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VOL. VII ISSUE 29 APRIL 13, 2011

Serving the CCRI Student Body Since 2007

The Unfiltered Lens www.TheUnfilteredLens.org

REC

CCTV forum, talks and troubles Servio Gomez Online Editor

A public forum was held on Thursday, March 31st at the CCRI Knight campus regarding issues related to the 21st Century Workforce Report and security improvement in CCRI’s campuses. The forum was proctored by President DiPasquale, who also answered student, faculty and staff questions. In an e-mail sent out to faculty and students, DiPasquale mentioned that he was “seeking [...] feedback as we [the administration] make decisions that will affect the future of the college.” The e-mail continued with “I will provide an overview of each topic, answer questions and gather your feedback during the forums.”   The e-mail provided dates, times, and locations of the public forums which were held over two days in all four campuses. The March 29th forums were held on the Lincoln

and Providence campuses, followed by two forums held two days after on the 31st at the Newport and Warwick campuses.   The first part of these forums was geared towards discussing the 21st Century Workforce Report and the latter half was intended to “explore whether security cameras are a worthwhile investment for increasing safety to protect the members of our [the CCRI] community.” The forum held at the Knight Campus had a fair turn out, with most attendees being faculty and staff. There was a moderate student turnout, with even a group seemingly coming in as a class.   While the forum was held publicly, some students were met with opposition when attempting to record the open forum. Before the forum formally began, an editor from The Unfiltered Lens, Brittany Gooding, prepared to record the session. Within the first five minutes of

the publicly-held forum, Louis Rainone of the Physical Plant, asked if the open discussion was being recorded. In response, President DiPasquale affirmed “officially no[...]” When asked by Professor Steve Forleo about other public forums, regarding the arming of campus police, that have been recorded, President DiPasquale expressed, “this isn’t a parliamentary procedure meeting [...]” Previous forums were not governed by Roberts’ Rules. DiPasquale then called for a

motion for those in objection to the recording. While no official record was kept as far as votes, Gooding, as well as Professor Forleo noticed a small number of people (less than ten) opposing to her recording. [Note: I arrived 30 minutes into the session and was preparing to record the forum myself until informed by a CCRI public relations photographer that I was not allowed.]   continued on pg 5, Forum

Read more about the Administration’s restriction of recording the open forum on pg. 13, SuPRESSed


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THE UNFILTERED LENS/SINCE 2007/VOL. VII ISSUE 29 APRIL 13, 2011

Student News T H E Student Government Elections Presidential Elections will be held from 12am on 21 April until 11:59pm on 22 April. All voting will take place electronically. A debate session will take place prior to the elections, but a date has yet to be determined. Elected candidates will be notified on 25 April. Knight Campus Student Government The next meeting will be held on 14 April 2011 behind the cafeteria at 2pm. KCSG also request that all clubs, if they have not done so already, submit their budget requests for next year immediately. Student Art Sale There will be a student art sale held at the Flanagan Campus (Lincoln) on 19 April. It will be held in the cafeteria, and all students are welcome to participate. There is no charge to participate, and all proceeds may be kept by the students.

Right of way at CCRI line, what to do if you have a stop sign, and how the two work together to form a safe One day on my way into driving environment. school, I was making my way up the hill and when I The yellow line on any came to the main intersec- road, whether it is solid, tion (where the road splits dashed, double, or single, to go to the parking lots means the same thing. The and under the school) I was yellow line signifies the norgreeted by a good old fash- mal flow of traffic. On camion New England one-finger pus the yellow line curves wave. to the left in the front of the school and heads down to The reason I received such the parking lots. a traditional “good morning” is because I had the This means that the path audacity to drive with the the yellow line takes is the flow of traffic to the parking normal flow of traffic. So lot and not yield to some if a person were driving person (who lacks common following that yellow line, sense) who came barreling they would not have to yield out from under the school to any other vehicle. without stopping. That red octagon seen So I will explain how the when coming out from unright of way works coming der the school is actually a into school. To do this I will stop sign. Proof of this is explain what to do if you the fact that the sign says are following the yellow “STOP” on it in big letters. Stefan Casucci Staff Writer

The stop sign means to stop until it is safe to proceed.

If person B was coming out from under the school So if a person was ap- and is approaching the stop proaching the stop sign sign, they would have no from under the school, they right of way, and could acshould stop, and wait until tually sit there for as long as the chosen path they would it takes for their chosen path like to take is clear and safe. to become clear and safe for use. When paths with yellow lines and stop signs are put Although driving may together they actually form be more difficult for some a phenomenon called traf- people, the rules of the road fic. The rules of how traffic are not that difficult to unworks and flows are called derstand. ‘traffic laws’. I have explained how to One purpose that traffic decipher what to do if you laws serve is to dictate who are following the yellow is taking a path that has the line, what to do if you are highest priority of travel (or at a stop sign, and how the who has the “right of way”). two work together to create If person A were driving up a safe driving environment. the hill on their way into I do apologize if I came off school and was approaching as condescending, but if the front of the school and is you already know the rules heading straight or towards of the road, and what conthe parking lot they would descending means, then this have the right of way. article is not for you.

For further information, contact The Lens’ Art Director, Jon Montalbano at jonathanmontalbano08@gmail. com Textbook Buyback The CCRI Bookstores will have textbook buybacks on the following dates: Friday, 6 May, 9am-3pm Monday, 9 May, 9am-7pm Tuesday, 10 May, 9am-7pm Wednesday, 11 May, 9am-7pm Thursday, 12 May, 9am-7pm Friday, 13 May, 9am-3pm Monday, 16, May, 9am-3pm Advertise your club and events Use The Unfiltered Lens to promote your club and club events. Each club has one free, full color, quarter page advertisement for the life of their club. Also, club officials can set up a calendar on our website, www. theunfilteredlens.org, which will be sent out with each e-mail version of the newspaper. For further information on either of these, contact The Unfiltered Lens at info@theunfilteredlens. org or call (401) 825-1215. **To have your notices posted in The Skinny, please e-mail The Unfiltered Lens at info@ theunfilteredlens.org subject Skinny.

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THE UNFILTERED LENS/SINCE 2007/VOL. VII ISSUE 29 APRIL 13, 2011

Student News

SVO returns to Knight campus Brittany Gooding Associate editor

Are you a student veteran attending the Community College of Rhode Island? Are you struggling with balancing schoolwork and classes, supporting family, and keeping a social life, while still in the service? Do you sometimes wish you could talk to a fellow veteran about your experiences within the service and having them be able to relate? As a veteran, do you hope that someday there will be a way to make the transition into schools much easier? If you answered yes to any of the previous questions, or you wish to support the student veterans, then you are in luck! As of this month, all four campuses at CCRI will be introducing a new club called Student Veterans of America. This club was organized by Anthony Paolino and is part of a non-profit, nation-

wide group that advocates for all student veterans.

