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KYRGYZSTAN:

successful youth – successful country


KYRGYZSTAN: successful youth – successful country

FOREWORD On 18 December 2009, the United Nations General Assembly adopted a resolution proclaiming the year commencing on 12 August 2010 as the International Year of Youth: Dialogue and Mutual Understanding. The Year coincides with the 25th anniversary of the first International Youth Year in 1985 that was titled “Participation, Development and Peace.” In 2007, the 1.2 billion people between ages of 15 and 24, those the United Nations refers to as “youth,” were the best educated young generation in history. Amounting to 18 percent of the world’s population, today’s youth are a tremendous resource for national development. However, the benefits from a large and dynamic youth population don’t ensue automatically. When societies provide adequate guidance and opportunities for youth in their education, health, employment, sports and leisure activities, the young people’s talents and energy can be unleashed early on empowering them to meaningfully contribute to development of their communities, their countries and the whole world. Over half of the Kyrgyzstani population is under the age of 25, and about 32 percent is between 15 and 25. The youth of the country (those between ages of 15 and 25) were born in the last decade of the Soviet Union and in the early years of the country’s independence. They grew up in time of massive changes in their immediate social environments that included both challenges and opportunities. The socioeconomic transformation in the whole Commonwealth of Independent States (CIS) region brought about significant changes in labor market prospects for young people. Those changes include new skills and educational requirements that often cannot be met because of deteriorating educational institutions and a fragile social fabric. Under Soviet socialism, employment was ensured by the State for all and was considered not an option but a duty. While choice was limited, the system provided young people a sense of security, assured a largely predictable path from school to work and gave access to benefits and social services provided by State-owned enterprises (2007 World Youth Report). Now, the situation is different. As a “young” state, both historically and demographically, Kyrgyzstan faces serious challenges: this Report demonstrates the potential to transform these challenges into real opportunities through focused efforts to tackle youth’s human development problems. To unleash the full potential of Kyrgyzstani youth, harness their energy to contribute to the socioeconomic and cultural development of the country, and make their transition into adulthood as smooth as possible, reliable channels of two-way communication are of utmost importance, including studies of youth problems, and studies of different segments of youth (school and university students, employed and unemployed youth, urban and rural youth, young men and women). This National Human Development Report puts exactly this type of research forward for the whole country. The authors surveyed 1,000 young people; the sample is representative and reflects the gender and age composition of the youth population in the Kyrgyz Republic. The respondents were asked their opinions about themselves and their environment. This nationwide survey of youth became the starting point for further expert analysis. Youth live through the impact of the same trends as the rest of the country’s population such as the global economic crisis, globalization and climate change. I have found it fascinating how young people respond to the current challenges. We have commentary and opinion on what young people think from experts, policy analysts, sociologists, economists, and experts in education, culture, and medicine. But, at the end of the day, what shines through in the report are the views of youth. Young people want quality education that meets the labor market requirements, adequate youth-friendly health services, access to information and modern technologies. The NHDR-2009/10 on youth in Kyrgyzstan is based on the results from this broad survey, followed by the focus group meetings and roundtables with young people throughout the country and expert analysis. This truly participatory approach provides us with a snapshot of youth’s needs and wants as they perceive and understand them. The group of independent authors looked at the components of human development (health, education, social activism, etc.) through the prism of values that affect youth’s behavioral patterns. We learned that young people in Kyrgyzstan most value getting education and making the right career choices. Their value orientations are related to the ideas about social order, its economic and political foundations, and perspectives on society’s historic development. I believe that the views of youth on these issues constitute an important factor in assessing current societal processes and development trends in the country. 


KYRGYZSTAN: successful youth – successful country

This report is based on the premise that good policies can make a real difference. It provides a set of recommendations for decision and policy makers, including approaches to the youth affairs and priorities in education, healthcare, employment, environment, and social activities. One of the report’s goals – to attract the attention of policymakers and public figures to the problems of young people – will be achieved through the wide coverage of the study results. We expect that the results will debunk some of the clichés and myths about youth of Kyrgyzstan and help to more effectively channel resources into specific policy measures in various areas. The final report has eight chapters. Chapter I contains an analysis of human development in Kyrgyzstan and provides related human development indexes. Chapter II examines the country’s youth policy and its impact on the dynamics of youth’s development and prospects in Kyrgyzstan. Chapter III provides insights into youth’s values and articulates their needs and wants as they have expressed them during the nationwide focus groups. Chapter IV discusses education and pinpoints the major problems in the area. Some of the major problems are the lack of focus on society’s needs, and in particular, on training modern, competent professionals with skills and knowledge sets that are in high demand. Chapter V analyzes labor and employment and links these issues with the high level of migration of youth. The chapter reveals that youth believe that migration is the best way to meet the needs they can’t fulfill at home because of limitations related to age and socioeconomic status. Chapter VI considers young people’s health and its links to the healthy lifestyle culture which has to be shaped in the society to provide for the healthier younger generation and human capital of the country. Chapter VII elaborates on youth’s social connections and prospects, including issues of family, security, and environmental problems that will have an impact on their generation in the years to come. Chapter VIII provides a broad picture of youth’s social activities covering their leisure time, cultural development, mass media preferences, participation in the decision-making processes and issues of access to reliable sources of information. The report wraps up with a set of recommendations for the national decision-making centers and international community to help the country harness its youthful energies to make real progress in the human development of the country. Together, the analysis and associated recommendations constitute a powerful tool that we hope will spark results-oriented dialogue and action towards providing the youth of the country an environment where they want to be, and the means they need to achieve their aspirations and contribute to an ever stronger national economy. I would like to express my deepest gratitude to the independent group of authors, the report’s Advisory Board represented by the UNDP national partners, Kyrgyz civil society and private sector representatives, and to all contributors to this report. My colleagues at UNDP also join me in thanking UNFPA Kyrgyzstan for the financial support in printing additional copies of this report.

.

Neal Walker Resident Representative UNDP Kyrgyzstan




KYRGYZSTAN: successful youth – successful country

CONTENTS



FOREWORD

2

INTRODUCTION

5

CHAPTER 1. HUMAN DEVELOPMENT IN KYRGYZSTAN

6

CHAPTER 2. YOUTH POLICY

12

CHAPTER 3. VALUES

19

CHAPTER 4. EDUCATION

24

CHAPTER 5. LABOR AND EMPLOYMENT

29

CHAPTER 6. HEALTH OF THE YOUNG GENERATION

35

CHAPTER 7. SOCIAL CONNECTIONS AND PROSPECTS

43

CHAPTER 8. SOCIAL ACTIVITIES OF YOUTH

51

POLICY RECOMMENDATIONS

63

ANNEX 1

72

ANNEX 2

83

ANNEX 3

96

ANNEX 4

97

BIBLIOGRAPHY

98

LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS

101

ACRONYMS

102


KYRGYZSTAN: successful youth – successful country

INTRODUCTION Since the late 1990s, interest in youth policy and youth issues have become a global trend. Politicians, community leaders, and social scientists have become increasingly concerned about the gap between the established political and social structures and the growing individualism, social passivity, and political indifference of youth. A number of youth issues that have significant impacts on the development of individual countries and of the world have come to the fore: drugs, HIV/AIDS, migration, unemployment, and the like. International forums have started to draw the attention of governments and the public to the need to develop and use the capacities of the youth, directing their energy into productive channels, and giving timely attention to demographic, social, and other problems. That’s why 15 National Human Development Reports (NHDRs) focused on youth were published in various parts of the world. Kyrgyzstan has not been excluded from these global trends. The year 2009 stands out here because this year those born after the country became independent on August 31, 1991 are coming of legal age. For the first time, a generation raised completely without the Communist Party’s influence is entering adulthood. This is a generation of young people who never been members of Komsomol (the Communist Union of Youth) or the All-USSR Pioneer Organization. With the collapse of the USSR and the resulting changes in the republic’s economic and political development goals, many social institutions that had protected interests of youth (albeit from the vantage point of communist ideology) ceased to exist and the new ones are still in the process of being established and developed. The state no longer provides special status or any guarantees for youth (for example, employment, education, benefits for young specialists, etc.) Many social, economic and administrative barriers have been torn down, which has led to extreme mobility for youth – the opportunity to choose where they want to live, what they want to study, and what career they wish to pursue. With the development of the global information network, young people now have more opportunities for individual development. Today, society is struggling with the emergence and expansion of new forces that affect hearts and minds (religious, nationalist and extremist organizations, criminal groups, etc.), which have active and aggressive policies focused on youth, which take into account the current situation, shaping new needs and promoting new values. All those external challenges and negative tendencies directly impact young people who, like the rest of society, are trying to adapt to the complex economic situation in the country. The state must more effectively pursue economic and social policies aimed at minimizing external risks and threats. However, such policies cannot be implemented successfully without input from the population, including young people. This Kyrgyz NHDR aims to discover and draw on the capacities of youth, focusing in particular on the most active young people. These active youth, in turn, will serve as catalysts, engaging other young people in their work. Thus, the strategy for working with youth should focus on creating structures, mechanisms, and an enabling environment for the formation and development of young people who are active in civil society, know how to serve as leaders, and are able to make decisions on their own.




KYRGYZSTAN: successful youth – successful country

CHAPTER 1. HUMAN DEVELOPMENT IN KYRGYZSTAN 1.1. Major tendencies

People are the real wealth of a nation. This simple truth is often overlooked and replaced with notions of economic growth and decline that focus on gross domestic product (GDP) as an indicator. We try to equate human wellbeing with material welfare. Yet, the most reliable indicator of progress is quality of life. The Human Development Concept is about opportunities for fulfilling human potential. It is about real alternatives that offer adequate income, education, health, and life without despotism. It puts the human being in the center of socioeconomic development. It is the cornerstone of the NHDR.

Box # 1: The Human Development Concept

Human Development is a development paradigm that is about much more than the rise or fall of national income. It is about creating an environment in which people can reach their full potentials and lead productive, creative lives in accordance with their needs and interests. People are the real wealth of nations. Thus, development is about expanding the choices people have, allowing them to lead lives that they value. It is about much more than economic growth, which is only a means —though a very important one —of increasing the range of choices people have. Fundamental to expanding this range of choices is increasing people’s capabilities —the range of things they can do or be in life. The most basic capabilities necessary for human development are to lead long and healthy lives, to be knowledgeable about the world, to have access to the resources necessary for a decent standard of living, and to be able to participate in the life of the community. Without these, many choices are simply not available, and many opportunities remain inaccessible. This way of looking at development, often forgotten in the face of concerns about accumulating goods and wealth, is not new. Philosophers, economists, and political leaders have long emphasized human wellbeing as the goal of development. As Aristotle said, “Wealth is evidently not the good we are seeking; for it is merely useful and for the sake of something else.” In seeking that “something else,” human development shares a common vision with human rights. The goal is human freedom. And in realizing capabilities and pursuing rights, this freedom is vital. People must be free to exercise their choices and to



participate in decision making that affects their lives. Human development and human rights are mutually reinforcing, helping to secure the well-being and dignity of all people, building self-respect and respect for others. “The basic purpose of development is to enlarge people’s choices. In principle, these choices can be infinite and can change over time. People often value achievements that do not show up at all, or not immediately, in income or growth figures: greater access to knowledge, better nutrition and health services, more secure livelihoods, security against crime and physical violence, satisfying leisure hours, political and cultural freedoms, and participation in community activities. The objective of development is to create an enabling environment for people to enjoy long, healthy, and creative lives.” Mahbub ul Haq Founder of the Human Development Report

http://hdr.undp.org/en/humandev/


KYRGYZSTAN: successful youth – successful country

Since 1995, nine NHDRs, have been written in Kyrgyzstan.

 Title

Year

1.

General Human Development Report

1995

2.

General Human Development Report

1996

3.

Social Cohesion

1997

4.

Role and Influence of the State

1998

5.

General Human Development Report

1999

6.

Democratic Governance for Human Development

2000

7.

Democratic Governance: Alternative Approaches to Kyrgyzstan’s Future Development

2001

8.

Human Development in Mountainous Regions of Kyrgyzstan

2002

9.

The Influence of Civil Society on the Human Development Process in Kyrgyzstan

2005

Box # 2: Kyrgyz NHDRs

1.2. The Human Development Index (HDI)

or Index of Human Capacity Development has been described in the NHDRs annually since 1995. The HDI reflects opportunities for the self-realization of nation’s citizens. It summarizes indicators of longevity, education, and income (gross domestic product per capita, by purchasing power parity in US dollars). In line with the decision of the UN Statistical Commission, the global International Comparison Programme measured GDPs in 2005, which affected indices that had been published earlier. For the present report, GDPs have been recalculated in line with US dollar PPP in 2005. Table 1.1 Components of the HDI Indicator

1993

1995

2000

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

Estimated life expectancy at birth (years) 1

67.3

66.0

68.5

68.2

68.2

67.9

67.7

67.9

Adult literacy (%)

97.3

97.3

98.7

98.7

98.7

98.7

98.7

98.7

Percentage people aged 7 to 24 who are enrolled in elementary, secondary, and higher education institutions.

66

63

71

71

71

71

71

72

Real GDP per capita (PPP 2005 $)

1,282

1,000

1,332

1,558

1,697

1,728

1,813

1,980

Life Expectancy Index

0.705

0.683

0.725

0.720

0.720

0.715

0.712

0.715

Education Index

0.867

0.859

0.895

0.896

0.895

0.896

0.895

0.897

Income Index

0.426

0.384

0.432

0.458

0.473

0.476

0.484

0.498

Human Development Index

0.666

0.642

0.684

0.692

0.696

0.696

0.697

0.704

Table 1.1 provides data showing the dynamics of the HDI and its components. Since 1993, Kyrgyzstan’s score on the HDI has increased by 5.7 percent, and since 1995, by almost 10 percent. From 1994 to 1998, HDI has decreased because of a reduction in growth in per capita consumption of GDP. The lowest level of HDI was in 1995: 0.642. In 2007 it reached 0.704. Because of real GDP growth, the Income Index increased from 0.384 in 1995 to 0.484 in 2007. The Education Index stayed virtually level, starting at 0.859 in 1995 and ending at 0.897 in 2007. The Life Expectancy Index decreased slightly from 0.725 in 2000 to 0.715 in 2007. On the regional level, (Table 1.2) HDI has undergone significant changes. In 2000, HDI in Issyk-Kul Province (0.718) and in Bishkek city (0.719) were significantly higher than the country’s overall HDI (0.684). The high level in the Issyk-Kul region can be attributed to the presence there of the Kumtor Gold Company’s mining enterprise. In 2002, due to a decrease in production at Kumtor, the index fell to 0.683 and did not exceed 0.700 in 2007.

1 Some decrease in the indicator is related to the country’s transition (since 2004) to criteria of viviparity and infant and child mortality suggested by the World Health Organization.




KYRGYZSTAN: successful youth – successful country

Table 1.2. HDI Dynamics 1995

2000

2004

2005

2006

2007

Kyrgyz Republic

0.642

0.684

0.696

0.696

0.697

0.704

Batken Province

-

0.638

0.648

0.638

0.638

0.650

Jalal-Abad Province

0.633

0.688

0.667

0.661

0.663

0.667

Issyk-Kul Province

0.646

0.718

0.708

0.697

0.683

0.693

Naryn Province

0.638

0.677

0.658

0.656

0.661

0.666

Osh Province (including Osh City)

0.621

0.654

0.641

0.641

0.665

0.667

Talas Province

0.641

0.678

0.677

0.675

0.685

0.685

Chui Province

0.660

0.681

0.691

0.687

0.682

0.683

Bishkek Province

0.664

0.719

0.749

0.762

0.812

0.828

In 2007, not a single province had an HDI over 0.700. The lowest HDIs – in Batken, Naryn and Osh provinces – were offset by Bishkek’s HDI of 0.828, to reach a national average of 0.704.

1.3. The Gender-related Development Index (GDI)

shows progress in the same aspects and variables as HDI does. But it also serves as a measure of human development that adjusts the HDI for disparities between men and women providing very basic measures of how gender inequalities in knowledge, long and healthy lives, a decent standard of living affect human development. The GDI is a measure of prosperity. In some countries attitudes toward women’s economic, social and political opportunities affect the overall human development status. UNDP developed the GDI to focus attention on this problem. This measurement negatively affects HDI depending on the status disparities between men and women. In human development, the larger gender dispariDiagram 1.1 ties in country, the lower is the GDI in HDI by province, 2007 comparison to the HDI. The dynamics of the GDI fully correlate with the dynamics of the HDI. The difference between HDI Batken province and GDI scores in Kyrgyzstan is traditionally small, indicating the principal parity Jalal-Abad province of development opportunities for men and women.

Naryn province Osh Province (including Osh City) Talas province Chui Province Bishkek City



Kyrgyz Respublic

Issyk-Kul province

The Adjusted Income Index grew from 0.451 in 2005 to 0.476 in 2007, accounting for most of the increase in GDI. Growth in the ratio of women’s salaries to men’s salaries was also strong (increasing from 62.5 to 67.3 during the same time period), as was growth in the aggregate share of female students in elementary, secondary, and higher education institutions (which increased from 73.1 percent to 73.7 percent). Estimated life expectancy at birth has also grown significantly.


KYRGYZSTAN: successful youth – successful country

Diagram 1.2 Dynamics of HDI and GDI

HDI GDI

1.4. The Gender Empowerment Measure (GEM) includes indicators reflecting opportunities for women in politics, administration, and business: the share of women in legislative bodies, in administrative and managerial positions, working as experts and technical staff. It is designed to measure the opportunities for women and men to actively participate in economic and political life of the country. Table 1.3. Dynamics of GEM components (percentage) 1995

2000

2004

2005

2006

2007

GEM

0.444

0.479

0.530

0.529

0.533

0.532

Share of women in economically active population

46.4

45.3

43.1

42.9

42.4

42.2

Share of women in legislative bodies

10.1

14.8

18.9

19.1

19.1

19.1

Share of women in administrative and managerial positions

35.5

29.5

34.5

36.1

38.7

37.6

Share of women working as experts and technical staff

44.3

44.0

57.0

61.9

62.5

63.1

Salary ratio, women to men

73

68

66.6

62.5

65.8

67.3

Table 1.3 the dynamics of GEM indicators does not have clear growth trends which affected both the national index and the regional ones (see Annexes 1 and 2). Kyrgyzstan’s GEM has increased mainly due to the introduction of gender quotas for seats in the country’s parliament. Before the introduction of quotas, in 2005 and 2006 not a single woman in Kyrgyzstan was elected to the legislative body of the country. From 2003 to 2007, the percentage of female parliamentarians grew from 7 percent to 27 percent. During the same period, the share of female administrative and managerial personnel increased by eight percent. In other words, women are gradually increasing their representation in public institutions. Yet, to significantly increase the number of women in the legislative branch of government, special measures in the form of gender quotas have been indispensable.




KYRGYZSTAN: successful youth – successful country

1.5. The Human Poverty Index (HPI-1)

was proposed by the international community to describe poverty and measure the level of hardship from the perspective of standard of living. However, it does not reflect the whole picture of poverty in the country; it focuses on a relatively small part of the population living in conditions of extreme deprivation. HPI-1 includes the percentage of people who die before the age of 40, the literacy level of the adult population, and an overall indicator of deprivation (lack of access to safe drinking water and healthcare services, and percentage of 1- to 6-year-olds who are underweight). HPI-1 dynamics (Table 1.4) show a decrease in this indicator. At the same time, analysis of HPI-1 shows uneven dynamics across the various provinces. In 2007, as in previous years, the lowest HP-1 level was recorded in Bishkek City. Table 1.4: HPI-1 by province Kyrgyz Republic Batken Province

1996

2000

2004

2005

2006

2007

10.3

8.4

8.7

7.8

7.1

6.9

10.1

11.7

8.9

7.5

7.9

-

Jalal-Abad Province

10.3

7.2

8.7

5.5

5.5

5.9

Issyk-Kul Province

9.6

6.5

8.2

7.5

8.1

7.8

Naryn Province

10.8

7.7

9.6

8.3

12.0

8.2

Osh Province (including Osh City)

14.0

11.7

11.9

12.5

9.8

9.0

Talas Province

13.0

5.9

6.8

7.6

6.4

6.8

Chui Province

7.2

9.4

7.9

9.3

8.4

8.2

Bishkek City

6.9

7.5

5.3

5.3

5.3

5.2

1.6. GDP

From 2003 to 2007, the GDP grew an average of 5 percent per year, reaching 141.7 billion soms in 2007. 2 GDP in 2008 was 185 billion soms (about $5.1 billion), reflecting real GDP growth of 7.6 percent. Overall, real GDP per capita (PPP, $) grew from $1,558 in 2003 to $1,980 in 2007. Despite the increase in the budget (both as a percentage of GDP and in absolute terms), during this period, social security spending decreased from 15.3 percent of government spending in 2003 to 10.5 percent in 2007.3 Average monthly government benefits for those living beyond the poverty line are low (187 soms 4). Social security assistance does not cover everyone in need of it, despite the increasing size of the national budget.

1.7. Poverty

2 “National Accounts of the Kyrgyz Republic 20032007.” (2008). Bishkek. 3 “The Second Periodic

Progress Report on the Millennium Development Goals in the Kyrgyz Republic.” (2009). Bishkek: UNDP. 4 “Kyrgyzstan in Numbers.

Statistical collection.” (2008). Bishkek.

5 “The Second Periodic Progress Report on the Millennium Development Goals in the Kyrgyz Republic.” (2009). Bishkek: UNDP. 6 “The Second Periodic Progress Report on the Millennium Development Goals in the Kyrgyz Republic.” (2009). Bishkek: UNDP.



Poverty levels in Bishkek and the provinces remain disproportionately high. While only 0.6 percent of people in the capital are extremely poor, in the provinces the number is 6.6 percent. At the same time, the percentage of population living in poverty is steadily decreasing. In 2007, the poverty line was 963 soms per month and the extreme poverty line was 640 soms per month. In 2003, 49.9 percent of the population was considered poor. In 2007, the number was 35 percent. In 2008, it was expected to be 34.8 percent. Real incomes grew by 17 percent5 during the period in question, which led to equivalent growth in private consumption. This is mainly explained by an increase in transfers from labor migrants, whose ranks have increased several times over (transfers accounted for 6.9 percent of GDP in 2003 and up to 27 percent of GDP in 20076), which amounted to around $1.02 billion in 2007. However, given the current economic crises in Russia and Kazakhstan, transfers from labor migrants are expected to decrease and some labor migrants will likely return to Kyrgyzstan. Their return will exacerbate the difficult situation in the domestic labor market and lead to a decrease in their families’ incomes. Kyrgyzstan is landlocked and is not on any major transit routes. Therefore, it is extremely dependent on the economic conditions of its main trade partners: China, Russia, and Kazakhstan. It is not accidental that in all economic forecasts, the experts are particularly concerned about decreasing production rates and devaluations of national currencies in Russia and Kazakhstan. Although the flow of foreign direct investment into Kyrgyzstan increased 280 percent from 2005 to 2008 (to $580 million), foreign trade flows increased 140 percent during that time period, and exports increased by 240 percent, the country’s trade balance still remains negative ($2.9 billion in exports, $4.7 billion in imports).


KYRGYZSTAN: successful youth – successful country

1.8. Education and life expectancy

The sociocultural development and the health of the population are interconnected with the condition of the country’s economy. In 2007, almost 21 billion of the country’s 35.9-billion-som budget (the budget accounts for 15 percent of GDP) were spent in the socio-cultural sphere. Literacy level of the adult population calculated as a share of literate population at the age of 15 and older is 271 per 1,000 people, and in 2008 this indicators has not changed. Estimated life expectancy at birth increased from 68.2 years in 2003 to 68.4 years in 2008. In 2003, the estimated additional life expectancy at the age of 60 was 15 years for men and 18.4 years for women. By 2008, those numbers had increased to 15.2 years for men and 19 years for women. In other words, men and women who have reached the age of 60 are expected to live longer now than they had been then. However, on average, women in Kyrgyzstan live longer than men.




KYRGYZSTAN: successful youth – successful country

CHAPTER 2. YOUTH POLICY Since independence, the Kyrgyz Republic has faced the need to create policies – including youth policies – that aren’t founded in the totalitarian ideology it once knew. So Kyrgyzstan has been shaping a new legal framework for youth policy and has implemented two national programmes for youth development for 2006-2008: Jashtyk and Kyrgyzstan Jashtary. The country adopted its “Conception for the Development of State Youth Policy in the Kyrgyz Republic Until 2010,” its laws “On the Bases of State Youth Policy,” “On Education,” and “On Elementary Vocational Training,” and a whole set of other laws on health and social protection for young people. The “Conception for the Development of State Youth Policy in the Kyrgyz Republic Until 2010” declares that, “state youth policy should aim to create legal, economic, organizational and other conditions and guarantees for the self-fulfillment of a young person’s individuality and the development of public youth organizations, movements and initiatives.” According to the Conception, the state has six priorities in this area: 1. spiritual, moral, civic, and patriotic development of youth; 2. state support for young families; 3. protection of health and promotion of healthy lifestyles for youth; 4. state support for education, culture, leisure, science, technology, and art; 5. provision of economic independence, vocational guidance, and labor rights for youth; and 6. support of young citizens in difficult conditions through social services, and rehabilitation. The policy measures developed for each priority were quite ambitious, including: • • • • • •

7 “Youth – Strategic Resource of Kyrgyzstan.” (2008). Bishkek: UNDP. 8 “The Concept of the State Youth Policy Development.” (2008). Bishkek. 9 “Materials of the Parliamentary Hearing on the Draft Law “On the Bases of State Youth Policy” on June 16, 2009.” (2009). Bishkek. 10 “Materials of the Parliamentary Hearing on the Draft Law “On the Bases of State Youth Policy” on June 16, 2009.” (2009). Bishkek.



cultivating respect among young people for their cultural heritage and national traditions; assisting young families in solving housing issues; developing healthcare services, including rehabilitation centers for youth; reducing the gap between urban and rural youth in terms of access to educational and cultural programmes; creating jobs for youth, especially those under the age of 18; and developing a network of specialized establishments capable of ensuring full-scale socialization of children and youth (such as boarding schools, orphanages, and sports schools).

However, analysis of the youth policy, conducted in the “white book” on youth policy revealed 7 that it is not being effectively implemented. As the Concept for the development of the state youth policy states “during the last 15 years authorities have been extremely disinterested, pushing urgent tasks in this field to the margins of country’s internal policy.” 8 The majority of activities planned in the national programmes were not implemented. Analysis of the content of the activities that were conducted shows that they had mainly a “mass cultural” character and included sporting events, seminars, and meetings. Besides, according to focus groups, real work with youth at the local level was limited to organizing leisure activities (dances, study groups, and sports clubs). In other words, activities in the area of youth policy boil down to the organization of leisure and entertainment. Such services these days are provided by private businesses (concerts, contests, discotheques) and non-governmental organizations (sports competitions and festivals). Representatives of state agencies say insufficient funding is the main reason that youth policy has been ineffective. Out of the 30 million soms planned for the Kyrgyzstan Jashtary programme for 2006-2008, only about 6.5 million soms were allocated: about 2 million soms in 2006; about 2.3 million soms in 2007; and about 2.2 million soms in 2008). 9 Indeed, the government seems to finance youth policy with “leftovers.” Funds from the central government’s budget primarily cover civil servants’ salaries and the operating expenses of state agencies. The national budget provides only limited amounts for organizing events, and local budgets do not fund any events, let alone policy measures aimed at youth. For instance, out of Kyrgyzstan’s seven provinces, only two of them – Talas and Osh – allocated funds for youth events.10


KYRGYZSTAN: successful youth – successful country




KYRGYZSTAN: successful youth – successful country

In reality, the state’s investments in youth are considerable, but they are made within a variety of different fields, including education, healthcare, cultural activities, and employment. The structure of the budget makes it complicated to perform a holistic analysis of how much the government spends on youth and how effective such expenditures are. All ministries and agencies say they provide services to everyone in society, without singling out the needs of youth as a separate target group. They focus their efforts on covering the maximum possible part of the population, as written in their regulations. Furthermore, the volume, standards, and quality of government services are not assessed by a single state agency. Thus, the problem is not a shortage of state resources invested in youth, but the lack of a strategic vision for such investments and a lack of focus in state youth policy. Due to the shortage of resources, the state is forced to move away from central planning and encourage youth to organize and motivate themselves. Defining the state’s role in youth policy remains an urgent task. Current approaches to working with youth have become obsolete and do not fit the reality of the modern market economy. The target of the policy (youth) is too broad, encompassing the entire population aged 14 to 28 (until amendments were introduced to the law “On the Bases of State Youth Policy”, it was 14 to 35). The existing analytical work on the problems of youth is insufficient. That is why the policies and measures that have been implemented have had a preventive, rather than reactive, nature. There is no system for collecting and processing information, no analysis and prioritization of problems that are identified, no classification, no forecasting, no alignment of policies with forecasts, and no coordination of work among ministries and agencies. Youth are not segmented, which leads to overly broad policies that don’t address the specific needs of different youth groups. That is why youth policy remains ineffective, poorly targeted, and formalistic, and is treated as a low priority among the state’s domestic policies. This can be explained by uncertainty in the conceptual approach to youth policy. There are no adequate institutional mechanisms or resources (neither financial nor human) for its implementation. In particular, the government organization that handles youth affairs changes its legal status nearly every time the government is reorganized, which shows a lack of consensus among decision makers on the goals, objectives, and functions of youth policy. The question of what, exactly, a government agency on youth affairs is responsible for and what it is supposed to manage – i.e., its mandate – remains open. Provincial committees on youth have been shut down (along with other state bodies at the provincial level) and the model for youth policy management at the provincial and district levels has not been clearly identified. Recently, the government began to signal changes in its approach to youth policy. In the past, 11 youth have been treated as objects (beneficiaries) of youth policy, rather than as subjects. The Kyrgyzstan Jashtary programme was developed without the broad participation of stakeholders, discussions with the public, or – most importantly – participation by youth. There have never been plans to monitor the achievement of the goals and objectives of the programme, let alone to involve youth organizations in independent monitoring of the program’s implementation. The new law “On the Bases of State Youth Policy,” which was adopted by the Jogorku Kenesh (the national parliament) on June 25, 2009, states that youth policy is to be developed with the participation of youth and implemented together with youth organizations. In other words, young people and their organizations were included among the subjects of youth policy. The preparation of the new law served as a good example of involving youth in policy formation: an initiative group comprised of representatives of youth organizations was formed, which developed a vision for a youth policy, which became the basis for the new law. This law also introduced some other innovations, including:

11 The subjects of policy are those who actively and consciously participate in political activity. The objects of policy are those at which this policy is aimed: for example, a group of people whom the state is trying to influence in order to change their behavior and social status.



• • • • •

separation of powers among state bodies; support and stimulation of youth initiatives through provision of grants for social projects; identification of mechanisms for involving youth in the development and implementation of youth policy; a legal mandate for state bodies to engage youth in the development and implementation of youth policy; securing the rights and interests of youth in the development of targeted programmes;


KYRGYZSTAN: successful youth – successful country




KYRGYZSTAN: successful youth – successful country

High in the mountains of Naryn Province lives an amazing young girl: Aigul. Delicate as a flower, but brave as a warrior, undeterred by obstacles, she managed to unite efforts and resources to help children.

