Page 1

Hello! This is the portfolio of Dylan C. Lathrop

Fall 2011

the energy issue

D ATA V I S U A L I Z AT I O N

gOVerNmeNT

bUSINeSS: OTHer

bUSINeSS: reTAIL/mercHANT eDUcATION

bUSINeSS: fINANcIAL/INSUrANce meDIcAL

pAymeNT cArD frAUD

UNkNOwN/OTHer

pHySIcAL LOSS

STATIONAry DeVIce

HAckINg Or mALwAre

INSIDer

pOrTAbLe DeVIce

UNINTeNDeD DIScLOSUre

Life’s a

Y axis = number of reported

incidents

Sometimes it’s intentional—hacktivists exposing racist jokes in emails exchanged by Arizona police officers—and sometimes it’s accidental, a misplaced iPhone or a misdirected email. But as the amount of data

we collectively produce has exponentially increased, so have the number of breaches. Since 2005, more than 534 million digital records have been stolen, lost, or compromised, according to the Privacy Rights

Clearinghouse. And those are just the incidents that have been reported. In reality, the number of breaches is probably much, much larger. We don’t even know how much data we’ve lost.

w w w.good.is / data

47

DISC DISC

E i t h E r w E i n n ovat E n ow o r w E g E t r E a dy fo r a da r k f u t u r E .

The energy Issue

2005 2005 Fall 2011 / Data

2011 2011

00

2010 2010

1010

00

2009 2009

1010

nikOLA tesLA / smArt meters / hOm bAttery-ChArGinG shOes / LeApfrO fueL fOr hAiti / GriD pArity and mO

2008 2008

2020

ALsO

2005 2005

2020

2011 2011

3030

2010 2010

3030

2009 2009

4040

2008 2008

4040

2007 2007

5050

2006 2006

5050

46

Life After CAp AnD t the GOOD GuiDe tO s enerGy in yOur Life nine wOrst bLACkOu

Data Breach Incidents

6060

2006 2006

Organizations Affected

6060

data curation Nathan Yau charts Dylan C. Lathrop

energize

Breach

2007 2007

NONprOfIT OrgANIZATIONS

SCHOOLS REFRESHED

bAtteries

nOt inCLuDeD

GOOD is a collaboration of people, businesses,

Iss

and nonprofits pushing the world forward. This is

Win

our quarterly magazine. More at www.GOOD.is

$6.9

DispL

Every month, the Pepsi Refresh Project awards up to $1.2 million in grants— from $5,000 to $50,000—to bring great ideas to life in communities across the country. So far, Pepsi has distributed more than $20 million dollars to fund hundreds of great ideas.

What's your idea?

gd022_Cover_121010ak.indd 1


Cover features the work of Andrew Kuo

GOOD Magazine Redesign GOOD Magazine is a current events magazine that focuses on contextualizing problems and celebrating solutions. It is a publication meant to define how we can live a meaningful 21st century life, wherein we focus on the great communal good as well as how to best serve our personal concerns. The publication underwent a redesign for the summer 2011 issue. In The Data Issue, under the art direction of Atley G. Kasky and Keith Scharwath, we restructured the grid, introduced new type styling, reduced elements and elevated the feel of the publication to something more fitting of a quarterly. I also provided the lead point for all communication for contributing artists and art directed most of this issue, as a hand off of duties from Atley G., Kasky to me.


D ATA V I S U A L I Z AT I O N

NONprOfIT OrgANIZATIONS

gOVerNmeNT

bUSINeSS: OTHer

bUSINeSS: reTAIL/mercHANT eDUcATION

bUSINeSS: fINANcIAL/INSUrANce meDIcAL

pAymeNT cArD frAUD

UNkNOwN/OTHer

pHySIcAL LOSS

STATIONAry DeVIce

HAckINg Or mALwAre

INSIDer

pOrTAbLe DeVIce

UNINTeNDeD DIScLOSUre

Life’s a

Breach

Organizations Affected

Data Breach Incidents

6060

6060

5050

5050

4040

4040

3030

3030

60

The Data Issue 2020

GOOD 024

COntents

COntents

50

2020 40

30

2011 2011

Clearinghouse. And those are just the incidents that have been reported. In reality, the number of breaches is probably much, much larger. We don’t even know how much data we’ve lost.

0

Andrew Kuo makes charts about charts. 46

46 Life’s a Breach

As the amount of data we produce has increased,

Fall 2011 / Data

w w w.good.is / data

so has the number of records we’ve lost or had stolen.

47

DISC DISC

86 Identity Crisis

32 The Seven Habits of Highly

Obsessive People

Transgender teens don’t have a problem with who they are. So why do psychiatrists want to label them

Designer Nicholas Felton compiles meticulous

as “disordered”?

annual reports about himself. We asked his mom and

92 Time Frame

70 Magician, Heal Thyself!

Everyday experiences take on new meaning when

Positive thoughts, laser-light shows, Arizona

they’re compressed into a single photograph.

shamans, and other motivational potholes on the road to self-help

girlfriend if the charts are getting it right.

