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The University News A Student Voice of Saint Louis University Since 1921

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Vol. XC No. 22 See how SLU students spent spring break >>unewsonline.com

Spring Break 2011 in photos

Friday, March 25, 2011

March Madness: who’s in your final four?

Staff writers take on junior Kyle Cassity in annual ‘Battle of the Brackets’ >>SPORTS

Widespread power outage blankets campus Power company credits wind for 3-hour blackout By JONATHAN ERNST Editor-in-Chief

High winds up to 40 miles per hour caused a widespread power outage on Wednesday, March 23, leaving most of Saint Louis University’s Frost Campus without power for approximately three hours and 13 minutes, according to the University’s electrical provider, Ameren UE. According to the Assistant Director of Facilities Management Keith McCune, the substation that provides power

to 21 buildings east of the Clock Tower went down at approximately 4:33 p.m. due to damage to electrical lines that triggered more equipment failure. All of these buildings were evacuated and most of them remained closed for the rest of the evening due to safety concerns. “When we heard about the outage, we immediately started assessing what buildings had power and what backup systems were running,” McCune said. “I was in constant communication with Ameren

UE.” Ameren UE made it a priority to get the substation back up because it also provides power to some buildings in the surrounding area. According to Ameren UE Communication Executive Lisa Manzo, 3,800 customers lost power in the metropolitan St. Louis area, including parts of the Midtown area and the Central West End. “Mother Nature came through, and we really saw the effects it can have,” Manzo said. “We worked imme-

diately to restore the power, and we were able to get power back in a timely manner.” The power outage quickly effected activity on campus, as students and staff were evacuated from the Busch Student Center, and fire alarms were triggered in Dubourg Hall. The St. Louis Fire Department also responded to an elevator entrapment that was reported at Fitzgerald Hall. “Public Safety did a See “Power Outage” on Page 3

Shah (Yuqing Xia) / Associate Photo Editor

Members of the Great Issues Committee prepare the stage for Michelle Rhee’s speech at Chaifetz Arena on Wednesday, March 23. The speech was moved due to the power outage. For more on Rhee’s speech go to unewsonline.com.

Bridge closure: No ‘Grand’ problems

DPSSS urges discussion of assaults By ANDREA ROYALS Managing Editor

Noah Berman / Photo Editor

Crews demolish the center section of the Grand Bridge on March 19. Demolition began the weekend of March 18-20 and will continue the weekend of March 25-27. Special care has to be taken to avoid damaging the railroad tracks below the bridge, so the structure is being taken apart piece by piece, according to Mike Timpe, general superintendent on the project site. The reconstruction is expected to generate roughly 60,000 man hours.

Shuttle detour may beat regular route By ERIKA MILLER Enterprise Editor

Regina Mathew, a freshman in the Doisy College of Health Sciences, was nervous to return to Saint Louis University after spring break and use the shuttle system for the first time since the closure of the Grand Bridge. She arrived at the shuttle stop an hour early, expecting potential delays on her way to class on the Health Sciences campus. She was surprised to arrive on the Health Sciences campus just 20 minutes later. Mathew’s experience reflects the concerns of many in the SLU community following the closure of the Grand Boulevard viaduct. St. Louis traffic crews closed the section of Grand that lies between Chouteau Avenue and Interstate 64 on Monday, March 14 around 3:30 a.m. Demolition began the weekend of March 18-20 and will continue the weekend of March 25-27.

The project is under the direction of the Kozeny-Wagner construction firm, and according to President Patrick Kozeny, the reconstruction will generate roughly 60,000 manhours. Crews expect to partially reopen the bridge to traffic in 14 months. Official closure of the bridge occurred while a majority of the SLU community was on spring break. According to Joe Stumpf, Mail and Transportation Services supervisor, a lack of activity around campus allowed St. Louis motorists to find alternate routes before students returned from break. The city encouraged motorists to use Vandeventer Avenue, Compton Avenue and Jefferson Avenue as alternate routes. Stumpf said, as of Tuesday, March 22, no problems had been reported with the shuttle system, and it seems to be running smoothly. Shuttle drivers credited the planning by Transportation Services with allowing them to take the Compton

detour route and still make all of the stops on time. Paaige Turner, associate vice president of the Frost campus and a member of the Grand Bridge Ad Hoc Committee, said the Grand Bridge closing created less disruption than anticipated, and students have recommended that the shuttles continue the alternate routes in the future. “It seems very well planned out, and I arrived to my class five minutes after leaving the main campus,” Brianne Keller, a junior in the Doisy College of Health Sciences, said. “The alternate route may be quicker because of the lack of streetlights.” Todd Waelterman, director of the St. Louis City Streets Department said the delay on the detour routes is around three minutes and heavier traffic congestion is occurring on Vandeventer. Jefferson Avenue may See “Bridge” on Page 3

Grand Bridge Project Start Date: March 14, 2011

Estimated Reopening: June 2012

New viaduct to include: Four lanes separated by an irrigated landscape medium Transit amenities for METRO Bus and METRO Link Dedicated bicycle lanes 12-foot wide pedestrian sidewalks ON THE WEB>> View more

photos from the Grand Bridge construction site at unewsonline.com.

Missouri legislature weighs voter ID; students concerned By SEAN WORLEY News Editor

The right to vote—a right protected by the United States Constitution, a right that, for some Saint Louis University and other Missouri college students, may be affected by proposed Missouri state government legislation. Missouri State Senate bill three (SB3) and Missouri House of Representatives bill 329 (HB329) are the two pieces of legislation that if passed would propose various changes to the voter registration procedure, specifically to voter identification. According to both SB3 and HB329, as found on the Missouri Senate and House

of Representatives websites Center is the focus of a sturespectively, voters would dent-authored petition. be required to present valid Created by College of Arts forms of identification in order to cast their ballots. Such forms of identification would include a non-expired Missouri driver’s license and In Jefferson City, non-driver’s identification card, photo-identification is- they don’t expect us to sued by the state national speak up. They think guard, by the United States we... will silently watch military or by the Departas they dismantle our ment of Veterans Affairs. Thus, Saint Louis Univer- fundamental right to sity students would be affected by this legislation be- vote. cause no longer would their -Thomas Bloom student IDs or out-of-state driver’s licenses be valid. The prospect of some stu- and Sciences students Patdents losing their privilege rick Grillot, sophomore, and to vote in the Busch Student Thomas Bloom, senior, the

petition entitled “SLU Students for Voters’ Rights” has been circulating online and garnering support from students. Grillot said the goal of the petition is to organize students around this issue and to bring awareness. He is opposed to the legislation because he feels it will “disenfranchise” voters. Bloom said his goal with the petition is to provide the students with a voice on the issue. “In Jefferson City, they don’t expect us to speak up,” Bloom said. “They think we are disengaged and apathetic and that we will silently watch as they dismantle our fundamental right to vote. I

want to prove them wrong.” Currently, 1,509 students are registered to vote in the BSC. Unless, their permanent address resides in the precinct associated with the BSC polling place, those students would have their voting registration voided under the proposed legislation, unless they took measures to register for an approved form of identification. Grillot stressed that students who currently are not registered to vote at the BSC polling place should still be mindful of this legislation. “If they were ever to be registered to vote here, See “Voter ID” on Page 3

A female student reported to the Department of Public Safety and Security Services on March 7 that she had been the victim of forcible rape near Fusz Hall on Feb. 26. The student chose not to pursue the incident further with law enforcement, according to Roland Corvington, director of DPSSS. The student reported that she was the victim of forcible rape approximately nine days after the incident allegedly occurred. Corvington said that because the incident was delayed when reported to DPSSS and there was no immediate threat to the safety of the student population, the department decided not to send a Campus Emergency Alert email. “Crime is reported, and we try to get information out that is important to the University community,” Corvington said. “It doesn’t always necessarily mean that the crime that was reported ends up being pursued toward investigative activity. It depends on the circumstance.” Corvington said that forcible rape falls under the umbrella of sexual assault, which also includes statutory rape and sodomy. According regulations in the Clery Act, “sexual assaults are considered on a case by case basis, depending on the facts of the case, when and where the incident occurred, when it was reported and the amount of information known by DPSSS” before a Campus Emergency Alert may be distributed. DPSSS publishes all reports to a crime log that can be found on the University website at http://www.slu.edu/ x22927.xml. DPSSS also has a Twitter account @SLUSafety that is updated regularly. Corvington said he encourages that all crimes be reported to DPSSS immediately. “One, help could be provided sooner,” Corvington said. “Two, evidence, if there is any, could be collected immediately. And three, if there is really, really good, descriptive information provided that [a subject] is a stranger versus a known individual, we See “Assault” on Page 3