The club would also serve as outreach within the community to build a solid relaAlthough this club used to tionship between the school be established at CCRI, it and local community and became inactive for several non-profit military groups, semesters and many con- such as: VFW, Legion tacts were lost from all of Chapters, the Veteran Centhe previous members. ter, and many others. This community outreach will After realizing the need include fund raisers and for a SVO, Paolino spoke other important factors. with the secretary of veteran affairs, Eric Shineski, SenaAnother important aspect tor Jack Reed, Senator Shel- of this club is to increase don Whitehouse, and Presi- awareness of veteran life dent Raymond DiPasquale, and give student veterans along with a board of sev- somewhere to go where eral student veterans who there are other individudiscussed veteran issues als who can relate and help and how to better student them through their issues by veteran lives and benefits. sharing success and failure stories. Shortly following, the opportunity arose for the reAll students are capable of organization of the Student joining this club as long as Veteran’s club at CCRI and they hold at least on credit Paolino has been working on any of the CCRI camextremely hard at rebuild- puses; although, non-vetering this group and making it an students will not be able much stronger and involved to hold an office position. than ever before. There was an event held The main goal of this club where students were able is to create school policies to join the Student Veterans that refer to veteran life club. by working out the needs of student veterans to help The SVO would like to make attending school eas- hear your thoughts, conier.

cerns, and ideas. Please join them at their first meeting on Friday, April 29, so your voice can be heard.

and how to improve a student veteran’s experience on campus. If there are any questions about this club, you may contact that club President, Anthony Paolino at ccrivets@gmail.com.

This club will be held biweekly and will utilized to discuss upcoming events, issues student veteran members are having, socializing and networking with veterFor further information on ans and supporters, infor- the club’s description, you mation for those who wish may look into studentvetto contact administration, erans.org/ccri, or facebook. com/ccrivets.

Photo: Knight Field Day ‘11

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THE UNFILTERED LENS/SINCE 2007/VOL. VII ISSUE 29 APRIL 13, 2011

Student News

UFL staff goes to Cali for JACC Evangeline West Editor in Chief

The 56th annual Journalism Association of Community College’s (JACC) conference was held on April 7th-10th this year in Sacramento, CA. The Unfiltered Lens, the only newspaper represented from outside of California, made the twelve hour trek through deserts and layovers to attend this crucial event that consisted of various workshops, speakers, and the chance to meet and network with other junior college newspapers.

photographers, editors, and writers alike. Each workshop featured a speaker involved with a California newspaper, examples of their work, and a question and answer portion for inquisitive students. The workshops typically ran for an hour and lasted all day. Contests for participants were also held, involving writing, cartooning and photography.

Saturday marked the final full day of events for the conference. The last set of workshops and contests occurred, and then the night ended with a banquet We stayed at the Doubletree announcing a new set of Inn, conveniently located JACC board members and in downtown Sacramento, contest winners. We were where the conference was then treated to a dinner and held. The first day kicked off given the chance to see othwith keynote speaker Joyce er school’s work. Terhaar, managing editor Apart from the vital inforfor the Sacramento Bee, who discussed different mation given in the workforms of journalism. After shops, the JACC conferthe speaker, students were ence provided a chance to welcomed to participate in network with other junior a scavenger hunt involving colleges from California, journalism trivia and tasks and a glance into the inner such as jumping into the ho- workings of their respective tel pool fully clothed. A 60’s papers. The hotel provided theme dance followed the many locations to make hunt where winners where friends and converse with announced. our fellow future journalists. The next day kicked off the majority of workshops, We left California starryincluding specific ones for eyed and motivated, our

media credit: Michelle St. Onge

brains full of new ideas and a Golden State experience that we are likely to never forget. Here’s what the Unfiltered Lens staff had to say about the JACC conference.

styles of other junior college papers. By doing so, I was able to trade experiences and receive feedback to help better newspapers. I gained all sorts of new ideas for our paper, and got to know different people in the meantime. Overall, the trip was a fabulous experience, and I honestly cannot wait to go back!” -Brittany Gooding

attendance. Everyone who I encountered was enthusiastic, friendly, and seemed like they truly wanted to improve their college newspapers.” - Mike Malczyn

“My focuses were the pho“More than just serving as tography/photojournalism a vehicle to gather informaand multimedia workshops. tion on how our paper can My goal was to gain insight be better, the trip served to of the picturesque fortune a re-ignite my desire for the journalistic photographer, work the paper does. Inspi“Through the various as well as the plights. Each ration and passion, that is JACC workshops I learned workshop I attended ofwhat I brought back from all sorts of relevant info fered me something inspirSacramento. I’ve set a few about making the most out ing. The speakers I listened goals for myself to achieve of journalism, but the great- to gave me something of for Burbank’s conference est impact was that of the their own to take from their next year.” fellow students I met who workshops, whether it was a -Ian Armitstead showed me our true poten- skill, experience, or a comtial for societal influence - bination of both. I felt more “I feel that attending the a power that I never knew knowledgeable, confident, JACC served as a rich learn- a college newspaper could and more ambitious in my ing experience not only for possess.” future contributions for The myself, but also for the rest - Alexandra Johnson Unfiltered Lens using what of the Unfiltered Lens team. I learned from the JACC. The workshops I attended “I thought this year’s I am very pleased with the inspired me to step up and JACC convention was very results from the conference, improve the distribution of helpful. As with last year’s and found that the energy the newspaper for the ben- convention, there were a from the JACC coordinaefit of the student body.” wide variety of workshops tors was extraordinarily mo-Servio Gomez to choose from. One of the tivating and encouraging. most helpful workshops I I believe that CCRI should “Although I learned a lot attended dealt with legal ad- continue to fund such a useof new information from vice for journalists. While ful and prestigious event the workshops, the part of we do have free speech in to enhance and further imthe trip that really interested this country, it is very im- prove the voice of their inme and inspired my many portant to practice ethical stitution.” new ideas for the Lens, was behavior in journalism. - Michelle St. Onge meeting different students The most inspiring part of and learning about the dif- the convention was actu“I didn’t know what to exferent atmospheres and ally the other students in pect out of my first JACC conference, but I left California a more positive and determined writer. The workshops provided ideas for possible careers, and the networking with California schools turned out to be a priceless and beneficial part of the conference. Part of me wishes I could stay on the Lens to attend next years conference in Burbank, but this weekend I fell in love with Sacramento and plan on applying to as many schools as I can on the West Coast.” -Evangeline West


