin-born, London based rapper Rejjie Snow keeps consistent with this new generation of artists. This quality is also reflected in interviews, where Marshall speaks with the same brilliant layering that one hears in his music. Meanwhile, his persona as King Krule never leaves his side. He stands as the face of modern Irish hiphop scene, proudly representing his country with a slight accent throughout his flow. Lyrically, he digs deep, burying his thoughts within a puzzle and leaves the listener to interpret freely. Behind his words stand jazz-based beats and the occasional emergence of a more electronic sound. For Snow, visuals are important, as one can see from his music videos, but on stage he would rather allow his words speak for themselves, putting less emphasis on his clothing. This persona of Rejjie Snow allows a more emotionally REJJIE SNOW

reserved Anyaegbunam freedom to sit in his open words, focusing less on his physical representation and more on the content. Within the new scene of emerging London-based artists, there’s an emphasis on the final production coming into being organically. Although their influences often span a wide array of genres and influences, they weave them together in such a way that a pure, nouveau sound emerges. Meeting deadlines and filling a specific image which has already been revealed in the music industry is not their goal; their attention is focused on making their unpolluted voice come through the record. The characters through which they perform are their ways of interpreting the world around them, their numerous early musical influences, and their own audio and aesthetic inclinations. As a result, the music itself is complicated, ever-changing, and an exceptionally unfamiliar. Only being twenty to twenty-two, Keable, Snow, Krule and Real are the new generation of multi-discipline artists, trusting their own creative voices to guide them forward.


UNDERGROUND LONDON

REJJIE SNOW


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ASHWINI NATARAJAN

ARTISTS OF MANA CONTEMPORARY JERSEY CITY’S BEST KEPT SECRET


MANA CONTEMPORARY

ASHWINI NATARAJAN

On the outskirts of New York City, a burgeoning community of artists is creating studios in a cultural space called Mana Contemporary —a one million square-foot, 1920’s-esque brick warehouse complex in Jersey City founded in 2011. Mana houses its own art gallery, the Middle East Center for the Arts, the Karole Armitage and Shen Wei dance companies, and numerous art foundations. Watch out Brooklyn and Manhattan, a new artist’s Mecca is on the rise. In addition to putting art on display and providing services for artists, Mana also serves to elucidate the artistic process and introduce an interactive element to the public. As visitors roam its white-walled hallways, they notice that studio doors are left open, piquing the curious passerby; artists can be viewed working in their natural habitats —painting, sculpting, print-making, among a plethora of other art forms. Unhemmed got the chance to peek into a few of Mana’s studios. Here’s who we found:


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Z BEHL

Z BEHL

Z Behl is a Brooklyn-based artist who was introduced to Mana by the Eileen Kaminsky Family Foundating almost a year and a half ago, and is currently continuing with her own studio. Her work focuses on “female mythology, the relationship between work and play, and the reinsertion of fun and passion in creating art.” Art has been a constant element in Behl’s life, but when she decided to go the professional route, she learned how to “professionally orient [her] ambition” by honing her skills and interests, and continuing to challenge herself creatively. “I am most inspired by resourcefulness, materials themselves, children's un self-conscious approach to learning and working in ways they don't understand. Bravery inspires me a lot, I don't see a lot of courage in art-making but when I do it’s incredible.”

“Z Behl and Her Money-Suit” Photographed by Ro Agents

“Lace Bodysuit” Photographed by Robert Banat


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“Pied Piper” Photographed by Jason Schmidt

“Z Behl and Her Money-Suit” Photographed by Ro Agents

Z BEHL


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JAY BATLLE

JAY BATLLE A Brooklyn native, Jay Batlle spends his summers in the Soutwest of France “doodling on menus and drinking wine.” He has been working at Mana for close to a year, creating art that “subverts the gourmet experience into social commentary, mostly on the interchangeability of wealth and power, and the blurring of boundaries between the two as it relates to indulgence and excess.” The idea of being an artist came to Batlle as he realized that he wanted to be in a field that did not compromise his identity. "I wanted something that was an extension of my life, not just an occupation to pay the bills.” Batlle’s key influences include the works of John Altoon, A.J. Liebling, Fergus Henderson and Ludwig Bemelmans. Menus and “grand restaurants with white table clothes that sit empty at lunch” also serve as impetus for his pursuits. In keeping with his obsession with fine dining, Batlle treasures his Larousse Gastronomique cookbook. “It's a tool and a friend at the same time.”

Left –”Le Grenouille,” Middle – “Ici,” Right – “Gino” All part of “Fatigue Series,” by Jay Batlle. 2014. 30” x 22”. Archival ink jet, and ink on paper mounted on stretched canvas with cooking recipe and collage on verso.

Left – "Yellow Restaurant," Middle – “Blue Restaurant,” Right – “Red Restaurant” All by Jay Battle. 2014 24” x 24” x 2”. Watercolor, ink, collage, and house paint on canvas with collage on verso


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JAY BATTLE


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RAY GEARY

RAY GEARY Ray Geary comes from New York City and has been at Mana for eight months. His art revolves around various types of resin that are clear with something cast inside or poured on either canvas or paper; but he has also been branching out into silkscreen, ink on canvas, and neon. Geary started collecting art since he was fresh out of college in 2005, primarily street art like Faile, D*Face and Invader —only to start making art in 2010. Faile’s silkscreen approach inspired Geary to take a summer class at NYC’s School of Visual Arts. “ I was all about silkscreening for a while, but then discovered resins and plastics, and I guess the rest is history.” Daily life and personal experience are key components that shape Geary’s artistic vision. He is currently working on a project called “Smokes,” which is 10 packs of different cigarette brands drawn on paper and then covered with colored resin. “This project is inspired by my battle with smoking.” Geary cannot bear to live without Chapstick.

Nicole Cohen and Rauquel Cayre of sketch42blog


MANA CONTEMPORARY

RAY GEARY

Photograph by Ray Geary


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LILI ALMOG “Muslim Girl #14”

LILI ALMOG

Series: The other half of the Sky

Israel-born and based out of New York City, Lili Almog works primarily with photography, video and mixed media. After attending an opening event at Mana, she was amazing at its “raw open spaces” and found that the “possibilities where incredible.” Having outgrowing her NYC studio space, she decided to expand into Mana —which has been home to her art for several years. For over a decade, Almog’s work has focused on representations of the feminine body and female psyche. “I have tried to remain as objective as possible in capturing the state of women's spiritual and cultural identity and the influence of western culture on this identity.” Yet Almog has recently been experimenting with drawing and mixed media as opposed to her photography and video, in conjunction with a pivotal change in her art’s focus; her work has taken a turn from examining social behavior to elucidating traces of human activity. Almog is now exploring America’s biggest junkyards and American playgrounds, such as baseball fields, golf courses and airplane “grave yards.” Because of the “enormity and ominous complexity” of these sites, she has learned how to use satellite maps and other means of advanced technology to truly fathom the meaning of ‘cultural mapping.” “The process of ‘cultural mapping’ by itself draws attention to the existence and importance of human obsessive possessions [and] behavior, linking the invisible borders of culture and art.” An artist at heart, Almog holds her studio space near and dear. She explains, “My studio is my sanity.”