Spring has sprung

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Friday, March 25, 2011

Let Us Introduce You Tony Johnson Fry cook has faith in student achievement, enjoys ‘pimping’ cars By RUBINA BAIG Contributor

Tony “Sho’nuff” Johnson has been a member of the Griesedieck cafeteria staff for almost three years now, having started in April of 2008. Ever since then, he has made a name for himself. Literally. The best part of his job is doing what he loves to do—his job. Cooking, frying, preparing meals, meeting students, talking to the people around him. He loves all parts of his day and all people involved. Born and raised in St. Louis, Johnson has been helping the rest of the cafeteria staff with preparation of fried foods. He is especially known for his wide selection: chili fries, curly fries, waffle fries, crinkle fries and many more. Known to love this role, he was given his own fry station last year, with his own “good luck fryer.” Johnson confidently states that a majority of the freshmen know him. Also, the majority of people that know him call him “Sho’nuff.” With a nickname such as “Sho’nuff,” Johnson surely has a story behind it. Johnson said that he remembered a character named “Sho’nuff” from the 1985 karate-genre movie “The Last Dragon.” He loved the phrase that was always repeated in the movie, and as a result he says “sho’nuff” as every substitute affirmative word in place of “yes.” Johnson makes it a point to make the students’ day. He will talk to students when they come up, asking how their day is going and how classes are coming along. The most defining moment for many students is when they mention to Johnson that they have a test coming up. Sure enough, “Sho’nuff” serves up “the good luck fry.” He will tell a nervous student to worry no more because he just cooked up a good luck fry, and it would give them the luck they needed. Many come back to tell him it worked, and all come

THE SLU SCOOP All Information Provided by Department of Public Safety and Security Services

Saturday, March 5

2:53 a.m. - INFORMATIONAL DPSSS observed two male subjects climbing into a restroom and detained the subjects. Both stated they were visiting on campus and that a friend in Fusz Hall opened the window so they could use the restroom. There was no damage to the window.

Victor Liou / Photographer

back for Johnson's encouraging words and delicious fries. “I have faith in them, and I believe in them,” Johnson said. Besides the enjoyment Johnson finds in making sure students are getting their “Scooby-doo snacks, kid’s meal and Fred Flinstone meal,” his way of describing a snack, a side and an entrée, he also loves cars, both driving and refurbishing them. His most common task is removing passenger seats, fixing in couches as seating and adding seatbelts shortly after. Sound familiar? He is a real-life version of the hit MTV Show “Pimp My Ride.” When asked if he got his inspiration from the popular TV show, Johnson said he was most certainly the original. “No, I started doing this

in [1985],” Johnson said. “So ‘Pimp my Ride’ copied me.” Johnson wishes students had more meals on their meal plan so that they would eat at the Griesedieck cafeteria more often. He claims that students stop coming by after freshman year, and he is sad to see them come either rarely or not at all. The beloved fry cook becomes a favorite of students very easily. Last year, during Griesedieck Staff Appreciation Day, posters were put up with Johnson’s picture, and students even made him a Facebook page called “We Appreciate Tony!” For those students who have not met this elemental figure at SLU, he encourages all to come say hi. They will “sho'nuff” love him.

By KRISTEN MIANO News Editor

When the power went out in the Busch Student Center, the power in the Student Government Association moved into Reinert. The SGA meeting took place as usual with some minor changes to the agenda. “It was a bit of an inconvenience to try to find another space to hold the meeting,” SGA President Courtney Anvender said. “We debated whether or not to cancel the meeting, but we decided that we needed to hold the meeting in order to consider the time-sensitive spot-funding requests.” After a report regarding the recipients of the Upperclassman Scholarship, SGA moved on to address two spot funding bills. First, the Saint Louis University Club Tennis Team requested $3505.88 to attend a

national tournament in North Carolina. Financial Vice President Tim Janczewski stated that the finance committee recommended allotting the group $2343.88 in accordance with the 60/40 split plane ticket cost policy. The senate voted to pass the funding bill. Next was a request from Students United for Africa asking for $12,000 to bring speaker Emmanuel Jal to campus. Jal, a former Sudanese child solider turned musician, spoke at SLU in 2009, but SUFA wanted to give new classes a chance to hear his story. “There’s a war going on in Sudan, if you didn’t know,”said SUFA president John Gallagher. “His effort is to bring awareness to the U.S.” SUFA brought the bill to SGA on short notice, as Jal’s managers contacted them over spring break to inform them that he would be in town this week. The group’s hope

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5:27 p.m. - DUMPSTER FIRE DPSSS received a call from a desk worker stating, “In the rear of the building, a dumpster belonging to Waste Management Company was engulfed in flames.” SLFD responded and extinguished the fire.

Sunday, March 20

3:17 p.m. - CHEMICAL EXPOSURE DPSSS responded and upon arrival an employee stated, “That about 10 days earlier, an incubator in the lab had been cleaned. When she opened the container some fumes escaped and burned her eyes. Her eyes ceased to burn after leaving the area.” The employee refused further medical attention.

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Monday, March 7

10:00 a.m. - SEXUAL ASSAULT Student Health reported that a student gave an account of an alleged sexual assault behind Fusz Hall on 02-26-11. The student refused any investigation by law enforcement. The suspect was described as an unknown male.

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was to bring Jal to campus March 29, which would break the speaker policy of a 20-business day timeline. Janczewski recommended the event be denied funding, as it was not an unforeseeable event. “Even though the mangers just contacted [SUFA], the group could have planned for a speaker during annual funding,” Janczewski said. Further concerns were raised about the burden this would place on the student activity fee. SUFA stated they planned to partner with the Center for Social Justice to not only cover the cost, but to also avoid the difficult process of reserving event space. Gallagher stated that SUFA realized the unrealistic nature of getting the funding, but he hoped for the opportunity to redo their annual funding proposal for the chance to bring Jal next year. The bill passed, voting to allocate $0 to SUFA.


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Friday, March 25, 2011

Voter ID: Students express opinions on proposed bill Bridge: Continued from Page 1

[the legislation] can affect them,” Grillot said. Grillot himself is not registered to vote in the BSC. While the petition continues to gather signatures, there are students who will not be signing in support of an opposition to the legislation. College of Arts and Sciences senior Danny Laub gives his reasoning. “In the most simplistic sense possible, it’s a matter of election integrity,” Laub said. “We live in a state where elections have been decided by a handful of votes per precinct and where every vote mat-

ters.” Laub said no matter if individuals believe voter fraud has occurred or not, a “policy of being proactive rather than reactive is usually a good idea.” He believes the legislation to solely be about “voter legitimacy” and not about partisan politics or any other issue. Though Laub states the legislation is not about partisanship or political ploys, two student organizations, College Democrats and College Republicans, each have their views on the legislation. Brenna Medlin, president of College Republicans, has similar statements on the legislation as compared to Laub.

Assault: Issue persists Continued from Page 1

can get that out and seek the individual quickly.” According to DPSSS, the student that reported the forcible rape is now seeking counseling services at the University.DPSSS has issued additional programs and resources to address the concerns of sexual assault on campus. They plan to dedicate April as Sexual Assault Awareness Month. “I prompted it because I felt there was a need to gather these resources together to educate the students,” Corvington said. “We have been teaching our officers and providing them with the same information, generally, to make them more sensitive to the victims in these cases.” DPSSS is currently offering female students an opportunity to participate in Rape Aggression Defense (RAD) Training. The training program meets once a week for four weeks and focuses on selfdefense and protection. The first session of RAD Training was held March 22, but Corvington said participants who want to get involved can still sign up. “No one wants to become a victim of that kind of assault,” Officer Pasquale Signorino said. “Unfortunately, it does happen. [RAD] has been developed to defend yourself aggressively.” DPSSS is also holding a panel to discuss sexual assault at 6 p.m. on April 18 in Tegeler Hall. Panelists include Detective Rick Noble of the Metropolitan Sex Crimes Unit, Claudia Charles, a licensed counselor in Student Health

and Counseling Services at the University, and Kathleen Hanrahan, the Director of YWCA Regional Sexual Assault Center, with opening remarks from DPSSS Officer Ken Hornak. At the panel, Corvington said students can expect to learn a few surprising statistics regarding sexual assault. “I think that some individuals may find it very surprising that they would be victimized by someone they know,” Corvington said. “The victim could come to trust the individual for a period of time, and then all of the sudden, things change.” Signorino also said students will learn statistics that show the most dangerous time in a woman’s life is the first six weeks of her freshman year away at a campus or university.This is the second time that DPSSS has held the panel discussion. “The last panel went extremely well,” Corvington said. “We only had a handful of students there, but the information was really helpful to the few students that were there.” Corvington said he attributes the low student interest toward these programs to a factor of doubt, and said that many people do not think sexual assault could actually happen to them. However, Corvington said that even if a student is not a victim, he or she can learn a lot from the programs. “You may be the one hearing something from your friend who was sexually assaulted who may come to you and ask you what to do,” Corvington said.