BOX 2.1 Aigul (town of Naryn)

Aigul Abdyldaeva is a young leader of the nongovernmental organization Booruker (Merciful), and a regional coordinator for the nongovernmental organization MSDSP KG, an Agha Khan Foundation-funded programme supporting community development in Kyrgyzstan’s mountainous regions. She is 31 years old and is raising one charming daughter. Aigul’s parents are from Issyk-Kul (in the north), but she was born in the south and lived there for a long time. More recently, Aigul has moved to Naryn Province and for two years she has been working for the good of her new home. Aigul was able to unite the resources of local and international organizations, business organizations, and private donors in support of a project called Healthy Children – Healthy Future, which was timed to coincide with International Child Protection Day. After the completion of the project, children will be able to play sports and games in the gym of the Uson Asanov Boarding School. Younger children can spend their free time on a new playground, under their parents’ supervision. In addition, 130 children from the boarding school will receive valuable presents. And all this is thanks to Aigul, who was able to convince the government of Naryn District, the OSCE, Dordoi Mobile, and other sponsors, that the boarding school needed help. This isn’t Aigul’s first time helping the boarding school, either. Back in December of 2007, she created a youth initiative group to gather contributions and buy food for the children there.

young professionals. For instance, in 2007, she initiated meetings on: the role of Tokmo Akyns (Kyrgyz oral folk poets) in the formation of the consciousness of the Kyrgyz people in the modern world; business ideas for future businessmen in Naryn; and many other subjects. Aigul has also played an important role in the success of summer camp in Naryn Province. This grand event, funded by UCA, involved Peace Corps Volunteers, UCA professors, and other community members. More than 50 children from 20 villages attended the camp, where they improved their English and took part in recreational activities, combining work and play. Perhaps most importantly, they made friends from far corners of Naryn Province. There are many more examples of Aigul’s achievements. Once, the deputy head of the Jash Danaker Union of Young Patriots in Naryn said, “Aigul does a lot of useful things for Naryn, even more than Naryn natives themselves.” Following her credo that healthy children will build a healthy future society, she does everything she can, sparing neither her strength nor her resources. Aigul is a big optimist and she likes to draw, play the piano and learn foreign languages. She is fluent in English and has two diplomas. After having been abroad numerous times, she still thinks that living in Kyrgyzstan is happiness!

Story told by Taalai Osmonov Edited by Nurgul Sharshembiyeva of Journalists’ House (03922 51546)

No matter where Aigul is working, she always approaches her work in a creative manner and keeps in mind that a prosperous future can only be reached by taking action in the present. Earlier, while working as a public relations coordinator at the University of Central Asia (UCA) in Naryn, she organized weekly events for the development of

• • • •

creation of a foundation to support youth initiatives, including the introduction of definitions of “active” and “talented” youth (whom the foundation will support); codification of the definition of the term “volunteering,” which will lead to changes in other laws, which will acknowledge volunteering as work experience; narrowing of the definition of “youth” to people 14 to 28 years old (from 14 to 35); and legal introduction of definitions of “informal” and “unorganized” youth, whose representatives should be involved in the implementation of youth policy.

This attempt to pour “new wine into old wineskins” does not seem to have been very successful, though. The new edition of the law has preserved vestiges of the past, such as mythical benefits and privileges for youth (for example, the “creation of measures of state support for talented and active youth, young families and young citizens in difficult life situations,” and “ensuring a guaranteed level of social services and implementation of measures for protecting and strengthening 


KYRGYZSTAN: successful youth – successful country




KYRGYZSTAN: successful youth – successful country

the health of young citizens�). Such “measures� can cause dissatisfaction among other groups of citizens – pensioners, for instance, who are not promised a guaranteed level of social services. The policy of guardianship of young people, characteristic of the Soviet period, continues. A lot must still to be done to move from the adoption of the law to its implementation. The development and prosperity of Kyrgyzstan depends on its approach to youth, its prevailing vision for the role of youth in society, and its ability to propose to its young citizens a unifying civil identity. The failure to do this could lead to dangerous consequences such as: a further decline in young people’s trust in the state and its institutions; a search by youth for alternative and more “just� forms of social order; involvement of youth in antisocial, destructive, and extremist movements; and decisions by youth to emigrate. Modern young people, who grew up during the transition period are not an inert group, in need of constant care and guidance. It is necessary to search for new mechanisms for involving youth in society, based on their individual goals and interests, which motivate them to independently solve their own problems. Youth should choose their own paths to development, ways of life, and ways of thinking. The role of the state is to provide equal access to the resources – including information and quality basic education – necessary for employment.




KYRGYZSTAN: successful youth – successful country

CHAPTER 3. VALUES 3.1. The Youth of Kyrgyzstan: Who Are They?

Kyrgyz law defines youth as “a socio-demographic group distinguished on the basis of an aggregate of age characteristics, specifics of social position, and other conditional socio-psychological characteristics determined by the social structure, culture, socialization, and child-rearing patterns of society.” Youth policy used to include everyone from 14 to 35 years old 12 – too large a group. The current NHDR has been developed in a public policy format from the outset, with numerous events and meetings, during which youth issues were discussed extensively and with the engagement of numerous stakeholders (representatives of state bodies, the parliament, the business sector, the academic community). These meetings contributed to the adoption of the new law “On the Bases of State Youth Policy,” which was adopted and signed by the president on August 14, 2009. This law lowers the age limit of the “youth” category to 28 years. The World Programme of Action for Youth up to the Year 2000 and Beyond, which was adopted by the UN General Assembly in 1995, emphasizes that young people are the main human resource for development and the key factor in socioeconomic changes and technological innovation in any country. Youth are the country’s capital, and, therefore, the way the country addresses the needs and wants of its youth determines the course of the development of the society and the state. Young people adapt to changes much more quickly, since they are more energetic, more mobile, and less conservative than their elders. These qualities are especially important during periods of social and economic reform.

 Young people participating in focus groups (FGs) conducted in the course of the development of this report defined youth:

Youth are people “with optimism and hopes who are able to take risks and follow their dreams.” (FG, Bishkek)

Kyrgyzstan is a young state. As of January 1, 2008, 39 percent of its population was between the ages of 14 and 34 (2,049,000 of the 5,224,000 people in the country).13 Two-thirds of all young people live in rural areas and one-third in urban areas; the ratio of women to men is about equal. The share of youth is practically the same in every province, but the “youngest” is Osh City, which has a population that is 43 percent youth. Forty percent of the populations of Osh, Jalal-Abad, and Batken provinces are young people; in Bishkek, it’s 39 percent; in Chui, Talas, Issyk-Kul and Naryn provinces, it’s 38 percent. To realize the full potential of Kyrgyzstan’s youth, constant channels of communication are indispensable, including studies of youth problems, and studies of different segments of youth (school and university students, employed and unemployed youth, urban and rural youth, young men and women). This kind of research has been conducted in the course of this report’s development. The authors surveyed 1,000 young people from all the provinces of Kyrgyzstan. Forty-five percent were male and 55 percent were female. More than half of those surveyed (59 percent) were not married. Seventy-five percent of the young people were Kyrgyz, 12 percent were Uzbek, 6 percent were Russian, and 7 percent were other nationalities. The distribution of respondents across the country’s regions was representative of the total youth population. About 40 percent of respondents were school or university students, 48 percent were employed, and 12 percent did not work and did not study. In other words, the sample is representative and reflects the gender and age composition of the youth population in the Kyrgyz Republic. The respondents were asked their opinions about themselves and their environment.

3.2. Opinions of Youth About the State and Society

Analysis of the transformative processes taking place in Kyrgyzstan and the other CIS countries shows that certain shifts are taking place in the collective consciousness and, first and foremost, in value orientations. This fact cannot be ignored in development of political and social programmes. A deepening differentiation between – and sometimes even confrontation between – completely different points of view on our past, our current problems, preferred paths to development, and attitudes toward innovation, dictate a need for systematic studies of the values of the society in general and specific social groups, in particular. This is especially important for youth, since they are the most dynamic and promising socio-demographic group.

12 “Law on State Youth Policy,” as of February 26, 2000.

A distinctive feature of this report is the fact that the authors looked at components of human development (health, education, social activity, etc.) through the prism of values. Because it is values

13 Demographic Yearbook of the Kyrgyz Republic. Statistical collection. Bishkek, 2008.




KYRGYZSTAN: successful youth – successful country

that affect youth’s behavioral practices, the most important of which are getting education, choice of profession (career choices?), and the like. The study of youth values conducted for this report was far from comprehensive – it did not cover all aspects of this complex and almost unexplored area – but the authors attempted to identify the major aspects of the issue. This chapter contains results from the study’s survey and focus groups. Various value orientations are related to ideas about the social order, its economic and political foundations, and perspectives on society’s historic development. Furthermore, the assessment of the current societal processes is important to analyze the youth preferences (social attitudes). The authors’ analysis of youth attitudes revealed that almost one-third of young people are afraid of the future or uncertain about tomorrow, and that one-fourth are dissatisfied with what is happening and want to change the situation, while 13 percent are apathetic and fatalistic. Only 20.7 percent believe positive changes are taking place. There are small differences between the attitudes of men and women. For example, a little more than one-third of male respondents fear the future and feel uncertain about tomorrow, while the number is smaller among women (27 percent).

14 National Survey of the Kyrgyz Republic. International Republican Institute, 2009.

Overall, youth in Kyrgyzstan have a wide range of attitudes, but they are predominantly pessimistic (and increasingly so as they age). In this, they are no different from the rest of the population, according to the results of other studies. People who live in Osh, Jalal-Abad, and Batken provinces (both youth and adults) are less pessimistic than those who live further north. 14 The reason young people plan for the short-term is because they are uncertain about the future. When talking about their plans for the future, almost all focus group participants – regardless of gender – mentioned the need to graduate from school and/or university, to find a job, to go to other countries for education or employment, and to start a family.

Diagram 3.1 In your opinion, which of the evaluations given below reflects the prevailing attitude in society today?

14%

The analysis of various aspects of youth’s life demonstrates the same situation. Thus, 28 percent of respondents were not satisfied with their artistic talents; 28 percent were not satisfied with their prospects for professional growth; 25 percent were not satisfied with their material wellbeing; and 24 percent were not satisfied with the level of legal protection available to citizens. At the same time, an overwhelming majority of respondents (96 percent), regardless of gender, are satisfied with their lives in general. The survey asked young people to choose the five most important values from a list and rank them by importance. Among the top five (regardless of age and gender) were the following (see Annex): 1. health; 2. peace; 3. family and children; 4. material wellbeing; and 5. freedom.

Satisfaction that positive changes are taking place Apathy, acceptance of fate Fear of the future, uncertainty of tomorrow Dissatisfaction with what is happening, desire to change the situation by any means Don’t know/no reply



The fact that health, family and children, and material wellbeing top the list demonstrates the adherence of young Kyrgyzstanis to traditional universal values. The fact that peace came second, attests, in our view, to young people’s concerns about the unstable situation in the country. This was also mentioned in the materials of the seminar “Peace and Development Analysis: UNDP Youth Programme,” which was conducted in February 2009.


KYRGYZSTAN: successful youth – successful country

In more stable societies, this value is not as important. For instance, according to the results of one study, the priorities of Russian youth were ranked in the following order: studies, education; family, children, home; job, business.15

 The Peace and Development Analysis (PDA) process is a tool to create a plan that contributes to a common vision of peace and development in Kyrgyzstan. The PDA process unites people from all sectors and levels in the Kyrgyz Republic. It is a bottom-up process, where the voices and concerns of people are taken into account and included in national and local development plans. This process makes people think not only beyond their individual interests, but also beyond the present – towards the future they want to create for their children. Consultative PDA workshops, designed to encourage the participation of a variety of stakeholders, were conducted in all seven provinces and in Bishkek. At the initiative of the Department of Economic and Social Policy under the Adminis-

tration of the President, the organizers also conducted a workshop specifically for youth. The workshop results and additional research are being consolidated into the National PDA Report, which will be launched at a national conference that will include representatives of the government, civil society, the mass media, and international organizations. Based on the information obtained in the PDA process and the consensus reached at the conference, a National Peace and Development Strategy will be developed. It will specify ways to eliminate root causes of conflict and instability in the country, and ways to regulate key tensions and conflicts at the national and local levels.

BOX 3.1. Peace and Development Analysis Process (PDA) in Kyrgyzstan Peace and Development Programme, UN Development Programme (UNDP) BASIC INFORMATION

Studying young people’s role models will help us understand their guiding principles, which will help us understand their behavior. Survey results revealed that 30 percent of respondents do not have any role models among the political, public, and cultural figures of the present, and 42 percent do not have any role models among figures of the past. Twenty-five percent of respondents named President Kurmanbek Bakiev as present-day role model. Chinghiz Aitmatov 16 was mentioned among both figures of the past and the present (in total, 23 percent chose him). Only 8 percent of respondents named Manas as a model. 17 Analysis of the large percent of “other” responses indicates localization of ideals. Oftentimes, the figures named were known only within the boundaries of a rather limited area. In determining value orientations, attitudes towards the past and the present are important, but so are attitudes towards new technologies and the modernization of society, in general. The survey showed that the majority of youth (55 percent) are open to innovations and want to try something new in their life, studies, and work. Every fourth young person said he or she would never risk trying something new and would keep to the beaten track. Every fifth could not identify his or her position. In order to determine to what extent the declared values were real, it was necessary to compare their emotional and rational evaluations. In the process of the survey, young people were offered a list of 36 concepts-values from three categories: civil (justice, rule of law, morality, and safety, for example), traditional (motherland, Kyrgyzstan, and tradition, for example) and market (business, entrepreneur, market, and middle class, for example). Respondents expressed their emotional response (“definition evokes positive or negative emotions”) to each concept. The concepts-values were conditionally divided into five groups based on their emotional assessment rankings. THE FIRST GROUP includes the concepts-values which received the highest number of positive assessments (more than 80 percent said they evoked positive emotions). They include “motherland,” “Kyrgyzstan,” “earth,” “money,” and “my relatives.” Interestingly enough, a concept from another concept category – “money” – was included in this “traditional-patriotic group.” On the one hand, this is a sign of young people’s pragmatism – youth today have a more rational-individual emphasis than the youth of previous generations. On the other hand, it indicates that money is not only the basis of material wellbeing, but also a means of solving many issues given the country’s increasing corruption.18 THE SECOND GROUP includes concepts that received an above average number of assessments (65-79 percent), including “safety,” “stability,” “justice,” “tradition,” “rule of law,” “law and order,” “private property,” “patriotism,” “president,” “nation,” “religion,” and “business.” The fact that “safety,”

15 ZIRCON: Value Orientations of Russian Youth: Ideological Declaration. Moscow, 2006. 16 Prominent Kyrgyz writer and public figure who is internationally known. 17 National hero who is glorified in the Kyrgyz national epic “Manas.” 18 National Survey, conducted by the International Republican Institute, 2008.




KYRGYZSTAN: successful youth – successful country

“stability”, “rule of law” and “law and order” were in the second category provides more evidence of the importance of “peace” as a value for youth. THE THIRD GROUP includes concepts that received an average number of positive assessments (51-64 percent). They include “strong state,” “morality,” “modernization,” “sovereignty,” “entrepreneur,” “democracy”, “market”, “civil society.” THE FOURTH GROUP includes concepts that received a low number of positive assessments (21 to 50 percent): “power”, “competition”, “politics”, “self-governance” and “middle class.” “Today, we all rely on money, I think it is wrong. Doctors and teachers buy diplomas with money. This is wrong.” (FG, unemployed youth, Naryn)

THE FIFTH GROUP includes concepts that received the lowest number of positive assessments (18-20 percent). They include “religious sects”, “bribe” and “revolution” Evidently, these notions are not very popular, but it’s important to note that they still received a significant number of positive assessments (see Annex). Traditional-patriotic concepts-values prevail in the first group. Civil society concepts-values placed mostly in the second and third groups. Concepts related to market values placed mostly in the second, third and fourth groups. At the second stage, the authors identified asked respondents for rational evaluations. To do this, they selected several concepts related to democracy and market relations, and suggested that respondents choose one of two opposing judgments about each concept. Analysis revealed that emotional and rational evaluations of certain concepts-values could differ considerably. This means that these values exist at a declarative level, while their real acceptance is ambiguous. “Democracy” evoked positive feelings in the majority of youth surveyed (61.3 percent). A similar number of young people (63 percent) placed “rights and freedoms of an individual” at the top of the list. Young citizens, eager to defend their rights from government interference, are always active in the process of democratization and social reform. This might be the result of education and organizing work by NGOs or the government’s proclamations about democratic values. However, every fourth respondent admits that the state’s power is stronger than the citizen’s rights. It is also interesting to note that “self-governance” received lower evaluations than “democracy” (49 percent). This attests to the fact that youth do not yet see these concepts as equivalent. Youth split into three groups when rationally evaluating the concept “democracy”: the first group (42 percent of respondents) thought democracy was the best form of government that exists. Every third respondent was convinced that democracy has more cons than pros. And members of the third group (one in four) could not identify their positions. Table 3.1 Democracy: Emotional and Rational Evaluations Democracy Emotional evaluation Positive feelings

Negative feelings

Neutral feelings/ don’t know

Democracy

61%

12%

27%

Self-governance

49%

18%

33%

Civil society

59%

13%

28%

Rational evaluation



Democracy is the best existing form of government

42%

Democracy has more cons than pros.

34%

Don’t know

24%

Individual rights and freedoms cannot be limited, even for the good of society and/or the state.

63%

In the interests of society and/or the state, some individual rights and freedoms can be limited.

27%

Don’t know

10%


KYRGYZSTAN: successful youth – successful country

According to emotional evaluations, market values were scattered among three groups, which, in our opinion, indicates that young people have not yet formed a coherent view of them. Rational evaluations divided respondents into three camps: first, those who supported stricter government control of businesses (40 percent); second, those who supported “the state giving more freedom to businesses” (49 percent). Third, there were those who were not certain (20 percent). Almost half of respondents saw “fair distribution of public goods” in a market economy, while one in three was convinced that market economies lead to “the widening gap between the rich and the poor, and the tyranny of employers.” Analysis showed that, among youth there was no significant gender difference in emotional and rational evaluations of values. Table 3.2 Market Values: Emotional and Rational Evaluation Market Values Emotional Evaluation: Positive feelings

Negative feelings

Neutral feelings/ don’t know

Private property

66%

10%

24%

Business

65%

10%

25%

Entrepreneur

61%

10%

29%

Market

56%

17%

27%

Competition

40%

32%

28%

Middle class

45%

18%

37%

Rational Evaluation: The state should control businesses more strictly

39%

The state should give more freedom to businesses

44%

don’t know

17%

A market economy leads to a wider gap between the poor and the rich, and tyranny by employers

33%

Only a market economy can ensure fair distribution of public wealth

46%

don’t know

21%

The concept of “stability” evokes positive emotions in 70 percent of young citizens, but it received a positive rational assessment from just 50 percent of respondents. One third of those who responded to this question had more revolutionary attitudes. Young people think that changes for the better are necessary for the country and, therefore, these changes should happen as quickly as possible and by any means necessary. These young people create a real social base for certain sociopolitical forces, some of which are destructive. Forty-three percent of respondents expressed a readiness to sacrifice themselves one way or another for the future of their country. Undoubtedly, here we see the presence of adolescent maximalism, which could be used either for the good of the country or for the expansion of radical and extremist forces, including those of religious nature. In this regard, we would like to emphasize the fact that 68 percent of respondents are convinced that Kyrgyzstan should be a secular country. “Order” and “law and order” evoked positive feelings in respondents (74 percent and 65 percent, respectively). However, an alarming trend is that every fourth respondent thought that, “If the law is bad, it is not necessary to follow it.” The authors looked at three components of value orientations: emotional, rational, and behavioral. In addition, it seems reasonable to study motivation. The stability of value orientations are tested by comparing stated perceptions of certain concept-values with real behavior vis-à-vis these concept-values. The authors of this report did not pursue enough in-depth research to present all aspects of young people’s value orientations in detail . However, what we have learned in this first attempt suggest that a deeper study of the subject matter is necessary.




KYRGYZSTAN: successful youth – successful country

CHAPTER 4. EDUCATION Kyrgyzstan has a well developed network of institutions of general and vocational education, which serves a large proportion of the country’s youth. But the system was created during the Soviet era and the education it provides reflects that, so it does not always meet the needs of a modern market economy. At the same time, funding for education is aimed at supporting the educational network itself, not its clients – the students. Nevertheless, youth value their diplomas, even if the diplomas don’t come with real professional/vocational knowledge.

4.1 Current situation in the educational system

Education is one of the national government’s largest budget items (7 percent of the 2008 budget). The right to education and the regulations supporting it are guaranteed by the Constitution, the law “On Education,” and other laws. Every citizen has the right to education regardless of gender, nationality, native language, social status, occupation, political and religious beliefs, or place of residence. 19 The law guarantees free secondary education. Education reforms including management decentralization, establishment of private educational institutions, changes in educational programmes and standards, and the introduction of information technologies have helped provide young citizens of the country with a variety of educational establishments and educational programmes. The system includes pre-school, school, elementary vocational school (EVE), secondary vocational school (SVE), higher vocational education (HVE), post-graduate, and informal education. Official statistics show that almost 56 percent of the country’s population have finished secondary school, 25 percent have finished vocational school, and 16 percent have finished at least part of a university degree. 20 For young people, having a diploma is prestigious – a perception based on both social traditions and Soviet attitudes. The majority of school students surveyed (75.8%) said they planned to attend higher education institutions. Still, education places only seventh among young people’s 14 most important values. Table 4.1 Main indicators of the education system in the Kyrgyz Republic Preschool education Number of students (in thousands) Number of institutions (units) 19 Law “On Education of the Kyrgyz Republic №92, 30 April 2003.” Bishkek. 20 “Education and Science in the Kyrgyz Republic,” (2008). Table 2.1. Bishkek: National Statistics Committee. 21 The ratio of a number of children

enrolled in this level of school to the total number of children of appropriate age to attend this level of school.



Coverage by education 21 Number of educators (in thousands)

59 (71% urban)

School education Grades 0-9

10.5% 3.7

Grades 10-11

1,080 938

465

Vocational education

142 2,168 (55 private)

96%

64% 72.1

Elementary

Secondary

Higher

29.3

43.4

250.4

111 (64 rural)

82 (12 private)

49

6%

3.5%

25.5%

3.3

3.4

14.4

In other words, there is an idea that a diploma is the norm – a necessary thing for a modern young person to have. Education has become an issue of social status rather than a conscious choice to work hard to obtain the knowledge and skills necessary to prepare for a profession.






KYRGYZSTAN: successful youth – successful country

4.2 Primary and secondary education

In spite of the high prestige accorded to education, the quality of primary and secondary education in Kyrgyzstan remains poor. The results of tests in mathematics and literacy administered by international and non-governmental organizations 22 attest to this fact. Only 13.6 percent of 15-year-old students in Kyrgyzstan can complete science assignments that meet the minimum international PISA standards for their age group. 23 In fact, Kyrgyzstan’s results were the worst among all the countries surveyed.

22 “Monitoring of Achievements in Education (8th grade). National Study on the Quality of Education in Eighth Grades.” (2003). Bishkek: Center for Public Opinion Studies and Forecasts. p. 144. 23 “Results of the Comparative International Study on Functional Literacy Among 15-year-old Students. PISA-2006.” (2006). Bishkek: Center for Evaluation of Education and Educational Methods.

PISA (Programme for International Student Assessment) is an international comparative research program focused on the quality of general education. Its goal is to evaluate whether 15-year-old students who obtained basic secondary education possess the knowledge and skills necessary for life. It has been conducted by the

Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) in triennial cycles since 2000. In 2006, Kyrgyzstan participated in PISA for the first time, joining 57 other countries.

BOX 4.1.

Kyrgyzstan’s schools don’t have enough computers. According to NSC 24 data, during the 2007/2008 school year, there were 14,300 computers in schools in Kyrgyzstan. Of those, more than 25 percent did not work (in rural schools, the number was 29 percent). About 43 percent of computers were Pentium IIIs or older, 36 percent were Pentium IVs, and 21 percent were other types. On average, each school has seven

computers, two of which don’t work. Only about 5 percent of schools in the country have access to the Internet (3 percent through ADSL lines and about 2 percent through dedicated lines). Most Bishkek schools, in contrast, have access to the Internet (20 percent through ADSL lines and 11 percent through dedicated lines).

BOX 4.2.

The quality of primary and secondary education is significantly dependent on the quality of the teachers, especially in rural schools. “The level of training and qualification of teachers, especially in rural schools, is low. Experienced teachers go into business, because they do not receive decent salaries as teachers. Sixty percent of schools in Kyrgyzstan experience difficulties because of a shortage of qualified teachers.” 25 Young people do not consider teaching to be a prestigious profession (academically weak students tend to major in education). More than 50 percent of education majors do not complete the requirements of their programs. Among education majors whose tuition was funded from the state (public) budget, more than half do not meet their commitment made as a prerequisite to obtain state (public) financing – a two year work in the public educational institution. 26 Teachers’ salaries are low – only 61 percent of the average salary for the country – so it’s not surprising there is a high turnover rate (20 percent of young teachers leave during their first year at work). 27 The teachers who stay are getting older and older: 5 percent of working teachers are of retirement age (59 years or older) and 57.4 percent are over 37. 28 Officially, attendance rates are high. However, according to unofficial data, around 40,000 children do not attend school. 29 The reasons are mainly socio-economic. 30 According to experts, 31 poverty, unemployment, and migration are the main factors that keep children from going to school. Poor, rural families that are unable to provide for their children place them in boarding schools.32 There is also a new reason emerging for young people to drop out of school: early marriage. Meanwhile, extortion of money from parents for the purchase of study materials, for the renovation of schools, and to pay entrance fees has became common practice. The amounts demanded often exceed what families can afford. The government is trying to combat illegal fees, but has so far been unsuccessful. Aside from money, there are other reasons children in Kyrgyzstan do not attend school. One is a lack of interest. Twenty-seven percent of students surveyed said they could not study their favorite subjects because of a lack of books and/or equipment, or a shortage of qualified teachers. Survey respondents also said heavy overall academic workloads prevented them from paying attention to their favorite subjects. 33 According to results of comparative international studies, Kyrgyzstan’s students do have a heavy academic workload. 34

24 “Education and Science.” (2008). Tables 8.12 and 8.13. Bishkek 25 Tursunbek Akun, Ombudsman of the KR, “On the Condition of Human and Civil Rights and Freedoms in the Kyrgyz Republic in 2008.” 26 Date provided by the Personnel Department (2008) and Department of Vocational Education (2008) of the Ministry of Education and Science. 27 “Study of Data From 42 Departments of Education (out of 54).” Bishkek: USAID Project “Sapattu Bilim.”

28 “National Statistical Collection for 2008,” (2008). Table 8.19. Bishkek: National Statistics Сommittee. 29 “In Kyrgyzstan, According to Unofficial Data, Around

40 Thousand Children Do Not Attend Schools.” News report, March, 31 2009 (17:41), Bishkek: Information Agency www.24.kg at http://www.24.kg/ parlament/48462-2009/03/31/110587.html, accessed on January 10, 2010.

30 “ Report on the Results of the Study Increasing the

Level of School Attendance Among Children in Poor and Remote Districts of the Kyrgyz Republic.” (2008). Bishkek: Ministry of Education and Science of the KR and Foundation for Educational Initiatives.

31 “Providing an Opportunity for Continuing Education in School After Long Absences. Situation Analysis.” (2007). Bishkek.

33 See the situation description at: http://www.unicef. org/kyrgyzstan/children_6038.html. Results of survey of youth conducted while preparing the NHDR. 34 “Analytical Materials for Developing the Strategy for Developing Education in the Kyrgyz Republic for 2010-2011.” (2008). Bishkek: Project of the European Commission in Kyrgyzstan “Support of the Ministry of Education and Science of the Kyrgyz Republic in Preparation for Introducing Programme of Sectoral Policy Support. p. 130.




KYRGYZSTAN: successful youth – successful country

A cross-regional analysis of the existing network of schools shows a lack of effectiveness and inconsistency in funding levels. The national average for per student funding was 4,000 soms per year; in Osh, the number was 3,846 and in Bishkek it was 5,626. 35 Local governments do not interfere with ineffective expansions of the school system, since the national government pays for school salaries, meals, and utilities. This leads to the construction of “dwarf” or “low-density” schools, which have only 5-10 students per class but levels of administrative personnel sufficient to serve many more. Although per student spending is many times higher than average at these schools, their level of knowledge is considerably below average. The situation could be improved by switching to a more effective model for funding schools. Two models of per capita financing were tested at 66 schools in Chui Province (in the town of Tokmok and in Issyk-Ata district) as part of international projects. At present, minimal standards for per student spending have been developed and are being tested. This approach allows each school to plan its own budget, according to its own needs. The per capita funding model promotes rational use of resources, since savings stay in the school budget and can be used to improve the school and give bonuses to teachers who work longer hours or perform better. Accordingly, the transition to per capita funding requires considerable enhancement of managerial capacity at schools, especially in terms of financial management. In line with the Country Development Strategy, Kyrgyzstan’s educational institutions should switch to per capita funding by 2011.

4.3. Elementary and secondary vocational education

The curriculum that students follow is obsolete and does not meet modern market requirements or provide the skills necessary. On the labor market, there are no full-fledged professional unions that would shape the demands for employee training and the requisite requirements.36 A survey showed there is almost no professional training for high school students. Young people leave school in a state of confusion; they are not prepared for the labor market. Changes in the labor market have not been factored into the development of curricula and the interests of employers are not taken into account. Educational programmes don’t offer students enough on-the-job training. There is no institutional interaction between educational establishments and the business world.

35 Data from Socium Consult

The elementary vocational education (EVE) system is supported by the state and has facilities, staff, and other resources. Because it is supported by the state, it doesn’t respond to market demands. Total budget spending per student in the EVE system was 14,300 soms, which was twice the average per student expenditure in the education system as a whole. However, these funds are not spent primarily on education: about 30 percent goes for meals for students and 10 percent for scholarships. Up to 48 percent goes for staff salaries and 12 percent to utility bills. 37 The average share of administrative-service personnel in secondary vocational education institutions (SVE) was 49 percent in 2007. In some of them it reached 60-75 percent. At the same time, the quality of elementary and secondary vocational education is not guaranteed, largely because of the lack of the learning/ training equipment, e.g., modern machines that are not purchased due to the lack of money.

Agency.

36 Regional EFO project on the

development of National Qualification Standards (2005-2008). 37 Analytical materials for writing

the Strategy for Education in the KR 2020.

38 Reference for Jogorku Kenesh. 2008.

Equally important is the reputation of elementary and secondary vocational education. In focus groups, youth noted that vocational education was not prestigious. Only 10.5 percent of students surveyed wanted to attend an elementary vocational school. They were mainly residents of the city of Bishkek and of Chui Province. None of them said they wanted to attend an elementary vocational school to learn a trade or skills. Instead, they justified their choice by saying it would take less time and money and offer more opportunities to provide for themselves. Indeed, more than 75 percent of graduates find a job within a year of graduation (though retention is a problem). 38

39 NSC, Education and Science in the KR, 2008. Table.11.6; 11.12 40 “Education and Science in the Kyrgyz Republic.” (2008). Table.1. Bishkek: National Statistics Committee. 41 “Education and Science in

the Kyrgyz Republic.” (2008). Table.11.3. Bishkek: National Statistics Committee.