“Window #1” Series: Between Presence and Absence


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“Outdoor Portrait #5” Series: Perfect Intimacy

LILI ALMOG

“Library” Series: Between Presence and Absence - Traces


RICHARD D. JAMES

Jason Mandel

The Return of the Mischievous Richard D. James


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He’s Back - Richard D. James aka Aphex Twin has returned with his first record under the legendary moniker after a 13 year hiatus. Although this is his first major resurgence since his 2001 record Drukqs, James made waves earlier in 2014 when a Kickstarter raised over $67,000 to press and release a vinyl of a little known side project of Richard D. James’ from 1994 called Caustic Window. The original test pressing netted over $47,000 and was purchased by Markus Persson, the creator of Minecraft. After that, things remained silent until late this summer when a cryptic yellow blimp with Aphex Twin’s logo and the number 2014 surfaced over London. The same day, Aphex Twin’s logo was found spray painted all over New York City and the electronic music community was in a frenzy. Days later, Warp Records announced the long awaited return of Aphex Twin with his new record unleashed from a supposed 150+ hours of unreleased material. Syro, named by Richard D. James’s son, has a purely synthetic feel, with callbacks to classics like Digeridoo, or Windowlicker. There is also some reminiscence to Richard D. James’ collaboration with Phillip Glass or his piano work on the schizophrenic Drukqs on the ambient piano piece closing out the album, aisatsana [102]. Syro’s flow gives the album a fluid thread riding throughout as a sort of digi-polyphonic direction for which things to flow. The track Produk 29 [101], showcases a classic synth sound with its bubbly basslines and breakbeat drums through a synthetic wonderland. Richard D. James has always had a maniacal knack for challenging the definition of modern music and has dug up some choice cuts from his vaults. He challenges his listeners into a cold rhythmic embrace as their ears ripped to shreds by his blistering drum lines. The album is a much anticipated return of one of electronic music’s most beloved pioneers.

All pictures courtesy of Warp Records


DUTCH GIRL


Cats top - NHTK, Bordeaux riding pants secondhand NHTK


Checked top - NHTK design, Checked trousers - NHTK design, Shoes - Zara


Checked coat - Monki Checked cap - Monki Purple swimsuit - secondhand by NHTK Shoes - Doc Martes Socks - Hema


Maxi dress - NHTK design Padded backpack - Zara


Blue velvet dress - secondhand by NHTK Rings - NHTK accessories


Sunglasses - NHTK accessories Crop top - secondhand by NHTK Knitted jumper - secondhand by NHTK


MUAH: Esther Bakker Model: Romy van den Broek Styling and photography: Eline Benting


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HANSY Christine Soo-Yeon Han

by Ashwini Natarajan


HANSY

Give us a bit of background. How did you get your grounding as an artist?

I was born in Seoul, South Korea, moved to California, lived in Cali for 4-5 years and moved to Paris and lived there for 2 years. I come from a family I come from a family where everyone is involved in the art scene, so naturally, I was exposed to a lot of the art world ever since I was little. When people asked me what I wanted to be in the future, I always replied as a painter, a sculptor, cartoonist, everything that was related to art. ClichĂŠ, but yes. In middle school, I dreamt of being a fashion designer and taught myself

how to use sewing machine, in high school I hoped of being a illustrator or a fine artist. I was all over the place - even today, I am still exploring.


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What do you study at RISD?

When I got to RISD, I realized there were so many more areas that I hadn’t been aware of and I wanted to visually explore so I chose Film/Animation/Video as my major, concentrating in open media. I hope to explore with different areas and figure out what I really want. For the time being, I want to deal with installations, which would create interactions with my audiences as well as for me, I get to be more interactive with my work.


HANSY


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HANSY


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What are your biggest influences? The people around me and the surroundings. My interests changes as I am exposed to new things. I’m a people person, I love meeting people and listening to their stories, I take photographs of my surroundings and the people I hang out with - I believe don’t have a specific influence since I don’t really settle down in one area.

Any projects that you're currently working on? I am currently working on a short film about my friend's habit of biting her nails. It's for fun, but I'm really excited. But, I have a lot of projects, since I go to an art school that requires you to work on multiple projects [laughs]. Also, a video project on tattoo, something that I am very interested in.

You've taken photographs at Seoul and Paris fashion weeks for a couple of seasons. Tell us about your foray into fashion and your role as a photographer in that context. I love fashion and I love capturing people when they are in action. So fashion week is something that stimulates me a lot, having models in beautiful fashion garments, waiting for their big moments to present themselves for that short runway walk- I love it and I love being able to be there in person to create images that capture those moments.


HANSY


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HANSY


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You incorporate quite a bit of portraiture into your photographic approach. What type of people do you gravitate towards photographing? I gravitate towards people who aren't scared of the camera. A lot of people mind about their images, which is normal, but I like the people that are able to have fun in front of the lens.

A question posed to every photographer: Digital or film? Film — for my daily life, however, iphone camera is financially way better and I have an easier access since it fits right in my pants pocket. DSLR — for fast pace scenes, usually when I am on the streets. For fashion week, if I had to choose, DSLR. Aside from your photography, you also create whimsical, experimental animated shorts. What is your inspiration and intention with them? The animation “Happens,” was about my friend who is 6'8" and he chipped off his knee bone due to an accident. When I heard this, I thought why not make an animation about a tall kid getting made fun of for being too tall for everyone else. A lot of my animations are me experimenting and seeing what I can do that I can't make it happen in live action.


HANSY


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HANSY


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What direction is your work heading in? Any projects or collaborations in the near future that you want to share with us? I want to be involved with the fashion industry and to continue with the fine-art aspect. I hope to do a lot of fashion photographs as well as films and maybe do crazy installations along with it. I have few projects that are happening this winter, but I am really excited about the SIKI IM photo shoot with UNHEMMED. It's still in process with planning and all, but we're trying to make it big.

Any post-graduation plans in mind? I'm trying not to push myself too hard because I get really anxious. SO, as of now, I plan on exploring with areas that I have access to. Maybe go to Paris and spend time there and really figure things out! Maybe intern under a photographer, a design firm or do my own thing.