“We, as College Republicans, feel this legislation will not put an undue burden on students and will do a lot to stop voter fraud,” Medlin said. “Fair and honest elections are the cornerstone of our great democracy. We must ensure that we protect our right to vote.” Max Jordan, president of College Democrats, is also passionate about protecting the right to vote. Jordan is in opposition to the bill. “The student population is moving in the direction of having more out-of-state students,” Jordan said. “We feel it is our obligation to speak out when students are being disenfranchised.”

Jordan said he, as representative of College Democrats, is in opposition to the bills as they are currently written for the reason of if students have the right to attend school in the state of Missouri, they should also have the right to vote in the state. “There should be safe and secure elections, and we support that,” Jordan said. “We also support the people’s right to vote, in any form.” While students continue to either voice their support or opposition to the legislation, the bills continue their journey through the Missouri state government. The Missouri Senate voted in the legislation’s favor, 26-7.

District five, under which SLU falls, state senator Robin Wright-Jones (D) voted in opposition to the bill. Calls to the office of Wright-Jones were unreturned. The legislation now faces the House vote. If passed by the House, the bills will be combined to form one constitutional amendment. The amendment will be subjected to the choice of voters, as it would appear on the ballot in the next schedule election. Even though the legislation has not yet taken effect, or passed for that matter, it is already the basis of a campus debate, and the conversation will continue as the legislation moves forward.

Dumpster fire shakes up Spring Break

Shah (Yuqing Xia) / Associate Photo Photo Editor

Jeff Weffelmeyer of the St. Louis Fire Department works to extinguish a small dumpster fire on Saturday, March 19. Occuring behind the Marchetti West apartment building, the fire had no discernable cause, according to the Department of Public Safety and Security Services. STLFD was able to extinguish the fire, and no major damage was incurred. No injuries were reported.

Power Outage: GIC event moved Continued from Page 1

wonderful job, and they came to report to me, and I believe we had about four or five buildings on campus that had elevator entrapments. The Fire Department and Public Safety were going building to building trying to get folks out of the buildings,” Dean of Students Scott Smith said. The outage affected several events, including the Michelle Rhee speech hosted by the

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Great Issues Committee and a performance of Dale Earnhardt Jr. Jr. with Reptar at the Billiken Club. The GIC event was relocated to Chaifetz Arena, and the Billiken Club cancelled its performances. “We treated it as any other emergency, so we evacuated the Student Center,” BSC Manager Chris Grabau said. “We didn’t have any power, so we didn’t have any way to support the multiple events going on.”

Freshman Bryce Knepp was outside of Griesedieck Hall when the power went out. “I was upset because I had a meeting to get to and all of my notes were inside, and they wouldn’t let me back in.” Facilities Services and DPSSS responded quickly “We felt that we handled the situation in the right manner, and it is just always nice to have those lights come back on,” McCune said.

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Delays minimal Continued from Page 1

be a better alternate route to try because “traffic is moving faster now [on Jefferson] than when the [Grand] bridge was open,” he said. During the first days after the Grand Bridge closure, delays were minimal. “On the first day that [the bridge] closed, the longest detour time was just over four minutes, which was great,” Kara Bowlin, press secretary to St. Louis Mayor Francis Slay, said. While traffic has not become a major issue, passengers on MetroLink and Metro busses had to make adjustments to their travel schedules due to the temporary shutdown of the Grand MetroLink station. Dianne Williams, director of communications for Metro, said that Metro customers are adjusting to these changes well and are taking a bus or two earlier than they normally would have to allow extra travel time. “Later at night there are some missed connections we’re trying to work with; it will be better when the Grand [station] reopens again,” she said. With the second weekend of demolition work approaching, Metro cannot run trains underneath the existing bridge due to safety concerns. To combat this issue, Metro will supply busses to connect passengers between the Union Station and Central West End MetroLink. The station will be closed until demolition work is complete and crews deem it safe for passengers to use. It is expected to reopen sometime in April. Williams said part of the city’s contract with the construction company is keeping the trains and the wires safe throughout the process. “If it appears even after April that it’s not safe, we’re not putting people off there, but [the construction company] believes they will be able to work in a contained area,” Williams said. Kozeny said dealing with the train and rail tracks is the biggest challenge facing the construction team. “All of this in a tight staging area, under a very tight schedule,” he said. According to Kozeny, collaboration between the building team and other project stakeholders will be critical to eliminating interruption to track service, delivering a safe work zone and meeting construction deadlines. Until the Grand MetroLink stop reopens, Metro is providing alternate transportation around the SLU campus. Metro Bus will be providing a reroute of the #70 Grand Bus Service that will pick up at the Union Station MetroLink stop. The Red Northbound #70 will connect passengers to the Frost campus and the Blue Southbound #70 will connect to Saint Louis University Medical Center, the Medical School and Cardinal Glennon Children’s Hospital. To assist students returning to campus after spring break who would have used the Grand MetroLink station, SLU Ride provided a pick-up service at the Union Station MetroLink stop. Will Hartzler, lead coordinator for SLU Ride, said the pick-up service was a collaboration between Transportation Services, Metro and the Grand Bridge Ad Hoc Committee. Hartzler said four vans began making pick-ups at 7 a.m. and ran through the day. He estimated 99 different escorts were made, bringing around 500 people back to campus. Metro workers were on hand to direct students to the vans. “It really was a multidepartment effort,” Hartzler said. The longest wait time for a pick-up was around three minutes, and Hartzler said all students seemed to be very pleased with the service. SLU Ride plans on providing the same pick-up service during Easter Break. Overall, the precautions taken by the SLU community to prepare for the closure of the Grand Bridge have met approval from students. “I still think I have to get to the stop about 10 or so minutes earlier than I normally would have to but it’s definitely not as bad as I thought,” Mathew said. “The consideration for what’s going on is definitely out there,” Stumpf said. “I can actually say thank you to all of the riders on the shuttles for their cooperation with all of this as well.”


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Editorials are opinion pieces written by the Editorial Board of The University News. The editorials printed in this space represent the opinion of The University News. Commentaries and Letters to the Editor represent the opinions of the signed authors but do not necessarily represent the opinions of The University News.

Students’ voices will be silenced under disenfranchising legislation Disenfranchisement is the death of democracy. Four bills moving through the Missouri General Assembly could lead to the loss of voting privileges by cutting off accessibility, and it will cause the direct disenfranchisement of many. Should the legislation pass, registered voters who do not have Missouri-issued IDs cannot vote in elections held in the state. This affects many out-of-state college students; 1,509 of them are registered at Saint Louis University. Many of us will be able to vote in the 2012 Presidential Election and in local and representative elections – the requirement of an ID will deter many of us from voting and disenfranchise some of us altogether. This is unacceptable. First, it is hard enough getting students at the voting polls despite SLU being a polling location and students not needing IDs beyond their SLU IDs. With the additional process of having to visit the Department of Motor Vehicles, filling out forms and paying extra fees, students will be even less likely to vote. On top of all that, one is required to have a permanent address in Missouri to even register for a Missouri ID. Thus, all students who live on-campus and have SLU

mailboxes cannot access the IDs issued by the DMV. For them, the choice to live on campus at any point in the years they spend here is a direct loss of their ballot and their voice. For SLU, that is ever y single registered freshman or sophomore, as well as some upperclassmen. Absentee ballots are still possible, but those are often counted last in the election process, and in the event of an over whelming majority for a candidate, they are often not counted at all. Our voices need to count. This is disenfranchisement through the unavailability of both access and power. It is the loss of voices in the democratic process. We cannot lose face in these tr ying times. We do not want to lose our votes. We want to see Missouri be open to the voices of those who decide to get an education here, to pay taxes and enjoy the benefits the state gives. Many of us see Missouri as our home. We are still active citizens who engage in multitude of activities that is the lifeblood of any society. We encourage the Missouri legislators to see past the faces plastered on plastic to the proud citizens beyond.