THE UNFILTERED LENS/SINCE 2007/VOL. VII ISSUE 29 APRIL 13, 2011

Student News

Surveillance forums continued from cover

Mention of security cameras being installed on the campuses began two years ago in the Spring of 2009 after a violent incident involving a female student. The incident, which occurred on March 18th, involved a woman at the Flanagan Campus being forced into the bathroom by a man with a knife. This incident encouraged some faculty and staff to petition for improvement on the campuses of CCRI. The petition for security cameras saw “more than 100 signatures” from the Flanagan campus, signed by faculty, staff, and students.   Another incident that was cited as a reason for concern was one relating to a group of armed gang members that entered the Liston campus in Providence on January of 2010, militantly searching for a CCRI student. Suspects in these incidents were never apprehended.   In his overview of the plan, President DiPasquale mentioned that talks of security cameras as of now are not final. He also added that the cost for the security cameras came out to be approximately $600,000 for systems in the Providence and Lincoln campuses alone. It was pointed out that the idea for this was more of a “bottom-up” approach driven by the petition in the Flanagan campus, after which talks of security cameras escalated within faculty and administration.   The question-and-answer section of the Knight forum was primarily led by concerned faculty and staff. While a good number of students attended, questions asked by those who attended were entertained, but noticeably given less consideration. In response to several questions President DiPasquale, as well as other administra-

tors, revealed opinions and reasoning  behind the current plans. It was revealed that current plans are primarily for the installation of security cameras on the Liston and Flanagan campuses.   When asked about whether planned security cameras were to be an act of surveillance or simply a means of recording, DiPasquale et al., including CCRI Acting Director of Security Richard Robinson, described that current plans for the security cameras are for recording and reviewing purposes only.

cost about $50,000 per extra employee. Patronage in support of the camera security measure expressed that the extra sense of security did justify the cost because it was going to be a onetime expense. [Note: For only two campuses].   Funding for camera security, said DiPasquale, will have to be taken out “in a systematic [manner] within our budget.” Also mentioned was the fact that politicians do not have to be informed and will not provide funding.   Student questions that Footage, said DiPasquale, were thoroughly respondwould facilitate in identifyMentioned costs estimated ed to brought about debate ing suspects should a victim that more personnel would concerning alternative to

media credit: urlybits.com

report an incident to campus security. Security personnel would then be able to remotely access necessary footage. The system currently being investigated would be capable of storing 30 or 90 days worth of footage.   Forum attendees brought up the idea of active surveillance. Response to this confirmed that the possibility that active surveillance, including personnel such as more security officers, would be too costly when compared to recording cameras and certainly would not be happening.

camera security that would make more sense. Rather than passively recording for possible occurrences, a wired relay emergency system was suggested, similar to those found on URI and RIC campuses. This suggestion was met with support by other attendees. In response, President DiPasquale mentioned that plans regarding security did indeed include a more complete solution. At this point, it was noted that CCRI is the only public higher-institution without security cameras on campuses. Costs and official details regarding that possible solution were lightly discussed.   Other concerns, in terms of prevention, included talks about building a better sense of community at the college (often regarded to during the forum as “business”). There was also reasonable mention of improvement of security personnel’s access to resources.   More student questions brought about concerns related to the morality and placement of security cameras. Tentative locations of these security cameras, according to DiPasquale et. al in administration, are for public locations such as parking lots, entrances, common areas, and secluded hallways. Placement in these locations, they said, would serve as a deterrent to criminal activity and help collect evidence for theft and mischief reports. Several attendees expressed agreement, citing that cameras would have helped identify and prosecute suspects in both extreme incidents such as the ones in Flanagan and Liston. DiPasquale later said that nothing would have prevented gangsters from entering the building in the incident in Providence.   There are several petitions circulating the CCRI campuses expressing massive opposition to the installation of cameras in public areas, as well as another against installation in the interior of the campuses.

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THE UNFILTERED LENS/SINCE 2007/VOL. VII ISSUE 29 APRIL 13, 2011

InterNational/Local News

One month later: Japan’s disaster Alexandra Johnson Managing Editor

It was just last month that the small island nation on Japan suffered what may very well be the worst natural disaster in the country’s history. For those who have not been keeping up with the news, on March 11 an earthquake of 8.9 magnitude on the Richter scale hit off the northeast coast of Japan – the world’s fifth largest earthquake since 1900. The quake was followed shortly thereafter by a tsunami; a series of massive waves caused by disruption of the continental plates under the ocean. Tsunamis are fast, with traveling speeds as great as those of commercial jets; thus, the people of Japan – in particular, the small coastal fishing village of Sendai where the waves

struck – only had about an Over the past month, 8-10 minute forewarning of workers in Japan have been the impending disaster. striving tirelessly to get the situation under control. The outcome? At least Japanese Prime Minister 13,228 people are dead, Naoto Kan has been do14,529 are missing, more ing his utmost to promote than 150,000 have been left calmness and unity amongst homeless and there is tens his people after what he of billions of dollars worth claimed was “the most seof damage. vere crisis…since World War II.” To top off the insane amounts of havoc and tragNevertheless, the world edy consuming the coun- has been quick to help as try, the earthquake caused millions of dollars have several discrepancies at the been donated to the cause, Fukushima No. 1 nuclear and international rescue power plant on Japan’s teams are flying in to transcoast. The cooling systems port a variety of relief supof multiple reactors failed, plies to the survivors. and a few days later at least one of them exploded. This is an arduous time for the small nation, and one As a result, tens of thou- that will forever plague the sands were evacuated from memories of those involved. the area as a precaution to Hopefully the world will potential radioactivity; but continue to work together to with so much of the country lessen the load and help Jain ruin, there was not exact- pan rebuild that which was ly a vast selection of places lost. to flee to.