HANSY


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TIMO WEILAND


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Concept/Production: Jason Mandel Co-Production: Franck Raharinosy Styling: Sean Kwon Photographer: Nika de Carlo Hair and Make-Up: Nika de Carlo Model: Ana Khutishivil Location: Corbin Chase all clothes timo weiland, special thanks Alan Eckstein


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TIMO WEILAND


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TIMO WEILAND


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TIMO WEILAND


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TIMO WEILAND


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TIMO WEILAND


Girls in Geller


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AW12 cropped flight pants in charcoal, AW13 knit mesh tank in bordeaux, AW12 polka dot oversized flannel in black, AW12 Stefan bomber in charcoal, SS13 piece dyed scarf in sepia


GIRLS IN GELLER

AW11 hidden placket club collar oxford in white, AW13 oversized dotted flannel in grey (as skirt), SS14 Richard blazer in black


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GIRLS IN GELLER

SS14 Richard pants in black, SS14 ladder tank in charcoal, Seconds tee in mustard, SS13 jail stripe shirt in grey, AW07 dinner jacket in black


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GIRLS IN GELLER

SS13 Type D jeans in sepia, AW13 plaid long flannel in brown, AW11 studded belt in black, AW13 combo scarf in black, AW08 braided cossack cardigan in black


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GIRLS IN GELLER

SS13 “still” tee in rose, AW10 laced cuff overcoat


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photographer: Han Kyung Kim stylist: Sean Kwon wardrobe: Sean Kwon, Eric Dunn makeup, hair: Yilla Chen


AN INTERVIEW WITH ROBERT GELLER With over one million monthly visits, www.styleforum.net is the largest online community of men’s clothing enthusiasts in the English-speaking world - and that makes for a lot of people with a lot of different tastes. And yet, ever since his time at the award-winning label Cloak, Robert Geller has been one of the forum’s favorite designers, both for the romance of his vision and for the joy his individual garments bring to the wearer. The world of menswear is still a relatively small one, and the obvious care that designers like Robert and magazines like Unhemmed put into their work makes it feel that much more tight-knit and welcoming. We’ve watched the growth of Robert’s eponymous line with a loving mix of fascination and anticipation, so when Unhemmed Magazine approached us about mining Styleforum members for questions to ask the man himself, we were more than happy to have the chance to bring our shared community closer together. - Jasper Lipton, Editor-in-Chief, Styleforum.net


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AN INTERVIEW WITH ROBERT GELLER

Unhemmed: Let’s start with one that a lot of people seem to be curious about – what brands or designers do you wear? From interviews, we know you’re a Dries fan and you wear Common Projects often, but what other brands or designers are part of your daily outfits? Robert Geller: Well, I have one Haider Ackermann piece – these black pants with green stripes going down the side, from last season; I would own a lot more Haider Ackermann pieces if I were willing to spend a lot more money on clothes [laughs] but I have, you know, mortgage and kids and stuff. When I was younger I spent more money on clothes, but now it’s harder. And like you said, I love Dries. Throughout the years I’ve bought quite a few Ann Demeulemeester pieces; for a while she was my favorite. And then sometimes I find little things in Japan, clothes by brands that don’t even have labels on them. Or there’s this vintage store called BerBerJin in Tokyo, and they do their own little pieces. U: Ok, so now more into some specifics about your clothes – will there be mesh tanks for SS15 and beyond? I love the Ladder tank, and the FW14 knit tanks were cool, but I think a lot of your fans miss the original mesh tanks. RG: It might come back, but it’s not planned for fall. We do knit mesh tank tops every season, different versions of the mesh, but it seems like a lot of people started doing mesh tanks. U: Yea, Saint Laurent did it too recently. RG: And Burberry. I wasn’t the first to have done knit mesh tanks – no, I’m not saying that. U: But you’ve been doing them for a few years now, and they’re always a layering staple in your collections. Speaking of which, you’re also known for your layering. In the past, you’ve done double layered tees, tanks, and hoodies; have you ever considered double layered bottoms? You’ve done shorts over thermal or neoprene leggings, but have you ever played with the idea of them being a one-piece garment? RG: It’s funny because – I think I was still at RISD – one of my teachers, when we would design stuff that’s tricky, like pants that’s also shorts that’s also some other thing, she asked, “Why don’t you just make it two pieces, and let the wearer have the option of styling it?” And that’s smart because as a designer, you can propose a way to wear it on the runway, but I like giving options to the customer. U: Can you give us some more details about the new made-in-US Denim line? RG: We’ve had denim in our line for a while, but the production in Japan kept getting more expensive; we felt like we were pricing ourselves out of the market. Then we said, “Let’s take it away from the structure that we have in Japan, and let’s do it on our own. We went to L.A. and found these three Japanese brothers


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AN INTERVIEW WITH ROBERT GELLER


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that make denim over there. And they’re amazing. I spent some time with them over there playing around with different kinds of denim and washes, and so now the jeans are structured. Before, there was the “5-Pocket Skinny,” the “Robert Geller Skinny Jean,” and the – U: – the “Type D” RG: Yea, and whatnot [laughs]. It just got so confusing to a point where I didn’t even know what was going on. So those days are over [laughs]. Now we have the “RG 1,” the “RG 2,” and the “RG 3.” The “RG 1” is our skinny jean – the slimmest; it’s like the ones where you put them on and they’re really tight, but then you wear them a little bit and they become just right. The “RG 2” is… I guess the closest you could say is the “Ace” from Acne? Skinny, but not hugging you. And then we have the “RG 3,” which is more like the [Acne] Max, more of the straight – what do we call it, the “Brooklyn dad jean”? [laughs] U: Is it just jeans? RG: And then we have one jacket. Each style, we have in four washes – black; offwhite, which is super nice; the “3-Year Fade,” and the “5-Year Fade.” The “3-Year” is like a blue washed denim, and the “5-Year” is like a light blue. U: I really loved the wash on your “7-Year Fade” jeans. RG: Yea, the “7-Year” was like the “5-Year,” but we upped it a little bit. U: What’s the inspiration behind the bar logo? I’ve actually wondered that for a while now, and I’m really glad someone submitted this question. RG: Minimalism? I wanted to have something that represents the brand, something iconic. I guess a little bit of Donald Judd. I just liked that structure, and so then we played around with the proportions a bit – it’s actually 5:1. I love the simplicity of it; it’s not a horse or a duck or a whatever. U: Actually, just the other day I was wearing one of my flannels, and a friend asked me, “What’s that bar?” [laughs] RG: “What does it do?” [laughs] U: These upcoming few are more about your design process and philosophies. This first one’s actually from a student who’s studying fashion design herself – how do you start your design process for a collection? RG: The first thing is to find a point of reference, like, “This is where we’re getting started.” Then I take a look at something that I’m interested in anyway, like a book that I’m reading or a photographer that I’ve been interested in for a long time. Or, a time and place. I’ve always been very interested in history, so things have always been, even through Cloak times, about a time and place, and trying


AN INTERVIEW WITH ROBERT GELLER

to see what was happening at that time and in that place. So whatever that may be, that’s the starting point. And then I create a little document, where I put this into words. Say, “Ok, this is about the late 60’s Berlin, this is what was happening, the student revolutions at the time…” Then I make a quick color story – what colors remind me of that time? And then I find artists that either are from that time or that look or feel like that time. I’ll find photographers, I’ll find movies. It’s a way to spend time working, but also look into things that I’m interested in anyway. So that’s the beginning, and the pressure comes to start the collection. For that, the process is that I wake up at 5 o’clock in the morning, and I start sketching; they’re quick sketches, sketching the ideas out. I usually work in groups – if I wake up in the morning and have one great idea for outerwear, then I’ll make a bomber, I’ll make a parka, I’ll make whatever in that group. Around 10 [o’clock], I usually meet with my assistants, and we’ll work on sketching those ideas in detail. U: From what I’ve heard, it seems that your assistants are really involved in the process, and that’s pretty cool. RG: Oh, for sure. Everyone’s really involved with everything; we’re a super tiny team, so we do everything together. Well… Not everything [laughs] U: What is your fabric selection process? RG: I go to Japan – you know I make almost everything in Japan. I spend a week there and visit all the fabric mills and fabric showrooms. When I’m designing, I start designing without having the fabric in my hand, but I have an idea of what I want that fabric to be. When I’m designing, I design in groups. I’ll do the cotton/nylon group, and have a reference photo of something that I think would be great for this group. So when I go to Japan, I find those fabrics that I think would work for the groups. U: How would you say the design aesthetic of your line has changed since you launched your label nearly eight years ago? RG: Well, the beginning was a little strange. The first three collections, it was like, finding myself? Trying to find a voice away from Cloak, but also still being into what Cloak was. The first collection was very much like… “Let’s make a really great leather jacket,” “Let’s make a really great bomber.” It was about finding a way to work with this new company in Japan. Then the second [collection] was a total departure – it was “Beuys Don’t Cry.” It was trying to do three collections in one – one that was like late 60’s surfer, L.A. vibe; and then I was doing a Joseph Beuys vibe; and it came together really strangely. It was probably the most… Off collection? [laughs]