Sexual Assault Awareness Month is vital for fighting rape culture and educating students There is nothing unclear about the fact hosting events throughout the month dethat rape is unacceptable. A “Forcible Rape” signed to broaden our understanding about report filed into DPSSS on March 7 of this sexual assault, rape culture, male-prevention year, reported as having occurred on Febru- rhetoric about rape and what “good sex” reary 26, raises the heartbreaking concern that ally is. we still do not understand rape. This includes having a panel with officers The report was filed 9 days after the pur- from the Department of Public Safety and ported event. While there might be other Security Services about staying safe on camreasons for this depus. Beyond dialogue, lay, it is true that for DPSSS is also offering too many rapes, we Rape Aggression Desee similar delayed fense classes, giving reporting – or no reus the skills to handle port at all. Most rapes do not occur dangerous emergenIt stems from a cy situations. in dark alleyways... 84 culture that someThese conjoined how puts blame on efforts are working percent of the time, one is to change your misthe victim, making them feel unsafe from raped by someone he or perceptions of rape public scrutiny and and sex, and to reshe knows personally. judgment should they verse the toxicity of seek justice. rape culture. SHAPE, Rape can be preUna and DPSSS are vented. Prevention calling on students begins by understandto open their minds. ing the most rapes do not occur in dark al- If we are not attending these events, we creleyways with strangers, but that 84 percent ate a debt of responsibility and a mountain of of the time, one is raped by someone he or ignorance. she knows personally, according to Una’s We have to begin talking about these iswebsite. It begins when we understand that sues. We run the immense risk of having 1 in 4 women are raped in the United States, more broken hearts and minds and greater and that this problem is one of the most un- injustice in the world if we do not begin this derreported and misunderstood. It begins self-education. when people stop choosing to rape. It begins “Public scrutiny” and hostility stems from by educating ourselves. us – let’s work to remove our hostile stares. April is Sexual Assault Awareness Month, Let’s work with Una, SHAPE and DPSSS to and Una and the Student Health Advocates find our way into a future free of ignorance, & Peer Educator Program (SHAPE) will be free of rape.

Posted below are the results from our web poll on The University News’ website. These are the current ways students spent their Spring Break. (75 votes total) What did you do over Spring Break?

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-The Conservative Billiken SLU’s conservative voice -The Progressive Billiken SLU’s liberal voice -Foreign Affairs Students studying abroad -Going into OT On and off the court - 24/7 Blogs, additional commentaries and activities such as our web poll are all available on our website: unewsonline.com.

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56%

Slept. A lot.

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After sitting in on the Senate debate on March 16, I was faced with some harsh realities about how some SGA senators view their role on this campus. I came to SGA to hear the debate on a resolution that would effectively state that the students of Saint Louis University oppose HB 329 HJR 14 SB 3 SJR 2. This legislation would void any registration forms from student mailboxes, as well as countless Missouri residents that are already marginalized for other reasons. What this means for SLU students is this: Any person who values their role in local and national government would not be able to vote if they register using their student mailbox numbers. But regardless on how you may feel about this legislation, this is not what was truly discussed at the SGA meeting I attended. Instead, the question of SGA’s role in political matters was brought to the floor. From the viewpoint of some senators, SGA had no role in political matters, and that was that. The resolution failed in senate that night, but I would like to address the issues that I was not able to voice that night. One point that was raised is the concern of double representation: Why should SGA represent the student body when they already have representatives in the State Legislature? The real question is not whether or not this resolution constitutes double-representation, but whether or not their representatives hear these student voters. By creating a unified stance on this issue on behalf of the student body, we are not casting two votes (double-representation), but rather we are making sure our true representatives know that the students of Saint Louis University care about the politics beyond the university. A statement on this legislation means that students on this campus care about being politically active, on both sides of the aisle, and believe that the youth vote still carries some weight. SGA was given the opportunity to tell the rest of the state that they are not trapped within the SLU bubble, that they care about ideas and resolutions that affect people beyond themselves. They passed up this opportunity in order to play it safe; SGA hid behind procedure, precedence and regulations in order to shy away from progress, boldness and anything that looks like a stance. You can count my vote as disappointed. - Lauren Araujo is a senior in the College of Arts and Sciences.

Quotes of the week

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In the most simplistic sense possible, it’s a matter of election integrity. - Danny Laub, senior in the College of Arts and Sciences.

” ”

See Page 3.

Make time for art. There is a level of devotion that you must have, but it is worthwhile if you really want to do it. - Charlie Turner, senior in the College of Arts and Sciences.

See Page 7.

Hard work goes a long way, further than talent does. You get out what you put in.

- Joanna Hoge, senior in the College of Arts and Sciences.

” ”

See Page 7.

No one wants to become a victim of that kind of assault. - DPSSS Sergeant Pascuale Signorino

See Page 3.


Opinion

unewsonline.com

5

Friday, March 25, 2011

Sex trafficking stops when we seek to self-educate and take action Why I want to continue my What if I told you about a business that was one of the most profitable, college career successful businesses in the world? It’s an industry as a superas old as the C human race and fulfills a need senior that was almost ommentary

as basic as the need for food and water. The merchandise is cheap for the suppliers, t h e r e f o r e Anne Heaton affordable for the consumers, and it can return over 1,000 percent profit per piece of merchandise. It’s as easily obtained, imported and exported as an “I <3 NY” t-shirt. It all sounds too good to be true, but I assure you, this miracle industry is all too real. The business? Human sex trafficking. The human ill, the social justice banner that many know, but few mention. In the minute it took to read that paragraph, somewhere, someone was added to the capital of this industry. From the time you woke up this morning to this moment as you’re sitting reading the paper, a young girl was sold over the internet to the highest bidder, beaten and abused, her virginity preserved to increase her price. This is bigger than emotional statements around the Super Bowl; sex trafficking is a constant part of global trade. Every day, more girls are stolen or seduced into slavery. They are sold to brothel owners who lie to them, saying that they were bought for up to $50,000 equivalents, and need to work for the brothel owners until the debt is repaid. A portion of each “paycheck” is promised to support the family from which the girls were taken, promised so the pimp can pocket more money. The brothel owner or pimp will add charges for medicines, abortions or anything that they can think of to add to the bill, until the girls are in bondage as porn stars or sex slaves for life. The girls, rarely more than 16 at the time of capture, go through a period of physical, mental and sexual torture until they will do

groups of sophomores are given a time to pick their housing based on a combination of factors including average GPAs and credit hours of applicants. Once an individual or group is assigned their time to pick housing, the wait begins, hoping time slot by time slot that the desired housing does not fill. I have not dealt with the housing system, outside of dorm assignments, in all of its glor y yet but I am optimistic, at this point, to its efficiency. My optimism has convinced me that my goals of a triple in the Village or Marchetti are within reach, but logic tells me this might be a pipe dream. The amount of sophomores that are likely tr ying to get into the limited Village spaces or one of the Towers is probably pretty frightening to a hopeful in the same boat. These are the moments that I envy those in Greek life who were assigned housing weeks ago and can breathe knowing that they have nothing to worr y about. At this point, it is not the complicated nature or even the excitement of finally moving up on the college totem pole, but the waiting game that we are all grudgingly forced to play that really makes this housing selection process so excruciating. As friends from other schools excitingly fill me in on their housing for next year of which I could not really have a clue, I sit here in a seemingly endless state of ambiguity as to my whereabouts in the coming year. I understand that it is a necessar y evil and that there really is no way to control the time it takes to properly place an entire student body, but if the planets could somehow align to expedite the process and get me into the Village, I would be highly appreciative.