If you want to help, check online for various donation and volunteer opportunities –anything you can do would be greatly appreciated.

media credit: spreadshirt.com

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THE UNFILTERED LENS/SINCE 2007/VOL. VII ISSUE 29 APRIL 13, 2011

Arts & Entertainment

Spheres of Knowledge:

A Look Into Sculpture, Re-purposing, & Symbolism John Deignan Staff Writer

Wendy Wahl was unloading what appeared to be large paper balls wrapped in a protective plastic sheet out from the back of her S.U.V. They each had been pierced by a single, thin metal rod. “Hold them from the base of the rod and lightly on the top (of the ball). They may be solid but they are still quite fragile.” She hands one off to Viera, the Knight Campus Gallery Director. Looking to me, she asked, “Do you want one of the big ones or the small ones?” I nervously took hold of one of the two spheres she held up. “The rods are removable, but it isn’t easy putting them back in.” Wendy began to mention to Viera that she would oc- plane as to that of the others. casionally suspend them by I ask, “What do these symwire. bolize? Is there any other point of view or meaning to We made our way to the this that I am not seeing?” elevator, which we would take four more trips up “There are many things that on our way to the gallery. come to mind when I look While waiting for the eleva- at these. What I’m really tor, Wendy asks, “Which interested in is what comes one do you have? C or L?” to your mind.” I could not I look around and eventual- help but see an association ly find a large letter L on the with planets, each differing plastic covering. “It says in size, seeming to line up in “L” on top.” a purposeful manner and at different intervals. “The plastic isn’t labeled. Each sphere is a letter from This theory was only the alphabet. I think your strengthened by the adholding C.” On the way up dition of an audio track. she clears up some of my Looping every few minutes confusion. was a windy, white noiselike sound; what one would These “paper balls” were imagine an empty void Wendy’s’ “Spheres of would sound like. Knowledge.” Each Sphere contains a set of letters from Looking at the complete a re-purposed, and other- show, a group of spheres wise out of date (A 1961 stand together in the otherEdition), version of the wise almost empty gallery, World Book Encyclopedia. their only accompaniment “Some have three letters, taking up a small, four-panel some have four. That’s why area. One section displays a some have greater mass.” bookshelf housing rows of hard covered Encyclopedia While setting up the volumes, their contents repieces it became clear that moved. each metal rod was a different length, allowing some Another two sections spheres to appear on a lower are occupied by four small

pieces, each a pattern of strangely shaped folded paper arranged on a black colored background. The last section has what appears to be a window planter filled with long strips of encyclopedia pages.

as that of different untapped worlds of knowledge, spreading as seeds in the winds until they could grab hold of someone’s mind, where they can finally grow and flourish. It is a testimony to the power of knowledge and a simple idea; the way a single idea can change into something truly dramatic.

The work is stunningly simplistic, yet conveys information and symbolism in a way hardly seen before, and could very well be the As the speech ended, first of its kind in modern Wendy began to take quessculpture. tions; one of the most surprising of which pertaining It’s hard to imagine the ex- to the smell of each piece, tensive amount of time and which someone decided to effort that went into such an investigate, stating that they incredibly large undertak- smelled “very industrial.” ing. From start to finish, WenDuring the opening recep- dy could be seen answering tion I asked a number of questions and going from guests what their impression was. Many, such as myself, said they saw planets. An occasional few were baffled, saying they only saw large paper balls. One or two even said they saw dandelions, which to my surprise was not too far from the view of Wendy herself. Addressing the guests, Wendy revealed her view

group to group. Her family was there to support her and there were constant smiles and laughs throughout the room. Overall, the show was a huge success and definitely not the last from Wendy Wahl. To any longtime art admirers and newcomers to the art world alike, you are sure to get something out of it. You never know what you might learn.

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THE UNFILTERED LENS/SINCE 2007/VOL. VII ISSUE 29 APRIL 13, 2011

Arts & Entertainment Black Friday, Friday However, this viral sensation is not because it has been deemed fantastic, but has instead claimed evBlack’s “Friday”- no, not the day eryone’s attention for many negaafter Thanksgiving that consists of tive reasons. ridiculous amounts of shopping at discount prices across the nationI am writing this article based on this “Friday” is a song performed what I have observed on YouTube by 13 year old amateur singer Re- through the commentary, as well as becca Black. “Friday” was written what has been shared along my conby Clarence Jey and Patrice Wilson nections on Facebook. I have miniand produced by the ARK Music mal knowledge on what is “real” Factory. music, for I am not a musician, but as a person I possess my own muThe video for the song, starring sical taste and opinions. Therefore, Black herself who was also accom- my angle for this article is going to panied by her friends and family, be a non-biased perspective on Rewas released on YouTube on March becca Black’s talent. 11th, 2011. The song has received dreadfulIt was instantly a viral video and ly appalling remarks about its lyrclimbed from 3,000 views to 18 ics, along the overkill of auto-tune. million views within the first week, Some viewers left comments telling and then from 18 million to 66.6 Black that she should “cut herself million views in the second week. and die”, and masses have judged this to be the “worst song ever” due Even now, the number of views to its cliché, shallow, bubble gum is still climbing. What is even more pop style. shocking are the 1.1 million comments that have been made by the It was questioned if Black could viewers. Unbelievable, right? even sing, which she has justified that she “isn’t the best singer, but Michelle St.Onge Staff Writer

media credit: popdirt.com

she does have talent”. I have taken the time out to listen to her sing a capella the National Anthem, as well as an acoustic version of “Friday”. The fact is, for a 13 year old with only three years of singing lessons behind her, she is capable of hitting all of the notes. We should also take into consideration that she is starting puberty, and does consider herself an amateur. She is also not going around pretending she is a professional. Her popularity is rooted from the social media that allows the sharing of her song and video.

tentions it is obvious that she tried her best, and had the courage to put herself out there. In reality, all she did was what she loved to do, and that was sing. Despite the songs declaration for being distasteful music, the controversy it has caused, and how it gave a new meaning to auto tuning, it is selling. It must be doing something right, even if it is for its hysterical nature.

Her heart is in her work, rather than her ego, and that is respectable and should not be overlooked. Perhaps in the future, Black will com“Friday” may not be something we pose songs that are more successful, enjoy listening to, and I know I do but for now she is just a kid who not really care for it, but when look- wants to enjoy her weekend. ing deeper into Rebecca Black’s in-

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THE UNFILTERED LENS/SINCE 2007/VOL. VII ISSUE 29 APRIL 13, 2011

Arts & Entertainment Ondrea’s Dreams-2010

In The Eye

By Brittany Gooding

Untitled

by Horacio Oliveira Inquisitive promiscuity; We united half-way where the hues occasionally meet Intense dragon’s blood’s sole purpose to bewilder connotations I once held about a not-so-typical girl like you

By Ondrea Robinson

Narrow spaces And I find myself pinned Stuck in a conflict Listening to screaming wind Too many arguments Locked in my head Quiet is what I want For that I am dead Blank are my eyes Lacking all emotion Blackened is the angry sky That cried into the ocean Towering mountains The snowy tops I can see Reaching high above They are too far away from me Pounding thunder Stillness all around The eye of the storm Is where I am bound Passively I argue Still I am beaten small I see arms outstretched to help But still, the wind forces me to fall.