4.4. Higher vocational education (HVE)

During the 2007/2008 academic year, there were 250,400 students in HVE institutions in Kyrgyzstan, 125 percent more than in 2002. Almost 89 percent of them were 17- to 24-year-olds. 39 According to NSC data, as of the beginning of 2007, there were 872,300 17- to 24-year-olds in the country. 40 The number of students in HVE institutions per 10,000 citizens tends to increase annually: in five years preceding the 2007/2008 academic year, it rose from 397 to 477. 41 There are 49


KYRGYZSTAN: successful youth – successful country

higher vocational education institutions in the country (33 public and 16 private), most of which (33) are in Bishkek. Batken, Naryn, Talas, and Chui provinces each have one higher vocational education institution. Issyk-Kul Province has two, Jalal-Abad Province has four, and the city of Osh has six. 42 Equal access to higher education is guaranteed through the use of the General National Test for Graduates and regulated by the “Regulation on the General National Test for Graduates Applying for State Educational Grants.” 43 During the 2007/2008 academic year, 29,400 students (11.7 percent) in HVE institutions were there on government scholarships, while the remaining 221,100 (88.3 percent) were paying. 44 According to one assessment, “the level of access to higher education in the republic is relatively high due to the low cost of education: full-time education for the pedagogic professions costs only 2,500 soms ($60) per year. For orphaned children, the disabled, members of the military, and children of permanent HVE institution staff, discounts of up to 25 percent are provided.” 45 Government scholarships for students at higher education institutions range from 24,000 soms for the Academy of the Arts to 3,000 soms for Talas University. Even standard higher education institutions feature considerable variety in government scholarships. Therefore, paying students end up subsidizing scholarship students. This situation has led to inefficient staffing. On average, there are 7.5 students per teacher in Kyrgyzstan. For comparison, higher education institutions in Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) states have about 14 students per teacher. In addition, Kyrgyzstan’s system is not cost effective: administrative and service personnel constitute 40-45 percent of staff. According to studies, students think curricula in many higher education institutions are outdated and do not take into account market demands and employers’ needs. 46 Out of 5,000 scholarship students in higher education institutions, only 30 percent find employment and the majority of those do not find work in their fields. Preliminary calculations show that the state “loses” around 25 million soms from its budget because the graduates, who got the public funding for their tuition, do not meet their commitment to work for two years in the public educational institutions. 47 Only 45 percent of youth are satisfied with the quality of education; almost every fifth respondent was not satisfied. A study of students in higher education institutions (HEIs) in Kyrgyzstan found that, on a five-point scale on their levels of knowledge, medical students in nine HEIs scored 2 to 2.6, law students in 24 HEIs scored 2.5 to 3.4, and economics students in 50 HEIs scored 2 to 3.5. 48 A survey showed that 24.8 percent of young people major in economics and management and 23 percent intend to become major in the liberal arts or in law. Only four percent study agriculture and 3.4 percent choose the services sector. This ratio shows the gap between the higher vocational education system and the structure of economy: 25.8 percent of the country’s GDP comes from agriculture and 43.9 percent from the service sector (see annexes). The state licensing and certification systems do not ensure high-quality education. Laws are limited by mechanisms based on a small number of comparative, evaluative indicators. 49 The government manages to control the quality of education “at the entrance,” rather than “at the exit.” In other words, the system ensures that good students enter universities, but it doesn’t ensure that they leave the universities with the skills they need to get jobs. There are no clear criteria for evaluating the performance of educational establishments. The systems for external audits and for ranking educational programmes are underdeveloped. Moreover, the independent agencies that evaluate educational programmes are still weak. Furthermore, students and employers are not involved enough in shaping the educational system. Education is still considered a public good, rather than a service provided by state and private service providers (despite a 2003 law that provides for reimbursement of damages caused by poor quality education). 50 Bribery and corruption have strong negative impacts on the quality of education. More than half of respondents in one study had direct experience with bribing, with half of them doing it more than once.51 This situation makes most people in Kyrgyzstan cynical about the value of certificates and degrees.



“In law school, in their first year, students dream of becoming Prosecutor General. In their second year – regional or district prosecutor. In their third year, they already want to become investigators. In years 4 or 5, they simply want to find a job and become a specialist in whatever is needed.” (FG participant, Osh) “The image of a teacher always evoked respect, but that ended the moment my teacher began giving us grades in exchange for money. In a teacher, we expect a person who knows everything. But, with us everything is the other way round – the teacher does not know his subject.” (FG, Osh)

42 “Education and Science in the Kyrgyz Republic.” (2008). Table1.4. Bishkek: National Statistics Committee. 43 Resolution and Decree №114 of the President of the Kyrgyz Republic, March 30, 2004 “On Further Improvement of Procedures of Awarding State Educational Grants (scholarships), General Republican Testing for School Graduates and Their Competitive Admission to Higher Education Institutions of the Kyrgyz Republic.”

44 “Education and Science in the Kyrgyz Republic.” (2008). Table 11.17; 11.18. Bishkek: National Statistics Committee. 45 “Higher Education in Central Asia. Modernization Goals.” Thematic Study. (0000). World Bank. p. 139.

46 Report on the Results of a Sociological Research. (2006). Bishkek: Eurasia Foundation of Central Asia and “Expert” agency (Eight Higher Education Institutions of Bishkek and Osh participated in the survey (926 students and professors)). 47 Abdullaeva, U. Vice Prime-Minister of the KR. “At least 78 Percent of Kyrgyz Alumni Enter Higher Education Institutions.” April 6, 2009 at http:// eng.24.kg/politic/2009/04/06/7601.html 13:52, accessed on December 25, 2009.

48 MES and MI. Results of comprehensive inspection on compliance with licensing requirements of HEE. July 2006.

49 World Bank, Higher Education in CA. Goals of modernization. Thematic Study. 50 Law of the KR “On Education” as of 30 April 2003, CC KR №92 (article 41) 51 Report on the Results of an Independent Sociological Poll “Corruption Elements in Largest Higher Education Institutions in the Kyrgyz Republic” JSC “DialectICON”, Bishkek, 2006.




KYRGYZSTAN: successful youth – successful country

4.5. Religious education

A re-islamization of the population is taking place in Kyrgyzstan, especially among youth. The country has seven Islamic higher educational institutions and more than 50 madrasahs without standardized educational programmes or teaching methodologies. For the most part, madrasahs teach only four or five subjects: Koran, Hadiths, Shariah, Arabic, and akida (beliefs). Only a few of them teach English and computer literacy. Unlike secular educational establishments, the madrasahs provide only a highly specialized body of knowledge, which creates barriers for the recognition of their diplomas and for the future employment of their graduates. In one survey, about 39 percent of respondents 18 years old and older would like to obtain a religious education. 52 Islamic educational establishments are interested in being included in Kyrgyzstan’s educational system, and getting their diplomas recognized by the Ministry of Education and Science.

4.6. Informal education

A system of informal education that includes self-education, self-discipline, and self-development is developing in Kyrgyzstan. There are training centers created by international and non-governmental organizations working in three interconnected fields: providing training in necessary life skills, developing youth initiatives, and involving youth in development processes. Advantages of informal education include diversity and variability, flexibility in content and schedule, focus on the student’s interests and the economy’s needs, and low cost. Assessments of results show that informal education does not have an instant effect – the skills and abilities obtained are not put to use immediately upon completion of the courses. A number of problems exist in the informal education system. Since there is no system for assessing the quality of the programmes, it is difficult to evaluate the quality. As a rule, services are limited and their cost is high. Many programmes are not recognized by the state. 52 Integration of Islamic Educational Institutions in Large Sections of the Public and Issues of Modernization of Islamic Educational Establishments in the KR. EFCA report with the help of the Center for Social Researches of AUCA, Bishkek, 2008, p. 44.



To summarize, Kyrgyzstani youth have access to all levels of education. The network of educational establishments in the country is far-reaching and the state has been consistently increasing its funding. The main problem with it is its inefficiency and its lack of focus on society’s needs, and in particular, on training modern, competent professionals with skills and knowledge sets that are in demand.


KYRGYZSTAN: successful youth – successful country

CHAPTER 5. LABOR AND EMPLOYMENT Work occupies an important place within the concept of human development, because work that meets a person’s needs and provides adequate income is the basis for a decent standard of living. The main problem for young people in the job market is that, while they have high salary expectations, their qualification and experience often do not meet employers’ requirements. Youth in Kyrgyzstan compose a significant part of labor force, but they do not have the competitive advantages of older, more experienced workers.

5.1. Analysis of the labor market

One of the important characteristics of the Kyrgyz labor market is the fast-growing working population, which is underpinned by the country’s high birth rate. 53 Youth comprise 51 percent of “supply” in the labor market. In 2007, 62 percent of youth were economically active 54 (as compared with 65 percent of all Kyrgyz citizens). 55 The employment rate among youth (56 percent) is slightly lower than the employment rate for the country overall (60 percent). A share of women among employed youth makes 39.3 percent. The employment of young people by sector reflects the structure of Kyrgyzstan’s economy. Despite the overall positive dynamics of employment indicators from 2003 to 2007, there remains an oversupply of workers in the labor market. However, the number of workers employed in construction, trade and services, and the textile industry has grown significantly.  Urban workers are employed mainly in the private trade and services sectors. Most employed workers live in rural areas (65 percent). Around 38 percent of all employed youth work in the agricultural sector, which is characterized by seasonal work and low salaries. 56 In 2007, the finance sector offered the highest average monthly salary (around $290), while the healthcare and education sectors offered lower salaries (around $70), and agriculture provided the lowest (around $48). Agriculture was the only sector that was losing workers and the workers it was losing are youth.

53 54

55

http://mz.kg/ru/analytics. Economically active population is a narrower segment of population than labor resources. It is a population offering its labor to produce/ manufacture goods and services. Economically active population includes both employed and unemployed.

Results of an Integrated Examination of Households in 2007. National Statistical Committee.

56 Results of Integrated Examination of Households in 2007. National Statistical Committee.

Diagram 5.1 Distribution of employment among Kyrgyzstanis aged 15 to 34 in 2007 (%)

The fact that 16 percent of all employed youth work in business, repair automobiles, fix household goods, or produce personal use items is not accidental. This sector offers higher incomes and is characterized by high cash flow; startup and operating expenses are relatively low. Young people are drawn to this sector by the convenient locations of the jobs: markets, stores and other sales outlets are located within the city, not far from places where young people live and study. According to 2007 State Committee for Migration and Employment research, the workers in highest demand are those with higher and secondary educations (22.6 percent), qualified technical workers (20.4 percent), equipment operators and engineers (22.3 percent) and laborers (17.7 percent). The need for blue collar professions is two to three times greater than the need for office workers and managers. The result is that young people who prefer to get university degrees instead of entering blue collar professions end up filling the country’s low-paid jobs.

Trade and Repair Works 17% Construction 11% Agriculture 38% Education 5% Industry 10% Transport & Communications 5% Hotels & Restaurants 3% Public Administration 4% Other 7%




KYRGYZSTAN: successful youth – successful country

5.2. Youth and unemployment

Unemployment is an urgent problem for young people in Kyrgyzstan. The unemployment level among youth is higher than the national average. Particularly vulnerable in terms of employment were women and younger segments of youth (15-19 and 20-24 years). However, as youth age, their rate of unemployment drops: unemployment among older segments of youth is virtually the same as the national average. Almost half of unemployed youth are young people who have training but not much experience. Diagram 5.2 Unemployment by age group (percentage)57

All population Both men and women

Men

Women

For many young people, information about vacancies is limited and difficult to obtain. The main reasons unemployed youth say they are unemployed are: low salaries (99 percent), a lack of jobs near where they live (86 percent), and a lack of information about vacancies (85 percent). Young people also acknowledge that their own shortcomings hinder them: a lack of professional knowledge and skills (85 percent); and a lack of professional experience and practical training (79 percent). It’s worth noting that they do not emphasize things like “availability of necessary connections,” “interesting work,” or social and communication skills like “ability to integrate into an organizational team,” as important for employment. There are no special gender limitations on choosing an occupation in Kyrgyzstan. However, all things being equal, employers prefer to hire men because of the stereotype that a woman with children can’t stay after hours or work weekends and her ability to go on business trips is limited. 58 While adults find themselves unemployed because of layoffs at their companies, young people tend to find themselves unemployed because their seasonal or temporary jobs ended or because they resigned. The fact that youth cite “quitting due to health reasons” as a reason for unemployment is alarming. 57

“Findings of a One-time Survey of Employment in 2006.” National Statistical Committee.

58



Gender Evaluation of a Country and Its Methodological Issues, 2007.

The bottom line is that young people are quite active in the labor market (61.6 percent of them are economically active), and they are highly trainable, but because they lack experience and professional skills, they are not competitive in the market for high-paying jobs. Exceptions are youth aged 30-34 years and, to a lesser extent, those aged 25-29.


KYRGYZSTAN: successful youth – successful country




KYRGYZSTAN: successful youth – successful country

5.3. Vocational training of youth

One of the most important reasons for the low level of employment among young people is a lack of professional skills that should have been provided by vocational training. Employers acknowledge that they are reluctant to hire young people since, “…unlike potential adult workers, they do not possess considerable competitive advantages connected to the level of professional knowledge/skills and work experience offered in the labor market….” According to representatives of job placement services, it takes 7-10 years to train a highly-qualified professional. The majority of unemployed young people have only a secondary education. 59 With this general level of training, it’s almost impossible for them to find high- and medium-skilled jobs, which comprise two-thirds of the job market. The majority of youth without vocational education are among younger groups of unemployed youth (15-19 years old and 20-24 years old). There are more unemployed women than men with higher and secondary vocational education. Among the unemployed with elementary vocational training there are more men. Graduates with higher education have more difficulty getting jobs than those with elementary or secondary education. 60 Organizations do not do a good job in mentoring newly hired staff, which requires additional resources and extra costs. A senior professional is not interested in spending his time training young workers, especially since the company’s management usually does not offer any incentive for this service. And the government does not provide incentives for hiring and mentoring young workers.

5.4. Attitudes toward work and salaries

Young people, especially those with higher education, have inflated expectations for jobs and salaries. Almost half of surveyed youth (42%) expect to earn a minimum income within an average of at least 5,400 soms a month in 2008. This average is shaped by the banking and financial sector, and construction. But most of them wanted more. It’s worth noting that relatively high salaries of 10,000 soms (around $268) and above are paid to qualified workers, a group that usually does not include young people. Young people’s inflated expectations lead them to eschew work or take casual jobs, rather than work for low salaries in full-time jobs. In doing so, they are underestimating the advantages fulltime jobs can offer in the form of professional experience, communication skills, teamwork skills, and so on. Furthermore, by staying unemployed, young people forgo experience, forget skills, and become easy targets for destructive forces. Young people say they choose their jobs largely independently. Rural youth, however, are more traditional than urban youth – they listen to their parents’ and relatives’ opinions and take their advice. Male survey respondents paid more attention to salary levels than female respondents, who were more interested in job security. Older youth were more likely to use job placement services, youth labor exchanges, and recruiting agencies.

59 Findings of a Special Survey of the Populations’ Employment. NSC, 2007. 60 Share of employment of VE institutions’ graduates make 88 percent. Assessments of the Situation of the Employment of Graduates of Establishments in the System of VocationalTechnical Education. Research commissioned by UNDP/ILO, 2009. 61 Employment, Unemployment, Labor Migration. Results of a Special Survey on Population’s Employment in July 2006.



Most young people spend almost all of their earnings on family needs and consumption. The low salaries available from existing jobs force young people to consider starting their own businesses. But youth do not have significant capital – most do not have their own houses, cattle, seed, vehicles, and other floating assets. Few lenders that provide non-collateral loans can afford to deal with young people, since they have inadequate credit. According to survey results, 33 percent of respondents do not have any resources (no money, no land, etc.). This is a problem for women, in particular. Some provisions of land and agrarian reform laws – as well as traditions and customs related to the possession, transfer, and inheritance of land – discriminate against women and prevent them from exercising their rights to land ownership. For example, after marriage, women leave their land to their parents.

5.5. Youth and labor migration

Labor migration does much to ease strains on Kyrgyzstan’s labor market. According to expert assessments, 100,000 to 700,000 Kyrgyz citizens work abroad and the number is growing. Most of the labor migrants are 20- to 29-year-olds with general or specialized secondary education.61 A certain proportion of young people are not very attached to their “little” homeland. They are mobile and adapt easily to new places and some of them do not see a future for themselves in Kyrgyzstan.




KYRGYZSTAN: successful youth – successful country

In Kyrgyzstan, there are more than 1,000 villages, large and small, rich and poor. All of them are different, but most share a similar fate. Nobody wants to live in a village; everyone is running away, leaving behind old people, dilapidated houses, and poverty. They are leaving in search of a good life. Our hero Aseyin Saralaev has instead returned to his home village and set a goal for himself – keep youth from leaving and turn Kyrgyzstan’s hamlets into prospering villages, where people solve their problems on their own. It is a pity that youth today only think about themselves, and rarely think about the future. This young man is astonishing. He is simple in his manners and wise beyond his years. Nobody would have thought that this promising young man would not be enticed by the prospect of a future in Kazakhstan. Aseyin was born in the small village of Kara-Suu, in the Kochkor District of Naryn Province. Back when he was a schoolchild, he created a team of young volunteers who helped the loneliest and weakest villagers. After completing his studies in Kazakhstan, returning home, and seeing the dilapidated school, hospital, and cultural center in Kara-Suu, he gathered a team of motivated villagers and began changing village life. Together with like-minded people, he began searching for opportunities and resources to revive life in his home village. First of all, they needed knowledge. With his own funds and resources and with help from friends, Aseyin went to Naryn and Bishkek to meet with people and organizations, asking advice, learning, and finding partners. In 2003, Aseyin created the Erkin Jashtar Demokratiyalyk Klubu (the Democratic Club of Youth) with the goal of activating youth and helping them to realize their potential. At the same time, the Akyl youth ensemble was created, the Taybas sports club was opened, and the Jashtar Ordosu computer classes were organized.

Today, many residents of Kara-Suu and neighboring villages actively participate in elections. During recent elections, many of them served as independent observers. They initiated lawsuits to challenge the validity of election results in election districts in Kochkor. Four villagers were able to promote the solution of the problem of land plots, and teachers defended their right to free access to information and freed themselves from BOX 5.1 subscriptions to government newspapers that Aseyin had been forced on them by district authorities. (Kara-Suu Village) All this became possible thanks to the efforts of Aseyin and his small, young team. Despite threats from local authorities and representatives of criminal groups, Aseyin courageously stands up for every individual. He feels injustice acutely and fights it until the end. In 2005, Aseyin wrote a letter to a friend, in which he expressed his views and hopes and simply asked him not to remain indifferent to himself and the future of his homeland. This letter was entered in the essay contest “My President and I,” and was ranked among the top 10 entries. This is what Aseyin told his friend at the end of the letter: “… how wonderful would it be, if the number of unemployed around you decreased? There would be no idle, drunken young people on the streets. To hear the grateful words from parents and the happy laughter of kids!! Think, my friend! Our future is in our hands!”

For two years (2006-2007), he paid for the publication of an independent informational/analytical newspaper called Dil Kayryk. A number of initiative groups, community organizations, and NGOs appeared in Kara-Suu. The villagers became more active and began to understand that life will not change if you do nothing. Aseyin’s initiative group grew into the public association Menin Ayilym (My Village). With the financial support of the School of Leadership programme (IKKO/Interbilim), Menin Ayilym implemented a project designed to solve crime problems among seniors at secondary schools in the Kochkor District of Naryn Province, partnering with the local police, school administrations, and the students themselves. According to recent data from teachers, crime and racketeering there have since decreased by several percent. 


KYRGYZSTAN: successful youth – successful country

“It is difficult to be young in Kyrgyzstan. There is … no quality education or quality life, and it is difficult to make a living. There are no opportunities to build a foundation for yourself. Out of those who studied with me, only 10 people found jobs close to home – the others became labor migrants.” (FG, Osh)

Young people aged 15 to 19 are the least likely to go abroad to find work. Women account for about 27 percent of young labor migrants. It is important to note that qualified specialists (teachers, doctors, engineers) are leaving the country as well. The majority of young labor migrants leave rural areas of Osh, Jalal-Abad and Chui provinces and go to Russia and Kazakhstan. As a result of the economic crisis of 2008, it is anticipated that some labor migrants will return to home. If the number is large, this will naturally increase tensions in the Kyrgyz labor market. 62 A set of measures will need to be developed to mitigate such tensions. Seventeen percent of survey respondents are planning to leave Kyrgyzstan within the next 12 months. Of those, 73 percent are leaving in search of work and 17 percent are not planning to return. Why are they leaving? A lack of jobs and an increase in the cost of living is forcing those who are capable of working to leave home to look for work. As a result, Kyrgyzstan is losing its capacity for future development. Jobs abroad pay significantly more than jobs in Kyrgyzstan. 63 Doctors, economists, and teachers are the professionals most valued abroad. The salaries they earn outside Kyrgyzstan are many times what they could earn within Kyrgyzstan. The following professions are also in high demand among foreign employers: welder, turner, mason, plasterer, painter, electrician, builder (painter, stucco mason, siding worker, carpenter, and plumber), driver, tailor, tailor’s cutter, seamstress, and cook. 64 External labor migration does have some positive aspects. First of all, it is a partial solution to the oversupply of labor resources in Kyrgyzstan; and a decrease in the supply of labor in Kyrgyzstan can lead to an increase in salary levels. Third, remittances from labor migrants increase incomes for family members at home and, thus, demand for goods and services, domestically. Furthermore, young migrant workers obtain new skills and qualifications, learn innovative technologies, are exposed to workplace culture, and increase their knowledge of the organization and management skills and experience.

62 “Representatives of the Association of Kyrgyz Diasporas in Moscow Advise Citizens of Kyrgyzstan Against Going to Russia to Work”. http://www.24.kg/ community/2009/04/01/110733.html. 63

Labor Migration from Kyrgyzstan. Mission for Labor Migration (IOM), Kyrgyzstan, 2008. 64



Ibid.

The main obstacle to employment for young people, besides their lack of qualifications and experience, is their lack of “socioeconomic adaptation skills,” such as: a desire to do high quality work, a positive attitude toward changes at work, an ability to work in a team, self-motivation, responsibility, entrepreneurialism, and a positive attitude toward competition. Young people cannot sell themselves in the labor market, cannot provide good arguments while discussing opportunities for career growth, and have poor adaptation and communication skills, which prevents them from adapting in teams and building partnerships. Young people believe migration is the best way to meet the needs they can’t fulfill at home. For young people who would prefer to start their own businesses, a lack of property and start-up capital are serious barriers.


KYRGYZSTAN: successful youth – successful country

CHAPTER 6. HEALTH OF THE YOUNG GENERATION Healthcare and medical services are vital in all areas of human development. Poor health sharply decreases an individual’s quality of life, and ability to make significant life choices, earn a decent living, and actively participate in the life of the society. Good healthcare is also one of the bases of a just society. It is vital for a sense of security, because without affordable medical care, many will always have to fear that a sudden illness could bring financial disaster. However, health is often not considered a problem for youth. As a rule, elderly people and children are most at risk for health problems; young people usually do not have serious health problems and normally do not worry about it. Therefore, it is easy to think that healthcare issues should not be a priority for youth policy. Yet, it is important to include health issues in an assessment of the human development situation for youth. First, youth tend to have health problems that are easier to prevent in young people than in the elderly. Thus, the situation can be improved significantly through awareness-raising activities. Second, a person’s lifestyle when he or she is young can lead to poor health later. Obviously, smoking, drinking alcohol, nutrition, and exercise impact a person’s health as he or she ages. This chapter examines medical issues in Kyrgyzstan. It focuses on health problems affecting youth and the measures being taken to solve them.

6.1. General information about health problems

According to studies, 90 percent of young people say their health is “excellent” or “good,” 7.4 say “satisfactory,” 1.6 percent said they get sick very often and suffer form chronic illnesses. While there were virtually no differences between urban and rural youth, there were regional differences (see Diagram 6.1). It should be noted that men are more optimistic about their health. Possibly, this opinion is connected to traditional images of masculinity, including a cultural norm that real men should be in good physical and sexual shape. Content analysis of print media shows that this image is prevalent Diagram 6.1: Evaluation of own health by region (N=1000)

Osh City Batken Jalal-Abad Osh Issyk-Kul Naryn Talas Chui Bishkek

Excellent

Good

Satisfactory

Poor




KYRGYZSTAN: successful youth – successful country

 Diagram 6.2 Causes of death among 15- to 34-year-olds

in the social consciousness, even today. 65 This leads to the neglect of illnesses among boys and young men, including parasitic infections, STDs, iodine-deficiencies, etc. As respondents aged, they were more likely to give lower evaluations of their health. Thus, the number of respondents with satisfactory or poor health increased from 6 percent among 14- to 19-year-olds to 13 percent among 25- to 34-year-olds. Although respondents’ subjective evaluations of their own health were positive, the reality was less encouraging. For instance, aggravation of students’ health conditions is a big problem. Preventative medical examinations showed that, by graduation, every fourth or fifth student suffers from a chronic illness.

external causes of mortality cardiovascular diseases gastrointestinal disease infectious and parasitic diseases tumors genito-urinary diseases diseases of the nervous system other causes of mortality

65 Interim report on the results of gender analysis of regional printed mass media within the framework of the project of the Government Office of the KR and UNDP on the 66

“Promotion of women in state service and politics,” conducted with the support of the Swedish Agency for International Development. 2009.

Diagram 6.3 Number of doctors and paramedical personnel (in thousands)

number of paramedical personnel

number of doctors



Cardiovascular diseases are the main cause of mortality in Kyrgyzstan, accounting for 49 percent of deaths, according to the Ministry of Health. This indicator has increased by 35.1 percent since 1991. The incidence of mortality by cerebral stroke among the working age population in Kyrgyzstan – 82.6 per 100,000 – was the highest in any country in the Eurasian region. 66 Second most common causes of mortality are so-called “external factors,” which account for ten percent of deaths in Kyrgyzstan. Among external factors, traffic accidents accounted for six percent of deaths in 2005 and 26 percent of deaths in 2007 – an alarming trend. Working-age men die three times as often as women. Also, the suicide rate among men is 3.7 times higher than among women. In 2008, the mortality rate in Kyrgyzstan was 7.1 per 1,000 people in the permanent population. In 2007 the number was 7.3 per 1,000 in Kyrgyzstan and 13.6 per 1,000 in the CIS. The patterns of mortality are different for youth. For them, the main cause of death is “external causes,” which accounted for 43.8 percent of young people’s deaths in 2007. Among deaths from external causes, 13.2 percent are vehicular accidents and 8.6 percent are suicides. Only 11 percent of youth die of cardiovascular diseases. Experts have noted not only an increase of this indicator, but also “rejuvenation” of the disease. Cardiovascular diseases are not only the main cause of mortality in Kyrgyzstan, they also cause many of those they don’t kill to prematurely lose their ability to work.


KYRGYZSTAN: successful youth – successful country

6.2. State policy in the area of healthcare

According to the Country Development Strategy for 2007-2010, the main programme in the area of healthcare is the Manas Taalimi National Healthcare Reform Programme of the Kyrgyz Republic, 2006-2010. Other programmes include: the National Strategy for the Protection of Reproductive Health of the Population of the Kyrgyz Republic until 2015; the Tuberculosis-III National Programme, 2006-2010; the National Programme for Improving the Health of the Population of the Kyrgyz Republic, 2009-2011; and the State Programme for the Prevention of HIV/AIDS, 2006-2010. In cooperation with donors, the Kyrgyz government developed a so-called sector-wide approach to healthcare, which involves improving the technical basis and other capacities of the country’s medical establishments. Indicators show sustainable progress in achieving healthcare targets. Significant progress has been made in reducing the number of tuberculosis cases and the mortality from tuberculosis. Also, a large number of events related to maternal and child health, HIV/AIDS, and cardiovascular diseases have been conducted. However, despite the fact that some interim indicators have shown some positive results, no significant positive impact is being observed. 67 According to experts, the healthcare system of the Kyrgyz Republic does not differentiate teenagers and young people as special clients and there country lacks “youth friendly” services – especially sexual health services. According to World Bank research, young people as a special population category are not covered by state medical and sanitary services. 68 Demand for sexual/reproductive health information and services for young people has not been satisfied, despite reforms in the healthcare sector. The quality of Kyrgyzstan’s future human resources in the context of the transitional economic period causes serious concerns.

6.3. Medical personnel

According to experts, one of the main problems for the healthcare system in the Kyrgyz Republic is that the number of medical personnel decreases each year. Kyrgyzstan has one of the lowest relative numbers of medical personnel in the CIS. The situation with paramedical personnel is particularly serious. The healthcare system’s needs for doctors is only met for 70 percent and paramedical personnel (nurses, medical assistants, clinical psychologists, masseuses). 69 The reason for this situation is the low salary levels for medical staff. Salaries in the healthcare and social services sectors in January-September 2008 were only 65 percent of the average salary in the Kyrgyz Republic.

6.4. Birth rate and maternal mortality

The birth rate in Kyrgyzstan has been steadily increasing since the beginning of this decade. From 2000 to 2007, it increased by 19 percent. Since 2003, it has been the second highest among CIS countries. Young people aged 20-29 had the highest birth rate in Kyrgyzstan and the birth rate was higher in rural areas (24.2 per 1,000) than in urban areas (22.4 per 1,000).70 In 2008, the official maternal mortality rate in Kyrgyzstan was 55 per 100,000 live births. This is one of the highest levels in the CIS. According to other research, the maternal mortality rate was 104 per 100,000 and there have been no signs of improvement in the past 10-15 years. 71 Experts say this discrepancy is caused by differences in methods of calculation.

Diagram 6.4 Birth rate by age group in 2007 (average annual number of newborns per 1,000)

67

“Reference on the results of work of healthcare organization in the republic for 2008 and goals for 2009,” http://www.med.kg/Articles/ViewSection.aspx?ArticleID=298, accessed on December 10, 2009.

68 Survey of Medical Services and the Healthcare System.” (2005). Bishkek: World Bank.

69

Speech by Mambetov M., the Minister of Health http://rus.kabar.kg/2009/02/06/m-mambetovsegodnya-v-sisteme-zdravooxraneniya-ne-xvataet30-procentov-specialistov/

70

Demographic yearbook of the KR. Statistical collection. Bishkek. 2008.

71

“Cluster research on numerous indicators.” 2006, NSC/UNICEF

Under




KYRGYZSTAN: successful youth – successful country

So-called “preventable� factors are the most common causes of maternal mortality. These include gestational toxicosis (23 percent) 72 and obstetric hemorrhages (20 percent). The predominance of these causes of death reflects a lack of adequate access to medical services for pregnant women, poor qualifications among primary care and prenatal care medical workers, a problem with early diagnosis of complications, and a lack of training among gynecologists on safe labor management and rendering emergency help. 73 Another reason for the high maternal mortality rate is poor health among mothers. More than 80 percent of cases were recorded in rural areas. The highest rates of maternal mortality in 2008 was registered in Issyk-Kul Province.