“What are your plans for after graduation?” Lately, I’ve gotten pretty good at dodging those seven dreaded Commentary words. I talk about the weather (it’s nice), the economy (it’s not) and the way Justin Bieber is styling his hair (he’s got great conditioner). Melanie Moriarty I stumble and mumble and fumble in a game of verbal Frogger, anything to cover up the fact that I have absolutely no idea how to answer that question. I’m 21, but by no means am I a real adult. I don’t pay my own rent, I forget to turn on the oven when I cook my frozen pizzas and the only living thing for which I’m responsible is a houseplant- and I’m pretty sure it hasn’t had a strong drink in weeks. Not only that, but some nights I’m still afraid of the dark. How is it, then, that I will graduate in less than two months? “Well, what do you want to be?” This question is even worse than the first one, and it’s gotten to the point where everyone has started prying: neighbors I haven’t talked to in years, strangers in the grocery store check-out line, my dentist. It’s natural that they would want to ask (really, I should know), but I can’t tell them the truth: I want to be on reality TV. I want to work at a job that pays well and lets me vacation 50 weeks out of the year. I want to do nothing and everything at once. I want you all to stop asking me such hard questions. Especially if I have a mouthful of toothpaste. Fifteen years ago, I would have answered much differently. When I was six, I knew exactly what I wanted to be when I grew up: a lawyer-ballerina-veterinarianprincess, one who happened to be president of everything. These days, I’m a little more realistic- I’m just aiming to be a contestant on The Bachelor. And while all of those jobs are still on my distant to-do list, today, it’s full of other tasks. Destroy another pair of heels on the campus’ cobblestone. Skip class and go to happy hour. Watch the simultaneous planting and destruction of the SLUlips. Pick up my cap and gown. Try not to vomit after doing so. This time next year, it won’t be appropriate for me to fake sick just so I can eat Doritos and keep up with those Kardashians. But for now, I’m hanging on tight. “Are you ready for the real world?” You’re talking about the TV show, right? I’m ready for the on-air version (college has been great practice), but something tells me I’m a little less prepared for what happens when the cameras stop rolling. When is this real world thing even supposed to start? Because right now, well, I’m doing everything I can to delay it. The good thing about denial is that it gives me plenty of time to think about all of the things I’m going to remember about Saint Louis University. Like the days when Iggy’s still existed. All of the tuition increase surprises. How the Billiken used to be small. Themed parties. Golf cart hit-andruns. That time a wizard got loose on campus. So will my real life begin the moment some administrator I’ve never met hands me a piece of paper that will give a purpose to my last four years? Or maybe when the spectators are done clapping for myself and a couple hundred of my closest acquaintances from the College of Arts and Sciences? Probably not. But who knows. The only thing that I am sure of is that I can’t be a college student forever. I know there are better things out there than a Chick-Fil-A within walking distance; I just don’t know what they are yet. For those of you who know how to answer these loaded, seven-worded questions, congratulations. But for those of you who don’t, I’d like to extend an invitation to a support group. We meet every Wednesday through Saturday at Humphrey’s. Refreshments are provided. Denial is optional, but strongly recommended. Causal attire is encouraged. After all, it’s the place where everybody knows your name. For now, at least. Cheers.

Stephanie Mueller is a freshman in the College of Arts and Sciences.

Melanie Moriarty is a senior in the College of Arts and Sciences.

Mauriel Blakeley / Illustrator

anything that a client will pay the pimp or brothel owner for. They are forced to have sex with as many as forty men or more in a single workday. Many pimps forbid girls from making their clients wear a condom, because if a customer has to wear a condom, he may refuse to pay and take his business elsewhere. People may be divided on abortion, divorce or euthanasia, but I have yet to meet a person who is not sickened by the thought of human trafficking. Maybe it’s the youth of the victims. Maybe it’s the millions spent on something so shameful. Maybe it’s the fact that the circumstances from which they were stolen were nearly as lamentable as the “careers” into which they were sold. But I would put to you that these facts are merely beggars on the street – they are not the source

of the problem, they only point to bigger, systemic failures and inadequacies. I put to you that what really sickens us about human trafficking is that it shows us what depravity the human being is really capable of: human beings are capable of not only exploiting their own young and innocent children (a uniquely awful depravity in itself), but of selling their young and innocent to other people for exploitation and making money off of their suffering. If we want to hold that all men have equal value, the same nature in the soul of the sex trafficker resides in us. Calling humans animals is praise too lofty for beings that so exploit their young. Now look at yourself. You already have access to the tools that can challenge this horrific practice. You have been educated, and you have time, resources, skills and the technology that will let you impact

the world. Are you a business major? Look into serving the nonprofits that exist or start your own organization. Political science? Look into ways to improve the social structures and governments that allow this to persist. Pre-med or nursing? Consider using your skills where medical care is not available due to cost or fear of authorities. If knowledge stops with you, it rots and you are no better off than if you had never read this article. The bottom line is that sex trafficking tortures and enslaves voiceless victims. Humanity should be sickened and deeply grieved by this reality. Because the whole of humanity is infected, the whole of humanity must intervene. If humans will not take steps to stop this depravity, who will? Anne Heaton is a sophomore in the School of Public Health.

Single-ply toilet paper makes life on SLU’s campus ‘rough’ I love Saint Louis University. Rigorous academics, a close-knit community and a gorgeous campus make it a wonderful place Commentary to spend the formative years of our young adulthood. However, as a semi-responsible student and part of the SLU family, I feel (as I hope all of you Doug Anstoetter do) a responsibility to improve SLU every day. For this reason, I would like to highlight a few problems that are very easy to fix. I am not aiming at the big issues, nothing that would inspire much of a debate, just a few ideas that would make SLU a more enjoyable place to go to school. Firstly, something has to be done about the toilet paper. Singleply toilet paper is horrible. What’s the point? I can’t imagine it actually saves much money. Any thoroughly hygienic person is going to double over or crumple the single ply toilet paper time and time again until it has the necessary thickness for proper waste absorption. In doing this, they use far more single-ply paper than they would double-ply or (dare I say) extra soft paper. SLU is a topof-the-line school. The grounds are breathtaking; the buildings are high-tech, but once you get into the restrooms, you realize you’ve been let down. They are stocked with the most basic of toilet papers. It is disheartening and uncomfortable. Singleply toilet paper seems to express a lack of care for the bottom half of the student body. Second, what’s the deal with the Billiken statue on West Pine? Years ago, the spot was occupied by a large, chubby, Buddha-like Billiken who was much beloved by students. He is still on campus but now stands guard over Chaifetz Arena. In his place is one of the creepiest statues at the University. The newer

statue is a tall adult Billiken. In his right hand, propped up and on display, he holds a smaller, babyish representation of the Billiken. The very existence of a baby and an adult Billiken calls to mind the troubling question of Billiken procreation. It’s a strange mystery, but not the real problem with the statue. The more urgent issue is that the adult Billiken is winking. Why? What does it mean when an adult Billiken holds up a baby Billiken and winks at us? Draw your own conclusions, but I feel there are some adjustments that can be made to the West Pine Billiken that might help all of us sleep more soundly. The final issue I will address (and probably the most difficult to remedy) is with the on-campus Subway. Every other Subway on Earth offers a lovely promotion with a dangerously addictive theme song. I’m speaking of course of “Five Dollar Footlongs.” For only $5, you can buy a variety of 12-inch sandwiches. It’s easy on the wallet and perfect for poor college students. Unfor tunately, those r esponsible for the SLU Subway know they have a corner on the market. The Five Dollar Footlong remains an elusive temptress to all of us at SLU. I’m not sure how it’s going to happen, but one day I hope to enjoy a tasty (literally and financially) “Five Flex Point Footlong.” Again, I’m not looking for radical changes. Most of the time, SLU runs a pretty tight ship. These are just a few problems that I feel would be very easy to fix and might make everyone a little happier. Order different toilet paper, replace baby Billiken with a basketball or something and maybe talk to some Subway representatives. I would commend anyone who rises to one of these challenges. Whatever happens though, SLU is still a pretty great place to go to school.

What does it mean when an adult Billiken holds up a baby Billiken and winks at us?

Doug Anstoetter is a senior in the College of Arts and Sciences.

Starla Salazar / Illustrator

Housing is a game of lottery and chance On Feb 25, Saint Louis University students began the exhausting wait for housing assignments for the 2011-2012 school year. Commentary This process follows the decision to move the $2000 housing scholarship to merit-based, allowing more upperclassmen to move offcampus next Stephanie Mueller year. This shift will likely help to aid in the housing process although the student body still has concerns about where they will be living next year. The Department of Housing and Residence Life is taking a step in the right direction with this change after facing criticism last year when sophomores were given first pick on housing due to the requirement that they stay on campus, leaving some upperclassmen, attempting to maintain the whole of their scholarship, stranded in unwanted apartments and lofts. Further criticism is already rampant for this year’s housing though, as upperclassmen are not given the chance to keep their current housing, or squat, in the coming year, and many will likely end up in off-campus housing, some out of choice and some out of necessity. As sophomores, this is more than welcomed, giving us a chance to maybe get the housing we want, or at least out of the community bathroom, 12 square foot space lifestyle. The ordering process for sophomores is one within the housing selection system that is far more complicated (arguably unnecessarily so) than the lotter y for upperclassmen. For this order determination,


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Arts OUT on the

TOWN Arts Editor’s Picks

Friday, March 25, 2011

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Band to bring ballads to Billiken Club Peter Wolf Crier aims for mystery, metaphor in music By WOLF HOWARD Staff Writer

MUSIC Friday, March 25 9 p.m. Margot and the Nuclear So and So’s with Sleepy Kitty and Union Tree Review Firebird Tickets are $12-14 9 p.m. Jon Hardy and the Public with Jon Bonham and Friends The Gramophone Tickets are $7 plus a $3 minor surcharge Saturday, March 26 9 p.m. London Calling The Gramophone 21 and over $4 before 10 p.m. and $6 after 10 p.m. Thursday, March 31 9 p.m. Peter Wolf Crier The Billiken Club Admission is free

Talk to us: Ashley Jones 314.977.2812 arts.unews@gmail.com

Photo Courtesy of Darin Back

Indie band Peter Wolf Crier will be performing at the Billiken Club on Thursday, March 31. The group released their debut album, “Interbe,” in May of 2010. Lead singer Peter Pisano describes the ablum as being “song-based” in that it contains no underlying tones or messages for the audience.