I might not be like those who died and paved the way, But I can still have a dream. A dream to make my own history. I want to be a successful writer. I want to be a successful advocate for autism. I want everyone to love one another. I want to graduate from CCRI when the time is right. In other words, education is important. It’s important for me to keep praying so God can bless me And allow me to be a blessing to others. I want to have people in my life who are positive. But the most important dream is to let God use me And let me be the person I need to be.

So, it seems that my incessant requests for creative writing are paying off... we currently have too many submissions to fit into print. To see all of the writInebriated in the sweet nothings ings from your talented classmates, visit our website www.theunfilteredlens. I barely remember—I’ve yet to understand what org and read through the TWOTW tab. this is.

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THE UNFILTERED LENS/SINCE 2007/VOL. VII ISSUE 29 APRIL 13, 2011

10

Arts & Entertainment For You

By Catherine Liebherr We all have the same secret but nobody speaks it. And if you die, I die. When no one is left, who will die? And if no one dies, who shall live? Who shall I dance with if you’re all dead? We all choose to let someone die at some point, but I refuse to let you die on me. I would die for love and I would die for you. What would you die for? *** I am not hiding from you, And I will live in a world where everyone is a coward, And every coward becomes a hero. A windowless paradise for the faint-hearted is where you hide, Willow trees composed of music-notes-this is where I wish to die. We must never forget that time is a circle and we are a square. And know that life is only a fraction of eternity, With the ultimatum of creating or dying. Die in your freedom, for what else is there? Let the chills run rampant and the floodgates disintegrate, Time is waiting for nothing to begin. And nature shall end you too, but what of that? You have to remember that fear is nothing but a basement with winding hallways And a pulsing heart in the center room. *** The end will never come with you. Nor shall it come with me. The end is nonexistent, even nothing is chaotic. And even nothing has a purpose. Nothing is always on the brink of being something. All creation awaits the coming of tragedy, All tragedy desires is blood. It has to only linger like the reaper and watch the panic spread. Blood is life. We all crave the blood of others. But nevertheless, we must be wary of whose blood stains the soles of our shoes. We must learn immediately that tolerance won’t save the world from tearing itself apart. We were a virus then, we are a virus now. Can’t we take a hint? The world is so talented at ruining everything. We never learn from our mistakes and this is our deadliest trait. No one ever knows what they’re doing. People and their damned pride- I wish I knew what they stayed up at night thinking about. You scare me because I love you. So I talk to these pictures instead of you. People break my heart, but I want you to know, That even though your face may be blank, your eyes sing of willow trees And gardens in the dead of winter. *** If you outnumber the brave for long enough, the majority moves into the right and the minority of morality becomes the coward and the shunned. These words are an extension of my soul And so I am a sacrifice for you in the hope that You will begin to fear what it is you will never do, In the hope that you shall live and do it. Is it the world that drives people crazy Or do people drive the world crazy? This world lacks compassion (just like conservative republicans). The things it could be capable of would make anyone pull the covers around tighter. Be a slave to no one and nothing, this is a war, Fighting to save myself and you. What will happen if I can’t do it. *** Mirror, mirror on the wall, will I be the one to fall? I want nothing more than to swallow the contents of that pill bottle And go upstairs to tell you to take care of me. To tell me that I won’t end up alone. But I could never tell you this, And I will always, always regret that. How sad that death approaching is the only situation in which we would say everything.

If only he had left me to wait. If only this beating heart could cease to be And the waves of a world so deep and real could wash away a world so far gone And show them life with fear for it’s all they respond to. I feel a breeze and I feel weightless, like I’m preparing to float away. I always wanted to fly, now if only I had my little green broom. And I feel in love and this love wishes for me to stay But I don’t think I can comply. At my funeral, I want everyone to wear purple. I want black candles burning bright blue teardrops in candlestick holders of green. And everyone should listen to Nirvana and Guns ‘n Roses. *** In the woods, youth is all that matters And young is what everyone is. Burn my willow tree, put me on the streets. Tragedy is beautiful and beauty is tragic. I’m afraid of love for it could mistake me for someone else. Is that the reason I write these words and you write yours? Because we are afraid? And all the reasons we give for writing these words is just a way to appear brave? *** The wind carries the whispers of wise men to ears That never listen to tell that the wisest thing of all Is to constantly accept your ignorance Because it is never-ending and forever expanding. In the silence lives the whispers of souls, Souls of long ago. They speak of tantalizing rhymes, rhymes older than they. In the silence they tell you to believe everything. In this soundless state, only fools believe in nothing. Temptation is just a word to make your instincts seem wrong, But you should listen to your instincts, they know what they are talking about. We never get our ending until the heart stops beating. And even I am not foolish enough to think that I could capture Whatever it is that you are on this page. Words are beautiful, but they can only go so far, And they can never quite reach you. I may hate myself but remember that I have always loved you. Why not give up everything for love? Is it so wrong to die for you?

Untitled

by Dickie Murphy Squares of land as far as I can see Green and brown like a winter quilt Broken by diagonals sometimes ellipticals Mostly square, boring, unimaginative I like the random diagonals and ellipticals Gives me a sense of a rebellious designer It’s probably not the case, but I don’t care The squares run to the mountains Where they go away, gobbled up by the rising earth Mother Nature’s way of telling us “Fuck off! I don’t like your symmetry and grids. I will raise mountains in your path shake and quake until your building collapse.” Bizarre the way humans work to destroy the planet that gives us life I say shake, mother, shake Shake us off your back Wipe us out with floods and earthquakes, mudslides and genocide Take yourself back to your original beauty Raise your mountains in the way of our development Spare none, humans are doomed to repeat history If you choose to spare a few destroy our technology Stop us from hurting you Force us to show you the love and respect we once did


THE UNFILTERED LENS/SINCE 2007/VOL. VII ISSUE 29 APRIL 13, 2011

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Arts & Entertainment in s U n Joi

:

th

ts in a e S e

s e i v e Mo

At th

media credit: daemonsmovies.com

Hanna 5/5 Rated PG-13, Starring: Saoirse Ronan, Eric Bana, Cate Blanchett, and Jason Flemyng. Directed: Joe Wright, Focus Features/Sony Pictures Entertainment. Run Time: 111 min. Tyler Dugan Staff Writer

Many screenwriters have tried to do the child-soldier story combined with the sci-fi twist of genetically manipulated perfection laced, secretly, into DNA. It is a well-known strategy to hook an audience. You are not expected to leave your conscience at the door no matter how brutal and lethal this child acts, the audience still embraces the child and wishes them safe keeping by the films end. Hanna takes that concept, runs with it, breaks some long-distance records, and keeps going far past where any other film makers have stopped. Director Joe Wright outwits nearly every action director of the last 2 years by creatively whipping up a flurry of emotional drives and tumbles that throw the viewers into terror, glee, excitement, and absolute sympathy.