6.5 Female sexual and reproductive health

Family planning and contraception must play important roles in solving the problem of maternal mortality. According to official data, 35.9 percent of women aged 15-49 use contraception. In general, the population of Kyrgyzstan is not adequately informed about family planning and contraception. Therefore, the problem of abortions remains acute in Kyrgyzstan. According to independent studies, abortions are one of the main methods used to regulate the birth rate and many of them are undocumented. According to NSC data, the number of registered abortions grew by 3,475 from 2007 to 2008. Data on abortions in Kyrgyzstan is contradictory and incomplete because: • there is almost no data on the number of abortions conducted in private clinics; • almost half of pregnancies surgically terminated in private clinics are not registered to conceal financial gains and avoid taxation; and • the introduction of co-payments for abortions has led to a search for the cheapest services from private clinics and among private practitioners. Nearly 27 percent of abortions are conducted on women aged 25-29. Also, a significant proportion (8.6 percent) is conducted on 12- to 19-year-olds. These official data have been corroborated by independent studies and expert evaluations. According to a 2005 study by the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at the Kyrgyz State Medical Academy, every tenth surgical termination of a pregnancy is done on teenagers. Table 6.1 Number of abortions by age group

72

Gestational toxicosis is a complication of pregnancy, which causes disorders of vital organs, especially the vascular system and blood flow. The cause has not been identified. 73

UNDP. 2009. Second Periodic Progress Report on the Millennium Development Goals in the Kyrgyz Republic: Bishkek, 2009. 74 75



From interview with professor N. Kerimova. (http://www.centrasia.ru/newsA. php?st=1215931080)

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

12-19

1,719

1,958

1,832

1,267

1,498

1,815

20-24

4,245

5,026

4,463

3,757

4,442

5,018

25-29

4,938

5,168

4,779

3,741

4,583

5,462

30-34

4,430

4,385

4,455

3,121

3,519

4,598

35 and over

3,893

3,447

4,506

3,028

3,283

3,907

TOTAL

19,225

19,984

20,035

14, 914

17,325

20,800

On average, by the age of 22, a woman in Kyrgyzstan has had one abortion. By the time she is 30.7 she has had two. By the time she is 36, she has had three. Most pre-marital sex involves women in the under 19 and 20-24 age groups. “In Kyrgyzstan seven out of 10 pregnancies end with abortion. The high abortion rate remains a problem for Kyrgyzstan. This is all the more urgent because every tenth abortion is done on an individual under 19. More than 200 abortions annually are done on teenagers under 14.â€? 74 In 2007, there were 9.2 abortions per every 1,000 women and in 2006 it amounted to 8.1. In 2007, 134 abortions were registered for every 1,000 pregnancies among 1517 year old girls; in 2006, the number was 160 per 1,000. 75 As their main reason for getting abortions, women cite socio-economic hardships such as: • lack of a permanent job and economic difficulties; • illness of spouse or lack of spouse; • lack of housing; • medical problems; • youth and unpreparedness for motherhood; and • lack of desire to have children.


KYRGYZSTAN: successful youth – successful country




KYRGYZSTAN: successful youth – successful country

6.6. Male reproductive health

One of the critical problems related to reproductive health of young people in Kyrgyzstan is the problem of male reproductive health (MRH). Services in this field are underdeveloped, especially in rural areas. In order to visit a urologist or andrologist, young men from rural areas have to go to a provincial center or to Bishkek. The vulnerability of men in the field of MRH is intertwined with stereotypes condoning risky behavior by men and not allowing them the “right” to failure. 76 Therefore, MRH protection activities should take into account gender approaches, local specifics, and local culture. Men refrain from showing their feelings in public, keep their problems to themselves, and visit doctors more rarely than women. This leads to considerable degradation of their quality of life and affects their ability to work and their psycho-emotional status. Experts note a high incidence of urological pathologies among men of working and reproductive age in Kyrgyzstan. From 2005 to 2007, the number of men in Kyrgyzstan with prostate diseases increased from 6,047 to 10,782, and the number of men suffering from infertility rose from 740 to 2,326.77

6.7. HIV/AIDS

In recent years, there has been a rapid increase in the number of HIV-infected people in Kyrgyzstan. The official number of HIV-infected people is 2,031 – 1,890 of whom are citizens of the Kyrgyz Republic, and 145 of whom have AIDS. A particularly alarming situation is developing in Osh, which hosts 45 percent of the country’s cases of HIV infection. In 2008, 552 cases of HIV infection were diagnosed, 532 of which were among citizens, and 37 of which were in patients with AIDS; they were found in all of Kyrgyzstan’s provinces. 78 In other words, the growth of HIV-infected people in Kyrgyzstan doesn’t depend on external factors anymore becoming one of the homebred problems of the country. Injecting drugs remains the primary route for the transmission of HIV. Injection Drug Users (IDU) constitute 67.1 percent of all HIV cases. The HIV epidemic among IDUs has reached a generalized stage. According to an epidemic control patrol carried out by an organization called AIDS in five provinces of Kyrgyzstan, 7.7 percent of IDUs have HIV. The situation was worse in Osh and JalalAbad, where the rates of HIV infection among IDUs were 12.9 percent and 14 percent, respectively. Drugs are easy to get and the number of drug addicts (particularly among the youth) is constantly growing because Kyrgyzstan is located on a drug trafficking route that runs from Afghanistan to Europe. The number of patients registered in drug rehabilitation centers increased by 150 percent from 2002 to 2007, including an increase of 130 percent among patients aged 15-34. Sexual transmission of HIV is increasing. In 2001, 3 percent of cases were transmitted sexually, while in 2008, the number was 25.1 percent. The number of HIV infections among women is also increasing. While in 2001, 9.5 percent of cases were in women, in 2008 the number was 33.5 percent. Most of these women do not belong to high risk groups and were infected by husbands who are IDUs. 79 These facts, as well as the growth in the number of sexually transmitted infections among youth suggest that measures aimed at promoting safe sex among youth are inadequate and/or ineffective. Kyrgyzstan had a national Strategy for Reducing the Youth Vulnerability 2001-2005, but because of the diversity of the target population group, it was only partially implemented. Providing 90 percent of youth with informational programmes and access to HIV-prevention services still remains an impossible objective. 80

6.8. Health as a value and a lifestyle 76

“National strategy for protecting reproductive health of the population in the KR until year 2015.” 77

78

Data of Medical Informational Center

Data of the Ministry of Health as of January 1, 2009

79 Reference on the results of work of healthcare organization in the republic for 2008 and goals for 2009. 80 81

Ibid.

“Attitudes, knowledge and skills of youth on issues of a healthy lifestyle” conducted by the company SIAR for UNICEF in 2007.



The World Health Organization (WHO) defines health as a condition of complete physical, spiritual and social welfare, and not only as a lack of diseases and physical defects. Promotion of a healthy lifestyle has become one of the main goals of state policies in many countries around the world. Therefore, in the course of our survey, we thought it is important to determine young people’s attitudes towards the idea of a “healthy lifestyle” (HL). Nearly 14 percent of survey respondents gave up bad habits or tried to combat them. Out of those, one in three was aged 14 to 19. This indicates that they have already -- even at such a young age -- developed bad habits. These results are confirmed by data from other studies. 81 Twenty-two percent of senior high school students smoke, including 19 percent of girls. Forty-one percent of students of the professional technical education institutions are smokers, including 13 percent of girls. One in 10 fifth- to seventh-graders had tried alcoholic beverages. Among senior high school students, 62 percent had tried alcohol; among PTI students, it was 30 percent. The main reasons why young people try tobacco and alcohol are curiosity and imitation of their parents and peers. The influence of the environment, especially peers, in our opinion, makes it an entrenched habit.


KYRGYZSTAN: successful youth – successful country




KYRGYZSTAN: successful youth – successful country

More than 84 percent of respondents said the main indicator of leading a healthy lifestyle was participating in sports, but only 39.4 percent of respondents participated in sports. Most of the athletes were young men aged 14-19. Personal hygiene and a healthy diet are followed by 55.3 percent and 32 percent of respondents, respectively. Girls aged 14-19 stood out as the most “conscientious” respondents. The survey showed that 16.4 percent of youth do not participate in healthy lifestyle-related activities. More than 35 percent of respondents cited a lack of free time as their reason. About 25 percent said he or she felt good and didn’t see the need. Every fifth respondent said he or she simply did not want to. Among respondents who said they did not do anything, the overwhelming number (80.2 percent) lived in low-income families with “resources sufficient only for food.” The need to lead a healthy lifestyle should be explained in pre-school. More often, though, extreme situations (disease, trauma, etc.) serve as motivations for leading healthy lifestyles. It is necessary to make health fashionable and to help youth understand that being healthy is more prestigious than being sick. Risk reduction for youth requires them to have relevant information and the opportunity to make good decisions. Policy measures can play a big role in helping young people with risk management, especially when these measures are aimed at teaching youth about the long-term consequences of their behavior.




KYRGYZSTAN: successful youth – successful country

CHAPTER 7. SOCIAL CONNECTIONS AND PROSPECTS 7. 1. The role of family for youth

Youth view marriage as primarily for procreation – they usually plan to have children during their first 1.5 years of married life. According to survey results, 30 percent of respondents between the ages of 20 to 24 already had one child, and most by the age of 35 already had three children. They consider three the optimal number. For respondents, family comes in third place as a value, after health and peace. Focus groups indicated that, regardless of where young people are from, family was the most important social institution for them and it played an important role in socializing them and shaping their values. In addition, when they talked about their achievements and their plans, young people often mentioned the importance of their parents:



“…my parents provided all the conditions for my self-realization and I want them to be proud of me in the future – I don’t want their efforts to go to waste.” (FG, Jalal-Abad).

7.2. Youth and marriage strategies

According to the national study “Are Teenagers Ready For Life?” conducted by UNICEF Kyrgyzstan, the majority of parents avoid discussions with children about gender roles, sex, and physiological development. Although most parents, regardless of their gender, age, or place of residence, realize the importance of teaching their children about healthy lifestyles, there is still a social taboo on discussions about these aspects of life. Some parents even try to protect their children from “undesirable” information. Half of respondents said they thought the best age for men to get married was between 25 and 29. At that age, men usually graduate, find jobs, and begin to think about starting a family. According to two-thirds of respondents, the optimal age for women to get married is between 20 and 24. In 2006, the average age women got married was 23.4 and men, 26.8. 82 Couples are waiting longer to get married, so they will have time to finish their studies, find a job, and start earning enough money, and have a place where they can live together. From 2002 to 2006, the incidence of marriage increased by 130 percent to 8.4 per 1,000, an increase which, to a certain extent, is linked to the growing number of young people in total population. Young people’s responses to the survey’s questions about their attitudes towards various forms of marriage were very interesting. Survey data shows youth support many types of marriage. The number of young women living in Muslim marriages is increasing. One-third of respondents have

82

Social tendencies of the Kyrgyz Republic, 2202-2006, NSC, Volume 3, 2008.

Diagram 7.1 Attitudes of young people toward various forms of marriage (%)

polygamy interethnic marriages marriages between representatives of different religions cohabitation same-sex marriages marriages conducted according to religious rites only (without state registration) bride kidnapping

positive

negative

do not care

do not know/no response




KYRGYZSTAN: successful youth – successful country

positive opinions about religious marriages (those that don’t include state registration). In this type of marriage, the property rights of the woman and children are not protected by Kyrgyzstan’s Family Code. Cohabitation without marriage is becoming common among youth.83 The survey confirms the popularity of common-law marriages among youth. Thus, although family is important, we see that it is changing. Youth today accept various forms of marriage, including same-sex marriages, which were not common for previous generations.

Diagram 7.2 Impact of labor migration on families (%)

it is a test feelings become stronger one is forced to accept it families are destroyed children grow up in incomplete families parents left without care do not care

7.3. Youth in the structure of households

Nuclear families predominate in Kyrgyzstan, accounting for more than 60 percent of all households. Extended families account for 11 percent of households. 84 About 29 percent of respondents said young couples should live with parents, while 70 percent said they should live separately. This shows that youth want independence from their parents. More wives (40 percent) than husbands (31 percent) wanted to live separately from parents. The desire to live with parents can be rooted in tradition or in financial necessity. Living arrangement preference depends on age, family status, and educational level. For instance, once a person gets married, his or her desire to live with parents decreases threefold. Young people who live in Bishkek are more inclined to live apart from parents. Youth constantly interact with their parents and relatives; they make decisions about their everyday lives and plans for their futures only after such interactions.

The survey showed that youth make independent decisions about places of residence, professions, employment, and family planning. Decisions about large investments and marriage are taken to their parents. As young people grow up, they move from being dependent on their parents to acting independently by the time they reach 25-34 years of age.

7.4. Impact of labor migration on the family

Today, 100,000 to 700,000 people from Kyrgyzstan are labor migrants. 85

83 84



Ibid.

The existence of labor migration has been common knowledge for a long time, but still, there has been no complete assessment of the impact of internal and external migration on the family. Labor migration changes the patriarchal model of leadership in the family because it is mostly men who migrate. In urban areas, the share of men in migration is 72.7 percent, while in rural areas it’s even higher – 77.6 percent. The overwhelming majority of migrants are men of reproductive age, which skews the demographic situation and the institution of family. 86

Ibid.

85 Some experts put the number of labor migrants at 1,000,200. IOM experts believe that the number of migrants does not exceed 350,000. Experts at the Agency for Migration and Employment say the number is between 500,000 and 600,000. These discrepancies can be explained by the complexity of external labor migration flows.

Another effect of labor migration is that many youth grow up outside of two-parent households, being raised by single parents or grandparents, instead. Family values and traditions are eroding, the number of homeless children is growing, and the amount of child crime is increasing. One in five respondents thinks labor migration increases the risk of the breakup of families. Women are especially concerned about this.

86

Focus group participants noted the important role that mothers play in raising children and shaping their values. Their negative evaluation of the consequences of migration is evident. Labor

Labor migration in Kyrgyzstan. – B.: 2008, p.166.


KYRGYZSTAN: successful youth – successful country




KYRGYZSTAN: successful youth – successful country

“Rural youth leave more. In the city, youth have something to do. I, myself, am a rural girl. And I sometimes go home to the village. There is nothing for young people to do there…Today, there are virtually no youth in the village. Recently, a person died in the village and there were no young people to dig the grave, old men did everything by themselves.“ (Participant, FG, Osh city)

migrants must leave their children and aging parents alone. They create a special type of family, a familial community separated by space and time, but still closely connected. The mass migration of young men combined with a low level of agricultural technology leads to inefficient, labor-intensive, and low-paid, female and child labor.

7.5. Security

Some aspects of personal security are peculiar to Kyrgyzstan’s youth. Bride kidnapping and domestic violence are widespread against a backdrop of growing crime and the romanticization of criminal as “heroes.” Still, the problem of young people’s safety is only on the periphery of the state’s attention. The tribal custom of bride kidnapping, which solves the problem of marriage without a costly wedding, is a criminal offense in Kyrgyzstan. In rural regions, 30 to 80 percent of marriages are the result of bride kidnappings. The majority of experts say the practice is widespread mainly for economic reasons, because bride kidnapping lets young people get married without costly matchmaking, exchanging of gifts between parents and relatives, and a wasteful wedding. 87 Domestic violence remains a pressing issue. Domestic violence occurs in all countries, both developing and developed. It is rooted in gender stereotypes, traditions, customs, and the socioeconomic situation. Domestic violence in our country is aggravated by bride kidnapping, polygamy, early marriages, forced marriages, arranged marriages, and religious marriages. As a result, it is first and foremost a problem for young women from rural areas.

87

“Third Periodical Government Report on CEDAW,” (2006). Bishkek. p.155

Seventy-five percent of women who turn to crisis centers are victims of violence by family members. More than 10,000 women annually seek help because of family violence. In 2003, the law on Socio-legal Protection from Domestic Violence was adopted in Kyrgyzstan, which allows for the issuance of temporary restraining orders. These are issued to the aggressor at the request of the victim. They restrict the aggressor from contacting the injured party (and under-aged children) and force the aggressor to pay for medical care. Violation of the terms of the restraining order is grounds for punishment. In 2004, 62 restraining orders were issued. In 2005, 101 were issued. During the first five months of 2008, 156 were issued, including 55 in Bishkek, 59 in Chui Province, 41 in Osh, and one in Issyk-Kul Province. Over the past five months of 2009, 11 petitions were submitted to the court for restraining orders (10 in Osh Province, one in Bishkek).

Diagram 7.3 Crimes by age group, 2007 (%)

banditry theft disorderly conduct robbery homicide




KYRGYZSTAN: successful youth – successful country

Teenagers are often subject to psychological violence by their parents. Young people see their parents as trying to control their studies, free time, choice of friends, expenses, etc. Young people complain of a lack of well-reasoned and clear explanations of what their parents want from them, a lack of opportunities to make decisions independently, and so on. As a result, young people look for truth and justice among their peers, searching for a place where they can be “understood” and provided with advice and protection. However, when in danger, 44 percent of respondents turned to their parents and relatives for help. Once they are employed, youth develop confidence in their ability to make independent decisions, including those related to safety.

7.6. Crime and youth

Modern youth live with violence and aggression experiencing a range of feelings about it, from concern for their safety to approval and desire to join the criminal world. Official statistics show that 52 percent of individuals who committed crimes were young men. Nearly twice as many young men in the 18-24 age group committed crimes in 2007 as young men in the 14-17 and 25-29 age groups. The most common types of crime among all three age groups were theft, robbery, and disorderly conduct (hooliganism). These accounted for 90 percent of crimes by 14- to 17-year-olds, 75 percent among 18- to 24-year-olds, and 67 percent among 25- to 29-year-olds. According to the statistics, youth are more likely to commit crimes related to drug trafficking as they age. Youth aged 18 to 24 accounted for most robberies. Since this group exceeds other youth age groups in number by 150 percent, it should be the focus of particular attention when developing youth policy. The most important causes of crime among youth are poverty, idleness, and unemployment. The overwhelming majority of those who commit crimes are youth who are not employed or in school. The system of sentencing for crimes also affects youth crime. Light punishments for serious crimes cause bewilderment and indignation in youth. Any inconsistency on the part of the government in applying legal measures in the fight against crime evokes vigorous reaction from youth and strengthens their distrust of law enforcement agencies. Socializing young people released from prisons is a big problem for the state. Around 40 percent of them do not have their own housing and do not wish to return to hometowns, preferring to stay in big cities. 88 State agencies provide them with services related to registration, assignment of SSN (social security number), and ID cards, but these efforts cannot solve all of their problems. The number of rehabilitation centers (and financial resources) available to help integrate former inmates into society is inadequate. Poor work by law enforcement agencies, particularly in preventing youth crime, plays an important role in the development of youth crime. It is alarming that only 25 percent of men are inclined to turn to law enforcement agencies in case of danger and that those who are least inclined are students. Every third young man fears the law enforcement agencies. The Juvenile Inspection and District Police agencies’ work has not improved law enforcement agencies’ work with young people. There is no systematic analysis and forecasting of crime among youth, no development of innovative educational and ideological methods of working with youth, no psychological consultation, and no consultation with young people. The low credibility of law enforcement agencies is balanced against young people’s trust in criminal groups to protect them from violence. Belonging to a group or just being acquainted with group “leaders” practically guarantees complete security. More than half of respondents do not rule out participation in criminal organizations, which can help them earn money, respect, and safety.

7.7. The environment

The impact of the environment on a person’s health and wellbeing can become apparent immediately or over time. However, Kyrgyzstani youth do not currently link their health to the environment. In the long term, this will aggravate health and environmental problems.

88

Roundtable “Securing human rights to housing” UNOHCHR. December 2008.




KYRGYZSTAN: successful youth – successful country

As a result of economic activity, an enormous amount of industrial and domestic waste, containing radioactive materials, heavy metals (cadmium, lead, zinc, mercury), and other toxic substances (cyanides, silicates, nitrates, sulphates) has accumulated in Kyrgyzstan. The problem of waste management is becoming increasingly urgent. Today, there are 92 sites in Kyrgyzstan with toxic and radioactive mining waste, according to the Ministry of Emergency Situations. Thirty-one contain 8.2 million cubic meters of radioactive waste, including 28 with uranium mining waste, three tailing pits with thorium waste from the metal industry, and five sites with waste from the non-ferrous metal industry. There are many tailing pits in Mayluu-Suu, Min-Kush, Shekaftar, Sumsar, Kadji-Say, Ak-Tyuz, and Kan. High levels of radiation pose a threat to the health of the population and the environment. In many dangerous areas, basic information about the radioactivity of the tailing pits is lacking and monitoring is not conducted because of a lack of appropriate equipment. 89 Youth are one of the groups most susceptible to negative environmental impacts. This was a point addressed during an electronic discussion on the CARNet Network, called “Uranium Tailings in Central Asia: Local Problems, Regional Consequences, Global Solution� (March-May 2009). While adult men go to other regions and countries searching for work, women and youth prove the most susceptible to the direct impact of the tailing pits. Discussion participants said children play hopscotch, football, and other games on tailing pits. Traditionally, tailing pits serve as grazing areas for cattle tended by children and teenagers. A new method to get livelihood through digging out copper, aluminum, and other precious metals from industrial waste or abandoned industrial premises, often radioactive ones, appeared in recent years. People engaged in such type of trade are called “stalkers.� 90 Many school children and youth join “stalkers� who dig out tailing pits. All this induces us to name young Kyrgyzstanis who live in these areas high risk. Yet respondents did not name ecology and conservation among their five top values. Despite the fact that health ranked first among their values, young people evidently do not connect environmental problems with their health, and ecology is associated only with natural disasters. Eightyeight percent of respondents viewed earthquakes as the most dangerous threat out of the 15 offered. The attitude of young people toward the problem of waste is typical. People in Kyrgyzstan hold a traditional view on solving the waste problem: it should be moved away somehow and destroyed. Hence the practice of burning waste, often right in the city streets and other populated areas. Only a few environmental organizations are trying to promote a modern approach to waste management, which involves reducing the amount of waste generated through the use of reusable packaging and rational purchases of better-quality goods that can be used for a long time. Environmental sensitivity remains low among young people. Environmental education in Kyrgyzstan gives them obsolete information and does not address the modern challenges the earth is facing. Environmental education programmes take one of two traditional approaches: the scientific, which focuses on the study of the connections among living organisms and the environment; and the naturalistic, which focuses on cultivating a love for nature. Neither provides students an opportunity to see the roots of environmental issues.

89

According to data from Kyrgyzstan’s State Agency on Environmental Protection and Forestry.

90

The word “stalker� (“hunter,� “follower�) became popular in the USSR after publication of the story of brothers Strugatskis “Picnic on the Roadside� (1972) and the release of Andrey Tarkovski’s movie based on this story and entitled “Stalker� (1979). In the story (and the movie) stalkers go to the dangerous zone that became uninhabited after the extraterrestrial invasion. In this context, “stalker� means a man who consciously goes after valuable findings on the territory jeopardizing his life and health.



Environmental safety was one of the priorities of the Country Development Strategy, 2011. Kyrgyzstan’s leaders do not pay much attention to global environmental threats related to climate change, energy, and food crises. Ensuring access of youth to modern environmentally clean technologies, teaching them to make ecologically sensitive decisions, and educating them about new ecologically sensitive technologies is increasingly important to shaping the values of future generations. Youth are the most important group targeted by the UNDP Environmental Protection for Sustainable Development Programme, which leads a range of environmental projects in Kyrgyzstan. Focusing on youth is justified if an activity is aimed at forming new approaches to environmental protection (EP) issues by introducing new social and economic mechanisms and resource-saving technologies for natural resources management. Thus, the UNDP’s Demonstration of Sustainable Management of Mountain Pastures project in Suusamyr Valley which was funded by the Global Environment Fund (GEF), has set up working groups that are 80 percent youth, in six pilot villages. The project managers point to high levels of


KYRGYZSTAN: successful youth – successful country

engagement by youth in the provinces and their motivation to solve environmental issues. Since the younger generation of Kyrgyzstan has already come face to face with the social and economic results of callous treatment of nature by the previous generation – degraded country-side and roadside pastures, cut-down forests, destroyed infrastructure and the like – they understand the benefits of nature conservation. Since they are the major beneficiaries of the Suusamyr Valley project, they contribute to the sustainable development and environmental safety of these territories through rural communities, farming enterprises and social mobilization efforts. Young people were the main target group of an information campaign on collection and recycling of domestic and industrial waste, which was conducted by UNDP’s Increasing the Capacity for Introducing Principles of Sustainable Waste Management in the Kyrgyz Republic 2009 project in partnership with a branch of the Regional Ecological Center of Central Asia in the Kyrgyz Republic, because, after all, attachment to a consumption culture and the related fixed attitude toward waste can be corrected much more easily in children and youth than in adults. The younger generation can influence adults by demonstrating new attitudes and new approaches. Therefore, the education of youth about waste management has been included in the National Strategy for Waste Management, which was developed by UNDP. A crucial activity area for the UNDP Environmental Programme is increasing the capacity and awareness of target groups. With this goal, the UNDP Environmental Programme worked with the UNV-UNDP Youth Programme to organize celebrations of International Environmental Protection Day in all regions of Kyrgyzstan for two years. To increase awareness about environmental issues, an environmental journalism contest was held in 2008. It involved meetings of young journalists with experts on environmental issues and specialists from ecological programmes and projects in the provinces (north, south, and Bishkek). Young people are more receptive to new information and therefore youth are the driving force behind the practical implementation of environmental ideas. The main areas of activity for ecological/environmental youth organizations in Kyrgyzstan are: • ecological/environmental safety; • sustainable development; • biodiversity; • participation in decision-making (ecological/environmental law); • renewable energy sources; and • clean technologies. Volunteers work in environmental organizations. The Youth Ecological Network has been functioning in Central Asia since 2006 and, since 2007, national and provincial forums have been conducted. There network Youth of Kyrgyzstan for Sustainable Development and Ecological Safety puts an emphasis on innovative technologies. The ecological organization BIOM engages youth in ecological activities and implements projects like Green School Nation, which taught students in 25 schools about ecosystems, helped them recreate ecosystem models at their schools, and led environmental lessons outdoors. The School Project for Using Resources and Energy (SPURE) includes 60 schools and leads students in studying renewable energy sources and technologies for the rational use of resources and energy. The Network of higher education institutions for Sustainable Development creates micro-reserves on land belonging to educational establishments and implements pilot programmes on sustainable development and ecological safety. The Network of Solar Villages of Kyrgyzstan is working with young people on renewable energy sources. In addition, the National Youth Center for Ecology, Local History, and Tourism implements activities in Kyrgyzstan. It organizes tourist and local history circles, annual ecological contests, summer camps, and rallies. Youth also participate in informational campaigns. At the same time, ecologists note that government funding for environmental activities is minimal and activities and projects in this area are mainly paid for by international organizations, including UNDP in Kyrgyzstan, although there are examples of sponsorship by local companies.




KYRGYZSTAN: successful youth – successful country




KYRGYZSTAN: successful youth – successful country

CHAPTER 8. SOCIAL ACTIVITIES OF YOUTH 8.1. The culture of everyday life and leisure

Examining the roles of culture and organized leisure in the lives of young people is important to understanding their development. Knowledge of the culture of their everyday lives, which determines their lifestyles and shapes their interactions, allows the prediction of a significant part of their behavior. This chapter analyzes young people’s access to cultural establishments, organized leisure, and sports. The freedom to choose among activities is limited by objective and subjective factors: the presence of social infrastructure, the accessibility of various forms of leisure, and the subject’s attitude toward spare time. In addition, it depends on the marital status, age, and income level. 8.1.1. Time budget The main source of information on leisure activities is the time budget. Information about how young people use their spare time is necessary for the development of various programmes, strategies and the like in areas related to youth issues (education, culture, etc.). Examining time budgets through time allocation indicators allows to record and analyze people’s actions in the areas of labor, everyday life, education, and leisure activities. The universal indicator used to study differences in the structures of time budget consumption by different groups of population is the Szalai index. Comparing indexes calculated from the results of examinations of time budgets of youth aged 14 to 34 over the period 2000-2005 91 leads to the following conclusions: • time spent working remained virtually the same, while the spare time decreased by 10 percent; • spare time flowed into other activities and there was a tendency toward domestication of leisure activities; • family responsibilities and children rearing tasks were satisfied first; and • gender differences in time budgets leveled out in both urban and rural areas, but still, women spend 3.5 times more time on housekeeping and twice as much time on child rearing. 8.1.2 Organization of leisure Youth who can independently organize their leisure time, make up over half of the respondents. Every fifth respondent’s parents organize his or her leisure time. For others, it is friends or schools that organize their leisure time. Gender differences are shown in the chart below: Diagram 8.1 Leisure activity organizers by gender (%)

91

Results of sample researches of time budget. 2000-2005, NSC of the KR

self

parents men

friends

school/university

other

women




KYRGYZSTAN: successful youth – successful country

BOX 8.1. A. Szalai Index

Examining time budgets using indicators of time allocated to various activities provides an opportunity to record and analyze people’s activities in the areas of labor, education, and leisure. The duration, frequency, localization, and other characteristics of these activities are taken into account. The following activities are classified in the time budget: 1 work time; 2 outside hours connected to work; 3 housekeeping; 4 education, professional development; 5 work in the garden, on summer house territory, farm land; 6 child rearing; 7 spare time; 8 satisfaction of physiological needs; 9 helping relatives and acquaintances; and 10 other time expenses not indicated above.

Professor A. Szalai’s Index is considered a universal indicator generalizing differences in the way time is spent:

where Vim and Vjm are time expenses on m-th element of expenses in i-th and j-th groups; nnumber of elements of the way time is spent. Generally, working family members use their spare time passively, watching television or listening to the radio. While, on average, men have 5.1 hours of spare time per day and women have 3.8 hours of spare time per day, they spend about 46 percent of that watching television programmes. The fact that there are 108 TVs for every 100 households 92 corroborates this finding.

The survey showed that 62 percent of youth spent their free time with family and 32 percent with friends. In our opinion, domestication of leisure happens due to the lack of culture and leisure institutions on the one hand, and the lack of financial means, on the other. Apparently, leisure with family or friends does not cost much. Marital status influences how leisure is spent. Thus, unmarried respondents split their time nearly equally with family and friends (45 percent and 48 percent, respectively), and the overwhelming majority of married people spend their time with their family. Traditional social roles are reflected in the use of spare time: women spend it with family; men split it about equally between family and friends. Unlike rural youth, young people who live in the capital have the opportunity to select how they want to spend their leisure time: 35.7 percent visit night clubs; 28.6 percent go to movie theaters; and 17.9 percent attend theaters. 93 Traditions are an important part of our culture and they are unchanging by nature. Youth consider obsolete those traditions that are burdensome for the budget and emphasize the shaping of social status, such as events related to marriage, funerals, and births. In young people’s opinions, traditional equestrian sports (kyz-kuumay, at-chabysh, ulak-tartysh) are also obsolete. 8.1.3. Accessibility of cultural establishments For a variety of reasons, the people of Kyrgyzstan have begun visiting cultural establishments less frequently. Almost 44 percent of survey respondents have never been to a cultural establishment, for lack of time, money, or desire – or the absence of the cultural establishments. The most important factor, though, seems to be individual income (not family income). The desire to visit cultural establishments often manifests itself when a person’s income reaches 5,000 soms a month.

92

Level of life of the population in the Kyrgyz Republic. 2003-2007, Annual publication, NSC, 2008. 93

www.diesel.kg 94

Ibid.

95 http://www.24.kg/ community/2007/12/22/72107.html.