Touching lyrics, sweet and strained melodies, and powerful sonic textures: this is the basic chemical make-up of Peter Wolf Crier, a two-piece band made up of singer and guitarist Peter Pisano and percussionist and sound engineer Brian Moen. Their debut album, Interbe, came out in May of 2010. It is what Pisano describes as a “song-based album,” containing no underlying tones or messages for the audience. “All we’re doing is making records that are based around sound,” Pisano said. Inter-be follows a two-year break for Peter, after his earlier band, The Wars of 1812, went on hiatus. He turned to education for a year or two, working as a science teacher at a private middle school. “Teaching has been the only other thing that I’ve done that’s gotten me to the same place,” he said. “I feel creative and inspired and connected to another human being.” When he got back to making music, he decided it was time to write material on his own. The music that would become Inter-be started off as

a solo venture. “I didn’t really think about bringing anyone else in on this record,” Pisano said. He wanted to make an album all about him, a largely different process from what he had experienced with his time in The Wars of 1812. “I’ve always retreated inside myself and closed the door when writing a song,” Pisano said. He explained that the major difference was being forced to trust his instincts more. He was careful to make a distinction though. “To call those instincts your own is to not acknowledge the people that helped with those things,” he said. Eventually Pisano realized he could collaborate with whoever he wanted on the project, and he immediately thought of Moen, whom he had met in Minnesota while playing a show with his previous band. Pisano explained that Moen was the person that came to mind. For Pisano, the songwriting process involves a lot of feeling and flow. His lyrics are created in a similar way. “I’ll sit down and press record and scratch out some

melodies,” he said. “At the very last moment of that sound coming out I’ll shape it into a word.” Pisano said he considers it a very “free-association” type of process. In the editing phase he adds cohesion to his words, though he finds it important to be somewhat mysterious and metaphorical in his words and arrangements, so listeners can find something new each time they come back. Since the album’s release, Peter Wolf Crier has been touring consistently. The thought of touring originally gave Pisano anxiety since he is a man that prefers a good amount of alone time to deal with the road. “I’m no longer fearful of it,” he said. “Every night you can just tell that we are doing exactly what we want to be doing.” However, he describes the live show as being exhausting. “That’s really exhausting to do that for 45 minutes straight. It’s also very sweaty,” Pisano said. Peter Wolf Crier is due to get sweaty and exhausted at the Billiken Club on March 31. Admission is free.

Student artists featured in local exhibition Two seniors nominated by Studio Art Program Faculty By RYAN BELMONTE Staff Writer

THEATER Friday, March 25 8 p.m. STOMP The Fox Theatre For ticket prices, visit fabulousfox.com Saturday, March 26 2 p.m. and 8 p.m. STOMP The Fox Theatre For ticket prices, visit fabulousfox.com Sunday, March 27 8 p.m. STOMP The Fox Theatre For ticket prices, visit fabulousfox.com

MOVIES Friday, March 25 Jane Eyre opens in theaters Sucker Punch opens in theaters Monday, March 28 8 p.m. Monday Movie Madness: Far and Away Cafe Ventana Admission is free

OTHER Monday, March 28 9 p.m. Tenacious Trivia Cafe Ventana Admission is free

Many pieces of artwork can look interesting, but the truly good ones have an interesting story behind them. This is the case for the work of two Saint Louis University artists, Joanna Hoge and Charlie Turner, who have work on display at the Varsity Art Show hosted by Art St. Louis. The exhibition is on display now through March 30 at the Art St. Louis main gallery. Returning for its 15th annual group exhibition, the Varsity Art Show invites faculties from 20 colleges & universities in Missouri and Illinois to select one or two outstanding undergraduate or graduate level art students to exhibit recent artworks to represent their school in the show. This year’s show will feature works by 38 artists, including Hoge and Turner. “We are lucky to have a lot of very good senior art majors this year,” Studio Art Program Director and Associate Professor of Studio Art Sharron Pollack said. She explained that some of the artists’ work goes to the Varsity art show and some goes to other exhibits. It is dependent on whose artwork is more suitable for which exhibit. “[Hoge and Turner’s] art was very strong and the sort of work that they did was well suited for a gallery,” Pollack said. The faculty members of the SLU art department came together and decided that Hoge and Turner would be the best out of the 10-15 senior art majors at SLU to represent the school. After they were notified of their selection last November, both students were able to choose their own pieces to display in the exhibit that they believed best represented them. The two pieces that Hoge decided to submit were pieces that she had worked on this past year. One of them is a large drawing titled “Hayley and Natalie.” The image shows a lesbian couple in embrace. While working on this for her senior seminar project, Joanna was inspired by some of the work from the artist Gustav Klimt, specifically his piece called “The Kiss.” “The image was so romantic, and there are so many heterosexual relationships portrayed in art, while the homosexual relationships are underrepresented,” Hoge said. She was inspired by some pictures on Facebook of one of her friends and her girlfriend. “There was an honesty in the pictures that I wanted to give a voice to,” Hoge said. “I wanted to immortalize this seemingly ordinary image and make it an event for people to see.”

Photos by: Noah Berman / Photo Editor

Seniors Charlie Turner (Left) and Joanna Hoge (Right) spend time in the Xavier Hall studios working on their artwork. Turner and Hoge were nominated by the faculty of the Saint Louis University Studio Art Program to participate in the Varsity Art Show. This is the 15th year for the show which is hosted by Art St. Louis. Faculties from 20 colleges and Universities in Missouri and Illinios were invited to select one or two students to participate in the show. The selected students were able to choose two pieces that they felt best represented them to be part of the show. This year 38 students will be featured in the show. The other piece she submitted is a figurative piece called “You Don’t Know What I’m Made Of (And Neither Do I).” It is a drawing, created using both graphite and colored pencils, showing a dysmorphic female figure with a surreal and colorful anatomy emerging from the gray surroundings. This piece was inspired by different images that Hoge had seen that were “representative of self, but not strict self-portraiture.” Hoge asked herself, “What makes up oneself?” This led her to think about the body and how people do not really know what they are made of. When drawing the insides of the female, she did not draw any of it to be anatomically correct, but instead created the beautiful, surreal images from her head. The two pieces that Turner chose have interesting stories of their own. His first piece is a large oil painting that he titled “Ma.” It

is a large oil painting of a skull that is shown only from its mideye level and below. Charlie painted the skull from a real skull that his father found while cleaning out the basement of the science department at Washington University in St. Louis. One of the boxes that his father stumbled upon contained many bones. Instead of throwing all of the bones away, each person working took two skulls. Charlie’s father kept one skull and mailed the other without a return address to a friend as a prank. “The piece has a looming feeling of doom and is about how fragile human existence is. Humans have always dealt with death and violence. The entire world glamorizes it, and in real life it’s not like that at all,” Turner said. His other submission is a small print that he called “Grim Head 1.” This is one print of a head

from a series of four warped human heads that he created. It started as a sketchbook drawing, but he did not really like it at first. He decided to just use the image for a test print. Once the print came out, he liked how raw it looked, so he went further with it. He wanted to make each head unique emphasizing and warping different parts of the face. The image he submitted shows a human head with a stretched mouth to look like a beak with teeth and molars. “It is a very grim and serious looking piece,” Turner said. “In these prints, I wanted to show human ugliness; not just physical ugliness, but the ugliness inside of human and their actions too.” As seniors, both Hoge and Turner are making plans for after they graduate from SLU. Hoge wants to continue working with holistic health and wellness in Boulder, Colorado

at graduate school. She also hopes to carry on working in the arts through freelance illustrating and submitting work in other art exhibits and art fairs. Turner said that after he graduates, he hopes to keep art as a part of his life by having days of the week where he will work and days where he will specifically work on art to build his portfolio for graduate school. As they graduate, they have their own advice that they would like to share with other undergraduate art majors. “Make time for art,” Turner said. “There is a level of devotion that you must have, but it is worthwhile if you really want to do it.” Hoge said she agrees. “Hard work goes a long way; further than talent does. You get out what you put in.” Hoge said. “I don’t feel like I’m just putting work into black hole since there is a lot of intrinsic value to art making.”