6

Q U aliFYi N g t i M E

Fall 2011 / Data

w w w.good.is / data

Q U aN t i F Y iNg g E N dE R

Identity Crisis

tiME FraME photographs D. Bryon Darby

Is transgender teens’ desire to switch their sex a mental disorder that needs treatment, or is it the rest of society that has a problem?

by Natasha Vargas-Cooper collages Beth Hoeckel

92

w w w.good.is data chest where 93 Elliott has two scars across/ his

Fall 2011 / data

his breasts used to be. He has full sideburns down his gaunt cheeks, a strong chin, and sharp jawline. His voice is not deep enough to be considered baritone. At 22, he looks like a rather boyish young man. You would not mistake him for a woman, although he was born a woman. There’s a chance you might mistake him for Morrissey, which is the look he’s going for. The asexual British rocker poet has long been the patron saint of gay and androgynous youth. Elliott’s story is one we are hearing more and more these days. About the time he hit puberty, his body started developing in a way that was incongruent to how he perceived himself. Breasts, new thatches of hair, and an emerging feminine shape pushed Elliott toward an identity that felt alien. By 16, he felt as though his body no longer belonged to him. “It was something happening to me. Like it wasn’t even a part of me.” To say that Elliott felt like a man trapped in a woman’s body or that he was repelled by his own private parts, as the typical definition Bio Natasha of a transsexual would Vargas-Cooper is a have you presume, journalist whose work

would be inaccurate. Elliott didn’t want to escape one sex role to embrace another, but he did have a desire to feel “more manly.” Disoriented and nervous about what was happening to him, he told his parents that he thought he was, perhaps, maybe, “bisexual?” But as time went on Elliott found that his feelings had less to do with which sex he was attracted to and more to do with which sex he wanted to be. In fact, for his age, Elliott thought very little about sex. He had somewhat resigned himself to a life of solitude, as lonely teenagers are wont to do. As Morrissey sings, “You don’t have to tell me … I know I’m unlovable.” His junior year of high school, Elliott found out about hormonal replacement therapy. Once he turned 18 he would be eligible to receive testosterone injections without parental consent and eventually his body would take on more masculine characteristics, including facial hair, a broader brow, deeper voice, and decreased breast size. To get the treatment, however, Elliott would have to undergo 15 sessions with a psychologist to prove that his biological sex caused him enough distress that it merited reassignment. That psychologist would then give him a letter addressed to a physician

certifying that Elliott suffered from genderidentity disorder. Elliott never believed he had a “disorder,” so he feared he would give the wrong answers, or not display enough distress. “It was all so ridiculous,” he tells me. “I was contemptuous of the whole thing. I basically had to keep meeting with this psychology grad student who handed me a fifty-question checklist on our first session. You can look up symptoms online to make sure you get your diagnosis letter, so I made sure I did that.” One thing trans-themed forums and blogs recommend is journaling about a “real life experience” to show a therapist. According to the “standards of care” put out by the World Professional Association for Transgender Health for the medical and psychiatric community, it’s recommended that prior to hormone therapy, the patient has a “documented experience” dressed as the gender he or she desires to be. This ultimately means going in drag to work, school, or among family to confront possible anxieties that come with a new gender and face “external consequences.” Though the process frustrated Elliott, he did not want to buy hormones on the black market (which you can also do

has appeared in The New York Times,

86

Fall 2011 / data

The Atlantic, and GQ.

w w w.good.is / data

87

7

2011

2010 2010

2009 2009

2008 2008

fill in the answer sheets their own way.

the outcome of the 2012 election.

2010

22 Graphic Statement

with a multiple-choice exam. We asked five artists to 10

and other hyperspecific voting blocs could determine

2009

exposing racist jokes in emails exchanged by Arizona police officers—and sometimes it’s accidental, a misplaced iPhone or a misdirected email. But as the amount of data

There are some things that just can’t be evaluated

SUV-driving lawyers who care about the environment,

2008

incidents

Suburban Hispanic moms who care about education,

we collectively produce has exponentially increased, so have the number of breaches. Since 2005, more than 534 million digital records have been stolen, lost, or compromised, according to the Privacy Rights

2007

Sometimes it’s intentional—hacktivists

56 The Testing Bubble

2006

Y axis = number of reported

2007 2007

2006 2006

2005 2005

20

66 The Information Arms Race

2005

data curation Nathan Yau charts Dylan C. Lathrop

2011 2011

2010 2010

2005 2005

2009 2009

00

2008 2008

00

2007 2007

1010

2006 2006

1010


the neighborhoods issue

can we borrow some sugar?