There are 1,766 community centers in Kyrgyzstan,94 only 172 of which (10 percent) are in villages. Annually, 26 thousand people, 51 percent of them women, visit these centers. And this is characteristic of a country with 60 percent of the population living in rural areas. In villages, leisure activities are organized by the groups of local young people, e.g., youth initiative groups (YIG) financed by international organizations and working in partnership with local governments. Kyrgyzstan has 293 movie theaters, which puts it in 19th place in the world, and they sell enough tickets for Kyrgyzstan to place 71st for number of tickets sold. 95 The country’s library system has 19,332.8 books, of which 8,008.78 (41 percent) are in rural areas, and 3,648.48 (18 percent) are in the Kyrgyz language.


KYRGYZSTAN: successful youth – successful country

Combined with other factors, poor access to cultural establishments and organized leisure opportunities stimulates young people to leave the village for the cities in search of a better life and jobs abroad. For rural youth, adapting to life in the cities with great difficulties can be easier involved in conflict situations, because it helps them solve the problem of internal discomfort. 8.1.4 Sports Sports are mainly a leisure activity. Eight percent of people in Kyrgyzstan are involved in sports.96 In Kyrgyzstan, people participate in 57 different sports97, in 2,399 physical education groups, which involve 1,105,000 young people. However, only 65 percent of Kyrgyzstan’s 2,066 schools have proper sports facilities. Only 11.5 percent of adults and 25.8 percent of students participate in sports. The decline in the health of various population groups, especially children and teenagers, reflects a low level of physical activity. The underdevelopment of health-improving forms of leisure and the destruction of the Soviet system of physical education for children and teenagers has led to a situation in which more than 69 percent of young people of pre-conscription age are not fit to serve in the military.98 Physical culture as a discipline is mainly targeted at a group of school age (7-15 years). Predictably, the older people get the less likely they are to participate in sports: the largest age group share of athletes is the 15- to 19-year-olds which amounts to 6.8 percent of all people engaged in sports.99 Since 1991, the network of sports facilities in Kyrgyzstan has decreased by almost tenfold. The number of private sports schools has decreased from 800 in 1991 to 80 in 2005.100 Physical education and sports, which are socially important but unprofitable, are fading away. For socio-cultural and economic reasons, athletes in Kyrgyzstan are turning away from team sports in favor of martial arts (pankration, kickboxing, boxing, and wrestling). 8.1.5. Youth and religion Today, the ideological vacuum created after the collapse of the Soviet Union is being filled by religion. Before 1991 there were only 39 mosques and 25 Russian Orthodox churches. Today, according to the State Agency for Religious Affairs, there are 1,648 mosques, 46 Orthodox churches, 15 protestant churches, and 15 other Christian churches. About 1,800 Islamic organizations and 300 Christian organizations are active in the country. The number of sects and religious movements is unknown: Satanists, Krishnaists, members of Rev. Sun Myung Moon’s Unification Church, representatives of Falun Gong, and representatives of other sects are active. In addition, extremist organizations such as Hizb-ut-Tahrir, the Islamic Movement of Uzbekistan (IMU) and Akromiya are working underground. According to one study, religion is playing an increasingly important role in Kyrgyzstan. It found that 62 percent of respondents identified themselves as Muslims first and Kyrgyz second.101 According to the study, 68 percent of respondents (64 percent of men and 71 percent of women) said religion had become an important part of their everyday lives and 18 attend religious establishments. Ten percent of young people between the ages of 15 and 24, and 16 percent of youth between the ages of 25 and 34, pray five times a day.102 A change of a secular worldview to a religious worldview – of various faiths – is taking place in Kyrgyzstan. There is direct evidence that young people’s values are changing. People are turning away from a paternalistic government and society. They are becoming individualists who rely on themselves, and take responsibility for their own lives, families, and homes. Through their activities, young people express not only their aspirations to make their lives comfortable, but also responsibility for their country, and desire to transform the world around them. It is important to use the active or potentially active youth as role models and send messages conducive to shaping civic values to young people.

96

Almakuchukov K.M., Tretyakov A.V. (2006). “Examination and Analysis of Policy in the Field of Physical Culture and Sports in Kyrgyzstan.” Bishkek, p. 99.

97

“Materials of Parliamentary Hearing on Youth and Youth Policy in the Kyrgyz Republic. Committee on Youth, Gender Policy, Physical Culture and Sports of Jogorku Kenesh (parliament) of the Kyrgyz Republic.” (2007). Bishkek.

98

Ibid.

99

Almakuchukov K.M., Tretyakov A.V. (2006). “Examination and Analysis of Policy in the Field of Physical Culture and Sports in Kyrgyzstan.” Bishkek, p. 99.

100 “Materials of Issyk-Kul Expert Analytical Workshop on the Development of the Conception of Physical Culture and Sports Development on 11-14 November 2005.” (2005). Bishkek: Soros-Kyrgyzstan Foundation. 101 Malikov, K. “Kyrgyz Youth Thinks that US Is a Threat to Islam, But Dreams About Living and Studying There.” http://eng.24.kg/ community/2008/10/24/6368.html, accessed on December 10, 2009. 102 Word Poll, Gallup (2008)




KYRGYZSTAN: successful youth – successful country

8.2. Access to information

Access to reliable sources of information is important for young people. To be active in public life, they need to know what’s going on in their communities, in their country, and in the world. Sources of information affect the level of education and culture, and organization of youth leisure activities. Reliable information also enables young people to make their own decisions and to participate in political decision making. Young people primarily want information about their peers, young people’s problems, and opportunities for education and employment (see the White Book on Youth Policy). Mass media and the Internet serve as their main sources of information. Research shows youth face a serious lack of information and have formed a certain mistrust of information in the mass media and on the Internet. 8.2.1. On the national level There isn’t a single socio-political publication in the country aimed at youth, even though, as of March 2008, there were 1,199 mass media outlets (print and broadcast) registered in Kyrgyzstan. News websites are not included in this number, since Internet publications are not legally considered “mass media,” although that may soon change. There are more than 100 television and radio stations registered in Kyrgyzstan. Only one Kyrgyz language channel (the National Television and Radio Corporation – NTRC) and three Russian language channels (Russia’s Channel 1, RTR’s “Planet,” and RTR’s ”Culture”) are broadcast across nationally. There are two nationally broadcast radio stations. Some residents of Kyrgyzstan who live near the borders can also watch TV channels and listen to radio stations from Uzbekistan and Kazakhstan. Radio and television stations periodically release programmes on youth themes, but survey results show that young people rarely encounter programmes about youth on television. Despite the seeming abundance of print media, its real significance as a source of information is limited because of limited circulation, periodicity, and accessibility. Out of 1,199 registered mass media publications, not more than 40 percent actually function.103 Even newspapers that are officially registered as daily publications only come out five times a week. Most print newspapers only have circulations of 5,000 to 7,000 copies. There are about 20 magazines, most of which are Kyrgyz or Kazakh versions of Russian glossies. It’s mostly the entertainment- and music-related articles in these magazines that appeal to young people.104 8.2.2 On the local level There is clearly an information gap between the capital and the provinces. More than 41 percent of Bishkek residents can read publications about youth. In the provinces, availability narrows: in Batken and Osh, only 12.6 percent and 14.5 percent (respectively) of youth can read publications about youth. The standard of living in the provinces is lower, so young people have fewer resources for newspapers and magazines, and there are fewer television and radio stations available. Also, regional mass media, which are more affordable, cover youth issues less frequently. The information gap between Bishkek and the provinces is clearest when it comes to Internet access. More than half of survey respondents in Bishkek said they used the Internet often (33.5 percent) or sometimes (22.2 percent). In Talas, only 12.5 percent said they use the Internet often and in Osh, only 13 percent of young people sometimes surf the net. Access to information in the regions is already difficult because of the limited mass media: about 15 percent of provincial print publications have small circulations and are published only three or four times a year. District newspapers are issued one or two times a month – or even more rarely. Regional television is represented either by local NTRC affiliates or private television stations with a limited broadcasting areas that reach only several kilometers beyond regional centers.

103 “Mass Media of Kyrgyzstan: Situation, Problems, Trends, and Development Perspectives. Report of the Ministry of Culture and Information of the Kyrgyz Republic.” (2008). Bishkek. 104 “Mass Media of Kyrgyzstan: Situation, Problems, Trends, and Development Perspectives. Report of the Ministry of Culture and Information of the Kyrgyz Republic.” (2008). Bishkek.



There are also differences in the mass media’s coverage of the issues important to different age groups. More frequently than other groups, information about youth is received by young people from 14 to 19 years of age (27 %) (for comparison, it makes 24.7 percent for the age group between 20 to 24 and 23.8 percent for the group of 25 to 34 years of age). Young people from 14 to 19 years old that receive such information “sometime” makes 45.3 percent (for comparison, it makes 38.9 percent for the group of 20 to 24 and 38.9 percent for the group of 25 to 34 year olds). In other words, mass media cover the problems of the so-called “awkward age” more often, since teenagers attract more attention from reporters because of stereotypes. At the same time, the schools and the army, which are populated, as a rule, by young people, need more attention.


KYRGYZSTAN: successful youth – successful country




KYRGYZSTAN: successful youth – successful country

8.2.3. The Internet Although the number of Internet users is known, it’s unclear how many of them are young people.

Who are the active youth? “They are the ones who aspire to achieve something, who do not stay in one place, who strive, who conduct social work, and have ideas. And passive youth are those happy with what they have. Active young people learn languages and computer skills, and go abroad.” (FG, unemployed youth, Bishkek) “Before thinking about the future of the country, we should first think about youth. The future of the country is in their hands. Everything is in our hands, we should strive, work for the future.” (FG, rural youth, Jalal-Abad)

The main users of the Internet in Kyrgyzstan are probably students who use it for educational purposes – most of them girls. Since there is a shortage of information from traditional sources, Bishkek youth use non-traditional media (the Internet) often, but for technical reasons young people from the provinces can’t do the same. There are no gender differences in frequency of Internet use. However, the share of young men who use the Internet (33.3 percent) is a little higher than that the share of young women who use the Internet (27.5 percent). Also, there are more young women among those who do not use the Internet at all or do not know what it is. The problem of the credibility of information available on the Internet is acute: users are not always able to evaluate the quality of a resource. Therefore, having access to the Internet does not necessarily mean having access to information. The percentage of young people who do not trust Internet resources is higher than percentage of those who mistrust print or television media. In the rankings of trusted sources of information, Internet resources come in 11th, samizdat – 12th and rumors – 13th places. At the same time, the so-called “digital divide” among youth is becoming more and more apparent, especially when it comes to Internet usage. Almost half of survey respondents said they did not have any computer skills, and 53.1 percent said they did not use the World Wide Web. Only about 11 percent said they use the Internet often. 8.2.4. Trust in mass media There is great concern about the credibility of the information provided by Kyrgyzstan’s mass media. Young people believe the most reliable source of information is state television (NTRC), which is trusted by 81 percent of respondents. However, the level of trust depends on the respondent’s place of residence. In Naryn, Batken, and Osh provinces, the level of trust is much higher. Viewers in Bishkek are less trusting. Trust in the Internet as a source of information was surprisingly low. Only 22.4 percent of respondents said they completely trusted it. We clearly see a tendency for trust in all forms of mass media, including the Internet, to decrease with age. For instance, almost half of respondents between the ages of 14 and 19 completely trust state television, but only one-third of 20- to 24-year-olds do; the older the respondent, the lower his or her level of trust. Not only is access to information limited, there is a shortage of the types of information youth want. Traditional publications for teenagers and students have ceased to exist. Experts have noted falling interest in socio-political publications, which are being replaced by entertainment. However, the majority of television channels, especially in Bishkek, are aimed at young audiences. They provide entertaining music programmes. As a rule, local mass media inform the population about the work of local government, visits of leaders, and official reports. To be fair, reporters say youth organizations do a poor job of communicating, failing to let the community know about their problems and initiatives. There is, however, a new tendency in the development of information in Kyrgyzstan, from a young person’s point of view: there is a decrease in the number of “traditional” newspaper readers. Interest in newspapers as sources of information, especially among urban youth, is decreasing as a result of the rapid development of online mass media. Media activity is increasingly being transferred to the Internet, where printed mass media are trying to find a niche for online versions of their publications.




KYRGYZSTAN: successful youth – successful country

8.3. Youth participation in decision-making 8.3.1. Characteristics of socially active youth The main criteria for categorizing youth as “active” or “passive,” was their participation and their intention to participate (“due to their own beliefs” or “for the country’s good”) in at least one sociopolitical organization (political party, NGO, professional and/or expatriate organizations, local government). According to the survey, 18 percent of young people are active or potentially active (hereinafter – “active”). There were no significant differences in the socio-demographic characteristics of the two groups, but young people with higher incomes seem to tend to be more active. There were no strong differences in attitudes among active and passive youth. However, active young people always seem to have opinions. Inactive young people marked the “don’t know” answer in the survey more often. Active young people were more likely to be satisfied with their lives, including the following areas: • professional and career growth; • leisure; • legal rights as a citizen; and • material wellbeing. The survey did not reveal any major differences been active and passive youth, in terms of their emotional attitudes toward concepts-values. However, there were differences of up to 15 percent in their responses. There were only two exceptions: active youth judged “religious sects” more positively (26.4 percent of active youth viewed them positively, compared to 18 percent of inactive youth); and inactive youth treated the concept of “money” more positively than active youth did. It should also be noted that active youth evaluated civil and market values, in general, more highly. One important driver of social activity is whether a person sees him or herself as a “subject” or is “selfdirected,” which is characterized by: 1. the ability to lead people and influence people; 2. the ability to make decisions and take responsibility; 3. the ability to see the consequences of actions; and 4. the availability of resources.

 Subjectivity (latin “subjectum” – subject): a quality of an individual who is the subject of activity. With regard to people, “being a subject” means being a carrier of the “I” idea, which in its turn means that a human thinks, perceives, experiences and fulfills himself as the cause of himself, or discovers himself as causa sui. The need of a human to come forward to himself, experience himself in his initial causality, and in the end justify to himself the identity “I=World,” creates an underlying source of his above-situational activity. Human subjectivity is expressed in his vitality, communication, and self-consciousness as tendency to self-reproduction. First of all, it appears from this that Subjectivity necessarily projects itself in goal-setting actions (reproduction presupposes the presence of a constantly renewed “model image” directing the process of recreating the things); further, that subjectivity means freedom (in the end it is an individual himself and not someone else “for him,” who implements reproduction, directs this pro-

cess and indicates its completion) and finally that subjectivity is impossible outside of development (an individual has to act in a complicated, unpredictable, changing environment and because of this, new methods of reproduction, formed at the previous step, are subject to reproduction). A person discovers his subjectivity by testing his own ability to be the cause of himself, which forms the basis of active inelasticity.

BOX 8.2

V.A.Petrovskiy




KYRGYZSTAN: successful youth – successful country

Seynep Diykanbaeva, an AUCA student, was able to prove to the whole world that cerebral palsy is not a disability, but simply a condition of the body. Seynep’s birth brought both happiness and pain to her mother, Tamara Kanayeva. How was she to live, what was she to do? The mother’s heart was telling her that her child needed help. BOX 8.3 When she was five, Seynep began writing poems Seynep Diykanbaeva, and singing, and when she was seven, she was on television for the first time. Seynep often performed at events for children. And even back then, she was concerned about handicapped children. Once, after her poems were published in a newspaper, she told her mother: “Mom, I want to compose many poems and have lots of money to change the lives of children like me. They sit at home, they do not study, and they do not communicate with anyone. If I had money, I would build kindergartens, schools, and cafes for them and they would be able to interact and study and wouldn’t be lonely.� These words were the basis for the creation of the Parental Association of Handicapped Children (PAHC) in 1995. At first, Seynep studied in the Umut-Hope rehabilitation center, and then she was home-schooled. But after proving to doctors and everyone around her that she is a normal person and had the same rights as other children, at the age of nine, the determined Seynep went to a mainstream school. By protecting her own rights, she began to protect the rights of children with limited abilities. As an author of articles about the lives of people with limited abilities, Seynep has participated in seminars in America, Finland,

Thailand, and other countries. When Seynep was 16, Kalle Kenkell, the famous wheelchair-bound advocate of handicapped people, who promotes the idea that handicapped people have unlimited abilities, heard about her. On Kenkell’s initiative, a documentary was filmed about Seynep called “The Song of Seynep,� and Kenkell shows it wherever he goes. Also, Seynep was nominated by Mobility International USA for inclusion in the book “Young People Changing the World,� after her participation in the second round of the second international Women’s Institute on Leadership and Disability (WILD 2003). And, those are only some of her achievements. Seynep has changed the laws of the Kyrgyz Republic that relate to the rights of handicapped children and their parents. She has been invited as an expert to various meetings and discussions on the rights of handicapped children and young people. Seynep’s positive example has helped many people to look at the world differently, to believe there are no insurmountable problems. Everything depends on whether a person has the desire to change his or her life and the lives of others for the better.

This story was told by Roza Kasymbayevna Serkebayeva and edited by Nurgul Sharshembiyeva (PA “House of Reporters,� 03922 51546)

In the survey, young people compared themselves to the abovementioned characteristics. Fiftythree percent of working youth, 42.4 percent of students, and one-third of unemployed youth said they could lead people. More than half of unemployed youth said they do not influence people around them and cannot lead people. More than 64 percent of employed youth say they are responsible, compared to 42 percent of unemployed young people. Almost half of all respondents set goals, including 61 percent of employed youth, 45.6 percent of students, and 46.6 percent of unemployed youth. Overall, more than half of employed youth and less than half of students possess the characteristics listed. And, despite the shortage of resources among unemployed youth, more than one-third of them display “subjectivity.� Undoubtedly, this quality should be used not only to realize the potential of the individual, but for the public good, as well. In the end, analysis of the survey data showed that active youth match the characteristics of “subjectivity� better than inactive youth and that here was a 17 percent to 22 percent gap between the responses of the two groups. Thus, what distinguishes active young people is: “The main thing is their backbone� (FG, Bishkek) Work with value orientations will allow potentially active young people to become truly active. 


KYRGYZSTAN: successful youth – successful country

8.3.2. Activity and participation in decision-making Young people in Kyrgyzstan today don’t participate much in decision-making processes, especially at the management level. By participation in decision making, we mean influencing the final decision to take into account the opinions and interests of youth. That situation is beginning to change, with more youth getting involved, but it is necessary to support this process at all levels. Indisputably, young people learn their first decision-making skills from their families. These skills then develop as they mature. 8.3.2.1. School/Educational Institutions In addition to traditional forms of student engagement in the life of educational institutions, such as serving on committees or as class leaders, new forms have begun to appear, like school parliaments and debate clubs where students discuss the problems of their educational establishments. Sixty seven percent of survey respondents said they took part in the social lives of their educational institutions either often or sometimes. At the same time, they had only a very general understanding of the meaning of the phrase “social life” – attending community work days or participating in student committees. These activities are typical of rural areas. In cities, where there are more opportunities outside of school, students more rarely take part in the social lives of their educational establishment. The level of youth participation in the financial decisions of their educational establishments – especially the more important decisions, like writing budgets and distributing funds – and in broader issues like management, is very low. It became apparent in focus groups that even students who pay for their own educations are not interested in knowing how their money is spent. The elections of management or the local student government is conducted formally, with the exception of the American University in Central Asia, which is not typical of Kyrgyzstan, since it is managed according to the American model. 8.3.2.2. Community/local level Local governments do not engage youth in decision-making, either. Despite the devolution of many of the national government’s powers to local governments, participation of the entire community in management at a local level remains theoretical. It is not accidental that almost 66 percent of respondents do not participate in village meetings, councils, public hearings, and other local government events. This is, in part, a consequence of the traditional isolation of youth from decision-making processes. It is also a consequence of a lack of mechanisms for community and youth participation in decision-making. As one of focus group participant noted, “An old method is being used: youth are only called when they are needed, or when something needs to be built for conducting meetings, but there are no mechanisms for youth development.” At the local level, young people’s weak organizational capacity is an additional barrier. Studies of youth organizations in Kyrgyzstan show that the main barriers for their development are a lack of knowledge of Russian and English, a lack of access to information, a lack of support from adults, and a lack of places to meet. Many young people do not speak Russian. Since the majority of training materials on organizational development and youth organization are in English or Russian, the language barrier is a serious problem. In some cases, adults refuse to support youth initiatives because they think youth “are too young to know what to do.” Local authorities also do not promote self-organization at the local level. Until 2008, organizations for working with youth were created as part of the local government administrations in the provinces. Their tasks included coordinating the activities of youth organizations. But now youth committees have been liquidated along with other state bodies at the provinces level and the question of who will work with youth remains open. However, even in places where these organizations functioned, they focused primarily on cultural events. Financing youth events is another problem. National programmes on youth policy do not allocate sufficient resources for implementing events at the local level, and local authorities do not plan such expenditures, hoping instead for transfers from national programmes. Youth, in turn, do not influence local budgeting. Participation of youth in traditional forms of representative democracy is very low. In the local elections held on 5 October 2008, 7,647 deputies were elected. Only 9 percent of them were under 30. Forty-five percent of them were 30-45. Of the 62 


KYRGYZSTAN: successful youth – successful country

city and district senate chairmen chosen, 16 were between the ages of 30 to 45 (25.8 percent). The overwhelming majority (74.2 percent) were over 45. Thus, youth is not sufficiently represented in local government bodies for protecting their interests, and the system of financing youth events is not organized. Another form of youth involvement in decision making is participations in public activities. Youth organizations, mainly in cities, are trying to break down stereotypes, mobilize young people to solve development issues, and create youth leaders. These organizations are particularly active in Bishkek and in Chui Provinces and less active in Osh, Jalal-Abad, Naryn, Batken, and Talas.105 Unfortunately, they do not cover remote rural regions. Civil society organizations work with youth, focusing particularly on the rights of mothers and children, and on vulnerable youth groups. These organizations offer services, information, and opportunities for obtaining education and developing skills. Many organizations specialize in HIV/AIDS, and also on sexual and reproductive health, since there is adequate funding for NGOs working in these areas. A gradually developing group of youth associations has become an integral part of the NGO sector, and has become active in politics, through civil society. 106 The Ministry of Education and Science has registered 70 youth organizations. However, according to local NGOs, 1,010 NGOs are active in Kyrgyzstan and 12 percent of them (302) working on the issues of children and youth107 (where children are people under 18108). 105 Green Book on the issues of youth participation in country’s development , p.20 106 UNDP HDR for 2005, p.22 107 Findings of research on youth policy 2005 – 2006, p. 20

108 According to the UN Convention on Children’s

Rights, which was ratified by the Kyrgyz Republic, as well the Code on Children of the Kyrgyz Republic, people are children until they reaches the age of 18.

The most popular groups among youth are: sports organizations (55.4 percent were members); professional organizations (29 percent); and political parties (26.4 percent). Slightly more than 1 percent of respondents admitted they belonged to criminal organizations. Interest in professional organizations increases rapidly between the ages 20 and 24 (37.6 percent of respondents in this age group said they were interested). The highest level of interest in professional organizations was expressed by young people in Osh (55.7 percent), Batken (50.8 percent) and Naryn (42.1 percent). Youth in Talas and Chui provinces had virtually no interest in them. In Bishkek, interest in professional organizations is not high at all (22.4 percent). No gender differences on this issue were observed.

Diagram 8.2 Types of organizations to which young people would like to belong (%) Sport Professional Political parties Musical NGO Religious Home-region-based Criminal




KYRGYZSTAN: successful youth – successful country

 We all know what a toothache is. Treating teeth is unpleasant and costly. But with our hero there are no such problems. A high-class dentist, Ulanbek Tursunbaev treats children of Karakol free of charge and also proudly fulfills his duty as a deputy. The story of his achievements is told to us by his spouse: I am nominating an honest and modest person as a Hero. He graduated from an ordinary school, went to an ordinary university and lives by honorable principles – believe in God, love your family, and serve your homeland. This is my spouse, Ulanbek, who fully dedicates himself to his work, hometown, and country. Ulanbek was born in 1975 in Bishkek and now lives in Karakol. He is an excellent family man and a beloved daddy for his son and daughter. He is the head dentist in the Issyk-Kul Provincial Dental Clinic. He did not choose to become a dentist by accident; his father is a successful dentist and is well-known in town. Today, dental work is costly and not everybody can afford it. Besides, the times when there were dental offices in schools and students’ teeth were under the close watch of specialists have long ago disappeared. Since 1992, there has been no free dental treatment for students. Ulanbek noticed that schoolchildren had neglected teeth. And they were forced to pay two or three times as much to have them treated. Nobody takes preventive measures. As it is known, many diseases begin from teeth diseases, especially in children. So Ulanbek decided to do something. He organized free treatment and preventative care for students in two schools in Karakol. Every day for two months students and teachers could visit him for quality treatment and profes-

sional advice. This had not been done for 15 years. But now it will be done twice a year. Ulanbek’s plans include finding a sponsor and expanding his program to cover two more schools in town. Rakymbek uulu Meder, a colleague and friend of Ulanbek’s said: “What Ulan did cannot be done by just anyone – treating teeth for free with today’s prices – since medication and materials for treatment are not cheap. This is a truly heroic deed!” In addition to his medical practice, Ulan also manages to do scientific research. He has conducted more than 60 studies on various sub- BOX 8.4 jects, and organized 300 training workshops in all Ulanbek the regions of Kyrgyzstan. He was among the first (Karakol) to introduce a quick needs assessment into the healthcare system. In 2003, Ulanbek’s “Study of the Opinions of Medical Personnel on Healthcare Reform” received first place in the “public health” category during the Second International Conference of Young Scientists in Yerevan, Armenia. He also participated in restructuring and rationalizing of the healthcare system of the Kyrgyz Republic. In 2007, he was elected to the Kyrgyz government’s National Multisectoral Coordinating Committee on Socially Significant and Particularly Dangerous Infectious Diseases. He has published research works, one methodological recommendation, and four articles on healthcare reform in the Kyrgyz Republic. Healthcare is not the only field in which Ulan has achieved excellence. Last year, he was elected as a deputy in the Karakol town council. Now he is solving the problems of the town and its citizens, which, unfortunately, are increasing with each year. Although he’s very busy, Ulanbek never forgets about his physical condition. He constantly plays sports, like soccer and chess.

Interest in political parties is approximately the same for all age categories; there are no gender differences. Maximal interest in parties was expressed by young people in Batken (44.1 percent said they were interested) and Jalal-Abad (33.3 percent). Osh and Issyk-Kul ranked third and fourth (27.1 percent in each). Youth in the capital turned out to be less enthusiastic about partisan activity (22.4 percent), while the least interested were young respondents from Talas and Naryn (8.8 percent and 7.9 percent, respectively). The low popularity of nongovernmental, non-commercial organizations (NCOs) among youth demands attention. In general, NCOs are only in fourth place (16.4 percent of respondents said they were interested) in the ratings. However, religious organizations were even less popular (only 10.5 percent of respondents said they were interested). Among supporters of NCOs, men and women are equally represented. The biggest interest in NCOs was expressed by young people between the ages of 25 to 34, while the least interest was shown by youth between the ages of 14 and 19. Young people’s motives for participating in one organization or another are important. The most important motives were: views of respondents (cited by 36.4 percent), desire to be useful to the country (18.5 percent), and protection (13 percent). Prestige placed fourth (7.5 percent). 


KYRGYZSTAN: successful youth – successful country

8.3.2.3. National level National level decision makers have an opportunity to engage youth in strategic decisions. Since there is no advisory body representing youth interests in Kyrgyzstan, youth can only participate in the system in traditional ways (the same ways as adults), i.e., membership in a state body. Experience shows that youth are not very involved in the decision-making process at the national level. Traditional forms of involvement – voting in elections for the parliament and the other representative bodies – appeals to only 53.4 percent of respondents, while 22.2 percent of them are sure that their vote does not count. More alarming, however, is the fact that, out of the remaining nonvoting youth only 8.2 percent do it consciously, on the assumption that their voice does not decide anything. It is apathy that lies behind non-participation in elections, and not an ideological position. Neither the government nor the institutional environment motivate youth to participation in public life. Stimuli for youth initiatives are also not created at the state level. For instance, there is no legislative basis for serving as a volunteer, except a mention in the new version of the law “On the Bases of Youth State Policy,” which declares a special foundation for financing youth initiatives. During the last parliamentary elections, special quotas requiring the inclusion of individuals under 35 on party lists were introduced to encourage representation of youth in government. Only through positive discrimination was it possible to elect young people to the parliament. The youth quota increased the interest of political figures in involving young supporters, which led to the creation of so-called “youth wings” of parties. But the problem is that these organizations were virtually created by adults for youth, i.e., young people did not form them out of a conscious need for self-organization. The state is taking the first steps toward involving youth in decision-making. The first national youth conference, to be called “Youth in the Development of the Country,” organized by the president’s administration with the support of the UNV-UNDP Youth Programme, was held on 10 November 2008 in Bishkek. It offered an example for the discussion of issues in a public policy format. Unfortunately, such events are mostly conducted with financial support from international organizations. Involvement of youth in discussions about youth policy has not yet become a common practice. The participation of Kyrgyzstan’s youth in the socio-economic life of the country is very limited because of a lack of information about opportunities that exist in this field. Moreover, more than half of the population lives in rural areas, which makes it more difficult to get involved. Exact data on the level and nature of youth participation is difficult to obtain, with the exception of a study conducted by the Youth Human Rights Group and focus groups of rural youth conducted by UNV.




KYRGYZSTAN: successful youth – successful country

POLICY RECOMMENDATIONS YOUTH POLICY Recommendations for state bodies 1. The bases for the formation of policy should be changed, starting with the goal of youth policy and the method of identifying youth problems. As far as the goal, we suggest an integrated approach, which would result in a young individual with fundamental knowledge, abilities, who is able to adapt to the constantly changing external environment and determine himself/herself, instead of a traditional sectoral approach focusing on education, sports, healthcare, employment and so on. 2. Each sectoral policy should have a “youth” component, i.e., policy measures that are designed to influence youth. Consumers’ opinions – in this case, those of young people – should be taken into account during the formation of these sectoral policies. 3. The paternalistic approach of youth policy should be eliminated and replaced with a partnership approach. The existing, socially oriented approach should be maintained only for vulnerable youth (orphaned children, disabled children, etc.). 4. The maximum age limit for those defined by Kyrgyzstan’s laws as youth should be reduced to bring it into accord with international standards (25 years should be the limit, according to UN standards). This should be coordinated with the National Statistical Committee. 5. National and local government organizations should not provide young people with special privileges but should instead concentrate on enhanced targeted policy measures, differentiation of the needs of youth and, consequently, definition of various youth segments. Possible criteria segmenting youth into smaller groups are: age, residence (rural vs. urban), and employment status (student, employed, etc.). 6. Efforts should be focused on the following strategic areas for state youth policy: improving the management of youth-related programmes at all levels; ensuring constant, equal and mutually beneficial dialogue by developing a horizontally and vertically integrated institution of social partnership between state, local self-governance bodies, and youth to ensure equal opportunities, transparency and coordination of the sides’ activities. Young people’s opinions should become an integral element of any consultation involving the government and civil society – for example, public budget hearings.