Marissa Wiegler (Blanchett) is an overbearing, potentially corrupted and very self-involved CIA operative who uses devious methods to get what she wants. She has climbed the ranks and earned a substantial place in the upper management. However; a single loose end that could fracture her entire career has recently showed up and that loose end is Hanna (Ronan). Product of a disturbing genetics project to create a perfect soldier and daughter to ex-operative Erik Heller (Bana) and his lover, Hanna is a perfect killing machine in the mind and body of an innocent 16 year old girl.

the film was made in: unique, quiet, chilling, and thought-provoking. The Chemical Brothers were in charge of the soundtrack and they did a splendid job. It is fairly reminiscent to Daft Punk’s music in the recent sequel Tron: Legacy, however; The Chemical Brothers have a certain originality and class that they apply to the soundtrack.

The score is not just racing music, chase themes, or fight songs. It is a wildly unique array of sounds and club mixing that produces a score that really puts this movie on the “WINNING” shelf. The most intriguing part of the score is the interesting way Joe Wright matches Erik has trained Hanna, alone in simple things like the whistling of the Siberian forests, to become an Marissa’s henchman to the track beuntouchable assassin so Hanna may ing played in the film. get close to the woman who killed her mother, Erik’s lover. The killer Other interesting aspects of this is, naturally, Marissa Wiegler. film are of course the setting and cinematography. Alwin H. Kuchler The story is jam-packed with hid- was in charge of bringing story den secrets, pockets of great char- writer Seth Lochhead’s imagination acter development, and tremendous to life and with Joe Wright’s rebelstory telling. Unfortunately for the lious film-making style the result is audience, the story has some loose an incredibly artistic approach to ends as well, but nothing so over- what is essentially an action flick. whelming that it shadows the qual- ity of the storytelling. Hanna uses dramatic symbolism This film not only nails it, it raises in set design, intense, tight, camthe bar and challenges other film The ending to the film is an ending era work and edgy, new-age music makers to take a chance and re- that labels the movie as being differ- to hook audiences and throw them minds them that action flicks can ent from all the other scrap-pieces around in a maze of story developstill be a work of art. chucked at us from “The Shit Fac- ment and splendidly choreographed tory”. It matches the story and style action.

To miss this movie in theaters would be a shame and to miss it all together would be a pity. This movie has so many great high-points and so few lows that I can’t imagine anyone walking out and not being at least somewhat satisfied. Forget Sucker Punch, forget Fast Five, see Joe Wright’s Hanna and see for yourself what is so awesome about this little girl who kicks big ass.

Rating System

5/5 - Wicked Awesome 4/5 - Worth Your Time 3/5 - Decent 2/5 - Barely Tolerable 1/5 - Utter Crap Sucker Punch 1/5 Rated PG-13, Starring: Emily Browning, Abbie Cornish, Jena Malone, Vanessa Hudgens, Jamie Chung, and Carla Cugino. Directed: Zack Snyder, Warner Bors Pictures. Run Time: 110 min. Tyler Dugan Staff Writer

This movie sucked. Do yourself a favor and go see Hanna instead.


THE UNFILTERED LENS/SINCE 2007/VOL. VII ISSUE 29 APRIL 13, 2011

12

Opinion/Editorial Attention Students:

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THE UNFILTERED LENS/SINCE 2007/VOL. VII ISSUE 29 APRIL 13, 2011

13

Opinion/Editorial

suPRESSed

by Brittany Gooding

Brittany Gooding Associate Editor

As President DiPasquale began speaking, Lou RaiOn Thursday, March 31st, none raised his hand and I entered room 4090 for the asked if anyone was re9:00 am open forum on the cording the meeting and 21st Century Workforce proceeded to discuss that and Surveillance Cameras. a recording of the meeting As an editor for the student would make him feel unnewspaper, The Unfiltered comfortable. Lens, I had an obligation to record the meeting in order Right away, I kind of to obtain factual and accu- freaked out and thought that rate information for the ar- I had done something seriticle that would be written ously wrong. At that point afterwards. in time I was completely unaware of my rights and I But before the proceed- honestly could not defend ings even began, I was myself, and I was also afraid faced with opposition from that I was going to get into some individuals attending some kind of trouble. the meeting. Then the President stated Let me just add that this is that he was not informed the first meeting I had ever that the meeting was being covered, and also I had nev- recorded and that nobody er been in charge of record- should be recording unless ing anything. So naturally, I he was told in advance. Afwas a little bit nervous about ter a vote to see who was whether everything was go- uncomfortable with me reing to work out correctly.

cording the meeting, only about five individuals of the fifty or so in attendance raised their hands to have me stop. I was told that I had to turn the recorder off, and that next time Administration must be given prior notification. Without a trace of anger I complied with the wishes of Administration, and I then sat through the entire meeting while adding my own input when I saw necessary; after all, the topic of the meeting is one that I found myself quite involved with, and one day it could impact my student life on the CCRI campus.

record the meeting.

rity cameras inside of our school, they will have vidBeing told I could not re- eos of us going about our cord was both inaccurate daily life. Yet I was shunned and wrong [Ed note: Ian and pushed around by them quote the damned statute], for wanting a simple recordand was a clear violation of ing of a meeting so that I my First Amendment rights could get accurate details on as a free-press reporter, a very important and openly since my job is to report on public meeting. public information that is of public concern. We, the How does any of this Unfiltered Lens, considered make sense? In my opinion, this a violation because I as it seems a little bit hypoa reporter was singled out as critical. not being able to record. Truth is, I have tried to However, this was not the make sense of the entire sitonly reason I found the con- uation, and none has come cept of being told to stop out of it. Both the individurecording such a big deal. als that I work with on the When I think about the top- student newspaper and myic of the meeting, the place- self are angered by all that ment of security cameras has happened, and as readin the school, I find it a bit ers, you will most definitely funny that I was told to stop be hearing more on this ismy recorder. sue.