the new orleans issue

sOlVinG tHE suBuRBs tHE GOOD GuiDE tO MaKinG yOuR nEiGHBORHOOD GREat MR. ROGERs anD ME

who dat

THE NOLA 25: NEw ORLEANs’s BEsT AND BRiGHTEsT CAN sCHOOLs sAVE A CiTY? BRAD piTT’s NEiGHBORHOOD

94

45

65

50

42

94

alsO

ALsO

CanDlEpin BOwlinG / RiCHaRD FlORiDa sHaRinG / CiViC pRiDE / nEiGHBORHOOD FlaGs GHOst tOwns / BlOCK paRtiEs and MORE

NAkED pizzA / Bp / kANYE wEsT / TREmE / sissY BOuNCE / DAVE EGGERs / RiGHTEOus fuR / kk pROjECTs / fLOATiNG HOmEs and mORE

Here comes the neighborhood.

FREE

GOOD is a collaboration of people, businesses,

Issue 019

and nonprofits pushing the world forward. This is

Spring 2010

HanGER

our quarterly magazine. More at www.GOOD.is

$6.95 U.S.

DOOR

New Orleans Issue

Neighborhoods Issue

THE AmAziNG REBuiLDiNG Of NEw ORLEANs

LOVE LETTERS TO NOLA

GOOD is a collaboration of people, businesses,

Issue 020

and nonprofits pushing the world forward. This is

Summer 2010

our quarterly magazine. More at www.GOOD.is

$6.95 U.S.

Display until July 5, 2010

gd19_Cover_031610ak.indd 3

DispLAY uNTiL OCTOBER 18, 2010

3/16/10 11:03 AM

the work issue

gd020_Cover_061410ak.indd 1

6/14/10 1:37 PM

the energy issue

heigh-ho, heigh-ho

shOulD yOu quit yOur jOb? tips fOr lOvinG what yOu DO (Or DOinG what yOu lOve) 30 places we want tO wOrk

energize

Life After CAp AnD trADe the GOOD GuiDe tO sAvinG enerGy in yOur Life nine wOrst bLACkOuts

76

65

44

65

90

42

ALsO

alsO

nikOLA tesLA / smArt meters / hOme AuDits bAttery-ChArGinG shOes / LeApfrOG teChnOLOGy fueL fOr hAiti / GriD pArity and mOre

Mike rOwe / Dan pink / clippy’s tips / cOwOrkinG / alternative entrepreneurs / 20 best perks / clip art cOllaGes / rObOt OverlOrDs and MOre

NSFW?

Our generation’s complicated

E i t h E r w E i n n ovat E n ow o r w E g E t r E a dy fo r a da r k f u t u r E .

GOOD is a collaboration of people, businesses,

Issue 021

and nonprofits pushing the world forward. This is

Fall 2010

our quarterly magazine. More at www.GOOD.is

$6.95 U.S. $6.95 Canada

The energy Issue

the work issue

relationship with work

gd021_Cover_092310_jdAK.indd 1

9/23/10 7:48 AM

bAtteries

nOt inCLuDeD

GOOD is a collaboration of people, businesses,

Issue 022

and nonprofits pushing the world forward. This is

Winter 2011

our quarterly magazine. More at www.GOOD.is

$6.95 U.S. $6.95 Canada DispLAy untiL ApriL 11 2011

Display until january 3, 2011

gd022_Cover_121010ak.indd 1

GOOD Magazine Previous to the redesign that appeared in GOOD 024: The Data Issue, I provided editorial design for five issues of the magazine, starting on GOOD 019, the Neighborhoods issue. On GOOD 022, The Energy Issue, I provided the overall assets used throughout the magazine. I worked under the art direction of Keith Scharwath (019, 022, 023), Atley G. Kasky (022, 023), Jennifer Daniel (021) and Ness Higson (020).

12/10/10 5:03 PM


◊ Zoot Suit RiotS ◊ stArt dAte June 3, 1943

Taking To The STreeTS

L.A.’s most fAmous And infAmous riots And protests by Cord Jefferson illustrations by JordAn CrAne

the spArk Problems similar to the ones currently plaguing American-Mexican relations were thick in California throughout the 1930s and ’40s, with Americans believing Latino newcomers were taking their jobs and affordable housing, and responsible for a crime wave. Calling attention to themselves even more, Mexican boys often donned loose-fitting zoot suits, whose excessive cloth made them illegal under World War II rationing. In all, it was a perfect background for a showdown between white servicemen and Mexicans when a mob of sailors stormed East L.A. and indiscriminately attacked Latino teenagers. the event For several days, servicemen from as far away as San Diego poured into L.A. by the hundreds to start fights and smash up businesses. Throughout it all, the police did nothing. Eventually, the attacks got so bad—and the lackadaisical police response so pathetic—that the military itself had to bar servicemen from entering L.A. The City Council also banned the wearing of zoot suits in public. the AftermAth First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt, so troubled by the riots, wrote in a newspaper column, “The question goes deeper than just suits. It is a racial protest. I have been worried for a long time about the Mexican racial situation. It is a problem with roots going a long way back, and we do not always face these problems as we should.” A committee created to explore the riots decided the media’s unfair portrayal of Mexicans as hoodlums and inappropriate police response were largely to blame. No U.S. serviceman was ever charged with a crime for his participation in the riots.