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U: I still want one of the neon pink “Oceanside” sweats [laughs] RG: [laughs] There were some really cool pieces in that collection, but the overall look was just so not really me. I finished [the collection] and I was like, “What did I just do?” And the next one was all dark and heavy and military and Himalayas. I liked that collection a lot, but it was too Cloak, you know? But Cloak was something Alexandre [Plokhov] and I did. Slowly, from there, step-bystep I started to crystalize what I am on my own, you know, what is Robert Geller? Since then, it’s gotten a bit less rustic, and a bit more refined. But that element of comfort, wash, and all of that is still in there. A lot less military – totally moved away from that. U: How’d you come up with the Dinner Jacket? You started that your first collection, but you’ve done iterations of it in the later collections. RG: I think I started that when I was in school. I designed a denim jacket with a shawl collar. We made that for Cloak. I liked the idea of mixing the more formal with the casual, so it’s like mixing a bomber with a dinner jacket or a blazer. It was taking pieces that didn’t necessarily go together, and combining them. U: I still want one from FW10. The outerwear pieces from that season were incredible… I want the Laced Cuff Coat too. RG: Yea, that was one where I really loved the collection in the showroom, but not as much as I thought I would on the runway. It’s funny how sometimes it just comes together. Not that the runway is the final judgment, but that’s what everybody sees. U: Do you have plans to stock in Europe? Or to show in Paris at all? RG: No, not show in Paris. Yes, stock in Europe; that’s our next step. That’s going to happen in the next couple of seasons. It’s just been hard with scheduling and timing and sending samples back and forth. It’s such a huge step – there’s such a big market that we just haven’t touched at all yet. I always look at Dries for guidance in terms of size, and you know, I really want to take it slowly. I have no rush. Things are going well. I’m past having to worry about winning awards and all those steps; I’m in a place all on my own, and I can guide this ship in the way I want to. What’s important now is relationships with stores, and really building the brand and taking it to the next level. Eventually we’ll have our own store, we’ll go to Europe – those are the immediate next steps.


AN INTERVIEW WITH ROBERT GELLER

U: So when is your own store opening up?! RG: [laughs] There’s no concrete plans. Yet. But it’s definitely something I have an urge to do. I feel like it’d be great to have a place to show the whole world how I imagine the clothes to be showcased. When my clothes are at all these stores, it’s hard to have control over all of them. I want to have [my store] in New York, and I want it to be really well done in terms of how it’s curated and decorated. It’ll come when it’s time. U: This one’s a personal question of mine, and a few others were curious as well - I know you’ve created a look for the CFDA/Vogue Design Challenge for Ann Taylor, and that you designed your women’s label, Harald; do you have any plans to design a women’s line again? RG: Yea, I get that question a lot. I don’t want to do just the women’s version of Robert Geller. There’s a lot of menswear designers who have done that, out of pressure to make the sales or whatever. But then you’re in the women’s market, and you’re not going to be able to compete with houses like Proenza or Marc Jacobs or Lanvin. So at that point, I decided that if I ever start a womenswear line, it’ll be at a point where I can have a team – have somebody just specified for fabrics, have somebody just specified for prints. That’s what you need to compete with those bigger, more established houses. It’s a different story than menswear; with menswear, I feel like I can do it all myself. U: I know you’ve been asked this multiple times in past interviews, but for the sake of sharing it again with our readers – who is the Robert Geller man? And the Robert Geller woman? The latter, I don’t think has been asked yet [laughs] RG: Well, now there are girls in Geller [laughs]. When I design in terms of an icon, who do I really like as a person? It’s Klaus Kinski. He’s amazingly talented, and he’s also kind of totally nuts. He has this disregard for what it seems like being normal. And he has a great style. In terms of who buys the clothes – a lot of times when I see people in the streets wearing Robert Geller, I’m really proud. I’m really lucky that my customers are so stylish and cool. But it’s not like the high-school-quarterback cool; it’s usually the guys that are really informed and into fashion, but in a nice way. I guess kind of the underdog in high school who turns out to be the coolest guy – I love that. I hear from all of my stores that the Robert Geller customer is super well informed; they call and they know the name of the style and the style number and they ask for what sizes are stocked. It’s usually the young creatives. The typical age range, I’d say, is from 23 to 40.


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U: The final question – we all know you’re the master of bomber jackets, so it’s only appropriate that we end on this one – which is your favorite bomber? RG: My favorite bomber is pretty easy because I wear it all the time. U: The green one? RG: Yea [laughs]. We’ve tried to remake it, and it just doesn’t end up the same. And I wear it so much, it’s starting to change colors…

Concept: Dominik Halas Interviewer/Coordination: Sean Kwon Photographer: Han Kyung Kim

Introduction: Jasper Lipton Special Thanks: Robert Geller, Fok-Yan Leung


GOLDEN STATEMENT

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THINGS YOU WILL NEED: 10-12 Inch Black Ribbon 10-12 Inch Black Suede Lanyard 10-12 Inch Thin Gold chain Scissors Old Bracelet


JENNY BUI

GOLDEN STATEMENT

BLACK RIBBON PIECE !

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GOLDEN STATEMENT

STEP 1: Take the old bracelet and set it aside as the foundation of your project. Take the black ribbon (10-12 inches in length/depending on your wrist size) and tie it in the center of the of gold chain.

STEP 2:

STEP 3: Spiral the braid around the old bracelet already set aside. Tie the ends together to the braid.

JENNY BUI

Start braiding the black ribbon and gold chain. When finished, tie the ends together.


GOLDEN STATEMENT

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THIN BRACELET

JENNY BUI

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GOLDEN STATEMENT

STEP 1: Take the black suede lanyard (10-12 inches in length/depending on your wrist size) and gold chain (10-12 inches in length/depending on your wrist size). Tie the black suede lanyard in the center of the gold chain.

JENNY BUI

STEP 2: With four sections of the gold chain and black suede lanyard, start a 4 string braid pattern.

STEP 3: Tie the ends together when finished by adjusting to your wrist size.


JENNY BUI

GOLDEN STATEMENT

RED RIBBON PIECE


GOLDEN STATEMENT

STEP 1: Take the red ribbon (10-12 inches in length / depending on your wrist size) and gold chain (10-12 inches in length / depending on your wrist size). Tie the red ribbon in the center of the gold chain.