The University News

Arts

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Friday, March 25, 2011

Show ‘stomps’ its way to the Fox Theatre By KATERINA CANYON Staff Writer

The international percussion phenomenon, “STOMP,” will be returning to The Fabulous Fox Theatre for a limited engagement starting March 25-27. Luke Cresswell and Steve McNicholas created the show in 1991 in the United Kingdom. It first previewed at the Bloomsbury Theatre in London. In 1994, the show opened at the Orpheum Theatre in New York and later began its United States tour in 1995. In 2006, “STOMP” New York marked its 5,000th performance. In 2008, Entertainment Weekly included the show in its list “New Classics: 50 Best Plays and Musicals from 1983 to 2008.” “Most people believe ‘STOMP’ to be a dance show,” performer Donisha Brown said. “It’s actually a music show. It’s like going to a concert. The music comes from the instrument we’re playing. It could be a broom, PVC, a trashcan.” The “STOMP” troupe is made up of eight performers who use household objects such as brooms, trashcans and matchboxes to make percussion sounds.

Brown has been performing with the show off and on for 12 years. She described “STOMP” as “a theatrical journey of rhythm, music and comedy” and explained that some routines cause the audience to “laugh themselves to tears.” “There’s a lot of comedy. You’re going to come into show, you’re going to laugh, clap, you’re going dance a little bit,” Brown said. The show has been touring for 15 years. However, it has undergone some changes through the years. “‘STOMP’ has evolved a great deal since its first incarnation at the Edinburgh Festival. Every reworking has involved losing some pieces and gaining new ones but has always stayed true to the original premise of the show: to create rhythmic music with instantly recognizable objects and do it with an eccentric sense of character and humor,” co-creator McNicholas said. Presented by Dance St. Louis as a special on the U.S. Bank Broadway Series, “STOMP” will take place Friday, March 25 at 8 p.m., Saturday, March 26 at 2 p.m. and 8 p.m., and Sunday, March 27 at 2 p.m. Visit fabulousfox.com.

Students show off talents to raise scholarship funds

for more information.

Victor Liou / Photographer

Sophomore Kari Kelley of Beyond All Reason sang at SLU’s Got Talent on Thursday, March 24. The Class Legacy Program hosted the event, and the proceeds raised will go to the Emergency Scholarship Program. Check next week’s edition of The University News for more on this event.

Wasikowska delivers expert performance in ‘Jane Eyre’ Although it has become a cliché that a film is incapable of representing a novel, especially one Movie Review of such w o r t h as “Jane Eyre,” you will be surprised with this film. Among the many f i l m s Brent Lang which have already attempted this feat with Charlotte Brontë’s novel, the acting, costume and effective use of sets make this version stand apart. Director Cary Fukunaga (“Sin Nombre”) brings us this new interpretation which innovatively begins with Jane

4/5 The Good: Costume, set design, and acting The Bad: Many times it failed to represent the book The Bad: A good film Photo courtesy of Laurie Sparham

(Mia Wasikowska) desperately escaping from Thornfield amidst a bleak landscape expertly directed with a combination of long and medium shots. Later, we receive the plot in the form of flashbacks, allowing the novel to effectively be compressed into a feature film. Nevertheless, the film did

miss the mark in depicting the suffering she experienced in boarding school, but such faults are to be expected in any adaptation to the big screen. At the same time, the audience still recoils in terror at the sight of her abuse, much as they would upon reading of it. In terms of the relationship

between Jane and Mr. Rochester (Michael Fassbender), the stages of their relationship were lacking, but Wasikowska delivered an expert performance as the intelligent and stoic Jane. Not only was she able to deliver quotes from the book, but her ease in period costumes was evident as well. As for Mr. Rochester, although Fassbender was able to display some of the menacing qualities of the character, he ultimately does not achieve to depict him as the book does. Although the film has some obvious flaws in comparison to the novel, it can be enjoyed by audiences that are unfamiliar with the story. I recommend taking the time to watch it; it will not disappoint.

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The University News

Sports

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Tra

March Madness Preview

Billiken Briefs Men’s Soccer Billiken soccer great Tim Ream has been called up to the U.S. Men’s National Team for the second time in as many years. Ream, a defender for the MLS squad New York Red Bulls, started for the National Team against South Africa and Chile last year. Ream made his mark in the MLS during his rookie season, being named a finalist for the MLS Rookie of the Year award and was named the Red Bulls 2010 defender of the year. As a Billiken, Ream was an All-American and the 2009 Atlantic 10 Conference Defensive Player of the Year. The National Team faces No. 4-ranked Argentina on March 26. The game will be nationally broadcasted live on ESPN2.

Track

and

Field

Senior Sara Fraley was named to the Atlantic 10 indoor track and field All-Academic team on March 23. Fraley, a biology major, finished second in the 1,000-meters at the Atlantic 10 championships in February. Her performance throughout the season earned her second team All-Conference honors.

Women’s Basketball Head coach Shimmy Gray-Miller has been named as one of 20 individuals to receive the 2011 Girls and Women Distinction Award from the Girl Scouts of Eastern Missouri. Gray-Miller will receive the award for her contributions to sports and fitness, one of the 10 categories in which the award is given. “It is a privilege to accept this award on behalf of our program,” Gray-Miller told the Billiken Media Relations Department.

Talk to us: Brian Boyd 314.977.2812 sports.unews@gmail.com

Friday, March 25, 2011

Men’s Basketball

Tourney Report Card remains Name: Saint Louis Billikens By Derrick Neuner wide open Date: 2010-2011 season Associate Sports Editor Okay everyone, slow down. Relax. So, your bracket is busted. You are the laughing stock of your ofCommentary fice pool. H e c k , you probably even picked all No.1 seeds to get to the Final Four, and you still could Brian Boyd not get it right. Breathe easy my friends. You are far from the only ones. Truth be told, it is a blessing in disguise. You get to kick back, put your feet up and enjoy one of the most entertaining NCAA tournaments we have seen in a while. This tournament has provided an assortment of dramatic finishes, head-scratching decisions, soul-crushing upsets and dominant individual performances. Did I mention that we are only at the Sweet Sixteen? Raise your hand if you had the Virginia Commonwealth Rams playing Florida State to advance to the Elite Eight. Are those crickets I hear? Nobody picked those teams? Not a single one of you? Interesting. Okay, let’s try again. How many of you had Richmond, the Cinderella of the Atlantic 10, outlasting both Temple and Xavier, two perennial conference powerhouses? Or who had THE ultimate Cinderella story from last year, Butler, knocking off the beast of the Big East, Pittsburgh? Do not even get me started on Morehead State trumping one of the most storied programs in college hoops history, Louisville, in the first round. The NCAA tournament has lived up to its nickname: March Madness. We have some of the most storied programs in the history of the sport such as Kentucky, North Carolina, Kansas and Duke dancing deep into the night. The bluebloods are right where their fans believe they belong -- poised to make a run at the biggest prize of them all, the National Championship.

C+

Overall

To some, our grade will be too generous. But the dismissal of the team’s top two scorers in the fall and the loss of Cody Ellis due to a shoulder dislocation wiped away all hopes of March Madness. Majerus’ Billikens, however, did manage to wrangle a 13-17 record despite consistently starting three freshmen. The defense was superb, a Majerus hallmark, though the young Bills struggled to shoot well, often leading to heartbreaking defeats and late-game let downs.

Defense

The Billikens had the stingiest defense in the A-10. They allowed just 62 points per game and averaged 33 defensive rebounds per game. SLU also forced 14 turnovers per game. While the offense was drying up, often the defense stayed solid and kept the team in the hunt for the win. The Bills also capitalized off fast-break points off turnovers.

D

Offense

While the defense was flourishing, the offense was floundering. SLU finished last in points scored in the league and averaged just 63 points per game. Though the Billikens were seventh in field goal percentage, they were 13th in 3-point shots made. They also finished 13th in offensive rebounds. Too often young freshmen were taking ill-advised shots and missing their box-out assignments.

Coaches

There may not be a finer basketball mind in America than Rick Majerus. His defensive schemes were outstanding; SLU competed in all but three games despite being less mature and less athletic than their foes. SLU walked into every match with a solid game plan. What may have been Majerus’ most difficult coaching year ever may have also been his finest.