◊ WattS RiotS ◊ stArt dAte August 11, 1965 With the Arab world in the midst of an historic

upheaval thousands of miles away, it’s perhaps easy to forget that Americans themselves—and Angelenos especially—have rioted in the streets many times before. Be it based on racial antipathy, anger at the government, or disappointment with a certain trial verdict from 1992, Los Angeles’ diverse citizenry has a history of demonstrating when it feels slighted, even if that means tearing the city apart from the inside out. Here, a rundown of Los Angeles’ most famous and infamous protests and riots.

98

the spArk Simmering racial tensions finally boiled over when a white cop arrested Marquette Frye for drunken driving and then refused to let Frye's brother, Ronald, drive the car home, instead impounding it. When Ronald—and subsequently the boys' mother—was arrested for arguing with police, a crowd of black onlookers grew angry, smashing cars throughout the night.

and the National Guard. On August 16, the riots finally subsided, leaving in their wake 34 dead—rioters, law enforcement, and fire officials—and more than 1,000 injured. Hundreds of buildings were burned or otherwise destroyed. the AftermAth Governor Pat Brown convened what would become known as the McCone Commission to make recommendations on avoiding another Watts-type riot. Citing poverty and low education as contributing factors, the commission recommended “emergency” literacy programs, increased low-income housing, and improved relations between the community and the police. A Los Angeles Times investigation from 1990 showed that most of those recommendations were essentially ignored.

◊ Rodney King RiotS ◊ stArt dAte April 29, 1992 the spArk Following the seven-week trial of four white LAPD officers charged with brutally beating Rodney King, a black man, a majority white jury acquitted the officers. A few hours after the verdict, the city descended into chaos.

Bricks and Mortar in the cit y of angels

the event The 1992 riots were as close to a race war as L.A. has come. Some African-Americans specifically targeted whites for attack—e.g., Reginald Denny—while others burned Korean-owned groceries. In response, Koreans in Los Angeles formed an impromptu militia to protect their businesses from blacks, Latinos, and whites. In the end, after 4,000 U.S. troops had barreled into the city in Humvees, the riots left dozens dead, thousands injured, and $1 billion in damages.

photographs by WIll ETlIng

the AftermAth Like with the Watts riots, a Special Committee of the California Legislature assembled to ascertain the underlying problems of the riots, many of which were quite familiar: “unemployment,” “inadequate housing,” “disrespectful white attitudes,” and “discriminatory administration of justice.”

the event Rioting continued for four days, during which time Watts residents violently clashed with police

99

bio Cord Jefferson is GOOD’s senior news writer.

GOOD Spring 11

www.good.is

Cities: Los Angeles

/losangeles

Shelter, in its most basic form, is about physical protection from nature and the elements. Yet throughout history, man has built structures that offer solace for the spirit as well. Within the built environment of the modern city, the various architectures of churches and temples tell different stories: Some point upward to the sky, while some direct all traffic in through the front door. Some attract second looks with their ornamentation, while some warn the uninitiated to walk on by. And some, quite frankly, tell us that this was the most affordable space available. In the following pages, the photographer Will Etling takes us on a tour of the literal foundations of Angeleno faith by viewing the walls we built in order to worship. —PATRICK JAMES

Issue 022 Winter 2011

Zenshuji Soto Mission

AnnuAl GlobAl EnErGy Consumption vs. AnnuAl AvAilAblE GlobAl EnErGy rEsourCEs

Church of Scientology

GlobAl AnnuAl EnErGy Consumption

Energize Issue 022 Winter 2011

solAr | WinD | biomAss | GEotHErmAl | oCEAn & WAvE | HyDro | CoAl | oil | GAs | urAnium

Contemplate the nearest light switch. Flip it and you instantly become part of a chain that leads from the now glowing lightbulb to thousands of miles of copper wire to a power plant that generates electricity by burning coal, a fossil fuel created hundreds of thousands of years ago when ancient ferns became trapped under a layer of mud and were slowly transformed. Electricity is not an inexplicable miracle. It’s the result of a complex series of chemical reactions and mechanical processes that we have turned to the purpose of wringing energy from nature. It’s a brilliant achievement except for one issue: Our main sources of fuel destroy the planet when we use them, and they are running out anyway. The situation is dire but not irreparable. We know that there is enough energy from clean, renewable resources on our planet to easily give us all the power we need. We just have to harness it. In this issue we celebrate the people taking on this great challenge of the 21st century. Energy means progress. And right now progress means finding new energy. 29 www.good.is /energyissue