With four sections of the gold chain and red ribbon, start a 4 string braid pattern.

STEP 3: Tie the ends together when finished by adjusting to your wrist size.

JENNY BUI

STEP 2:


TWIGGY

Photographers: Rebecca Broderick, Diane Na Model: Alison McCarthy Hair and Makeup: Silvia Macareno Stylists: Sarah Bochicchio, Taryn Riemer, Marcy Huang

Twiggy


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Checkered top from Stefanel


TWIGGY

Dress by Forever 21 Shoes by J Crew


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Graphic top is Alfred Dunner


TWIGGY

Sunglasses are Vince Camuto Printed dress is Ted Baker


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Looking and ing: Intervie Brendan Fal How did you develop a unique style or aesthetic as a DJ? How did you create this brand of your– self in NYC? How has it adapted over time? I always loved music and would just play what I thought was cool when I started. But I quickly realized DJing isn’t about only what I love, but what others want to hear. I started to adapt my style to suit the crowd and learned how to read the crowd, which

helped me grow immensely. My brand has been a work in progress. I’ve put a lot of time into it unknowingly and more recently, knowingly. At the start, I just wanted to look presentable and play a really fun set that people enjoyed. The music spoke for itself and although my mixing wasn’t so great off the start, I learned quickly by putting in a ton of work hours and grew my craft. Then I started to work on the corporate side of the DJ world and real–ized that


d Listen— ew with llis by Shannon Sotomayor

not only was the music important, but also building myself as a brand. I also realized there was a hole in the market for a male corporate DJs in the fashion space and beyond. My new focus became apparent and I started to work towards growing within that space. Over time it’s come a long way. My music has evolved, my skill level has evolved and I’ve learned to play in many different environments, from being on tour and playing stadiums, to playing small

events in-store for 30-40 people. You need to be able to adapt to your environ– ment no matter what career you’re in, in my opinion. If you can get on someone else’s level and find out what they want, you’re sure to make a good impression.


Who are your stylistic influences in music and fashion? How does fashion influence your DJ persona, you as an individual, and do they interlink? I’ve always been a more simplistic man when it comes to fashion. I love the James Dean’s and Paul Newman’s of the world and what they brought to style. In music, I look up to people like Mark Ronson who is a great producer and also an amazing DJ. Someone like Mark has a great outlook on the industry. But there are so many musicians in so many different genres who are hard working and groundbreaking that I respect for various reasons. Fashion helps my DJ persona because it opens the door for more oppor– tunities with brands. By having a fashionable pres– ence, I’m able to get in the door with brands, not always on the music level to start. It’s nice to build with a brand further then just DJing or beyond just wearing their clothes. The goal is to build a broader

program with brands; from DJing their events, to supporting their products in person and being involved in their campaigns. The ultimate goal is to be putting out a collaborative product with them. To me that’s the future.

What have you learned working with artists such as Theo London and as an independent artist? What are the differences of group and solo work? The gains? It was interesting working with a music artist. He taught me a ton and I will forever be thankful. There are so many balls to juggle being an artist; from making music, to interviews, to promotion, touring, label relations and the politics of it all. In short, although the job itself seems fun and something everyone wants to do, it’s a very intense  24/7 life you are required to  lead and you give up a lot in return. Life on the road is draining and there’s no end in sight, not to mention studio night after studio night.


I have nothing but respect for touring artists and what they go through to fill a room/stadium each night. It’s a massive job. There are many differences in working with a group vs. being solo. The main differ– ence is the physical size. By yourself, you’re able to travel alone or with a road manager/manager and keep your costs low thus allowing yourself to take smaller gigs to increase your presence or have a greater monetary gain for the bigger gigs. With a group, your travel and member expenses are quite high so it becomes much more difficult to turn

a profit unless you can sell a ton of merch and crush ticket sales, not to mention traveling on the ground rather then in the air, so time is another factor. There are a ton of differences, but that’s a pretty big one as income is a very relevant factor in turning an artist a successful business. In the end though, when you’re playing your music, and the crowd is right, nothing else matters, but it always will when the show ends. Although it seems fun, and most definitely is more fun than a normal 9 to 5, it’s a job and a business and you need to treat it as one.


What’s one thing you’ve learned recently that has shaped your stylistic choices as a DJ or as an individual? Good question. That’s a tough one. I’ve learned to not overcomplicate things as of late. To look at things in the simplest possible light and attack them as such. I think when I read/ heard that Apple devel– opers gave iPhones/iPads to babies and young chil– dren to study their patterns and implement them in the development of their devices, it stuck with me.

In this day and age we tend to try and use jargon and make things look more complicated then it really is, perhaps just to seem that we’re worth more then we are, but I’m loving the keeping it simple and trans– parent route. It’s helped me be more honest with myself and directed my decision-making. And, it has helped me play better DJ sets. I try to not scratch a million times or add a ton of effects or everyone’s worst nightmare; switching up songs so quickly you don’t even get to hear the part you enjoy. I’ve been letting the music speak for itself and transitioning better within my set. Inter– estingly it’s carrying over to my life as well. Thanks for asking this, it’s good to realize things like this are happening.


What artists/musicians/ bands/or genres would you suggest we keep an eye out for? A loaded question as always, but a good one. If you look at the trend of music, I believe heavy electronic music is on the way out. Dubstep was really the peak of electronic music and noise and now it’s going towards more instrumental music with sax, more piano sounds vs. synth, and guitar riffs hence Pharell and Daft Punks latest hits. I think the swing is going towards more minimal and clean music and back to rock in a few years. Hip Hop will stay constant but it’s background melodies always change with the direction of the industry. It’s always close but right behind the newest trend.

Personally I’ve found a new love for Jazz and I’m still exploring it more and how I can truly implement it into what I’m doing without seeming like I’m trying to hard to make it work. Currently I’m into Caribou, their new album is crazy! Make sure to check out Can’t Do Without You and the Tale Of Us Remix. I’m also loving remixes by Julius Abel, Lane 8, Grandtheft (my Canadian brother), Throttle and Flight Facilities. Theophilus’ new album Vibes is amazing as well Definitely pushing the boundaries. On the newer side, watch out for a band called Dutch Party that is about to put out some music shortly. Also, RKCB has something very smooth about them that you should be aware of. In the bigger world, Travis Scott is only gaining steam and Kygo is slowly taking over the electronic dance scene with very clean melodies and his tropical sound. And that’s just off the top of my head. There’s so much out there right now, I could really go on forever.


What have you been listening to lately? Again, obsessed with Caribou - Can’t Do Without You (Tale of Us & Mano Le Tough Remix). If it was a tape, I would be playing it out for sure. Also loving Makonnen — Tuesday. Such an interesting and unexpected vocal to catch and it’s incredible.

Photographs by Libby Gray

What were the coolest/ weirdest experiences you’ve had working with Vogue and in fashion shows? There are plenty of weird nights to be had. Some of the small in store events I end up doing can take interesting turns if they don’t get the expected crowd. But on the coolest side, I recently DJed the Balmain After Party for Paris Fashion Week and the scene was out of control. Couldn’t have had more of the who’s who in the room and not only that, but the dancing was out of control. Definitely the best party to date I’ve DJed. Was an epic evening and would do it all over again in a second.