It was not until I began telling my fellow comrades from the Lens about what happened in the meeting that I discovered how big of an issue it was that AdYou see, if our Adminministration did not let me istration were to put secu-


THE UNFILTERED LENS/SINCE 2007/VOL. VII ISSUE 29 APRIL 13, 2011

14

Opinion/Editorial

A view on violence in the media:

viewers actually practicing acts of violence in real life. Quite to the contrary, there In the chaotic and war-torn is in fact statistical evidence world that we live in today, proving that there is no corviolence is a part of our ev- relation between media vioeryday lives. We hear about lence and the rate of crime. it incessantly, we read about To delve deeper into this it in books and magazines, we see it on television, and topic, lets look at Japanese in the new age of technol- media vs. American media. ogy we can even live it in In 1981, there was a study videogames. Many believe comparing television from that with all of these various these two nations, the priforms of media shoveling graphic depictions of violence into the minds of our nation’s youth, the result is a generation of callous fiends fueled by aggression and prone to violent behavior. Alexandra Johnson Managing Editor

Violence in the media is one of the most common arguments of our time, and there has been much controversy as to the supposed resultant increase of aggressive and violent behavior by viewers. Many assert to have ample evidence to support such claims, and although I admit I will buy the fact of increased media violence possibly leading to increased levels of aggression, there is no factual basis whatsoever to prove that violence on television leads to viewers committing violent acts in real life.

well as scenes depicting severe mutilation and torture; this included a man being suspended from a ceiling by dozens of metals hooks sticking through the skin of his back. Quite frankly, nothing that I have seen in American media has even come close to reaching that level of violence.

haps the most controversial form of perceived media violence is videogames. For the past few decades, this revolutionary interactive form of media has flourished into a multi-billion dollar business, steadily increasing in its technological capabilities and thus its popularity as well. With this influx of gamers playThis is interesting though, ing highly realistic games, because statistical analysis naturally the issue has been

media credit: readthespirit.com

game that means that I am going to go out and shoot someone in real life too. I guess that also means that the other estimated 70% of Americans who play videogames are destined to kill in real life as well. If this is the case, then how come we haven’t? The answer is simple: because that is quite possibly one of the most uneducated and ignorant theories ever to have been thought up. Videogames, no matter how violent, generally do not cause violence. I love videogames, I have been playing them for well over a decade, and shockingly, I have not gone out and killed anyone. My brother also plays videogames, and he has not killed anyone either. My cousins, my close friends, and nearly all of my acquaintances have at some point played videogames recreationally, and lo and behold! Not one of them has turned into a murderer!

Quite to the contrary, in fact, I believe that videomary focus being on each of world crime rates show sparked as to whether or not games actually have posicountry’s differing portray- that the United States has such games are as bad as, tive effects on those who al of violence. Although nearly five times the amount if not worse than, TV when play them, such as improvone of the major discov- of crime as Japan; in fact the it comes to causing violent ing reflexes and even serveries was that both Japan United States has the high- behavior in it’s participants. ing as sufficient tools of and America had roughly est crime rate in the world, teaching (for example, the the same amount of media more than double that of Once again, the majority Assassin’s Creed games, in In regards to aggression violence, the nature of the the country with the sec- of those with ‘professional addition to being fun and levels, research has shown two were very different, ond highest ranking. With opinions’ on the subject exciting, somehow manthat “Over the years, labo- with research showing that this in mind, I do not think preach the ridiculous theory age to also leave you with ratory experiments…have “Violent scenes are less fre- that any such correlation be- that videogames are hor- an exponentially increased consistently shown that quent in Japanese-produced tween violent TV and vio- rible inventions that lead to knowledge of world hisexposure to violence is as- programs, yet tend to last lent behavior can be drawn. lives of crime and murder tory). sociated with increased longer, are more realistic (yet interestingly enough Even if we were to get rid none of these professionPlaying videogames is heartbeat, blood pressure and place a much greater and respiration rate, and a emphasis on physical suf- of such programs, we would als seem to have ever tried also highly cathartic; an algreater willingness…to in- fering”. still be exposed to violence playing a videogame them- ternative and safe means of in the news on a daily ba- selves). Some authors on releasing ones stress. Perflict pain or punishment on others”. However, the key I myself, being an avid sis. Research has shown the topic have even gone so sonally, videogames have words in that observation watcher of international that not only are crime and far as the blame the horrific helped me a great amount are “greater willingness”, films, agree with this analy- violent world events among events of Columbine on in that respect. I will adas opposed to saying some- sis of Japanese media. In the most frequently covered videogames, claiming that mit that sometimes when I thing more along the lines fact, the most violent film I news topics, but that major because the shooters liked get very angry, yes, I would of “increased tendency.” have ever seen is a Japanese news networks tend to over- to play the popular game like to hit someone to removie titled Ichi the Killer. emphasize brutal crime and Doom, then that was both lease my tension; and the As it is with essentially ev- This film, which was about heavily rely on sensational their inspiration as well as invention of videogames erything in life, the thought a sadomasochistic yakuza presentations of violence. the cause of their violent has saved some poor person of doing something is en- member trying to hunt down Nevertheless, I do not con- behavior, which ultimately from a black eye by giving tirely different from actually another extremely psychot- sider it either reasonable of led to them going on a mur- me a structured and virtual doing it. Just because see- ic, sadomasochistic man, logical to assume that view- derous rampage throughout way to focus my energies. ing violence on TV might was by far the most disturb- ing violence on a screen their high school. There has even been valid make people more willing ing movie I have ever seen. will undoubtedly cause one research to disprove this unSo, according to this the- sound theory of videogames to display violent behavior, There are countless graphic to become a violent person. there is nothing to suggest scenes of women brutally ory, since I have shot somecontinued on next page The most recent and per- one in a fictitious videothat it leads to an increase of beaten, raped and killed, as


THE UNFILTERED LENS/SINCE 2007/VOL. VII ISSUE 29 APRIL 13, 2011

15

Opinion/Editorial

Does it lead to violent consumers? continued from prev page

causing violence, showing that since the early 90’s when videogames have increased in popularity among the younger generations, violent crime has decreased.

dren are playing shoot-’emups. A couple of thousand years ago, families went to the Colosseum in Rome to cheer as gladiators sliced their opponents’ limbs or were eaten by lions.”

One argument against videogames is that, unlike real-life, there are no stimulus discriminators built in to condition players to know right from wrong as well as when to stop. Although I will not deny that there are some games that cross the line (such as Grand Theft Auto, in which one receives points for robbing and killing innocent bystanders), others, such as the various Call of Duty games, do not glorify war, but rather show the terrifying circumstances surrounding it and the brutal consequences for those involved.