Gra phic Vio lence Drawing the largest crime scene in America by PatrIck Strange and LeO McgOvern

Since the summer of 2005, New Orleans has been predominantly known for two ongoing events—the devastation, governmental buffoonery, and human catastrophe that was Katrina, and the city’s unending culture of crime. It wasn’t long after residents returned from their evacuations to Houston, Atlanta, and beyond that the city’s crime rates reached their pre-storm levels. They have since remained the highest in the country. Violent assaults and damage to property are everyday occurrences in a place that has become accustomed to tragedy. Poverty, corruption, and lack of education set off a murderous cycle decades ago; Katrina only made it worse.

To assume that New Orleans crime begins and ends on the streets and in the emergency rooms would be misguided. As numerous local government and civic leaders have argued ever since the levees broke, the systemic negligence that led up to the breaches and the response following them could be considered criminal in both deed and intent (with blame mostly resting upon the Army Corps of Engineers and FEMA). The ongoing city and state corruption and corporate irresponsibility might be seen as transgressions of the highest order (as exemplified most recently by the Gulf of Mexico oil spill). It is this idea—New Orleans as both crime-ridden and as a crime scene itself—that takes center stage in a couple of current graphic novels depicting Katrina-era New Orleans.

The recently published NYPD Blue-meets-Seven crime drama Sweets—created by Louisiana native Kody Chamberlain—attempts to use New Orleans’s staggering murder rate for its fictive advantage. Set in late August, 2005, as the hurricane looms, Sweets follows Detective Curt Delatte as he chases down a serial killer who leaves pralines as his calling cards. Adding somber insult to fatal injury, Delatte’s wife has just left him after their daughter was killed in a brazen hit-and-run. Murder and civic chaos abound, and the surrounding violence only heightens the sense of impending doom as the storm swirls towards the city. “Like it or not, the murder rate gives the city a sharp edge,” Chamberlain says, “which adds weight to any story set in New Orleans.”

88

BIO Patrick Strange is the managing editor of Filter and the co-publisher

BIO New Orleanian Leo McGovern is the publisher of ANTIGRAVITY, the

89

GOOD Summer 10

and editor of New Orleans’s Constance, an art and literature journal.

founder of The Alternative Media Expo, and the creator of the online

www.good.is

comic Firesquito.

/neworleans

New Orleans


YOU WISH CORNER GROCERY LIQUOR • BEER • WINE

COR LIQ


Foodprint Project (left page) Foodprint Project is an endeavor started by Nicola Twilley and Sarah Rich that focuses on the problems facing cities through the lens of food. They have held live events in New York, Los Angeles, Toronto and Denver and are currently gearing up to showcase this work in Italy. The poster was created to hang in promotion and as a show piece for that upcoming event. Assets made from this poster will be later implemented in two pamphlets meant to be dispersed at the event and online.

Various Illustrations (right page) Select illustrations from Bloomberg View and GOOD.


MCAD Magazine The Minneapolis College of Art and Design is a world renown design and art school based in Minneapolis, MN. During my time working at MCAD DesignWorks, I was fortunate enough to be the designer for the MCAD Magazine, a publication that gets sent out to other schools and alumni to the college. Made in collaboration with the Art Direction team Midwest Visual Agency, we crafted a simple, brutalist interpretation of the magazine, focusing on clean hierarchies and analog form making methods to convey all the relevant news coming from the institution.


Pepsi Refresh Project The Pepsi Refresh Project is an initiative to create ground level change in communities across America by giving out grants—that vary in size—to democratically voted projects. This work is a sampling of the year long involvement I had in tracking the impact and distilling the information related to all the good Pepsi created in 2010. Made during my time as the staff designer at GOOD Projects.

13

playgrounds

Every month, the Pepsi Refresh Project awards up to $1.3 million in grants — from $5,000 to $250,000 — to bring great ideas to life in communities across the country. So far, 42 — totalling $620,000 — have gone to help our four legged friends.

What's your idea?

Every month, the Pepsi Refresh Project awards up to $1.3 million in grants — from $5,000 to $250,000 — to bring great ideas to life in communities across the country. The Pepsi Refresh Project has helped build and restore thirteen fun-filled playgrounds, giving children across the country something to smile about.

What's your idea?

Every month, the Pepsi Refresh Project awards up to $1.3 million in grants — from $5,000 to $250,000 — to bring great ideas to life in communities across the country. Pepsi Refresh grantees have covered 123,332 miles on foot, bike, and inline skate to raise awareness for community causes—from affordable housing to obesity—from Puyallup, Washington to Gainesville, Florida.

What's your idea?