Ashwini Natarajan

Yet from being a yoga instructor to collaborating on apparel lines, there is more to Yarbrough than the photographs that his Yashica T4 captures. Unhemmed sat down with the burgeoning artist and asked him a few questions.

Billy Yarbrough

Hailing from the beach towns of San Clemente, photographer Billy Yarbrough is known for his laid-back beach scenes, landscapes oozing quintessential Americana spirit and whimsical So-Cal culture. Recent projects have included “I’m Being Watched,” documenting old televisions set aside for trash on L.A. sidewalks —a common practice among L.A. natives. These bulky, 90’s televisions take on quirky personas as they are snapped in different surroundings —in parking lots, in front of doorsteps, in front of bushes— culminating in this project to give a life to an untold story. “Karma Collection” portrays insight into Yarbrough’s journey through India’s ambient mountainscapes and ashrams, meeting more than a few intriguing characters along the way. NYCbased Milk Gallery sells his prints through their online store.


Where did it all begin? How did you get your bearings as a photographer? I’ve always been interested in how things worked —taking things apart and putting them back together again. My mom would find me old cameras thinking I would do that but I ended up just using them. What inspires you? I’m inspired a lot by photography that fits into the “new topographics” genre. I’m a huge fan of Robert Adams, Stephen Shore, and William Eggleston. Todd Hido, Juergen Teller, and Henrik Purienne are amazing at capturing people also. Music is an inspiration for me too. A good album can make me feel a certain way and that can change how I see the world.


What is your favorite beach for surfing in California? I just surf the local beach breaks in San Clemente. Riviera and Lausen’s are my go–to’s. I live close to Trestles too, which is a world class wave, but I barely get out there since its so crowded.


What’s your shooting style? Do you plan photo shoots or do you snap whenever it feels right? My favorite photographs are usually when I’m traveling. When I’m not working as a photographer doing a paid shoot is when I do my best work. Shooting what I see without regulations or guidelines is a much more creative space. In your project, “Karma Collection,” you present a series of stunning, spiritually-charged photos taken in Rishikesh, India. What were your intentions with these photos? Do you have plans to return to India soon? Those photographs came during a time when I was doing the physical practice of yoga for upwards of 4 hours a day and the rest of the practices of yoga the remainder of the day everyday and so was everyone around me. The nature of my situation and environment definitely had an effect on what I was seeing. One of the major lessons I learned there was that what goes on internally, (how you think, how you feel, etc.)

has a direct relationship with the external world. As a pho– tographer, the external world is everything, so learning how to hone myself internally is very important. I do plan on going to India again to elaborate on the project and to build a bigger book as soon as I find the funding. You are a yoga instructor in addition to being a photographer. What style of yoga do you teach? How has yoga influenced your artistic approach? I was trained in Hatha yoga, but Teaching in So-Cal requires a bit of a mashup with Power Yoga or else people with think its some weird religious thing or will get bored. Along with the ways I described in your previous question, yoga definitely has clarified my visions of photographs and has helped me to mindfully get shoots done. What does your photography reveal about your personality and outlook on life? I only try to keep myself in positive situations but with my photographs I guess it might be more neutral. Not sure how my


photography portrays my personality so I’ll just leave that up for interpretation. Give us seven songs that are captivating you at the moment. Nose Grows Some — Thom Yorke Open Eye Signal — Jon Hopkins Coronus, The Terminator — Flying Lotus Turn Around (Åme Remix) — Sailor & I Give Up — FKA twigs Parallel Jalebi — Four Tet aisatsana [102] — Aphex Twin What was the most memorable photo experience you have had? The most memorable experience I had was when I was in Bali in 2011 walking the beach with just my camera and I remember clearly thinking that I was completely content. Up until then I think I was pretty dependent on others for validation or something. That moment was a turning point artistically and I started to shoot photographs for myself and not for what I thought people would think about them.


What is your favorite camera to shoot with? Why? I have a shitty Yashica t4 that only fires 9/10 times I press it and it’s really slow. It’s a great camera thats widely known for its quality and some of my favorites came from it. I also shot in India exclusively with an Olympus OM-1. It’s a total workhorse. You seem to be branching out into different visual mediums and collaborations, as we can see from your short films and work with graphic designers. Can you talk about the direction you are heading towards? My friend Sam “Mandellis” Schryver is a graphic designer/ fine artist and together we are Pyrite Studio. Currently were building the studio to work on some big art pieces and some apparel lines. Personally, I’ve got conceptual photo/video projects with accompanied ambient music I’ll be working on for a while.


Channeling Chapman by Jacob Pharoah

Give me a wonderfully brief summary of yourself. I do a little bit of everything. I make music, I play parties, I DJ, and I do social media and digital marketing for some companies. Could you talk about your creative process? Where does it start? I think a lot of the time stuff will just kind of come to me, I’m always listening to music and I’m always listening to instrumentals, or songs without words and thinking about how to fill the space. I’ll be thinking about something or talking about something and all of a sudden have an idea and I’ll build around that piece. Maybe I’ll just sing something to myself and like how it sounds. To me it’s about building something. You have your first piece and you use that to lay the foundation. Sometimes you’re taking two pieces and filling it out with details. It’s all about shapes and puzzle pieces fitting together. And you’re creating the pieces. Eventually you have a puzzle that’s made out of pieces that you created and put together.

And outside of music? With visual stuff I like to collaborate with people who also have a vision. I love that my work can inform someone’s vision. I kind of like having other people’s interpretations involved. I try to make sure I don’t get lost in there. I wouldn’t say I butt heads, but I like to be involved in every part of the process. When it comes to the visual stuff, it’s about telling a story and figuring out how the words translate with the visuals.


If fashion plays a part in your creative process, which it appears to, how does it influences you? To me, fashion is a lot like music. It’s a means of self-expression. It allows me to be a different person everyday. Today, I’m casual, basics, going to work, but if I’m going to a party, I’m going to wear a crazy plastic Tokyo neoprene sweater and matching pants, or something I got from a thrift store with something I got from Opening Ceremony and really pop out. What are some things that are really inspiring you right now? I’m really into post-apocalyptic utopia type stuff like The Matrix. I’m reading 1984 again, and I recently just watched this movie Equilibrium with Christian Bale. On one end I feel like the world is on fire right now and people are just watching it burn, but on the other end, aesthetically we’re going to really interesting places. Brands like Hood by Air and Telfar are creating a new uniform for the future. I like how things are cleaner and more advanced and constructed while everything else is in complete chaos. What about in the music world? Who’s doing it for you right now? Musically, right now I’m listening to Tinashe. Her new album is so perfect and so well done. I’m also listening to FKA twigs right now. She’s obviously a goddess. I really love strong female artists. That’s really where I get a lot

of my inspiration throughout my life, people like Janet Jackson, Mariah Carey, and groups like En Vogue. Who is your style icon? You can have more than one if that’s too difficult. I’m not really into idolatry when it comes to artists, especially with the cult of celebrity on the Internet, but there are definitely people that get it right. Chloë Sevigny always gets it right. I wouldn’t say he’s my style icon, but I really love everything that Kanye


does. I think that he’s one of the most experimental artists when it comes to how he wears menswear. I don’t think many people, especially in the rap world, are taking the risks that he takes. I just really like people who live in a mainstream context but are able to go different places with their style. If I’m a college student and I want to look like a fashion-forward rap artist, what are the top three items I need in my closet? 1. You need some designer sweatpants. Casual is the new luxury. The trend of high-end street wear is going to fade and people are going to want to be more comfortable and neutral.