In addition to potential increased aggression and violent behavior as perceived effects of witnessing/partaking in violence in the media, there is also the subject of desensitization. This is defined as the diminished emotional responsiveness to a negative or an adverse stimulus after repeated exposure to it, and according to professionals, initial exposure to media violence typically produces adverse responses like increased heart rate, perspiration and disgust; however after prolonged exposure we simply stop caring.

WHAT WILL YOU DO? Originally from Ghana, Dzifa fell in love with New England and RWU on a summer visit when he was in high school. Following in the footsteps of his aunt and uncle, Dzifa majored in Legal Studies, which prepared him for internships with the attorney general’s office and at the Norton Rose law firm in Paris, France. Of course, Dzifa was as busy on campus as he was off campus as a member of Mock Trial, SOAR Leadership training, a writing tutor and a DJ on WQRI. Dzifa is putting his hands-on knowledge to work. What will you do?

www.rwu.edu

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admit@rwu.edu

DISCOVER YOURSELF

As one man brilliantly put As a member of the it, “I think it is great if our younger generation upon biggest concern is that chil- whom all of these accusa-

tions of desensitization and increased aggression are directed, I firmly disagree and am quite frankly, somewhat offended. I have been exposed to much media violence in my life, and I do not think that the majority of my peers or I are any less sympathetic because of it.

Those in support of this argument avidly claim that we are learning to associate killing and suffering with entertainment, our favorite snacks, and the intimacy of our dates. However, what these so-called professionals on the topic seem to overlook is that, apparently contrary to popular thought, we are not stupid! We know that we are watching fiction, and we possess enough brain cells to tell the difference between such fictitious displays and reality. Yes, there are some horrible things in the media, and yes we do watch them, but that

does not mean that if we were to see someone killed right in front of us then we would just stand there staring blankly like a bunch of apathetic Neanderthals. In fact, a number of studies have shown that rather than desensitizing, watching media violence actually frightens its viewers, the effects of which often being longlasting.

the media violence I have been exposed to, I was still horrified this past spring when I watched King Henry VIII behead yet another one of his wives on Showtime’s The Tudors.

In conclusion, those who constantly claim that violence in the media is corrupting the nation’s youth need to stop preaching theories that have no basis in One 1998 study in Ohio fact, and actually do someeven proved that the inci- thing constructive with their dences of various psycho- time – such as finding a logical trauma experienced cure for cancer or achieving by viewers increased pro- peace in the Middle East. portionally to the number of In the meantime, leave my hours they spent watching generation alone. such media violence each day. Media violence does We are not apathetic, we not desensitize us: if any- are not corrupt, and we thing it disturbs us. certainly are not running around murdering people As I said before, I have left and right. Sure, there is been watching violent tele- the occasional oddball who vision for years. I saw Mor- might break the rules, but tal Kombat when I was five- generally speaking, society years-old and Aliens when I really needn’t worry. was four, and yet, despite all

Dzifa

Class of 2010 Ghana Legal Studies and French


THE UNFILTERED LENS/SINCE 2007/VOL. VII ISSUE 26 FEBRUARY 16, 2011

Opinion/Editorial

Evie’s View

search & s e i z u r e

media credit: Evangeline West

Stop! All belts must be inspected upon entry!

Evangeline West Editor-in-Chief

WTF! Even TSA lets me keep my belt

Kyle Connolly is a CCRI student with bright blue eyes, an ever-present smile, and a punk-rock style straight out of 1978. On April 5th, Kyle was approached and pulled out of art class by a CCRI security guard. The reason? A vintage bullet belt that Kyle eral and accepting, students’ wore as an accessory. fashion choices should not be stifled. A similar incident He was interrogated by occurred a few semesters the officer, identified and re- ago when a female student corded, and told that his belt was approached in the comwould be taken until he re- mon area and told to remove ceived a call from the Dean. her studded choker. When he questioned the reasons for such, the secuJust like a strict dress rity officer mumbled some- code instated in most high thing about “making people schools after the sudden nervous...Columbine.” rash of school shootings in the 2000’s, students are beThe security guard then ing oppressed and punished went out of his way to storm merely for their choice of into the Unfiltered Lens wardrobe. publication office and displayed the belt before bluntI empathized all too ly saying, “This is why we strongly with Kyle’s plight. need security cameras” to In high school, I had dyed professor Steve Forleo. As black hair and wore Marilyn advocates of human rights Manson t-shirts. and freedom of expression, we at The Unfiltered Lens One day near the end of were outraged by this inci- my Sophomore year, my dent. fellow Hot Topic dressed friend Dustin and I walked In a college environment, through the hallway and noespecially a school that ticed people holding squirt prides itself on being lib- guns. An innocent comment

David M. Gannon Jr.

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was made along the lines of cover who we truly are and “I thought guns weren’t al- our calling in life. lowed in school.” We worry too much about The next day, Dustin was our grades and social life pulled into the front office to be concerned about the and searched by a police strain over what we should officer, and I was called wear in order to not be hasout of class and questioned sled by security. about our plan to “shoot up I would like to say Kyle the school.” After years, we can laugh about it, but was issued an apology and the humiliation and outrage his belt was returned, but regarding the incident still sadly that is not the case. burns strongly in our brains. Kyle attempted to retrieve It is the plight of the mis- his accessory from the fit — anyone who does not school and was told that he adhere to the norm of Aber- was not allowed to reclaim crombie and Fitch apparel is his own property. Now the shunned, teased and feared issue has gone from a hassle by their peers and authority. and an outrage to downright theft. “It’s something you learn Section 5 of Article II of to deal with,” Kyle said. CCRI’s Student Handbook “But why do I have to?” states: “A student shall be Why do we still have to be free from searches and seisingled out for our choices zures of person and posin attire? It’s 2011, and we sessions while on College are in college; a place to dis- property unless there is a

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Servio Gomez Jorge Medina

I feel violated

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case of imminent danger or when there are reasonable grounds upon which to believe it is necessary to conduct a search immediately in order to protect life or property.” How this applies to Kyle’s case has yet to be explained by the college, though inquiries have been made through security and the office of the Dean of Students. The ACLU has been alerted of this case and actions will be taken against the school. We cannot let such a display of abuse of power and discrimination go unnoticed. [Ed note: Kyle’s property was returned to him on Monday, April 11th. As of publication, he is still awaiting a copy of his police report.]

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Since 2010

The opinions and views expressed in The Unfiltered Lens student newspaper are solely those of their writers and are no way, shape, or form, the opinions or views of CCRI and/or of its affiliates.

©The Unfiltered Lens 2011


Vol VII Issue 29