For the Troops

In just nine months, the Pepsi Refresh Project has directed over $550,000 to 14 projects that affect the lives of troops. We've seen so many creative ideas for improving the lives of servicemen and servicewomen — from job retraining in New Haven to Girl Scout cookies airmailed to war zones. And with funding from the Pepsi Refresh Project, nearly 10,000 care packages have been sent to our troops abroad, with the goodies pictured below. To all our troops, on this Veterans Day, we salute you.

1,500 Golf Clubs 3,350 Tubes of Toothpaste 50,000 Golf Balls 3,350 Disposable Cameras

3,350 Energy Bars

1 Visit with an NHRA Driver

3 Trips to Disneyland

3,350 Movies

Tickets to the Little League World Series

3,175 LED Flashlights 3,350 Packs of Playing Cards

3,175 Video Games

3,350 Books 5,617 Songs

Awes me, New Y rk

Rosendale Theater

C-R Kids at Cohoes Music Hall

Veterans

Towanda Skate Park

To date, New York state has received:

33 Grants $1,750,000

The Empire State really is something. The communities in New York have been doing remarkable things through the Pepsi Refresh Project, from major school improvements to veterans' support, and everything in between. Here’s a look at some amazing things New Yorkers have done to make their world a better place.

9 78 9 Performance Spaces & Art Programs!

Schools Improved!

New Playgrounds!

LIVE! TONIGHT! SOLD OUT!

Pepsi Refresh Project Guidebook

Military Support Projects!


The Citizen—Cheyenne The Citizen—Cheyenne was my senior thesis project at the Minneapolis College of Art and Design. The purpose of the project was to solve the problems facing the contemporary daily newspaper. The idea was based on the feeling that the local newspaper had been ravaged by Associated Press contracts that forced them to focus not on local news, but adhere to a guideline of delivering national news that wasn’t always relevant to the citizens of any given local city. I tested out an idea of democratizing the newspaper by purchasing ad space in my hometown newspaper, The Wyoming Tribune Eagle and inserting locally sourced pieces that ran free in the issue. Allowing citizens to control what the news was focused it down to a pure news delivery system, and the strength of the publication was smart, enjoyable design that made it accessible to anyone looking through the paper. The subversion of placing this in the constantly harder and harder to sell ad space both gave a new way of utilizing that portion of the paper, while also propping up the host publication with additional income.


TIMELINE

THE COST OF BEING FEMALE

SCREENING FOR GESTATIONAL DIABETES FOR PREGNANT WOMEN

How Much the Average Woman Spends on a Lifetime Birth

of Basic Health Care $294.00

$300

The Institute of Medicine has named eight preventive services that women should get for free under the new health care law. Democrats and women’s health organizations are rejoicing—they’ve been fighting for this for years. But exactly how much money are we talking about? We imagined a “typical” American woman whose sexual health and life choices correlated with the national averages, and tallied up the money required to ensure she's in good reproductive health. This timeline shows all the milestones that would be free, should the Department of Health decide to take the IOM’s advice. Turns out being a woman is pretty pricey.

$270 $240

$210

$180

$147.00

$150 $120

TIMELINE KEY:

$90

Diabetes Screening

HIV Counseling

Sterilization

HPV Testing

Lactation Support

IUD Insertion

Hormonal Birth Control

$80.00

$60

$40.00

Domestic Abuse Counceling

$30 0

Double these totals, because the average American woman has two babies in her lifetime.

CHART KEY: With insurance

Without insurance

HIGH-RISK HPV TESTING Starting at 30, she’ll need an HPV test every 3 years until about age 70. That’s about 40 years, or 13 comprehensive Pap smears.

Various Infographics

= $20.00

Infographics made for a variety of topics, all appearing online or in the pages of GOOD. Clarifying information and making it consumable beyond just raw numbers is something I am trying to better grasp in my ongoing practice, and these infographics represent that evolution.

ANNUAL HIV COUNSELING AND SCREENING If she has one screening a year for 30 years, she's out anywhere from $1,500 to $6,000.

HAITI

Corporations gave/pledged/promised in-kind donations of this much to Haiti (counts non-American companies and international charities): $146.8M

Average cost of HIV test

Two Quakes, Two Tactics In the one month after the disaster, average Americans were far more magnanimous with their donations in the aftermath of the Haiti earthquake than they have been for Japan, according to figures compiled by the Chronicle of Philanthropy. Global corporations however, have been much quicker to give to America's fourth-largest trading partner.

corporate donations individual donations

American individuals gave this much to Haiti in one month after the quake (via American charities): $709M

JAPAN

Corporations gave/pledged/promised in-kind donations of this much to Japan (counts international charities): $277.5M (as of 4/4/11)

American individuals gave this much to Japan in one month after the quake and tsunami (via American charities): $246.5M

$50 COPAY

$150–$200

0

$50

$100

ANNUAL COUNSELING FOR STD INFECTIONS

$150

$200

FULL RANGE OF BIRTH CONTROL

The average American woman will spend 30 years trying to prevent pregnancy.