A-

Freshmen

A

The freshmen were outstanding for Majerus this season. Forced to spend too many minutes on the court, Dwayne Evans and Mike McCall blossomed mid-way through the season. Evans, a two-time A-10 Rookie of the Week and All-Rookie team mention, led league freshmen in rebounding. Jordair Jett and Rob Loe also received valuable time on the court, time that will nurture their growth next season.

Returners

The bitter truth is that the returners were never meant to lead the roles that were thrust at them this season. While Kyle Cassity responded reasonably well, Majerus never intended him to lead the team in minutes or points. Brian Conklin needs a big body to work alongside. Most disturbing was the disappearance of Christian Salecich’s shot and Cory Remekun’s lack of effort on the court.

C

See ”Tournament” on Page 10

Bracket Busted: Students share Final Four picks Derrick Neuner, Senior Associate Sports Editor

Kyle Cassity, Junior Guard, Men’s Basketball

Saintsaitions According to an announcement made by the SLU Athletic Department, the Saintsations are looking for well-rounded, talented and enthusiastic female cheerleaders and dancers to try out for the 2011-2012 season on April 8 and 9. Registration on April 8 begins at 6:45 p.m. and on April 9 at 9 a.m. Both tryout sessions will be held at Chaifetz Arena.

A

Tyler Vachio, Sophomore Sports Staff Writer

Brianna Radici, Freshman Design Director


Sports

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Friday, March 25, 2011

Baseball

Tournament: Entertaining, unpredictable

Head coach earns 100th win Northern Illinois 7 Saint Louis 3

Saint Louis 6 Southern Illinois 8

Northern Illinois 1 Saint Louis 7

March 16

March 18

March 20

A disastrous sixth inning marred by four errors ultimately led to SLU falling at the hands of the Huskies, 7-3. Things were all knotted up at one in the fifth inning. In the sixth, a combination of four defensive miscues by the Billikens and three hits by the Huskies allowed Northern to score six runs and break the game open. In the bottom of the ninth, SLU made some noise, driving two runs in and loading the bases with two outs, but were unable to convert. Zack Smith took the loss for SLU.

Senior slugger Jon Myers came up big for the Billikens, driving in three runs to spark the offense in an 8-4 victory over the Salukis. Alex Alemann got the call on the mound, surrendering three earned runs over six innings of work. The win lifted his record to 2-0 on the year. Jon Levin iced the Southern Illinois offense out of the bullpen, working out of a bases-loaded jam in the seventh to preserve the lead. Senior Nick Becker reached base in all four atbats, scoring three times.

Western Illinois 6 Saint Louis 8

Illinois Saint Louis

March 16

March 19

Left-fielder Cody Cotter scored three times to help the Billikens top the Leathernecks by a score of 8-6. The pitching staff worked in a committee throughout the game with head coach Hendrickson sending five different hurlers to the hill, none of them throwing more than three innings. Freshman Derrick Mazzio picked up his first win of the season.

7 3

In the final game of SLU’s gauntlet against opponents from the state of Illinois, the Billikens avenged an earlier loss to the Huskies by a score of 7-1. The win gave head coach Darin Hendrickson his 100th career victory at SLU. In only four seasons, Hendrickson became only the third head coach in school history to amass 100 wins. The entire starting lineup either hit safely or crossed the plate. Freshman Brett Vanover allowed only one run over seven innings and walked only one batter.

Saint Louis SEMO

7 3

March 22

The Billikens were clinging to a 4-3 lead in the sixth inning before surrendering three runs to the Fighting Illini in the next frame. Sophomore C.J. Rose had a solid day at the dish, going two-for-four and driving in a run. Junior Jerry Mancuso gave up five runs in five innings before being relieved. The loss dropped the Billikens record to 12-6 for the year.

Continued from Page 9

SLU tallied 20 hits, a season high, and Jon Myers blasted two solo home runs, his first two of the season, and upped his average to .295 after a slow start to the year. Sophomore Jordan Hammerman was locked in, driving in four runs on three hits. The victory lifted SLU’s record to 14-6 on the year. The Billikens open up conference play on March 25 against Saint Joseph’s.

Ryan Giacomino/ Photographer

Teammates Jerry Mancuso (left) and Mike Levine are two key pieces to the Billikens success. SLU is off to a hot start, heading into conference play with a 14-6 record. Last year the team won 33 games and were A-10 Champions.

Saint Louis University 2011 Men’s Baseball UPCOMING GAMES

R

March March March March March

25 26 27 29 30

@ Saint Joseph’s @ Saint Joseph’s @ Saint Joseph’s @ Eastern Illinois vs. Evansville

Softball

Pitchers lead the way for the Billikens in A-10 play La Salle Saint Louis

0 1

March 18

Ryan Giacomino/ Photographer

SLU stands at 18-11 under first-year head coach Christy Connoyer.

The Billikens opened up Atlantic 10 play against La Salle, winning the game with late-inning heroics. Kelcie Mantesa continued her impressive season on the mound, throwing another complete-game shutout and striking out 13 Explorers in the 1-0 victory. In a classic pitchers’ duel, the game was scoreless heading into the bottom of the seventh until SLU freshman Kelsey Biggs stepped up drilled a walk-off double.

La Salle Saint Louis

1 6

March 19

SLU wrapped up the series against La Salle in commanding fashion, using strong pitching and team-wide offensive contributions to pick up the victory. Four Billikens got tallied RBI’s in the contest. The third inning saw the SLU offense pick up steam, with Alyson Brand, Rachel Falleto and Tori Holland all smacking doubles to cap off a four-run inning. Hannah Huebbe pitched brilliantly, allowing only one run over five innings.

Fordham Saint Louis

3 1

March 20

The Billikens opened up a double-header home stand against conference foe Fordham, dropping the first game by a 3-1 tally. Kelcie Matesa put together another strong outing, giving up only three earned runs over seven innings, but the offense could not generate enough to give her the win. SLU was held to only two hits by Fordham. Kristin Nicoletti belted a double and scored the Billikens’ only run.

Fordham Saint Louis

2 0

March 20

SLU bounced back with a win behind Hannah Huebbe, who allowed only three hits and surrendered no walks to the Rams, striking out five. The Billikens jumped on a mistake by an early defensive mistake by Fordham that allowed Tori Holland to advance to second base. Junior Erin Cejka drove her in with a single. The Billikens improved their record to 18-11 and 3-1 in conference play and face Charlotte on March 26.

Those blueblood programs probably did not think that the other dancers in the ballroom would include the perennial wallflowers such as Florida State, Virginia Commonwealth and Butler. Heck, most years these guys are not even invited to the dance, instead sitting at home, wondering when their time to shine would come. Fortunately, unlike another major college sport, NCAA basketball has it right, and these little guys have an opportunity to make some big noise. Tomorrow night, either the Florida State Seminoles or the Virginia Commonwealth Rams, No. 10 and No. 11 seeds, respectively, will be playing for a chance to go to the Elite Eight. Say that out loud, and let it sink in for a while. The winner’s opponent would be the winner of the Kansas/Richmond game, a No. 1 vs. No. 12 matchup. I love the A-10 and am pulling for Richmond, but I am sorry, there is no chance they oust the Jayhawks. Kansas would have the opportunity to get to the Final Four without facing anything higher than a No. 9 seed. Three teams with seeds higher than 10 are playing tomorrow night. Unreal. The brackets may have been busted, and the NCAA tournament may be slowly approaching circus-like, but throughout the confusion and upsets, there seems to be some clarity. Right now, Ohio State and Kansas have to be the prohibitive favorites to meet in the title game, neither team having been truly tested. That being said, it has gotten to the point where I would hardly be surprised if VCU and Marquette ended up playing for the title. Heck, I would not be surprised if a church league team somehow made it to Houston. It may be a while before we witness another tournament this entertaining and unpredictable. Enjoy, hoops fans.


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Friday, March 25, 2011

The Paul Garcia Lecture in International Studies presents:

The Bosnian Memory Project Dr. Jack Luzkow and Dr. Ben Moore of Fontbonne University

Muslim women weep after fleeing Srebrenica, Bosnia in 1995. The Telegraph

Tuesday, March 29th 3:00 p.m. Sinquefield Stateroom (DuBourg Hall, Rm 409) Dedicated to establishing an enduring record of Bosnian genocide survivors in St. Louis. LUMI_3428_StadiumSportsBar_UN_AD.indd 1

3/11/11 11:20:56 AM


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Friday, March 25, 2011

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No. 22 Mar 25