EDUCATION Ministry of Education and Science, international organizations / UN agencies / donors working in the area of education 7. The state should set strategically clear-cut and well-defined priorities for the upcoming year, five years, and ten years in the system of education. It should determine the results the education system should generate and what qualities and characteristics the system needs now and in the future at all levels. It should contribute to the development of social partnership in education at the national, provincial, and local levels. It should increase the transparency, reporting, and accountability of education managers to partner organizations. 8. New approaches to shaping educational content should be applied that flexibly react to the needs of the labor market and to external challenges. 9. Educational institutions should be provided with broad authority to make managerial decisions, including redistribution of financial and other resources. Educational institutions should have the right to independently design their curricula. Supervisory boards with active representative participation of the community should monitor and control the all educational systems. International departments and career centers should be established in vocational education institutions. An independent system for certifying and accrediting educational institutions should be created. A rating system for educational institutions should be introduced. 10. The structure of the education system should be optimized for the rational use of resources. 11. New approaches and educational technologies should be developed, which enable students to study while working, including a module system, evening schools, evening classes in comprehensive schools, and specialized education. This requires educational institutions to ensure flexibility in types of education and a more open access to education. 


KYRGYZSTAN: successful youth – successful country

12. Financial resources should, to a greater extent, be used for improving the quality of education and not for maintaining the infrastructure. The network of educational establishments should be optimized by closing costly educational establishments and reassigning students to other establishments. It is necessary to stimulate the creation of non-traditional educational establishments. 13. The image of education as a major and as a profession needs to be improved, as does the training for pedagogical staff. The structure of payments to teachers must be changed: the study load should be optimized and the resulting savings should be used for bonuses. 14. Young people should be engaged in pedagogical majors. Local governments should share responsibility for training young teachers and provide work for them, especially in rural areas. Mechanisms should be developed for controlling the quality of education among scholarship students. 15. The languages of instruction in vocational education need to be rationalized. Eighty percent of 80% of schools use Kyrgyz as their language of instruction, but 68 percent of higher vocational education institutions and 76 percent of secondary vocational education institutions provide instruction in Russian language. 16. The structure of education should be brought into accord with the needs of the economy and the labor market, taking regional development into account. It seems reasonable to strengthen vocational orientation among high school students, and to enhance the appeal of elementary and secondary vocational education among youth. 17. Vocational technical training should be transformed into a link in a chain of continuous education, a basis for retraining the unemployed and a locus for local regional development. Vocational education should be modernized by creating and introducing a new model aimed at the multi-sectoral needs of the territorial labor market, ensuring employment and self-employment (entrepreneurship) of youth, vocational re-training of adults and staff training for large national projects. 18. The system of informal education should be expanded, allowing young people to obtain education regardless of age and experience. A system of official recognition of qualifications, knowledge and skills obtained at any level of education, in everyday life and on the basis of professional experience, should be created. 19. Teaching citizenship should become a component of the educational system’s work. A course on citizenship – a civics course – should be created, focusing on citizenship, human rights, democracy, and ecology.

YOUTH EMPLOYMENT Ministry of Economic Regulation; Ministry of Labor, Employment and Migration 20. Programmes on youth entrepreneurship should be developed to support unemployed youth through access to commodity markets (through the government orders, public procurement for the Government Materials Reserves Fund, delivery to the state enterprises and the like), targeted credit and educational-consultative resources. The programmes should be targeted and customized for different groups of youth, taking into account their various outlooks and lifestyles, apportionments of services and the conditions of female entrepreneurs and returning labor migrants. 109 21. When developing and selecting projects to invest funds from the Foundation for Development, care should be taken to target projects that would create new jobs for unemployed youth. 22. Suggestions should be developed for state co-financing of commercial banks’ interest rates for loans to youth. New types of lending used by some commercial banks (guarantee funds, bank guarantees, etc.) that minimize collateral requirements for youth should be considered. 23. Measures should be developed to economically stimulate businesses that attract interns and trainees (tax breaks and contributions to the Social Fund, preferential lending, etc.), and for strengthening mentorship within business organizations. 109 It is necessary to use the approach of 24. Implementation of a provision in the Tax Code exempting employer spending on employee such commercial enterprises as mobile training, which stimulates hiring of young employees, should be advocated. communication providers that offer tariffs affordable for young people 25. Proposals should be developed on partial government subsidization (through taxes, tax exusing cell phones rather for personal emptions, holidays, etc.) of young people’s wages, especially for young families and socially communication (during non-working hours) than for business. vulnerable youth. 


KYRGYZSTAN: successful youth – successful country




KYRGYZSTAN: successful youth – successful country

26. A national informational portal should be created listing job vacancies and a database of individuals searching for work. Employment services should be created with the goal of more broadly informing unemployed youth about vacancies and employers’ requirements. 27. Job search and career centers for youth should be created, which should include a systematic analyzis of the youth labor market, study demand for young workers, establishment of permanent contacts with employers and employment centers, represent the interests of youth to employers, and identify new needs and requirements of employers. 28. Informational-explanatory work among youth on the benefits of self-employment and income generating activity should be improved, popularizing ideas about freedom of choice, entrepreneurship, and the market economy. The stories of young entrepreneurs’ successful experiences should be spread through the mass media. 29. Micro-credit programmes should be provided to help socially vulnerable youth set up small businesses. 30. The employment of young people with limited abilities should be supported through the creation of a list of organizations and a set of quotas. 31. Professional training standards should be improved, with an eye toward changes going on in the work place and the active participation of stakeholders such as business associations and consulting organizations. Standards for professions suitable for youth should be created. 32. Work on identifying professional directions for university students should be enhanced. Students’ abilities should be identified in educational establishments. Business should be asked to bid for the right to locate workshops in unused parts of educational facilities, in which students could receive vocational training and learn entrepreneurial skills. 33. Courses should be developed and introduced to the vocational education system on starting and running businesses. While they are taking classes, students should also prepare and defend business plans. 34. The professional skills of faculty in the elementary, secondary and higher vocational educational institutions should continuously be improved through and participation in donor organizations’ educational projects, master classes and so on. Control should be strengthened over the improvement of educational methods and the theoretical-practical knowledge and skills of teaching staff.

MIGRATION AND YOUTH 35. Kyrgyzstan’s agreements with other countries on labor migrants should be revised, with an eye toward streamlining and harmonizing Kyrgyzstani labor migrants’ pensions and medical services/insurance in both the sending and the receiving country. 36. Cooperation and partnership mechanisms should be developed among government, NGO, and private organizations, including employment agencies, with the goal of rendering maximal support to labor migrants at all stages of labor migration. 37. A broad network of organizations should be created to support employment for Kyrgyzstan’s citizens abroad. Measures should be developed for controlling the activities of intermediary employment organizations. 38. Young labor migrants should be assisted through the coordination of services and mechanisms between the sending and receiving countries, to optimize workforce supply for professions and sectors that have the largest shortage of workers in receiving countries. Monitoring and analysis of the labor markets in the sending and receiving countries should be conducted and labor flows should be regulated. 39. Informational support should be provided for young people to help them through the process of labor migration, from preparation for departure to searching for jobs, from moving to another country to returning home and reintegrating into society. 40. The possibility of creating banks that accumulate and use the finances of businessmen and entrepreneurs returned from labor migration, as well as local entrepreneurs, to support entrepreneurship among youth should be examined. 41. Centers supporting entrepreneurship should be developed, planning for return of the maximum number of labor migrants. 42. A favorable business environment should be created at the national and local levels for labor migrants wishing to start their own businesses. 


KYRGYZSTAN: successful youth – successful country




KYRGYZSTAN: successful youth – successful country

43. Socio-psychological support should be provided for returned labor migrants and their families, using existing crisis centers. 44. Studies should be conducted on the impact of labor migration on Kyrgyzstan’s demographics, labor market, and citizens’ quality of life (focusing especially on youth).

HEALTH, ECOLOGY AND SECURITY Ministry of Health, Ministry of Internal Affairs, State Agency on Environmental Protection and Forestry, international organizations/UN agencies/donors working in the area of health care, the environment and human security. 45. Behaviors conducive to healthy lifestyles should be encouraged at all stages of the educational cycle. All available means should be used to promote a fashion for healthy living. Health as a paramount value should pass from the system of knowledge into the system of habits among youth. 46. Comprehensive measures should be implemented to reduce traffic accidents. Campaigns should be conducted to raise awareness on the consequences of theft, robbery, and hooliganism. 47. Reducing extortion and other types of violence in educational establishments, especially schools, should become a priority. 48. A system of “youth-friendly� medical services should be developed, especially in the field of sexual health. 49. Education in environmental sensitivity should be an integral part of the education of young people; environmental knowledge and skills should be inseparable. 50. Work on socializing young people released from prisons should be improved; economic incentives should be created for organizations that work with this category of youth.

FAMILY AND LEISURE Office of the President of the Kyrgyz Republic; Ministry of Labor, Employment and Migration; international organizations/UN agencies/donors working in the area of family, gender and governance. 51. Large-scale information and advocacy events should be conducted, aimed at increasing respect for women and recognition of her important role in the family. Mass media coverage should be encouraged of the application of legal measures in cases of violence against women and girls forced into marriage. A series of TV programmes dedicated to this issue should be developed, with the involvement of public figures and government agencies. 52. The family and educational establishments should be more broadly involved in raising young people. Young people’s access to information and their involvement in decision making processes should be insured.

SOCIAL ACTIVITIES Office of the President of the Kyrgyz Republic; Ministry of Labor, Employment and Migration; international organizations/UN agencies/donors working in the area of family, gender and governance 53. State and local government agencies should inform and consult with youth. 54. A youth information portal should be created on the web, perhaps by modernizing an existing site – www.jashtar.kg, for example. 55. A national school for young leaders should be created, based on the National Personnel Reserve, for the preparation not only of state officials, but also of executives in the business and NCO sectors. 56. The information available on the youth portal should be entertaining and popular enough to become a model of distribution of public information about youth for all mass media outlets. 57. Local governments should allocate facilities in schools, cultural centers, and other buildings – and provide other support, as necessary – for youth initiative groups. 58. Youth in the provinces should be provided with information in Kyrgyz. International organizations working with youth organizations should be encouraged to produce original (not translated) textbooks and other academic materials in Kyrgyz. 


KYRGYZSTAN: successful youth – successful country




KYRGYZSTAN: successful youth – successful country

59. Through job centers and other agencies working with youth, a system of comprehensive information and consulting centers focusing on employment, education, and leisure should be created. 60. A law on volunteers’ rights should be created to secure their legal status and provide a legislative basis for volunteering. 61. The involvement of initiative groups and other forms of youth participation in public life should be widened; for example, through the conduct of regular public hearings. 62. Youth initiatives should be included in local government and community development programmes. 63. A Foundation for Youth Initiatives Support should be created to finance social and business projects with youth participation.




KYRGYZSTAN: successful youth – successful country

ANNEXES




KYRGYZSTAN: successful youth – successful country

Annex 1. MAIN SOCIO-ECONOMIC INDEXES OF THE KYRGYZ REPUBLIC Table 1. Primary data on Kyrgyzstan 1995

1 2 3 4 5 6



2000

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

Area, in thousands of sq. km.

199.9

199.9

199.9

199.9

199.9

199. 9

199.9

199.9

199. 9

Population density, in people per sq. meter

23

25

25

25

26

26

26

26

26

Permanent population at the end of the year, mln. people 1

4.6

4.9

5.0

5.0

5.1

5.1

5.2

5.2

5.3

Children and teenagers, %

38.0

36.7

35.2

34.5

33.8

33.2

32.8

32.6

32.3

Over working age, %

9.2

8.9

8.7

8.5

8.4

8.3

8.2

8.3

8.3

Rural, %

64.7

65.2

65.3

65.1

64.8

65.0

65.2

65.3

65.4

Urban, %

35.3

34.8

34.7

34.9

35.2

35.0

34.8

34.7

34.6

Men, %

49.2

49.4

49.4

49.4

49.4

49.4

49.4

49.4

49.4

Women, %

50.8

50.6

50.6

50.6

50.6

50.6

50.6

50.6

50.6

Kyrgyz, %

60.3

65.7

66.9

67.4

67.9

68.4

68.9

69.2

69.6

Russian, %

15.7

11.7

10.7

10.3

9.9

9.5

9.1

8.7

8.4

Uzbek, %

14.2

13.9

14.1

14.2

14.3

14.3

14.4

14.5

14.5

Ukrainian, %

1.6

0.9

0.8

0.7

0.6

0.6

0.5

0.5

0.4

Tatar, %

1.2

0.9

0.8

0.8

0.8

0.7

0.7

0.7

0.7

Dungan, %

1.0

1.1

1.1

1.1

1.1

1.1

1.2

1.2

1.2

Uyghur, %

0.9

1.0

1.0

1.0

1.0

1.0

1.0

1.0

1.0

Turkish, %

0.6

0.7

0.7

0.7

0.7

0.7

0.7

0.7

0.7

Korean, %

0.4

0.4

0.4

0.4

0.4

0.4

0.4

0.4

0.4

German, %

0.5

0.4

0.3

0.3

0.3

0.3

0.2

0.2

0.2

Other nationalities, %

3.6

3.3

3.2

3.1

3.0

3.0

2.9

2.9

2.9

Infant mortality, per 1 000 newborns 2

28.1

22.6

21.2

20.9

25.7

29.7

29.2

30.6

27.1

Child mortality, per 1 000 newborns 3

41.3

33.2

29.0

27.7

31.8

35.1

35.3

35.3

31.2

Natural increase, in thousands

80.4

62.7

65.8

69.5

74.8

72.9

82.2

85.1

89.6

Negative migration balance, in thousands

-18.9

-22.64

-27.8

-16.7

-19.3

-27.0

-31.0

-50.6

-37.8

Population capable of working, at the end of the year, in millions

2.4

2.7

2.8

2.9

2.9

3.0

3.1

3.1

3.1

Number of employed, mln. people 5

1.6

1.8

1.9

1.9

2.0

2.1

2.1

2.2

2.2

Level of registered unemployment at the end of the year, %

2.9

3.0

3.1

2.7

2.7

3.0

3.2

3.0

2.9

Level of total unemployment, on average per year, % 6

5.7

7.5

12.5

9.9

8.5

8.1

8.3

8.2



Graph for year 1998 shows data of the First National Population Census as of March 24, 1999 (FNC-1999.) Increase in infant and child mortality is connected to the country’s transition to viviparity criteria in 2004, recommended by the World Health Organization, when registration of infant mortality with very low body mass (from 500 to 1000 g) began in registry authorities. Ibid. Data were updated due to estimation to the nearest thousand people. Source of information: 1993-2001 – labor-force balance-sheet, 2002 – sample survey of domestic households on employment issues (November 2002), 2003-2007 – data of a module “Employment and Unemployment” of an integrated research on domestic households, 2008 – preliminary data. Ibid.


KYRGYZSTAN: successful youth – successful country

Table 2. Human Development Index 1995

2 3 4

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

Estimated life expectancy at birth, in years 1

66.0

68.5

68.1

68.2

68.2

67.9

67.7

67.9

68.4

Adult literacy rate, %

97.3

98.7

98.7

98.7

98.7

98.7

98.7

98.7

98.7

Percent of population aged 7-24 that are students in elementary, secondary and higher educational establishments

63

71

72

71

71

71

71

72

71

Real GDP per capita, PPP, in $ 2

1000 (1122)

1332 (1560)

1438 (1622)

1558 (1714)

1697 (1928)

1728 (1936)

1813 (2024)

1980

-

Estimated life expectancy index

0.683

0.725

0.718

0.720

0.720

0.715

0.712

0.715

-

Educational level index

0.859

0.895

0.898

0.896

0.895

0.896

0.895

0.897

-

3

0.384 (0.404)

0.432 (0.459)

0.445 (0.465)

0.458 (0.474)

0.473 (0.494)

0.476 (0.495)

0.484 (0.502)

0.498

-

Human Development Index 4

0.642 (0.649)

0.684 (0.693)

0.687 (0.694)

0.692 (0.697)

0.696 (0.703)

0.696 (0.702)

0.697 (0.703)

0.704

-

Income index

1

2000

Some decrease is connected to the country’s transition in 2004 to viviparity criteria, recommended by the World Health Organization, and accordingly to infant and child mortality. Data of the round of international comparisons in 2005, in parentheses – data of the round of comparisons in 2000. Ibid. Ibid.

Table 3. Humanitarian development 1995

2000

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

Estimated life expectancy at birth (years) 1

66.0

68.5

68.1

68.2

68.2

67.9

67.7

67.9

68.4

Maternal mortality (per 100.000 children born alive)

44.3

45.5

53.5

49.3

50.9

55.5

60.1

51.9

55.0

Number of people per 1 doctor Scientists and technicians (per 1000 people)

306

343

366

370

375

384

395

405

404

Number of people admitted to educational establishments

0.8

0.6

0.6

0.5

0.5

0.5

0.5

0.4

0.3

(% of population between the ages of 7 to 24 years)

60

71

72

71

71

71

71

72

71

Total indicator of admittance to higher educational establishments (% of admitted out of the population at the age of 17 years)

20

49

33

42

53

54

46

47

40

Women (% of admitted)

51

51

54

55

58

56

57

57

55

Daily newspapers (annual circulation per 100 people)

35

27

18

27

10

10

3

3

3

TVs (per 100 people)

14

9

5

5

5

5

6

7

7

Real GDP per capita (PPP, US $) 2

1000 (1122)

1332 (1560)

1438 (1622)

1558 (1714)

1697 (1928)

1728 (1936)

1813 (2024)

1980

-

GDP per capita (US $), according to the “Atlas” method 3

350

280

290

340

400

450

500

590

-

1

Some decrease is connected to the country’s transition in 2004 to viviparity criteria, recommended by the World Health Organization, and accordingly to infant and child mortality. 2 Data of the round of international comparisons in 2005, in parenthesis – data of the round of comparisons in 2000 3 Update of data due to change in calculation methodology of WB.




KYRGYZSTAN: successful youth – successful country

Table 4. Human disasters 1995

2000

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

45.93

43.1

39.9

35.0

2008

Indicator of poverty rate (% of population) 1

57.3

52.0

44.4

49.92

Rate of official unemployment (%) - total

2.9

3.0

3.1

2.8

2.7

3.0

3.2

3.0

2.9

including youth between the ages of 16 to 29 years (in % to economically active population at this age)

3.3

3.2

2.9

2.8

2.9

3.2

3.4

3.4

2.9

Salary of women (% of men’s salary)

73

68

65

64

67

63

66

67

67

Consumer price index (December in % to December of previous year)

132.1

109.6

102.3

105.6

102.8

104.9

105.1

120.1

120.0

Nominal rate of US dollar to som (average rate for the period)

10.82

47.72

46.94

43.72

42.67

41.01

40.16

37.31

36.57

Number of years lost due to premature death 4

21

19

18

18

20

20

20

20

19

Road-traffic injuries (per 100.000 people)

78

67

71

81

78

Declared rape cases (per 100.000 women between the ages of 15 to 59 years)

26

23

22

20

18

19

17

16

18

Sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxide emissions (kg per capita)

7.3

4.0

2.2

2.2

1.9

2.1

2.1

2.0

2.4

Carbon oxide emissions (kg per capita) 5

1.6

0.6

0.6

0.7

0.7

0.7

0.9

0.9

0.6

-

-

-

-

1 Results of a multipurpose survey of poverty by the World Bank project, for 1993 – data of first survey, conducted in the fall of 1993, for 1995 – data of

2 3 4 5

survey, conducted in the spring of 1996, for 1996-1999 in the fall of relevant year. Change in indicators for 1996-1998 is connected to a recalculation of the poverty line, in which the structure of expenditures on meals was changed. The need to make changes is connected to the economic crisis 1998 (crisis directly affected the change of consumption structure due to an increase in expenditures on food products at the expense of other expenditures.) Data for 2000-2002 were calculated according to the results of budget surveys of 3 thousand households. Data for 2003-2004 according to the results of an integrated sample survey of domestic household budgets and labor force. Calculation according to a new poverty line. Ibid. Increase in indicator in 2004 is partially connected to the country’s transition in 2004 to viviparity criteria, recommended by the World Health Organiza tion, when registration of infant mortality with a very low body mass (from 500 to1000 g) began in registry authorities. Since 2001 included from stationary sources only.

Table 5. Tendencies of human development

1

1995

2000

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

Estimated life expectancy at birth (years) 1

66.0

68.5

68.1

68.2

68.2

67.9

67.7

67.9

68.4

Enrollment rate in higher educational establishments (% of total enrollment rate, including other institutions)

76

59

53

63

57

57

60

62

70

Real GDP per capita (PPP, US $) 2

1000 (1122)

1332 (1560)

1438 (1622)

1558 (1714)

1697 (1928)

1728 (1936)

1813 (2024)

1980

-

GDP per capita (US $ according to the “Atlas” method) 3

350

280

290

340

400

450

500

590

-

Total expenditures on education, % of GDP

7.1

3.7

5.0

5.3

5.2

5.2

5.8

6.6

-

Total expenditures on health protection, % of GDP

4.3

2.2

2.6

2.4

2.3

2.4

2.8

2.9

-

Some decrease is connected to the country’s transition in 2004 to viviparity criteria, recommended by the World Health Organization, and accordingly to infant and child mortality. 2 Data of the round of international comparisons in 2005, in parenthesis – data of the round of comparisons in 2000. 3 Update of data due to change in calculation methodology of WB.




KYRGYZSTAN: successful youth – successful country

Table 6. Differences between men and women (women – men, %) 1995

2000

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

Estimated life expectancy

115

112

112

112

112

112

114

114

113

Population, at the end of the year

103

102

102

102

102

102

102

102

102

Adult illiteracy 1

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

271

Students in elementary, secondary and higher educational establishments (%)

104

101

103

103

104

105

106

106

105

Admitted to secondary educational establishments

102

97

97

89

80

102

103

99

97

Completed secondary education

108

106

106

96

102

104

99

101

100

University (or equivalent HEEs) enrollment rate

162

127

112

122

129

124

136

141

76

Admitted to HEEs to study natural and applied sciences

213

228

163

184

181

197

164

238

258

Population in labor force2

96

83

79

79

76

75

74

73

-

Employment in nonagricultural sector 3

96

75

77

79

75

76

74

72

-

Unemployment 4

146

132

100

88

88

92

86

87

Salary

73

68

65

64

67

63

66

67

67

Data of a socio-demographic survey in 1994 and the First National Population Census of 1999 on individuals of 15 years of age and older.

2 Source of information: 1993-2001 – labor-force balance-sheet, 2002 – sample survey of domestic households on employment issues (November 2002), 3 4

2003-2007 – data of module “Employment and Unemployment” of integrated research on domestic households. Ibid. Ibid.

Table 7. Situation of women 1995

2000

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

Estimated life expectancy at birth (years)

70.4

72.4

72.1

72.2

72.2

71.9

72.1

72.3

72.6

Average age at first marriage (years)

21

22

23

23

23

23

23

23

23

Maternal mortality rate (per 100.000 infants born alive)

44.3

45.5

53.5

49.3

50.9

60.1

55.5

51.9

55.0

Infant mortality rate (per 1000 newborn) 1

28.1

22.6

21.2

20.9

25.7

29.7

29.2

30.6

27.1

Child mortality rate (per 1000 newborn) 2

41.3

33.2

29.0

27.7

31.8

35.1

35.3

35.3

31.2

Admittance to secondary higher educational establishments (%)

71

51

68

60

60

67

65

64

64

Graduates with completed secondary education (% of women at a normal graduation age)

65

443

50

60

61

61

57

58

59

Admittance to stationary education in HEEs (% of total admittance)

66

56

53

55

56

55

58

59

43

Admittance to HEEs for studying natural and applied sciences (% of women in HEEs)

25

33

18

29

29

27

24

25

17

Female labor force (% of total labor force) 4

49

45

44

44

43

43

42

42

Administrative and managerial personnel (% of women)

36

30

29

30

36

38

Parliament (% of seats taken by women)

5

5

7

7

7

39

-

38

-

27

27

1 Increase in infant and child mortality is connected to the country’s transition in 2004 to viviparity criteria, recommended by the World Health Organiza-

tion, when registration of infant mortality with a very low body mass (from 500 to1000) began in registry authorities. Ibid Decrease is connected to a decrease in the number of graduates of 9th grades (from 90.5 thsd. in 1999/2000 to 35.3 thsd. In 2000/2001)as a result of ending the experiment on the transfer of students from 3rd to 5th grade, i.e. end of transition from 10-year education to 11-year education. 4 Source of information: 1993-2001 – labor-force balance-sheet, 2002 – sample survey of domestic households on employment issues (November 2002), 2003-2007 – data of module “Employment and Unemployment” of integrated research on domestic households. 1 3




KYRGYZSTAN: successful youth – successful country

Table 8. Demographics 1995

2000

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

Indicator of total fertility

3.1

2.4

2.5

2.5

2.6

2.5

2.7

2.8

2.8

Indicator of fertility in a time sample (in % of 1990)

86

67

69

69

71

69

75

78

78

Indicator of dependency (%)

70

66

64

62

60

59

57

56

55

Population at the age of 65 years and older (%)

5.5

5.5

5.5

5.5

5.6

5.6

5.5

5.4

5.3

Estimated life expectancy at the age of 60 years (number of years) Men

14.4

15.6

15.0

15.0

15.3

15.0

14.9

14.9

15.2

Women

18.7

18.7

18.3

18.4

18.8

18.7

19.2

19.0

19

De facto population (at the end of the year, mln. people)

4.6

4.9

5.0

5.1

5.1

5.2

5.2

5.3

5.3

Annual population growth (%)

1.5

0.8

0.8

1.1

1.1

0.9

1.0

0.7

1.0

Table 9. Medicine and health 1995

2000

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

Number of years lost due to premature death 1

21

19

18

18

20

20

20

20

19

Death from widely spread diseases 2

47

54

56

56

55

56

56

56

57

out of them death from malignant tumors (% of the total number of deceased)

8

9

9

9

9

8

8

8

8

AIDS morbidity rate (HIV-infection carriers per 100.000 people)

0.04

0.33

3.2

2.6

3.23

3.3

4.7

7.9

10.5

Alcohol consumption (liters per adult person)

3.6

4.1

6.4

6.4

6.6

6.6

6.7

6.6

6.6

Tobacco consumption (kg per adult person)

0.3

0.5

0.6

0.7

0.7

0.7

0.7

0.7

0.7

Number of people per 1 doctor

306

343

366

370

375

384

395

405

404

Medical services, paid for by the social insurance service (%) 4

7.9

6.4

6.7

6.1

5.5

5.1

2.3

-

-

State expenditures on health protection (% of total state expenditures)

13.6

11.5

10.1

9.6

10.2

11.3

12.1

11.2

10.05

Total expenditures on health protection (% of GDP)

4.3

2.2

2.6

2.4

2.3

2.4

2.8

2.9

-

number)

1

(% of the total

Increase in the indicator in 2004 is partially connected to the country’s transition in 2004 to viviparity criteria, recommended by the World Health Organization, when registration of infant mortality with a very low body mass (from 500 to1000 g) began in registry authorities. 2 Diseases of the circulatory system and tumors. 3 Increase in the indicator is connected to a rapid increase of patients, mainly, citizens of the country, men of 20-29 years. 4 Since 2006, expenditures on social insurance are not separated; they are included in expenditures on social protection. 5 Preliminary data




KYRGYZSTAN: successful youth – successful country

Table 10. Education 1995

2

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

60

71

72

71

71

71

71

72

71

Completed secondary stationary education (%)

87

91

94

96

96

96

95

96

94

Completed secondary technical education (% of total senior secondary education)

38

24

22

22

26

22

21

12

18

Number of HEEs

32

45

46

47

49

51

47

49

50

Admittance to HEEs for stationary education (%)

75

59

53

63

57

57

60

64

70

Admittance to HEEs with education in natural and applied sciences (% of total)

7

8

5

6

5

4

4

4

3

Expenditures on higher education (% of state expenditures on education) 1

8.2

14.7

19.6

19.9

19.8

18.9

18.0

15.9

-

State expenditures per student in HEE (mln. soms)

87.5

337.5

657.3

747.3

864.3

930.5

1135.2

1459.4

-

Total expenditures on education (% of GDP)

7.1

3.7

5.0

5.3

5.2

5.2

5.8

6.6

State expenditures on education (% of GDP) 1

2000

Indicator of admittance to educational establishments (% of population between the ages of 7 to 24 years)

6.6

3.5

4.4

4.5

4.6

4.9

5.5

6.02

6.5

Data for 1993-1997 changed due to a recalculation of expenditures in % to government expenditures on education (earlier – to total expenditures on education, including expenses of enterprises). Preliminary data.

Table 11. Human capital formation 1995

2000

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

Aggregate share of students in elementary, secondary and higher educational establishments (% of population between the ages of 7 to 24 years) Both sexes

63

71

72

71

71

71

71

72

71

Men

62

71

71

70

70

70

69

70

69

Women

64

71

73

73

72

73

73

74

73

Number of public organizations (excluding political)

885

3759

6018

7355

8963

10515

11892

13394

13491

Scientists and technicians (per 1000 people)

0.8

0.6

0.6

0.5

0.5

0.5

0.5

0.4

0.3

Scientists and technicians in applied researches (per 100.000 people) 1

52

33

32

32

33

Expenditures on research and development (% of GDP) 0.3

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

Graduates of secondary educational establishments (% of graduation age population)

45

432

48

61

60

60

58

58

59

Graduates of HEEs (% of graduation age population)

10

21

30

35

36

35

33

28

33

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Graduates of technical and mathematics majors, majors in natural sciences (% of total number of graduates)

1 2 3

Both sexes

28

20

20

18

18

18

21

20

21

Men

13

11

12

11

11

12

14

13

13

Women

12

9

8

6

6

7

7

7

8

Number of people with higher education (% of population at the age of 15 years and older) 3

10.8

10.5

10.5

10.5

10.5

10.5

10.5

10.5

10.5

Since 2005 this indicator is not separated due to abridgement of statistical reporting Decrease is connected to a decrease in the number of graduates of 9th grades (from 90.5 thsd. in 1999/2000 to 35.3 thsd. In 2000/2001)as a result of ending the experiment on the transfer of students from 3rd to 5th grade, i.e. end of transition from 10-year education to 11-year education. Data given: for 1992, 1993 – according to data of 1989 census, for 1994-1998 – socio-demographic survey of 1994, for 1999-2008 – according to data of the First National Census in 1999.




KYRGYZSTAN: successful youth – successful country

Table 12. Employment 1995

2000

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

39

39

43

43

43

44

44

45

Agriculture

47

53

49

43

39

38

36

35

-

Industry

17

10

12

15

18

18

19

20

-

Services

36

37

39

42

43

44

45

45

-

Ratio of future replaceable labor force

191

186

172

166

159

154

149

146

144

Number of working hours per week (per person, in manufacturing)

36

35

35

35

35

33

35

35

35

Labor force (% of total population 1

2008

Percent of workers employed in:

1 Source of information: 1993-2001 – labor-force balance-sheet, 2002 – sample survey of domestic households on employment issues (November 2002),

2003-2007 – data of module “Employment and Unemployment� of integrated research on domestic households.