$146.8 MILLION

$709 MILLION

$277.5 MILLION

This is the one thing she can probably get free now at a local health clinic, although as of now much of the education women get about STDs in some states comes from abstinence-only health classes, while clinics close down around them.

$246.5 MILLION

If she’s on hormonal birth control, the monthly co-pays are about $15 to $50. MONDAY

MONDAY

31

OR

$180 TO $600 A YEAR

MONDAY

31 31 31 MONDAY

$5,400 TO $18,000 A LIFETIME

An IUD insertions with health insurance costs about $60, and needs to be inserted every 5 years. Without health insurance, it can be more than MONDAY

LACTATION SUPPORT AND COUNSELING, EQUIPMENT FOR BREASTFEEDING SOURCES: THE CHRONICLE OF PHILANTHROPY (INDIVIDUAL GIVING IS FROM AMERICANS TO AMERICAN CHARITIES), U.S. CHAMBER OF COMMERCE BUSINESS CIVIC LEADERSHIP CENTER

20

Big L.A.’s core S

A COLLABORATION BETWEEN GOOD AND DYLAN C. LATHROP

Perhaps because Hollywood casts such a large shadow, and perhaps because it lacks an NFL franchise, Los Angeles is rarely regarded as one of the nation's great sports cities. Yet it's home to some of the most popular professional sports teams in the nation—and those teams routinely fill their stadium seats. AEG's controversial proposal for a new downtown stadium and convention center could lure an NFL team to L.A., but is it what the city needs—or wants? Here's what AEG says the project would do for the city.

$

LOCATION! LOCATION! LOCATION!

Amid the conflict over the potential downtown stadium, what's been somewhat forgotten is the bid for construction of Los Angeles Stadium in the City of Industry, 30 miles east of downtown. The proposed LEED certified, EIR approved building would be situated in a 600-acre area ideal for tailgating before games and utilize solar power.

STADIUM STATS FOR THE ROSE BOWL & THE COLISE UM

OCCUPAN CY

92,542

FARMERS FIELD

L.A.

40

Do sports teams make money for cities? It's tough to say. In an article for The Washington Post, Sally Jenkins notes that between 1995 and 2003, 21 stadiums were built or renovated with luxury boxes at a total cost of $6.4 billion—of which the public paid $4.4 billion.

FARMERS

Born: Pro

FIELD

OCCUPAN CY

93,607

APPROXIM ATE APPR OXIMATE DISTANCE DISTANCE FROM FROM DOWNTOW N DOWNTOW N

11 MILES

It costs $80 for a single lactation class, plus about $670 for breastfeeding supplies.

Because AEG claims the project won't cost taxpayers a single cent (helped in part by Farmers Insurance cutting a massive naming rights check), the project looks to get fast-tracked through City

50

Hall. That means it has the potential to generate money for the city without burdening the budget, but it also means the public has less of a say over how it's built (or whether it happens at all).

$600, OR $3,600 FOR A LIFETIME If she decides to get sterilized, it’ll cost her anywhere from $1,500 to $6000. Most insurances cover it, but only partially, so the costs could still be up to $2000.

SCREENING AND COUNSELING FOR DOMESTIC VIOLENCE Some insurance companies pay for a few counseling sessions, but 5 sessions will still cost her $200 in copays. Out of pocket, it could cost her around $1000.

$412.64

ANNUAL PELVIC EXAM

ATTENDANCE CAPACITY

REVENUE

TEAM VALUE

HOME GAMES

AVG. TICKET PRICE

COST OF STADIUM

56,000

$247 MIL

$727 MIL

81

$30

$18 MIL

45,050

$217 MIL

$521 MIL

81

$20

$24 MIL

By the time she turns 18, a woman will have her first pelvic exam, and gets an average of one a year until she is about 70. That’s 52 exams.

5 TOTAL SESSIONS Start

Exam

End But the real cost of not providing this service for free is often a life, since most women don’t seek out counseling in the first place.

4 MILES

jected 201 5 Home: Los Angeles “Developme nt of Farm change the ers Field and the Con face of dow of hotels vention Cen ntown and and ter will furt facilitate with an esti other major entitle additional her d project mated valu developmen s within e in excess ts the immedia of $3 billi te vicinity PROJECTED on.” —AEG , STATS FOR FARMER Seating S FIEL D 68,000 stan dard sea Parking ting 32,000 par 78,000 exp king spa and able ces within seating Jobs Between a 15 minute 20,000 and walk to Farm 30,000 tem wage and ers Field union jobs porary and permanent Funding $1 billion living total inve stment for all privatel the develop y funded ment of Farmers Field,

MONDAY

THE AVERAGE COST FOR A FAMILY OF FOUR TO ATTEND AN NFL GAME

A LOOK AT L.A.'S OTHER TEAMS—WHAT THEY'RE WORTH AND HOW MANY PEOPLE THEY SERVE TEAM

MONDAY

31 31 31

18,997

$214 MIL

$643 MIL

41

$113

$375 MIL

18,997

$102 MIL

$305 MIL

41

$52

$375 MIL

18,118

$98 MIL

$215 MIL

41

$47

$375 MIL

Death

At a $40 co-pay for each, she’ll spend $2,080 on preventative pelvic exams throughout her life. If she doesn’t have insurance, she’ll spend an average of $120 a pop at Planned Parenthood.