What is exciting you about hip-hop/rap culture right now? I think what excites me is that people are really starting to embrace weird artists. People are looking for artists that are alternative and strange and whose influences are wide. There’s no room for the regular rapper anymore. If you don’t have something interesting about you that reaches people on multiple levels, there’s not really space for you. That’s exciting for me. I think it’s exciting that people like FKA Twigs can be so well received—that’s a sign of the times changing. I think people want something different, and we’re finally giving the artists a chance to deliver those things.

2. You need some kind of mesh t-shirt. Not a mesh tank top. Unless it’s long, then it’s okay. Just don’t wear a literal straight-up mesh wife beater—you’re basic.

If you could pick your spirit animal, who or what would it be?

If you have those three items you can switch them with anything and I think that you’ll be good. But really you should dress however you want. The sexiest thing for me in fashion is people owning their look. That’s the difference between someone wearing Adidas sandals with socks, and people being like “what are you doing?” versus owning it and people recognizing it as a look. And that’s the fun thing about fashion.

I would say there’s a lot of taking a concept and just multiplying it a million times. There are so many companies that are building off the concepts that brands like Hood by Air and Been Trill put out there and aren’t really adding anything to them. It’s one thing to be building off an idea, but to just copy what they did... There are too many hats with words on them. There are people that are taking that idea and pushing it further, but

I would choose a giraffe because I have a really long neck, and I’m really lanky and awkward. And I’m kind of 3. The third thing would be some always looking for something. I feel really strong shoes. Like some Timber- like I always just look like a giraffe. lands or some Nike boots... Just a really good black shoe. This all has What do you think is horribly wrong about men’s fashion right now? to be black by the way.


there’s a lot of mass multiplication of easy concepts. With guys, there’s such an obsession with what’s cool. That whole HYPEBEAST culture is so intense. It’s not about individuality. I think the younger generation, the kids in high school right now, they’ll be the ones to dress differently and look for individuality. Who do you think is doing great things with menswear? Shane from Hood by Air, for me, is doing things that I’ve never seen. Things that I want but would never think of myself. Those are the kinds of people I’m influenced by, people who

are coming up with things I wish I’d thought of myself. I also think of Telfar, and I think LPD is doing cool things. Public School does some awesome stuff, and Tim Coppens is another brand I look out for. All these people are looking to the future. Guys’ range can be a lot more limited than girls, and these designers are looking to expand what it means to be in menswear. How do you think rap and fashion are related? I think that music and fashion will always be close together. They’re both a means of self-expression. That’s


the way that artists and designers connect: both are trying to say something with what they’re making. Rap is a young culture, it’s a party culture, and I think that a lot of designers are going out and having fun with them. It’s a similar energy. It’s especially great now to see these really cool artists wearing these really cool designers. I think it’s really exciting to see young people coming together in huge ways.


What are your fashion pet peeves? I hate bowler caps and fedoras. I don’t like bow ties. I don’t like the color salmon. I don’t know if curly mustaches are a fashion pet peeve, but I’m not a huge fan. Birkenstocks, yes or no? They’re comfy... I think that when you’re in college, so much of your look is about comfort and you shouldn’t have to worry about looking fashion– forward every time you’re going to class. I definitely spent the whole of freshman year in pajamas, so I think Birkenstocks are fine. What are the next steps for you as an artist? I’m working on an EP right now, and that’s been a process. I really want to make sure I’m doing everything with my best foot forward. It’s important to me to make really good stuff as opposed to just turning stuff out for the sake of relevancy. I think that if you make good stuff that you can always come back with that in a bigger way each time. I have another video coming out. I’m just working on my sound, it’s new, and it’s way different from anything else I’ve put out. I’m working on putting out more quality stuff and giving everything some TLC.

Photographs by Class New York


The New Male Runway By Jake Moffett


“The very boss of the penis and the horrible pushed out testicles… the buttocks of such persons look like the hinder part of a she-ape in the full moon.” This could have been a review on a number of major menswear lines from the past decade. However, it’s the illustration Geoffrey Chaucer paints in his 15th century classic, The Canterbury Tales, describing the current fashion at time. True to fashion’s cyclical nature, Chaucer’s coloring of men-in-tights would again become apparent more than 500 years later on all the major runways. Though she’s a fictional editor, Miranda Priestly of The Devil Wears Prada offers insight as to the reason fashions evolve so rapidly. On Andy’s cerulean sweater, Priestly says “And then it, uh, filtered down through the department stores and then trickled on down into some tragic Casual Corner where you, no doubt, fished it out of some clearance bin. However, that blue represents millions of dollars and countless jobs and it’s sort of comical how you

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think that you’ve made a choice that exempts you from the fashion industry when, in fact, you’re wearing the sweater that was selected for you by the people in this room from a pile of stuff.” The reappearance of trends is not mutually exclusive to either men’s or women’s lines, though an evolving of certain aspects of fashions is clearly seen. Men– in–tights is perhaps not common, but men in skintight denim is much more apparent. The “Trickle-Down” system in fashion is the driving force behind new trends, new faux pas, and new normalcies. Higher classes want to distinguish themselves from lower classes, and abandon trends that prove otherwise. Forbes Magazine did a study on the desires of millennials that encompassed all genders in its questions. Amongst the highest desires for the generation,  extrinsic worth and image is placed much higher over more intrinsic attri– butes, such as selfless community leadership and religious obliga–


tions. The desire to stand out for the first time has surpassed fitting in and conformity. The suit became a standard men’s outfit in response to industrial– ization at the end of the 19th century to the middle of the 20th. In Fashioning Masculinity, Craik states “Ornamentation was viewed with suspicion. The overall impression conveyed the serious disposition of men locked into the industrializing economy.” Goals at the time were heavily different than those of millennials. A 9 to 5 job guaranteed security, stability, and conformity. Two World Wars had finally ended and in an effort to silence any outliers, men’s fashion took a hiatus from what were an otherwise rather colorful previous 500 years. Millennials don’t want to fit in. They want to be unique, be happy, and be famous. The easiest way to reflect these desires is to project an image constructed of unique fashions. Historically, men’s fashions are more elaborate, but as men enter

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the public work force, the women’s role became to dress to impress, and to separate social statuses. The evolution of men’s fashion started with the male model, however. Up until 2003, male models were typically muscular, heavier, and older than their counterparts today who are an average of 6’3” and 155 pounds. The shift can be attributed to Hedi Slimane, the French  Fashion Designer who headed Dior Homme from 2000-2007. As one of the leading Haute Couture Houses, when Dior debuted the skinny male model other brands took note. A shift towards androgyny was the first step in a shift towards a hybridization of male clothing into female clothing. For Fall 2014 fashion shows,  mens– wear saw a number what are traditionally women’s pieces. Leather pants, a trend for women in seasons past, were featured prominently in Gucci, Hermés, and Valentino. Calvin Klein, Astrid Anderson, and Burberry all debuted crop tops in their shows. Coach,