Table 13. Unemployment 1995

2000

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

Number of officially unemployed (thsd. people) Both sexes

50.4

58.3

60.2

57.4

58.2

68.0

73.4

71.3

67.2

Men

20.5

27.1

27.6

26.5

26.8

32.2

35.5

35.5

33.5

Women

29.9

31.2

32.6

30.9

31.4

35.8

37.9

35.8

33.7

Youth

20.3

23.2

22.0

20.7

22.3

25.2

28.3

27.9

27.9

Young men

8.9

10.6

10.6

9.6

10.4

12.6

13.7

13.9

14.3

Young women

11.4

12.6

11.4

11.1

11.9

12.5

14.6

14.0

13.6

Rate of official unemployment (total- %)

2.9

3.0

3.1

2.7

2.7

3.0

3.2

3.0

2.9

Total number of unemployed, including those searching for work independently (thsd. people)

100.0

144.3

265.5

212.3

185.7

183.5

188.9

191.1

Up to 6 months

74

40

34

30

34

37

45

43

31.7

From 6 to 12 months

17

30

32

30

29

26

29

24

24.7

More than 12 months

9

30

34

40

37

37

26

33

43.6

-

Duration of official unemployment (%)

Proportion of unemployed, %

of the total rate of unemployment : 1

Men

41

46

50

53

53

52

54

54

-

Women

59

54

50

47

47

48

46

46

-

1

Source of information: 1993-2001 – labor-force balance-sheet, 2002 – sample survey of domestic households on employment issues (November 2002), 2003-2007 – data of module “Employment and Unemployment� of integrated research on domestic households.

Table 14. Military expenditures 1995

2000

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

20081

Military expenditures (% of GDP)

1.6

1.7

1.5

1.5

1.5

1.4

1.4

1.1

1.0

Military expenditures (% of expenditures on education and medicine, in total)

14.8

31.7

22.5

23.8

23.4

20.3

17.9

13.4

13.2

1 Preliminary data.




KYRGYZSTAN: successful youth – successful country

Table 15. Balance of natural resources 1995

2000

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

Total country area (thsd. sq. km)

199.9

199.9

199.9

199.9

199.9

199.9

199.9

199.9

199.9

Population density (people per 1 sq. km)

23

25

25

25

26

26

26

26

26

Arable and permanently cropped lands (% of total area )

7

7

7

7

7

7

6

6

6

Hayfields (% of total area)

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

Forests and forest plantations (% of total area)

7

8

8

8

8

8

8

8

8

Irrigated lands (% of all arable lands)

64

66

66

66

66

66

66

66

66

Internal renewal of water resources per capita (1000 cubic meters per year)

2.7

2.4

2.4

2.4

2.3

2.3

2.3

2.3

2.3

Annual withdrawal of water, % of water resources

95

67

71

63

65

66

68

71

71

Per capita (cubic meters)

2,426

1,638

1,695

1,499

1,542

1,534

1,122

1,629

1,604

Number of reserves and natural parks

7

12

14

15

16

16

16

17

17

Table 16. National income accounts 2007

2008

Agricultural industry (% of GDP)

40.6

1995

34.2

2000

34.4

2002

33.6

2003

32.9 (29.9)

2004

28.5

2005

28.7

2006

26.9

25.8

Industry (% of GDP)

12.0

25.0

17.9

17.3

16.0 (19.2)

17.3

14.9

13.1

14.0

Services (% of GDP)

34.0 (33.6)

29.6

35.6

36.8 (36.9)

38.1 (38.3)

40.7

41.2

42.9

43.9

Private (% of GDP)

75.0

65.7

67.5

77.9

76.0

84.5

95.2

87.5

-

State (% of GDP)

19.5

20.1

18.6

16.8

18.2

17.6

17.9

17.1

-

Total domestic investments (% of GDP)

18.4

20.0

17.6

11.8

14.5

16.4

24.2

26.6

-

Total domestic savings (% of GDP)

9.3

14.4

17.4

7.6

10.4

8.2

10.8

20.7

-

Income (SB) from taxes (% of GDP)

15.1

11.7

13.9

14.23

14.8

16.2

17.6

18.7

19.41

Expenditures of central Government (% of GDP) (SB)

28.6

17.3

20.2

20.2

20.0

20.0

22.2

25.3

24.31

Export of goods and services (% of GDP)

29.5

41.8

39.6

38.7

42.6

38.3

41.7

52.9

-

Import of goods and services (% of GDP)

42.4

47.6

43.3

45.2

51.3

56.8

79.0

84.1

-

Consumption:

1 Preliminary data.




KYRGYZSTAN: successful youth – successful country

Table 17. Trends in economic development 1995

1 2 3 4 5 6

2000

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

Consumer price index (December in % to December of previous year)

132.1

109.6

102.3

105.6

102.8

104.9

105.1

120.1

120.0

Income (SB) from taxes, % of GDP

15.1

11.7

13.9

14.2

14.8

16.2

17.6

18.7

19.41

Assessed taxes, % of all taxes

50.0

38.4

40.0

36.4

35.1

35.8

30.5

28.2

32.52

Total budget surplus/deficit (% of GDP)

-11.5

- 2.0

-1.0

-0.8

-0.5

0.2

-0.2

0.1

0.83

Volume of money supply (Đœ2)4 , mln. soms at the end of the year

2,754

7,367.5

10,995.6

14,676.4

19,379.3

21,295.9

32,280.9

43,018.0

48,452.7

Bank interest rate 5

46

38.3

4.4

4.0

4.0

4.1

3.2

8.8

15.1

Trade balance, mln. US dollars 6

-113.4

-49.6

-101.2

-135.3

-222.2

-429.3

-924.1

-1277.9

-2430.2

Volume of state securities emissions, mln. soms

200.7

563.2

768.3

928.8

1,214.6

1,399.3

1,283.0

1,671.4

4,173.4

Preliminary data Preliminary data Preliminary data Đœ2 – aggregate money supply Discount rate of the National Bank of Kyrgyzstan. which characterizes a minimal level of the value of money. In 2000 it equaled 38.3% as a result of the stabilization of the financial situation in the financial market. Not including foreign trade volumes of individuals.

Table 18. Weakening of the social structure 1995

2000

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

Convicts (per 100.000 people in the population at the age of 14 years and older)

580

617

502

474

417

371

368

340

284

Juvenile convicts (% of the total number of convicts)

7

6

7

6

7

7

7

7

6

Intentional homicides (per 100.000 people)

12

8

71

61

6

7

7

6

6

Both sexes

13

10

11

10

9

9

9

9

9

Men (per 100.000 people)

21

17

19

16

15

15

14

14

14

Women (per 100.000 people)

6

4

4

3

3

3

4

4

4

Declared rape cases (per 100.000 women between the ages of 15 to 59 years)

26

23

22

20

18

19

17

16

18

Total number of crimes

41,008

38,620

37,193

35,606

32,616

33,277

31,392

29,151

29,519

Crimes connected to drugs

2,623

3,539

3,018

3,106

3,090

2,565

2,437

1,996

1,905

Economic crimes

2,647

3,155

2,773

3,413

3,166

2,971

3,119

2,916

2,139

Percentage of solved criminal cases

61.1

77.2

76.8

78.8

77.7

63.7

63.3

66.5

64.9

Number of emigrants. people

37,302

27,887

32,717

21,209

22,607

30,741

34,423

54,608

41,287

Number of registered refugees. at the end of the year. people

13,311

10,609

7,584

7,501

5,921

-

-

-

-

Asked for refuge. during the year. people

7,617

655

279

160

279

-

-

-

-

160

905

284

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Suicides (per 100.000 people)

out of them – recognized as refugees

-

1,5091

Refuges crossed off the register during the year. people

-

1,749

1,788

988

1,864

Divorces (% from conducted marriages)

22

22

20

16

15

16

16

17

17

Children born out of wedlock (%)

19

32

33

32

32

33

32

32

30

1 Updated data.




KYRGYZSTAN: successful youth – successful country

Тable 19. Wealth. poverty and social investments

1 2 3

1995

2000

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

Real GDP per capita (PPP. US $) 1

1,000 (1,122)

1,332 (1,560)

1,438 (1,622)

1,558 (1,714)

1,697 (1,928)

1,728 (1,936)

1,813 (2,024)

1,980

2008

-

GDP per capita (US $ according to the “Atlas� method) 2

350

280

290

340

400

450

500

590

-

Percentage of industrial GDP (%)

12

25.0

17.9

17.3

19.2

17.3

14.9

13.1

14.0

Participation in income: Ratio between the upper 20% and the lowest 20%

7.1

10.9

9.1

8.5

8.6

9.9

8.9

9.2

Expenditures on social insurance (% of GDP) 3

0.1

0.2

0.2

0.1

0.2

0.1

0.0

Total expenditures on education (% of GDP)

7.1

3.7

5.0

5.3

5.2

5.2

5.8

6.6

-

Total expenditures on health protection (% of GDP)

4.3

2.2

2.6

2.4

2.3

2.4

2.8

2.9

-

Average income. per capita

150.6

495.5

706.3

772.5

827.4

955.9

1,111.5

1,417.3

-

Income in 20% of poorest households. soms per capita in a group

58.5

162.6

250.9

259.0

275.5

310.4

359.4

515.8

-

Expenditures on meals in percentage of total expenditures of households

48.0

44.4

39.5

40.7

43.3

47.5

43.7

45.6

-

-

-

Data of the round of international comparisons in 2005. In parenthesis – data of the round of comparisons in 2000. Update of data due to change in calculation methodology. Since 2006, expenditures on social insurance are not separated; they are included in expenditures on social protection.

Table 20. Overcoming internal and external isolation 1995

1 2 3

2000

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

Radio sets (per 100 people)

13

8

5

4

5

5

5

5

5

TVs (per 100 people)

14

9

5

5

5

5

6

7

7

Visits to cinema theatres per year (per 1 person)

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.04

0.04

0.03

Visits to museums per year (per 1 person)

0.2

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

Registered library users (per 1 person)

0.4

0.2

0.2

0.2

0.2

0.2

0.2

0.2

0.2

Daily newspapers (annual circulation per 100 people)

35

27

18

27

10

10

3

3

3

Published books (number of publications per 100000 people)

7

9

13

13

14

14

11

13

17

Use of writing and printing paper (metric tons per 100 people)1

5

Sending letters (per capita)

2

1

1

1

1

Long-distance calls (units per capita)

7

9

11

13

14

Telephones ( per 100 people)

8

8

102

113

13

19

32

50

74

Cars (per 100 people)

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

6

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

For 1994-1998 – data are given only according to JSC “Akyl�. Including cellphones. Including cellphones.




KYRGYZSTAN: successful youth – successful country

Table 21. Energy consumption 1 1990

1

1995

2000

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

Energy for commercial needs. total (billion. kg of oil equivalent )

7.6

2.5

2.4

2.5

2.7

2.8

2.8

-

-

Energy consumption (kg of oil equivalent. per capita)

1,722.8

535.3

497.6

507.9

541.4

548.6

544.0

-

-

Efficiency of energy consumption for commercial needs (energy consumption. kg. oil equivalent per 100 US dollars GDP)

-

164.7

178.9

157.0

141.1

125.9

113.7

-

-

GDP per energy consumption unit (2005. PPP in US dollars per kg of oil equivalent)

1.5

2.3

3.0

3.1

3.0

3.2

3.2

-

-

Annual changes in energy consumption for commercial needs (in % to previous year)

-

-12.6

-0.4

13.5

7.6

2.4

0.1

-

-

Indicators changed according to change in calculation method.

Table 22. Urbanization growth 1995 Population in largest cities – Bishkek and Osh cities (% of country’s urban population)

2000

55

57

-

Population in cities with 1 mln. or more people (% of urban population)

2002 57

-

2003

2004

57

-

56

-

2005 57

-

2006 57

-

2007 57

-

2008 57

-

-

Largest cities with largest population density (Bishkek city – number of people/1 sq. km).

5,560

6,148

6,178

6,230

6,327

6,391

6,450

6,513

6,587

Urban population (% of total)

35.3

34.8

34.7

34.9

35.2

35.0

34.8

34.7

34.6

Annual increase of urban population (%)

0.8

1.0

0.2

1.6

1.9

0.5

0.5

0.3

0.7

2005

2006

2007

2008

Table 23. Pollution and environmental protection 1995

2000

2002

2003

2004

Sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxide emissions (thsd. metric tons)

33

24

111

Sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxide emissions (kg per capita)

7.3

4.0

2.2

2.2

1.9

Pesticide use (metric tons per 1000 people)

0.3

0.1

0.25

0.28

0.28

-

Radioactive waste

31.5 2

32.6

111

10

11

11

10

12.8

2.1

2.1

2.0

2.4

32.1

-

32.1

-

-

-

-

-

26.2

27.9

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Toxic industry waste (metric t. per sq. km) accumulated over a year 2

2.4

27.2

Urban waste (kg per capita)

201

-

-

-

-

-

paper and cardboard

0.3

-

-

-

-

glass

0.06

-

-

-

-

-

-

26

Waste processing (% of consumption):

1 2



Data on stationary sources only. Significant increase in data happened due to commencement of industrial activity of “Kumtor� gold-mining enterprise.


KYRGYZSTAN: successful youth – successful country

Annex 2. MAIN SOCIO-ECONOMIC INDICATORS OF REGIONS OF THE KYRGYZ REPUBLIC KYRGYZ REPUBLIC

2000

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

TERRITORY Number of administrative-territorial units at the end of the year: Districts

40

Cities

221

22

24

Urban settlements

29

29

28

-

3

Rural districts

429

Permanent population (at the end of the year. thsd. people)

4,907.6

Settlements

4

40

40

40

40

40

40

25

25

25

25

25

28

28

28

28

28

3

3

3

3

3

3

439

442

443

444

444

444

440

4,984.4

5,037.3

5,092.8

5,138.7

5,189.8

5,224.3

5,276.1

2

40 3

STURCTURE OF ECONOMY (in % to GDP) Agriculture

34.2

34.4

33.6

29.9

28.5

28.7

26.9

25.8

Industry

25.0

17.9

17.4

19.2

17.3

14.8

13.1

14.0

Services sector

29.6

35.6

36.8

38.3

40.7

41.3

42.9

43.9

1,725.9

1,836.6

2,377.2

2,795.9

3,571.0

35,070

FOREIGN INVESTMENTS MCB per capita. soms

1,205.3

1,404.8

1,540.4

5

PRODUCTION PER CAPITA Gross Domestic Product soms (in current market prices) US Dollars (in PPP) US Dollars (in PPP)

3

13,297

15,094

16,646

18,526

19,617

21,918

27,107

1,332 (1,560)

1,438 (1,622)

1,558 (1,714)

1,697 (1,928)

1,728 (1,936)

1,813 (2,024)

1,980

SOCIAL INDICATORS Estimated life expectancy. years Men

64.9

64.4

64.5

64.3

64.2

63.5

63.7

64.5

72.4

72.1

72.2

72.2

71.9

72.1

72.3

72.6

Men

54.7

56.0

55.9

56.9

57.1

57.6

57.8

-

Women

45.3

44.0

44.1

43.1

42.9

42.4

42.2

-

67.6

64.9

64.1

66.6

62.5

65.8

67.3

67.3

Domestic households

50.8

44.9

38.1

34.6

32.0

30.9

26.3

-

Population

62.6

54.8

49.9

45.9

43.1

39.9

35.0

-

Domestic households

23.6

18.7

11.7

9.2

7.4

6.2

4.1

-

Population

32.9

23.3

17.2

13.4

11.1

9.1

6.6

-

Share of population without access to safe drinking 8 water . %

14.0

15.8

21.4

19.0

15.6

10.2

7.0

-

11.4

9.8

8.6

7.8

6.5

5.6

4.8

-

6.6

12.4

7.8

6.7

6.0

6.1

5.2

-

0.3

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.2

Women Share in economically active population

6

Salary ratio. women to men. % Share of poor population (including extremely poor). %

6

7

Share of extremely poor population. %

Share of population without access to healthcare. % Share of undernourished children. %

10

Share of children not attending school . %

11

9

INDICATORS OF DEVELOPMENT HDI

3

HPI-1 GRDI GEM

3

3

0.684 (0.693)

0.687 (0.694)

0.692 (0.697)

0.696 (0.703)

0.696 (0.702)

0.697 (0.703)

0.704

-

8.4

9.5

9.4

8.7

7.8

7.1

6.9

-

0.680 (0.689)

0.681 (0.688)

0.685 (0.691)

0.689 (0.696)

0.688 (0.694)

0.689 (0.695)

0.696

-

0.479 (0.481)

0.454 (0.455)

0.471 (0.473)

0.530 (0.532)

0.529 (0.531)

0.533 (0.535)

0.532

-




KYRGYZSTAN: successful youth – successful country

1

Including Batken town created in 2000 and Isfana town created in 2001. Including towns of Nookat and Kochkor-Ata created in 2003. 3 Including Kerben town. created in 2004. 4 In 2002 Sara-Beein settlement council was created in the town. of Mailuu-Suu. Jalal-Abad region. consisting of 3 settlements: Sary -Bee. Kogoy and Kara-Jygach. 5 Starting from 2006 the minimal consumer budget was calculated in accordance to the Resolution of Jogorku Kenesh of the Kyrgyz Republic №1088 from June 9. 2006 and methodology approved by the resolution of the Government of the Kyrgyz Republic №333 from August 15. 2007. 6 1996-2001 – labor-force balance-sheet. 2002 – sample survey of households on employment issues (November 2002). 2003-3007 – data of module “Employment and unemployment� of an integrated survey of domestic households. 7 Data of the round of international comparisons of GDP in 2005. in parenthesis – data of comparisons round in 2000. 8 Data from 2003 are given according to the results of an integrated sample research of 5016 domestic households. 9 Data from 2003 are given according to the results of an integrated sample research of 5016 domestic households. 10 Data from 2003 are given according to the results of an integrated sample research of 5016 domestic households. 11 Data are given according to unit weight of children not attending schools between the ages of 7 to 17 years. 2

BISHKEK

2000

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

TERRITORY Number of administrative-territorial units at the end of the year: Districts

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Cities

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

Urban settlements

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

Settlements

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Rural districts

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Permanent population (at the end of year. thsd. people):

768.0

772.0

778.4

790.7

798.8

806.3

814.2

823.8

Agriculture

1.3

0.8

0.2

0

0

0.2

0.9

-

Industry

7.9

13.4

10.9

9.4

10.5

12.1

9.3

-

Sectors service

63.1

57.7

60.4

63.7

62.8

60.2

63.8

-

MCB per capita. soms

1,286.6

1,506.4

2,017.8

2,523.31

2,940.9

3,717.5

STRUCTURE OF ECONOMY (in % to GDP)

FOREIGN INVESTMENTS 1,721.0

1,969.1

PRODUCTION PER CAPITA Gross Regional Product soms (in current market prices)

16,216

26,042

29,647

35,834

40,711

45,867

60,413

-

US Dollars (in PPP) 2

1,832 (2,147)

2,823 (3,183)

3,285 (3,614)

3,986 (4,529)

4,195 (4,701)

4,205 (4,693)

4,832

-

SOCIAL INDICATORS Estimated life expectancy. years Men

64.6

63.4

63.6

63.9

64.2

64.4

64.6

66.3

Women

74.4

74.5

73.6

73.6

73.7

74.1

75.0

75.3

Men

55.5

55.8

55.3

55.2

55.8

56.4

56.3

-

Women

44.5

44.2

44.7

44.8

44.2

43.6

43.7

-

Salary ratio. women to men. %

68.5

67.3

69.3

69.8

64.2

73.2

72.2

75.8

Share in economically active population 3

Share of poor population (including extremely poor)% 4 Domestic households

28.3

23.2

16.4

12.8

7.5

4.5

3.0

-

Population

40.6

31.7

22.5

16.5

10.8

5.5

5.0

-

Domestic households

10.5

6.3

4.0

3.6

-

-

-

-

Population

17.1

8.3

6.6

4.7

0.4

0.4

0.6

-

Share of extremely poor population . % 5




KYRGYZSTAN: successful youth – successful country

Share of population without access to safe drinking water. % 6

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

-

Share of population without access to healthcare. % 7

16.7

18.9

8.2

7.1

6.1

7.3

2.8

-

Share of undernourished children. 1-6 years. % 8

12.7

19.1

8.7

5.9

5.0

5.5

3.1

-

Share of children not attending school. % 2

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.03

0.03

0.03

0.02

0.01

HDI 3

0.719 (0.728)

0.752 (0.759)

0.761 (0.766)

0.749 (0.757)

0.762 (0.768)

0.812 (0.818)

0.828

-

HPI-1

7.5

9.2

5.2

5.3

5.3

5.3

5.2

-

GRDI 3

0.714 (0.722)

0.742 (0.749)

0.755 (0.760)

0.743 (0.750)

0.790 (0.796)

0.804 (0.810)

0.821

-

GEM 3

0.458 (0.461)

0.519 (0.522)

0.539 (0.541)

0.540 (0.544)

0.537 (0.541)

0.539 (0.543)

0.547

-

INDICATORS OF DEVELOPMENT

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

Starting from 2006 the minimal consumer budget was calculated in accordance to the Resolution of Jogorku Kenesh of the Kyrgyz Republic №1088 from June 9, 2006 and methodology approved by the resolution of the Government of the Kyrgyz Republic №333 from August 15, 2007. Data of the round of international comparisons of GDP in 2005. in parenthesis – data of comparisons round in 2000. 1996-2001 – labor-force balance-sheet. 2002 – sample survey of households on employment issues (November 2002). 2003-3007 – data of module “Employment and unemployment� of an integrated survey of domestic households. Data from 2003 are given according to the results of an integrated sample research of 5016 domestic households. Ibid. Ibid. Ibid. Data are given according to unit weight of children not attending schools between the ages of 7 to 17 years.

CHUI REGION

2000

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

TERRITORY Number of administrative-territorial units at the end of the year: Districts

8

8

8

8

8

8

8

8

Cities

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

Urban settlements

5

5

5

5

5

5

5

5

Settlements

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Rural districts

104

104

104

104

104

104

104

104

Permanent population (at the end of the year. thsd. people)

765.7

751.4

752.1

752.8

752.3

756.7

759.9

762.4

STRUCTURE OF ECONOMY (in % to GDP) Agriculture

47.7

40.6

50.7

46.4

47.5

44.0

41.6

-

Industry

16.4

22.4

9.4

16.5

13.0

14.0

16.1

-

Sectors service

25.3

30.1

33.1

30.9

33.4

34.1

32.2

-

1,614.0

2,229.9 4

2,604.8

3,496.1

FOREIGN INVESTMENT MCB per capita, soms

1,165.2

1,278.8

1,367.2

1,465.4

PRODUCTION PER CAPITA Gross Regional Product soms (at current exchange rates)

16,463

21,798

20,851

22,450

22,853

26,291

31,075

-

US dollars, PPP 1

1,685 (1,974)

2,006 (2,262)

1,835 (2,019)

1,858 (2,112)

1,884 (2,111)

2,130 (2,377)

2,201

-

SOCIAL INDICATORS Estimated life expectancy, in years




KYRGYZSTAN: successful youth – successful country

Men

62.8

61.3

61.3

62.0

61.5

60.6

60.4

61.3

Women

72.7

70.8

69.9

71.0

70.6

70.7

70.6

71.1

Men

54.8

53.6

54.3

55.7

57.1

58.0

57.4

-

Women

45.2

46.4

45.7

44.3

42.9

42.0

42.6

-

Salary ratio. women to men. %

60.2

64.5

57.8

62.0

58.7

63.5

65.7

66.6

Share in economically active population 2

Share of poor population (including extremely poor).% 3 Domestic households

26.8

24.7

19.7

13.9

16.9

15.1

9.8

-

Population

34.6

32.0

27.7

21.7

22.0

20.1

15.0

-

Domestic households

8.7

7.5

5.8

4.0

3.7

2.6

0.9

-

Population

14.0

9.9

8.5

6.8

5.3

3.8

1.4

-

Share of population without access to safe drinking water. % 5

0.0

0.8

0.2

0.0

3.9

0.7

0.4

-

Share of population without access to healthcare. % 6

27.1

17.4

16.1

17.8

17.4

12.1

7.8

-

Share of undernourished children. 1-6 years. % 7

9.6

14.3

10.9

9.1

11.4

9.9

9.1

-

Share of children not attending school. %8

0.4

0.3

0.2

0.2

0.2

0.2

0.2

0.2

Share of extremely poor population . % 4

INDICATORS OF DEVELOPMENT HDI 3

0.681 (0.689)

0.687 (0.694)

0.682 (0.688)

0.691 (0.699)

0.687 (0.694)

0.682 (0.688)

0.683

-

HPI-1

9.4

8.7

7.7

7.9

9.3

8.4

8.2

-

GRDI 3

0.676 (0.685)

0.678 (0.685)

0.668 (0.674)

0.685 (0.692)

0.669 (0.676)

0.674 (0.680)

0.677

-

GEM 3

0.572 (0.574)

0.504 (0.507)

0.553 (0.555)

0.600 (0.602)

0.595 (0.597)

0.594 (0.596)

0.584

-

1 Data of the round of international comparisons of GDP in 2005. in parenthesis – data of comparisons round in 2000

2 1996-2001 – labor-force balance-sheet. 2002 – sample survey of households on the issues of employment (November 2002). 2003-3007 – data of module

“Employment and unemployment� of an integrated survey of domestic households.

3 Data from 2003 are given according to the results of an integrated sample research of 5016 domestic households.

4 Starting from 2006 the minimal consumer budget was calculated in accordance to the Resolution of Jogorku Kenesh of the Kyrgyz Republic â„–1088 from

June 9. 2006 and methodology approved by the resolution of the Government of the Kyrgyz Republic â„–333 from August 15. 2007.

5 Ibid. 6 Ibid. 7 Ibid.

8 Data are given according to unit weight of children not attending schools. between the ages of 7 to 17 year.

ISSYK-KUL REGION

2000

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

TERRITORY Number of administrative-territorial units at the end of the year: Districts

5

5

5

5

5

5

5

5

Cities

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

Urban settlements

5

5

5

5

5

5

5

5

Settlements

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Rural districts

58

58

58

58

58

58

58

58

Permanent population (at the end of the year. thsd. people)

417.8

420.6

423.4

426.4

428.5

430.9

432.6

434.9

STRUCTURE OF ECONOMY (in % to GDP)




KYRGYZSTAN: successful youth – successful country

Agriculture

29.8

44.7

27.7

24.6

28.0

40.8

35.0

-

Industry

56.0

32.2

56.2

58.0

50.2

32.0

31.0

-

Services sector

11.9

19.3

13.7

14.3

17.7

22.0

19.1

-

1513.5

1658.1

2241.6 1

2598.3

3461.7

FOREIGN INVESTMENT MCB per capita. soms

1145.7

1271.8

1356.3

PRODUCTION PER CAPITA Gross regional product soms (in current market prices)

25,670

19,869

28,209

33,547

30,729

28,015

35,563

-

US Dollars (in PPP) 2

2,583 (3,026)

1,818 (2,050)

2,463 (2,710)

2,868 (3,259)

2,602 (2,916)

2,282 (2,547)

2,513

-

SOCIAL INDICATORS Estimated life expectancy. in years Men

64.3

61.7

60.2

61.8

60.9

59.4

60.0

61.0

Women

72.7

69.1

70.0

70.2

69.7

70.2

71.1

71.3

Men

56.7

59.6

54.9

57.7

57.6

56.5

58.8

-

Women

43.3

40.4

45.1

42.3

42.4

43.5

41.2

-

Salary ratio. women to men. %

53.2

60.2

63.6

72.4

64.8

62.7

70.5

71.9

Percent of economically active population 3

Percent of poor population (including extremely poor) 4 Domestic households

58.9

45.1

42.8

43.3

38.5

34.4

31.1

-

Population

70.9

53.9

52.1

54.1

51.5

43.9

38.6

-

Domestic households

31.8

21.6

10.8

11.8

8.9

6.2

5.4

-

Population

45.4

26.7

14.7

17.2

14.2

10.6

8.1

-

Share of population without access to safe drinking water. % 6

0.0

0.0

12.7

14.8

4.1

4.5

4.2

-

Share of population without access to healthcare. % 7

12.5

2.0

2.7

7.0

6.4

5.2

2.2

-

Share of undernourished children. 1-6 years. % 8

4.4

5.5

3.2

5.2

5.0

8.1

7.1

-

Share of children not attending school. % 9

0.5

0.3

0.2

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.3

0.1

Percent of extremely poor population 5

INDICATORS OF DEVELOPMENT HDI 10

0.718 (0.726)

0.684 (0.690)

0.703 (0.708)

0.708 (0.715)

0.697 (0.704)

0.683 (0.689)

0.693

-

HPI-1

6.5

7.2

6.8

8.2

7.5

8.1

7.8

-

GRDI 11

0.708 (0.717)

0.671 (0.678)

0.691 (0.697)

0.705 (0.712)

0.689 (0.696)

0.677 (0.683)

0.687

-

GEM 12

0.456 (0.460)

0.431 (0.433)

0.441 (0.443)

0.552 (0.555)

0.561 (0.564)

0.561 (0.563)

0.556

-

1

Starting from 2006 the minimal consumer budget was calculated in accordance to the Resolution of Jogorku Kenesh of the Kyrgyz Republic №1088 from June 9. 2006 and methodology approved by the resolution of the Government of the Kyrgyz Republic №333 from August 15. 2007. 2 Data of the round of international comparisons of GDP in 2005. in parenthesis – data of comparisons round in 2000. 3 1996-2001 – labor-force balance-sheet. 2002 – sample survey of households on employment issues (November 2002). 2003-3007 – data of module “Employment and unemployment� of an integrated survey of domestic households. 4 Data from 2003 are given according to the results of an integrated sample research of 5016 domestic households. 5 Ibid. 6 Ibid. 7 Ibid. 8 Ibid. 9 Data are given according to unit weight of children not attending schools between the ages of 7 to 17 years. 10 Data of the round of international comparisons of GDP in 2005. in parenthesis – data of comparisons round in 2000. 11 Ibid. 12 Ibid.