Sources: Planned Parenthood and Quest Diagnostics, www.healthcarebluebook.com, Guttmacher Institute, Kaiser Family Institute, www.suite101.com

SEE MORE AT WWW.GOOD.IS/INFOGRAPHICS

A collaboration between GOOD and Dylan C. Lathrop


Contract Killer

KEY While advocates of smaller government see contractors as the path to a slimmer public sector, they cost more than federal employees and their private-sector counterparts

TOTAL FEDERAL COMPENSATION

SEE MORE AT WWW.GOOD.IS/INFOGRAPHICS

TOTAL PRIVATE SECTOR COMPENSATION AVG. CONTRACTOR BILLING RATE

RIP

Accounting

Cemetery Administration Services

Computer Engineering

Correctional Officer

600000

600000

600000

600000

500000

500000

500000

500000

400000

400000

400000

400000

300000

$299,374

200000

300000

$268,653

100000

$124,851

200000

200000

200000

100000

300000

300000

$299,832

$106,124

$83,132

100000

$136,456

$131,415

100000

$94,485

$72,977 0

0

0

0

General Attorney

Nurse

Police

600000

600000

500000

500000

500000

400000

400000

400000

400000

300000

300000

300000

300000

200000

200000

$554,923

500000

200000

200000

$220,924

$179,254

$174,803

$175,081 100000

100000

0

0

$105,714

$83,803

Facility Operations Services

600000

600000

$33,598

100000

$91,042

$71,256

$57,533

$95,659

100000

0

$108,060

$119,449

0

SOURCE: PROJECT ON GOVERNMENT OVERSIGHT

A COLLABORATION BETWEEN GOOD AND DYLAN C. LATHROP

What is the Ideal Space Career for You?

www.good.is

This might not come as a big surprise to those of us who read the op-ed pages every day, but most commentators are not accurate prognosticators. New analysis of pundits' statements during the 2008 presidential race shows that while a number of them fared better than a simple coin toss at predicting outcomes, most were reliably inaccurate. Which talking heads got it right occasionally—and which stopped making sense?

DO YOU HAVE A DEGREE IN SCIENCE OR ENGINEERING?

YES NO

GOOD

DOES YOUR FAVORITE MOVIE HAVE “STAR” IN THE TITLE?

BY THE NUMBERS LET ME FINISH!

YES NO

NO, TO SPACE!

You don’t really love space anyway :( SPACE DOMINANCE

NO

ARE YOU REALLY JUST IN IT TO MEET ALIENS?

NO. THEY WILL NEVER LIVE UP TO THE HYPE

YES

ASTRONAUT

SETI RESEARCHER

Good for you! But you’ll have to hitch a ride with the Ruskies.

Well, at least until all the funding is pulled.

9 14 2

GIVE UP THE DREAM! DUH, OBVIOUSLY

YES

NO

CAN YOU WITHSTAND LONG HOURS STARING AT A COMPUTER SCREEN?

DUDE, JUST BE A PILOT!

DO YOU SPEAK RUSSIAN?

UGLY

NO

CAN YOU FLY A PLANE?

YES

BAD

SCI-FI WRITER That Battlestar Galactica fan-fic isn’t gonna write itself!

Source: "Are Talking Heads Blowing Hot Air? An Analysis of the Accuracy of Forecasts in the Political Media” by Hamilton College

GOOD

BAD

UGLY

OTHER FACTORS

Paul Krugman

Howard Wolfson

Lindsey Graham

Maureen Dowd

Mike Huckabee

Carl Levin

Ed Rendell

Newt Gingrich

Joe Lieberman

Chuck Schumer

John Kerry

Sam Donaldson

On the whole, liberals tended to be more accurate than conservatives, even when the topic was not political in nature.

Nancy Pelosi

Bob Herbert

George Will

Kathleen Parker

Andrea Mitchell

Cal Thomas

David Brooks

Tom Friedman

Hank Paulson

David Broder

Eugene Robinson

Clarence Page

Pundits holding a degree in law also tended to be more accurate than those without it.

Nicholas Kristof Hillary Clinton

A collaboration between GOOD and Dylan C. Lathrop


Unequal-Design is Dylan C. Lathrop

dylan@unequal-design.com 612 840 0550

Thank you for your time.

Fall 2011 Portfolio  

A sampling of recent work.

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