Prada, and D&G displayed man purses that were large, as seen typically in womenswear shows. This isn’t to say that men shouldn’t wear womenswear clothing by any means, but now designers are promoting an abundance of more accessible sizes and more comfortable fits for men. This positive change is only a first step to the acceptance of an industry to start promoting gender fluidity and identity discussions. Wearing a suit to the office is still a typical practice, but over the next decade it’s likely there will be a shift in what is standard and what is passé. The next season of menswear is likely to show even more traditional female-wear being presented in ways that fit the male body better. In an ideal future, menswear and womenswear will merge into a holistic “humanswear” clothing show, sans judgments, plaid, and polos. King Louis XIV would be proud.


remembering oscar de la renta

Saying Goodbye to Oscar “I Hate Pretty” de la Renta (22 July 1932 – 20 Oct 2014) By Britanni Taylor

Born in the Dominican Republic as the youngest of seven children and the only boy, Óscar Arístides Renta Fiallo was expected to follow in his father’s footsteps by taking over the family’s insurance business. Instead, at the age of 19, he set off to Madrid to study art. Behaving as most teenage boys would, he quickly spent the money his father sent him as well as the extra money sent by his sisters (unbeknownst to his father). And so, he began sketching for extra cash. Soon enough, the wife of an ambassador noticed his sketches and commissioned him to design a gown for her daughter. The dress ended up on the cover of Life magazine that fall. At this moment, it is safe to say a star was born. After this brief exposure to design, de la Renta instantly immersed himself in the world of fashion. He first apprenticed under Cristóbal Balenciaga in 1957. However, when the everambitious de la Renta asked to be transferred to the designer’s main office in Paris, he was told to wait a year and gain more experience. Not accustomed to being denied anything, Oscar left for Paris in 1961 and found himself apprenticing under Antonio Castillo at Lanvin. In 1963, when Oscar de la Renta arrived in New York with his three letters of introduction, American fashion was undergoing a transition. Previously, the emphasis had been on the manufacturers. However, John Fairchild promptly eradicated this tradition when he took over his family’s newspaper business, Women’s Wear Daily. Fairchild opted to switch the focus toward the designers at the same moment that the “working woman” began to surface. With


the changing times and Diana Vreeland as a mentor, de la Renta began designing for Elizabeth Arden. Two years later, he left Arden for Jane Derby’s company, Seventh Avenue, as partner. Soon after, Derby retired, and Oscar took over. At the onset of his solo career, Jacqueline Kennedy took note of his designs and de la Renta commenced a tradition of dressing first ladies. Soon, this tradition broadened to socialites, CEOs, and A-list celebrities alike. Never had a designer so seamlessly become a celebrity himself. Alongside his first wife, Françoise de Langlade, (editorin-chief of French Vogue whom he married in 1967) Oscar de la Renta became an unstoppable force. His charming personality and old-fashioned mannerisms made him fast and long-standing friends of the beautiful elite. His name became synonymous with both the red carpet and the White House. Nevertheless, Mr. de la Rentas true genius lay in his myopic view of the present and immediate future. When asked in an interview with New York Magazine what his favorite design was, he responded:

I don’t have any favorites. Not until Alex [Bolen, present CEO] joined the company in 2003 did we even have an archive… I always thought that in fashion, the most important thing is

to move on. I think there are two kinds of designers: the survivors, like me, and the designers who so strongly identify with one look and one period in their careers that they can never get beyond it. I also have the memory of a mosquito, so the most important piece is the next piece, and the next collection, because I cannot remember the last. Oscar de la Renta never made it a secret that his design process rested in the customer. More than any other designer, he understood that neither the red carpet, nor the wedding aisle is the runway. Thus, each time a woman stepped out in one of his creations, they walked without the burden of having to act as the exhibition of a designer’s ego. On the other hand, Oscar de la Renta’s designs redefined “pretty,” a word de la Renta was cited to hate. He entwined elegance and femininity back into the clothes of many powerful women as never before. Mr. de la Renta’s colorful, island-inspired clothing might not have been the obvious choice for much of his clientele, but this worked to his favor. Not

one to reinvent himself every season, he carved a niche for himself in American fashion. He became the go-to for any women on that special night, whether the Oscars or a gala. Oscar de la Renta was the staple for the “ladies who lunch.” However, as the role of women changes and it becomes more en vogue to stamp out your own sense of style, loyalty to a designer is lost in lieu of the same loyalty towards oneself. This is the woman de la Renta designs for, “she is someone who will choose the red dress over the pink, even if her husband prefers the pink.” Truly, every facet of his life reflected his love for powerful women. After the passing of his first wife, he remarried American philanthropist and socialite, Annette Engelhard. Meanwhile, his fan base only grew as strong women in important positions of power embraced their femininity. In this way, Mr. de la Renta effortlessly found a way to stay current without compromising himself. His designs evolved to fit this new woman in an era in which it wasn’t apparent that he belonged. Additionally, de la Renta’s humility and love of family coalesced into a strong social media presence. His stepchildren and adopted son have all worked for him at one point in time. More than anyone, they brought Oscar to a new generation of women. Buyers may not have immediately understood the older man that would show up to work in a pinstriped suit instead of the unconventional attire of most designers, but who could resist a man who isn’t afraid to call out our First Lady for wearing a cardigan to Buckingham Palace?


All of this makes the recent announcement of his passing that much harder. After being diagnosed with cancer in 2006, he continued on and managed to grow his business by 50%, to $150 million in sales. Close friends said he never let his illness stop him. At last year’s “Fashion Talks” event, de la Renta made mention of his health, saying:

Yes, I had cancer. Right now, I am totally clean. The only realities in life are that you are born, and that you die. We always think we are going to live forever. The dying aspect we will never accept. The one thing about having this kind of warning is how you appreciate every single day of life. In the Dominican Republic, the place that shaped so much of Oscar’s life, flags were at half-staff. He succumbed to complications from cancer surrounded by family and friends at his second home in Kent, Connecticut. Twitter and Instagram were also ablaze with tributes and reminiscences of the late designer. Many posted their de la Renta creations; radiant symbols of a girl’s dream come true.

Peter Copping, previously the artistic director for Nina Ricci, will succeed de la Renta, beginning November 3rd. After de la Renta brought John Galliano onto the team in order to offer him a second chance after an earlier scandal, many rumors circulated of who his successor might be. Luckily, the house that de la Renta began will not face the same challenges as other design houses that have had to scramble for leaders. Copping’s and de la Renta’s aesthetics align well; Copping has a mastery of creating sweet, yet sexy designs, although he has more stereotypical British restraint compared to de la Renta’s island flamboyance. Surely, there is no end in sight to the house that Oscar built. His influence will continue to be felt for generations, as his name remains synonymous with beauty, individuality, and ingenuity.


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UNHEMMED MAGAZINE // ISSUE III  

ISSUE III features an exclusive shoot with Robert Geller, Timo Weiland, interviews with Brendan Fallis, Billy Yarbrough, Alex Chapman, Gordo...

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