KYRGYZSTAN: successful youth – successful country

BATKEN REGION

2000

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

TERRITORY Number of administrative-territorial units at the end of the year: Districts

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

Cities

41

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

Urban settlements

5

5

5

5

5

5

5

5

Settlements

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Rural districts

28

30

30

30

30

30

30

29

Permanent population (at the end of the year. thsd. people)

393.1

403.6

409.0

413.7

418.1

423.2

426.0

431.1

STRUCTURE OF ECONOMY (in % to GDP) Agriculture

50.6

55.5

52.2

54.7

46.9

44.1

49.3

-

Industry

6.8

8.6

5.4

6.9

7.6

7.4

7.5

-

Services sector

36.7

33.1

36.9

34.8

41.6

44.3

38.7

-

1290.4

1339.7

1883.0 2

2205.0

2953.8

FOREIGN INVESTMENTS MCB per capita. soms

-

1091.5

1158.0

PRODUCTION PER CAPITA Gross regional product soms (in current market prices)

6530

7495

8543

8892

8042

8485

11742

-

US Dollars (in PPP) 3

588 (688)

589 (664)

637 (701)

648 (737)

550 (617)

581 (648)

704

-

SOCIAL INDICATORS Estimated life expectancy. years Men

66.0

66.7

66.4

66.8

66.2

66.3

66.5

66.4

Women

71.5

70.9

73.1

72.7

72.5

72.2

72.4

72.4

Men

55.2

57.2

56.5

57.8

57.6

57.8

56.8

-

Women

44.8

42.8

43.5

42.2

42.4

42.2

43.2

-

Salary ratio. women to men. %

77.7

69.6

64.6

67.8

67.7

72.4

72.3

58.6

Domestic households

63.9

56.2

78.7

70.2

51.2

43.6

34.6

-

Population

69.0

62.5

84.9

77.8

59.1

50.9

40.4

-

Domestic households

31.9

23.7

30.3

28.5

14.6

13.4

7.5

-

Population

37.3

27.2

36.3

33.7

18.8

16.1

9.2

-

Share of population without access to safe drinking water. % 7

28.2

47.3

40.3

36.0

28.4

19.1

19.7

-

Share of population without access to healthcare. % 8

7.7

6.1

10.8

8.2

4.0

4.3

2.6

-

Share of undernourished children. 1-6 years. % 9

4.2

14.4

5.1

4.7

2.3

2.2

5.2

-

Share of children not attending school. % 10

0.1

0.1

0.03

0.1

0.1

0.01

0.01

0.01

Share in economically active population 4

Share of poor population (including extremely poor). % 5

Share of extremely poor population. %6

INDICATORS OF DEVELOPMENT



HDI 3

0.638 (0.647)

0.645 (0.651)

0.651 (0.656)

0.648 (0.655)

0.638 (0.644)

0.638 (0.644)

0.650

-

HPI-1

10.1

15.9

13.3

11.7

8.9

7.5

7.9

-

GRDI 3

0.637 (0.646)

0.636 (0.643)

0.642 (0.648)

0.642 (0.649)

0.631 (0.637)

0.633 (0.639)

0.645

-

GEM 3

0.358 (0.359)

0.365 (0.366)

0.381 (0.382)

0.452 (0.453)

0.464 (0.464)

0.506 (0.507)

0.456

-


KYRGYZSTAN: successful youth – successful country

1 Including Batken town created in 2000 and Isfana town created in 2001.

2 Starting from 2006 the minimal consumer budget was calculated in accordance to the Resolution of Jogorku Kenesh of the Kyrgyz Republic â„–1088 from

June 9. 2006 and methodology approved by the resolution of the Government of the Kyrgyz Republic â„–333 from August 15. 2007.

3 Data of the round of international comparisons of GDP in 2005. in parenthesis – data of comparisons round in 2000.

4 1996-2001 – labor-force balance-sheet. 2002 – sample survey of households on employment issues (November 2002). 2003-3007 – data of module “Em-

ployment and unemployment� of an integrated survey of domestic households.

5 Data from 2003 are given according to the results of an integrated sample research of 5016 domestic households. 6 Ibid. 7 Ibid. 8 Ibid. 9 Ibid.

OSH REGION 1

2000

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

TERRITORY Number of administrative-territorial units at the end of the year: 2 Districts

7

7

7

7

7

7

7

7

Cities

3

3

33

3

3

3

3

3

Urban settlements

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

Settlements

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Rural districts

80

84

83

85

86

86

86

86

Permanent population (at the end of the year. thsd. people) 4

1211.0

1247.3

1017.9

1033.5

1049.2

1065.1

1073.7

1089.0

Agriculture

44.0

50.5

65.3

59.7

56.3

50.7

48.9

-

Industry

5.6

10.7

6.3

4.2

4.6

4.8

2.1

-

Services sector

41.8

32.6

22.1

27.5

26.7

27.2

31.1

-

1561.2

2140.85

2645.0

3406.7

STRUCTURE OF ECONOMY (in % to GDP)

FOREIGN INVESTMENTS MCB per capita. soms

1024.4

1242.3

1355.4

1441.4

PRODUCTION PER CAPITA Gross regional product – soms (in current market prices)

7683

8243

9040

9343

10514

12481

14488

-

US Dollars (in PPP) 6

691 (810)

737 (831)

789 (868)

761 (864)

838 (939)

971 (1083)

1042

-

SOCIAL INDICATORS Estimated life expectancy. years Men

66.9

67.1

66.9

67.7

66.7

66.7

66.4

66.6

Women

72.8

72.9

72.6

73.6

73.1

72.2

72.9

72.8

Men

54.5

57.9

57.8

58.6

57.4

58.1

58.9

-

Women

45.5

42.1

42.2

41.4

42.6

41.9

41.1

-

Salary ratio. women to men. %

78.9

65.6

68.9

72.5

69.2

71.6

78.1

66.8

Share in economically active population7

Share of poor population (including extremely poor). % 8 Domestic households

61.8

58.2

46.4

47.4

46.2

42.5

38.8

-

Population

70.7

63.9

56.4

57.0

55.9

52.1

46.6

-

Domestic households

30.1

28.1

15.7

8.5

7.9

5.6

3.3

-

Population

36.7

32.5

21.2

11.3

10.2

7.6

6.4

-

Share of population without access to safe drinking water. % 10

36.6

34.1

38.0

34.9

40.7

24.9

17.0

-

Share of extremely poor population. % 9




KYRGYZSTAN: successful youth – successful country

Share of population without access to healthcare. % 11

6.9

13.0

9.3

6.8

4.8

5.1

9.8

-

Share of undernourished children. 1-6 years. % 12

5.2

12.2

9.1

7.9

6.4

8.3

2.2

-

Share of children not attending school. % 13

0.1

0.02

0.2

0.1

0.1

0.2

0.1

0.3

HDI 14

0.654 (0.663)

0.659 (0.666)

0.661 (0.666)

0.641 (0.648)

0.641 (0.647)

0.665 (0.671)

0.667

-

HPI-1

11.7

14.0

13.2

11.9

12.5

9.8

9.0

-

GRDI 15

0.653 (0.662)

0.652 (0.659)

0.653 (0.658)

0.638 (0.645)

0.646 (0.652)

0.656 (0.662)

0.659

-

GEM 16

0.398 (0.399)

0.386 (0.387)

0.406 (0.407)

0.472 (0.472)

0.472 (0.473)

0.468 (0.469)

0.468

-

INDICATORS OF DEVELOPMENT

1 For 1992-2002 – including Osh.

2 From 2003. data on Osh region have been changed due to the exclusion of Osh City. 3 Including Nookat town created in 2003 and excluding Osh City. which became a city of republican significance. 4 From 2003. data on Osh region have been changed due to the exclusion of Osh City. 5 Starting from 2006 the minimal consumer budget was calculated in accordance to the Resolution of Jogorku Kenesh of the Kyrgyz Republic №1088 from June 9. 2006 and methodology approved by the resolution of the Government of the Kyrgyz Republic №333 from August 15. 2007. 6 Data of the round of international comparisons of GDP in 2005. in parenthesis – data of comparisons round in 2000. 7 1996-2001 – labor-force balance-sheet. 2002 – sample survey of households on employment issues (November 2002). 2003-3007 – data of module “Employment and unemployment” of an integrated survey of domestic households. 8 Data from 2003 are given according to the results of an integrated sample research of 5016 domestic households. 9 Ibid. 10 Ibid. 11 Ibid. 12 Ibid. 13 Data are given: according to unit weight of children not attending schools between the ages of 7 to 17 years. 14 Data of the round of international comparisons of GDP in 2005. in parenthesis – data of comparisons round in 2000. 15 Ibid. 16 Ibid.

TALAS REGION

2000

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

TERRITORY Number of administrative-territorial units at the end of the year: Districts

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

Cities

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

Urban settlements

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

Settlements

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Rural districts

35

36

36

36

36

36

36

36

Permanent population (at the end of the year. thsd. people)

203.7

208.1

210.5

212.1

213.6

216.0

217.6

219.4

STRUCTURE OF ECONOMY (in % to GDP) Agriculture

75.6

77.7

78.5

72.7

68.9

70.4

62.1

-

Industry

3.9

4.3

3.6

4.1

6.1

5.7

4.2

-

Sectors service

18.5

16.0

16.2

19.7

18.1

20.4

28.6

-

MCB per capita. soms

1,030.0

1,306.1

1,437.9

2,056.6 1

2,464.3

3,267.9

18,404

21,271

24,277

26,842

-

FOREIGN INVESTMENTS 1,156.9

1,190.1

PRODUCTION PER CAPITA Gross regional product soms (in current market prices)



13,110

15,444

19,050


KYRGYZSTAN: successful youth – successful country

US Dollars (in PPP) 2

1186 (1389)

1286 (1450)

1460 (1606)

1358 (1543)

1562 (1750)

1814 (2025)

1799

-

SOCIAL INDICATORS Estimated life expectancy. years Men

66.2

64.1

63.1

63.5

62.1

62.6

63.2

63.1

Women

72.3

68.5

71.5

72.6

71.4

71.6

71.4

71.9

Men

53.2

53.5

56.0

57.9

58.1

57.3

56.8

-

Women

46.8

46.5

44.0

42.1

41.9

42.7

43.2

-

Salary ratio. women to men. %

71.1

60.3

64.3

68.6

63.2

80.0

74.3

69.6

Share in economically active population 3

Share of poor population (including extremely poor). % 4 Domestic households

74.7

61.8

49.4

44.9

35.9

32.3

28.3

-

Population

80.8

65.5

55.4

51.3

44.4

40.0

35.3

-

Domestic households

38.5

29.4

14.4

14.7

10.0

7.1

5.8

-

Population

48.5

31.4

18.1

16.8

14.1

9.7

7.9

-

Share of population without access to safe drinking water. % 6

0.1

0.4

2.5

2.7

2.7

1.6

0.7

-

Share of population without access to healthcare. % 7

10.3

7.6

5.2

7.2

10.0

4.5

1.6

-

Share of undernourished children 1-6 years. % 8

4.0

8.1

8.1

7.0

6.6

7.2

9.4

-

Share of children not attending school. % 9

0.8

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.02

0.02

Share of extremely poor population. % 5

INDICATORS OF DEVELOPMENT HDI 10

0.678 (0.686)

0.676 (0.682)

0.681 (0.686)

0.677 (0.685)

0.675 (0.681)

0.685 (0.691)

0.685

-

HPI-1

5.9

6.8

5.9

6.8

7.6

6.4

6.8

-

GRDI 11

0.675 (0.684)

0.664 (0.671)

0.673 (0.678)

0.672 (0.679)

0.669 (0.675)

0.682 (0.688)

0.681

-

GEM 12

0.426 (0.428)

0.411 (0.412)

0.409 (0.411)

0.528 (0.530)

0.529 (0.530)

0.533 (0.535)

0.532

-

1 Starting from 2006 the minimal consumer budget was calculated in accordance to the Resolution of Jogorku Kenesh of the Kyrgyz Republic №1088

from June 9, 2006 and methodology approved by the resolution of the Government of the Kyrgyz Republic №333 from August 15, 2007. Data of the round of international comparisons of GDP in 2005, in parenthesis – data of comparisons round in 2000. 3 1996-2001 – labor-force balance-sheet, 2002 – sample survey of households on employment issues (November 2002), 2003-3007 – data of module “Employment and unemployment” of an integrated survey of domestic households. 4 Data from 2003 are given according to the results of an integrated sample research of 5016 domestic households. 5 Ibid. 6 Ibid. 7 Ibid. 8 Ibid. 9 Data are given according to unit weight of children not attending schools between the ages of 7 to 17 years. 10 Data of the round of international comparisons of GDP in 2005, in parenthesis – data of comparisons round in 2000. 11 Ibid. 12 Ibid. 2




KYRGYZSTAN: successful youth – successful country

NARYN REGION

2000

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

TERRITORY Number of administrative-territorial units at the end of the year: Districts

5

5

5

5

5

5

5

5

Cities

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

Urban settlements

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

Settlements

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Rural districts

56

58

61

61

61

61

61

61

Permanent population (at the end of year. thsd. people)

254.6

261.1

264.0

265.5

267.0

268.7

269.9

271.5

STRUCTURE OF ECONOMY (in % to GDP) Agriculture

70.8

64.8

63.3

61.6

53.7

48.0

44.3

-

Industry

7.9

9.3

7.0

7.9

10.8

7.6

4.6

-

Services sector

16.4

21.3

24.0

24.5

23.7

22.9

23.9

-

MCB per capita. soms

1,080.9

1,351.8

1,443.3

2,119.11

2,426.4

3,186.9

-

FOREIGN INVESTMENTS 1,217.8

1,301.6

PRODUCTION PER CAPITA Gross regional product soms (in current market prices)

11,963

12,312

13,377

14,755

15,661

19,241

23,327

US Dollars (in PPP) 2

1,136 (1,330)

1,079 (1,217)

1,121 (1,233)

1,127 (1,280)

1,154 (1,294)

1,481 (1,653)

1,539

SOCIAL INDICATORS Estimated life expectancy. years Men

66.3

62.1

62.8

62.0

61.9

59.7

61.2

62.0

Women

73.4

70.2

70.5

70.6

70.0

71.1

71.1

71.2

Men

56.9

60.2

59.1

58.8

65.1

65.9

65.7

-

Women

43.1

39.8

40.9

41.2

34.9

34.1

34.3

-

Salary ratio. women to men. %

69.3

64.7

65.9

72.7

73.7

71.4

76.8

77.5

Share in economically active population 3

Share of poor population (including extremely poor). % 4 Domestic households

87.6

79.7

65.7

60.6

45.1

47.6

41.7

-

Population

90.9

84.6

72.1

66.3

51.2

49.3

45.2

-

Domestic households

62.7

49.9

26.1

26.5

17.4

13.5

10.4

-

Population

68.6

52.2

30.4

30.7

20.0

15.1

12.8

-

Share of population without access to safe drinking water. % 6

6.7

10.7

25.7

22.2

11.9

40.1

11.4

-

Share of population without access to healthcare. % 7

12.4

7.75

9.5

5.5

2.8

1.3

2.2

-

Share of undernourished children 1-6 years. % 8

3.1

4.9

7.0

6.2

5.1

3.0

5.3

-

0.5

0.3

0.2

0.7

0.7

0.6

0.6

0.7

Share of extremely poor population. % 5

Share of children not attending school. %

9

INDICATORS OF DEVELOPMENT



HDI 3

0.677 (0.686)

0.665 (0.671)

0.663 (0.669)

0.658 (0.666)

0.656 (0.663)

0.661 (0.667)

0.666

-

HPI-1

7.7

8.1

10.8

9.6

8.3

12.0

8.2

-

GRDI 3

0.677 (0.685)

0.651 (0.658)

0.655 (0.660)

0.654 (0.661)

0.645 (0651)

0.650 (0.656)

0.657

-

GEM 3

0.450 (0.452)

0.385 (0.386)

0.417 (0.418)

0.532 (0.534)

0.516 (0.517)

0.510 (0.512)

0.509

-


KYRGYZSTAN: successful youth – successful country

1 Starting from 2006 the minimal consumer budget was calculated in accordance to the Resolution of Jogorku Kenesh of the Kyrgyz Republic №1088 from

June 9. 2006 and methodology approved by the resolution of the Government of the Kyrgyz Republic №333 from August 15. 2007. 2 Data of the round of international comparisons of GDP in 2005. in parenthesis – data of comparisons round in 2000. 3 1996-2001 – labor-force balance-sheet. 2002 – sample survey of households on employment issues (November 2002). 2003-3007 – data of module “Employment and unemployment” of an integrated survey of domestic households. 4 Data from 2003 are given according to the results of an integrated sample research of 5016 domestic households. 5 Ibid. 6 Ibid. 7 Ibid. 8 Ibid. 9 Data are given according to unit weight of children not attending schools between the ages of 7 to 17 years.

JALAL-ABAD REGION

2000

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

TERRITORY Number of administrative-territorial units at the end of the year: Districts

8

8

8

8

8

8

8

8

72

Cities

5

5

61

7

7

7

7

Urban settlements

8

8

7

7

7

7

7

7

Settlements

-

33

3

3

3

3

3

3

Rural districts

68

69

69

68

68

68

68

68

Permanent population (at the end of the year. thsd. people)

893.7

920.3

933.5

947.6

960.8

973.4

980.4

993.7

STRUCTURE OF ECONOMY (in % to GDP) Agriculture

29.3

38.8

37.5

38.2

35.8

36.1

38.7

-

Industry

44.0

24.9

22.7

27.4

26.5

26.6

23.9

-

Services sector

19.0

27.3

31.4

25.4

31.5

30.6

29.9

-

1594.4

1634.3

2101.2 4

2473.2

3137.5

FOREIGN INVESTMENT MCB per capita. soms

1104.3

1307.9

1445.8

PRODUCTION PER CAPITA Gross regional product PRODUCTION PER CAPITA)

13,088

11,120

10,938

11,389

12,002

14,065

16,563

-

US Dollars (in PPP) 5

1,269 (1,487)

1,046 (1,180)

1,018 (1,120)

1,026 (1,166)

1,002 (1,123)

1,074 (1,198)

1,114

-

SOCIAL INDICATORS Estimated life expectancy. years Men

68.0

66.4

66.9

66.0

65.5

65.5

65.7

65.6

Women

72.9

72.2

72.3

72.9

71.8

72.2

72.6

72.5

Men

52.7

53.7

54.4

56.3

55.7

56.3

56.3

-

Women

47.3

46.3

45.6

43.7

44.3

43.7

43.7

-

Salary ratio. women to men. %

58.0

57.2

57.8

58.5

57.7

56.5

58.7

56.2

Share in economically active population 6

Share of poor population (including extremely poor). % 7 Domestic households

67.6

57.7

48.0

40.6

46.3

51.7

43.9

-

Population Share of extremely poor population. % 8

76.5

66.8

57.7

50.1

55.9

58.3

53.0

-

Domestic households

26.5

18.9

12.0

8.6

13.0

13.1

8.6

-

Population

36.1

21.1

16.6

12.7

18.0

17.3

12.0

-

Share of population without access to safe drinking water. % 9

13.1

14.8

32.6

25.8

7.1

5.6

1.4

-

Share of population without access to healthcare. %10

7.2

2.5

2.3

3.1

2.2

2.1

5.4

-




KYRGYZSTAN: successful youth – successful country

Share of undernourished children 1-6 years. %11 Share of children not attending school. % 12

6.9

14.0

7.1

5.7

2.8

2.5

7.4

-

0.4

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.05

0.1

INDICATORS OF DEVELOPMENT HDI 13

0.688 (0.696)

0.670 (0.677)

0.669 (0.674)

0.667 (0.674)

0.661 (0.667)

0.663 (0.669)

0.667

-

HPI-1

7.2

8.1

10.1

8.7

5.5

5.5

5.9

-

GRDI 14

0.682 (0.691)

0.665 (0.672)

0.663 (0.668)

0.663 (0.670)

0.653 (0.659)

0.654 (0.660)

0.659

-

GEM 15

0.411 (0.413)

0.402 (0.403)

0.414 (0.415)

0.449 (0.450)

0.447 (0.448)

0.448 (0.449)

0.439

-

1 Including town of Kockor-Ata created in 2003.

2 Including town of Kerben created in 2004. 3 In 2002 Sara-Beein settlement council was created in the town of Mailuu-Suu. Jalal-Abad region. consisting of 3 settlements: Sary -Bee. Kogoy and KaraJygach. 4 Starting from 2006 the minimal consumer budget was calculated in accordance to the Resolution of Jogorku Kenesh of the Kyrgyz Republic №1088 from June 9. 2006 and methodology approved by the resolution of the Government of the Kyrgyz Republic №333 from August 15. 2007. 5 Data of the round of international comparisons of GDP in 2005. in parenthesis – data of comparisons round in 2000. 6 1996-2001 – labor-force balance-sheet. 2002 – sample survey of households on employment issues (November 2002). 2003-3007 – data of module “Employment and unemployment” of an integrated survey of domestic households. 7 Data from 2003 are given according to the results of an integrated sample research of 5016 domestic households. 8 Ibid. 9 Ibid. 10 Ibid. 11 Ibid. 12 Data are given according to unit weight of children not attending schools between the ages of 7 to 17 years. 13 Starting from 2006 the minimal consumer budget was calculated in accordance to the Resolution of Jogorku Kenesh of the Kyrgyz Republic №1088 from June 9. 2006 and methodology approved by the resolution of the Government of the Kyrgyz Republic №333 from August 15. 2007. 14 Ibid. 15 Ibid.

OSH (CITY COUNCIL)

2000

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

TERRITORY Number of administrative-territorial units at the end of the year: 1 Districts

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Cities

-

-

1

1

1

1

1

1

Urban settlements

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Settlements

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Rural districts

-

-

1

1

1

1

1

-

Permanent population (at the end of the year. thsd. people) 2

-

-

248.5

250.5

250.4

249.5

250.0

250.3

STRUCTURE OF ECONOMY (in % to GDP) Agriculture

-

-

8.1

7.0

6.8

4.2

4.4

-

Industry

-

-

12.1

9.4

15.6

12.6

5.6

-

Services sector

-

-

70.1

73.0

69.6

78.9

82.7

-

FOREIGN INVESTMENTS MCB per capita. soms PRODUCTION PER CAPITA



Gross regional product

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

soms (in current market prices)

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

US Dollars (in PPP)

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-


KYRGYZSTAN: successful youth – successful country

SOCIAL INDICATORS Estimated life expectancy. years 3

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Men

-

-

64.0

62.6

63.3

62.7

62.9

63.2

Women

-

-

72.1

70.2

70.4

71.1

70.5

70.6

Men

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Women

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Salary ratio. women to men. %

-

-

64.7

65.6

64.8

58.6

64.5

63.8

Domestic households

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Population

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Share of extremely poor population. %

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Domestic households

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Population

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Share of population without access to safe drinking water. %

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Share of population without access to healthcare. %

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Share of undernourished children 1-6 years. %

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

0.05

0.02

0.02

0.02

0.01

0.02

Share in economically active population

Share of poor population (including extremely poor). %

Share of children not attending school. % 4

INDICATORS OF DEVELOPMENT HDI

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

HPI-1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

GRDI

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

GEM

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1 Until 2003 Osh was a part of Osh region. 2 3 4

Ibid. Ibid. Data are given according to unit weight of children not attending schools between the ages of 7 to 17 years.




KYRGYZSTAN: successful youth – successful country

Annex 3. Ranking of the Values



Health

1st place

Peace (without wars and conflicts)

2nd place

Family. children

3rd place

Material well-being/ independence

4th place

Freedom

5th place

Love

6th place

The job/studies one likes most

7th place

Love for God

8-место

Environment. nature preservation

9th place

Country’s independence

11th place

Safety. security

12th place

Career growth

13th place

Social milieu / environment

14th place

Access to information

15th place

Male

Female

Health

Health

1st place

Peace (without wars and conflicts)

Peace (without wars and conflicts)

2nd place

Family. children

Family. children

3rd place

Material well-being/ independence

Material well-being/ independence

4th place

Freedom

Love

5th place

Love

Freedom

6th place

The job/studies one likes most

The job/studies one likes most

7th place

Love for God

Love for God

8th place

Environment. nature preservation

Country’s independence

9th place

Country’s independence

Safety. security

11th place

Safety. security

Environment. nature preservation

12th place

Career growth

Career growth

13th place

Social milieu / environment

Social milieu / environment

14th place

Access to information

Access to information

15th place


KYRGYZSTAN: successful youth – successful country

Annex 4. Values Grouped by Categories Concepts

Positive attitude (%) First group 80-100%

Motherland

91.7

Kyrgyzstan

87.0

Land

85.1

Money

82.0

My family/clan

81.1 Second group 65-79%

Nation

74.3

Religion

73.9

Order

73.8

Safety

73.2

Tradition

71.1

Stability

70.0

Justice

69.1

Ownership of private property

66.0

Patriotism

65.8

President

65.5

Business

65.3

Law and order

65.3 Third group 51-64%

Strong state

63.4

Democracy

61.3

Entrepreneur

60.6

Sovereignty

59.7

Civil society

59.3

Morality

57.0

Market

55.7

Modernization

52.5

CIS

51.5 Fourth group 21-50%

The Sanjyra (genealogy of Kyrgyz family clans)

50.0

Self-government

49.3

Authority (power)

48.0

Middle class

44.8

Kyrgyz traditionalism

43.4

Politics

40.9

Competition

39.5 Fifth group 10-20%

Religious sects

19.6

Revolution

18.2

Bribes

10.2




KYRGYZSTAN: successful youth – successful country

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KYRGYZSTAN: successful youth – successful country

Law of the Kyrgyz Republic “On Youth Policy,” February 26, 2000. Malikov, К. 2008. “Youth in Kyrgyzstan Thinks That the US Is the Threat for Islam, But Still Dreams of Studying and Working in This Country.” Information Agency 24.kg, October 17, 2008. http://www.24.kg/community/40973-2008/10/17/95605.html. Accessed in December 2009. Mambetov, М. 2009. Speech of the Minister of Health of the Kyrgyz Republic M. Mambetov. http://rus.kabar. kg/2009/02/06/m-mambetov-segodnya-v-sisteme-zdravooxraneniya-ne-xvataet-30-procentov-specialistov/. Accessed in December 2009. Ministry of Culture and Information of the Kyrgyz Republic. 2008. Report of the Ministry of Culture and Information of the Kyrgyz Republic: “Mass Media of Kyrgyzstan: Situation, Problems, Trends, and Development Prospects.” Bishkek, March 2008. Ministry of Education, Science and Youth Policy, Foundation for Educational Initiatives. 2008. Strategic Study Results Report “Raising the School Attendance Level in Poor and Remote Districts of the Kyrgyz Republic:” Bishkek. Ministry of Education, Science and Youth Policy, UNV Youth Project, OSCE. 2006. “Analytical Note: Problems of Youth Participation in Republic’s Development:” Bishkek. Ministry of Education, Science and Youth Policy. 2006. Results of the Comprehensive Audit of the Institutes of Higher Education on Compliance with the Licensing Requirements. July 2006: Bishkek. Ministry of Health of the Kyrgyz Republic. 2009. “Note on the Activity Results of Healthcare Organization of the Republic in 2008 and Goals for 2009.” http://www.med.kg/Articles/ViewSection.aspx?ArticleID=298. Accessed in December 2009. Ministry of Health of the Kyrgyz Republic. 2009. Data of the Ministry of Health of the Kyrgyz Republic as of January 1, 2009. Ministry of Labor, Employment and Migration of the Kyrgyz Republic. 2008. Analysis of the Labor Market of the Kyrgyz Republic for the First Half of 2008 and Demand for Skilled Cadre. http://mz.kg/ru/analytics. Accessed in December 2009. National Statistics Committee of the Kyrgyz Republic and State Committee on Migration and Employment in the Kyrgyz Republic. 2007. Special edition. Employment, unemployment, labor migration. The results of the crosssectional study of the population employment in June 2006: Bishkek. National Statistics Committee of the Kyrgyz Republic. 2001. “Results of the Sampling Observation of the Time Budget:” Bishkek. National Statistics Committee of the Kyrgyz Republic. 2006. “Results of the Sampling Observation of the Time Budget:” Bishkek. National Statistics Committee of the Kyrgyz Republic. 2008. Demographic Yearbook of the Kyrgyz Republic, 20032007. Statistical Compendium: Bishkek. National Statistics Committee of the Kyrgyz Republic. 2008. Education and Science in the Kyrgyz Republic. Statistical Compendium: Bishkek. National Statistics Committee of the Kyrgyz Republic. 2008. Kyrgyzstan in Numbers. Statistical Compendium: Bishkek. National Statistics Committee of the Kyrgyz Republic. 2008. National Accounts of the Kyrgyz Republic 2003-2007. Statistical Compendium: Bishkek. National Statistics Committee of the Kyrgyz Republic. 2008. Results of the Integrated Study of Households in 2007: Bishkek National Statistics Committee of the Kyrgyz Republic. 2008. Societal Trends of the Kyrgyz Republic, 2002-2006, Issue 3: Bishkek. National Statistics Committee of the Kyrgyz Republic. 2008. Standard of Living the Kyrgyz Republic’s Population, 2003-2007. Annual Publication: Bishkek. National Statistics Committee of the Kyrgyz Republic/ UNICEF. 2006. “Multi-Indicator Cluster Study.” From the interview with Professor N. Kerimovs “The Number of Abortions in Kyrgyzstan Is Growing.” http://www.centrasia.ru/ newsA.php?st=1215931080. Accessed in December 2009. Ombudsmen of the Kyrgyz Republic. 2008. Report of the Ombudsmen of the Kyrgyz Republic Tursunbek Akun “On the Situation of Rights and Freedoms of a Human Being and Citizen in the Kyrgyz Republic in 2008.”




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KYRGYZSTAN: successful youth – successful country

LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS Page 2

Photo of Alimjan Jorobaev

Page 6

Poster of Natalya Ten, Kamilla Nazarova and Anatoly Kolbin

Page 12

Poster of Zlata Maltseva and Oleg Vasilenko

Page 13, 15, 17

Posters of Alla Kivachitskaya

Page 16

Photo from the archive of Public Association “Atuul”

Page 19

Photo of Talgat Berikov

Page 22

Photo of Samat Barataliev

Page 23

Poster of Tolgobek Koichumanov

Page 24

Photo of Pavel Bolshakov

Page 26

Poster of Eugene Morozov

Page 27

Photo of Ulan Murzakhmetov

Page 29

Poster of Evghenia Kuzmenykh

Page 30

Photo of Alexandra Kashirina

Page 31

Poster of Anna Zima

Page 32

Photo of Zlata Kovalenko

Page 33

Photo from the archive of Public Association “Atuul”

Page 35

Poster of Mihail Kostyuchenko

Page 38

Photo of Chinghiz Narynov

Page 39

Poster of Natalya Ten, Kamilla Nazarova and Anatoly Kolbin

Page 41

Poster of Alla Kivachitskaya

Page 43

Photo of Adyljan Shamshiev

Page 44

Photo of Kadyr Batyrkanov

Page 45

Poster of Roman Kirichenko

Page 47

Photo of Boris Pilipenko

Page 50

Poster of Anna Zima

Page 51

Poster of Guljan Artykbaeva

Page 53

Photo of Fay Walker

Page 54

Photo of Anna Zima

Page 55

Poster of Anton Tyulenev

Page 56

Photo of Nurayim Ryskulova

Page 57

Photo of Dmitry Motinov

Page 58

Photo from the archive of Public Association “Atuul”

Page 59

Joint poster of students of Ecological-Economic Lyceum #65, Bishkek City

Page 60

Photo of Victor Tsoi

Page 61

Photo of Natalya Andrianova

Page 62

Photo of Anton Slon

Page 63

Poster of Ivanna Shmeleva

Page 65, 67, 69

Posters of Roman Kirichenko

Page 71

Photo of Darya Hristolyubova

Page 96

Poster of Alexey Bolotskih, Olesya Nikulshina

Page 97

Poster of Natalya Don, Evgheniya Pak, Aikanysh Barakanova

UNDP Kyrgyzstan thanks all young people who participated in two competitions “Jashtar.Molodezh.KG” of 2008 and “Generation ‘Y’” of 2009 and who provided their works for this publication, and Public Association “Atuul” for cooperation and information support.




ACRONYMS GDP WHO HL STD HPI-1 GEM GRDI HDI YIG MRH LSG NHDR NGO NSC EP PPP UNDP MM CIS FG STP UNICEF UNFPA



Gross domestic product World Health Organization Healthy lifestyle Sexually transmitted disease Human poverty index Gender empowerment measure Gender-related development index Human development index Youth initiative group Male reproductive health Local self-government National Human Development Report Non-governmental organization National Statistics Committee of the Kyrgyz Republic Environmental protection Purchasing power parity United Nations Development Program Mass media Commonwealth of Independent States Focus group Surgically terminated pregnancy United Nations Children’s Fund United Nations Population Fund


Kyrgyzstan: National Human Development Report 2009/2010