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JANUARY 2017 | $6.00

ISSUE 11

LIVING A LIFE OF LEADERSHIP

EXCLUSIVE STORY NEW YORK TROOPER CAPT. TODD DOUGLAS


LETTER FROM THE EDITOR GREETINGS READER, For a majority of my life, I have made it a point to surround myself with people that live by example; people that value their actions more than their spoken word. These individuals strive to become the best that they can be and in return create a ripple effect of positive influence. People’s attitudes are contagious and you are defined by the people that you choose to associate and surround yourself with. This issue is dedicated to those who choose to serve others - people that have chosen to not only serve but lead. Leaders are not born, they are shaped and molded by experiences both good and bad. They choose to rise above the status quo and put their best foot forward even if that means stumbling along the way. As the guest editor of this magazine, I am honored to present to you stories and anecdotes that embody leadership and service. This month’s issue of MIAD Bridge features a book review of Hermann Hesse’s famous novel, Journey to the East, an article on leadership and technology, former MIAD students chronicling their volunteer services, and exclusive interviews with everyday leaders like Todd Douglas, a captain for the New York State Troopers and Eric Addeo, a creative force in the world of advertising and marketing. These articles, stories, and interviews span the whole spectrum of leadership and service. At their most elemental, these articles and tales will help you gain a better understanding of the world we live in and what leadership can bring to it. At their best they can inspire you to live a life of service, gratitude and, you guessed it: leadership. Thank you, and enjoy.

EDITOR IN CHIEF

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" IF YOUR ACTIONS INSPIRE OTHERS TO DREAM MORE, LEARN MORE, DO MORE AND BECOME MORE, YOU ARE A LEADER.

"

JOHN QUINCY ADAMS

FOUND LAKE, ST. GERMAIN, WI


TABLE OF CONTENTS 6

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DEPARTMENTS BRIDGE REVIEW

AUTHOR BOB CORBETT GIVES A REVIEW OF HERMANN HESSE'S CLASSIC TALE, "THE JOURNEY TO THE EAST."

BRIDGE TALK

AN EXCLUSIVE INTERVIEW WITH LOCAL MARKETING/AD GURU, ERIC ADDEO.

28 BRIDGE LIFESTYLE WHAT MAKES A GOOD LEADER? SEVEN PROS SHARE THEIR INSIGHT ON WHAT IS TAKES TO BE AN EXCEPTIONAL LEADER.

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ARTICLES

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PONDER THIS

HOW IS LEADERSHIP DEFINED IN THE MODERN ERA OF THE INTERNET?

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EDITOR'S PICK

MIAD ALUMNI MICHAEL MARTIN TALKS ABOUT SERVICE AND HIS VOLUNTEER EXPERIENCE.

22 BRIDGE STORY

NEW YORK STATE TROOPER TODD DOUGLAS REFLECTS ON HIS 30-YEAR CAREER IN LAW ENFORCEMENT.

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BRIDGE BOOK REVIEW This novel first published in 1933 by German novelist and poet Hermann Hesse, explores the role of leadership and finding the ultimate truth through a tale of adventure and travel.

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times.” He’s aware that much of what he tells in the novel is imagined.

Count Keyserling’s book, plus others have been written about “the League” but none of those people who published books were part of the League nor of this journey to the East.

“There were amongst us many artists, painters, musicians and poets. Ardent Klingson was there and restless Hugo Wolf, taciturn Lausher, vivacious Brentano – but however animated and lovable the personalities of these artists were, yet without exception their imaginary characters were more animated, more beautiful, happier and certainly finer and more real than the poets and creators themselves.”

he narrator has been on a journey with the League. It is sometime after WWI. The narrator is forgetful, but he has vivid memories of his experience. Yet he can’t reveal anything about “The League.” But he would rather die than reveal any of the details .

There are secret goals of the League, but each member could also have his own goals and those he or she could reveal. The narrator’s aim was to see Princess Fatima and win her love. They are not the only group in the League; there are others and they even meet up with some along their journey.

What he does reveal of the journey is filled with mysticism, magic and information about the sect within the League’s doing and decisions. The narrator himself was a musician and storyteller. Also central to the story is the servant, Leo, a simple laborer. He sought the secret of communication with animals and especially dogs. Leo was nearly everyone’s favorite on the journey. The goal was not really the “East” as the title suggests: “. . . it was the home and youth of the soul, it was everywhere and nowhere, it was the union of all

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Later we read: “After we had border crossed half Europe and a portion of the Middle Ages, we camped . . .”

Thus we learn that the journey is not only in space, but also in time. Leo, the servant leaves and everything changes and falls apart. The narrator begins to doubt he can really tell the tale of their journey. What is it about, what is the central meaning or force? He no longer knows and thus he doesn’t think he can tell the tale. He resolves to begin the story anew until he “gets” it. “I will be mindful of the first principle of our great period, never to rely on and let myself be disconcerted by reason, always to know that faith is stronger than so-called reality.” After the collapse of his part in the journey to the East he returns home and meets with Lukas, an old


friend and editor. Lukas has heard of the League and dismissed its importance. He called it “The Children’s Crusade.” Given that is the subtitle of Kurt Vonnegut’s novel of the firebombing of Dresden, and given that Vonnegut definitely knows and is close to Hesse’s writing, it makes me wonder if this novel is the influence on Vonnegut for that subtitle. The narrator needs to make sense of what happened. Lukas writes off his need by telling him many prophets and messianic hopes came to the fore after the war, and he should understand his urges in relation to this phenomenon of the time. Lukas himself had a good deal of forgetfulness in relation to his experience in the war. Nonetheless, eventually, Lukas wrote his book, so there is hope for him too. Lukas gives him a lead: it turns out if Leo were a last name, not first, there may be someone with that unusual last name in the phone book, and there is, Andreas Leo. The narrator hurries there and spies on him for some time, trying to get a look at him, and it is “his” Leo, so he confronts him. Leo seems to have no idea who the narrator is and denies any information about the League, nonethe-

less, the troubled narrator writes Leo a long and impassioned letter about his experience and Leo relents. He is not the innocent he had pretended and takes the narrator to the High Throne of the League. From here on out the novel is extremely reminiscent of PART of Kafka’s The Trial, especially, but has much of the mystery of what’s happened that one gets in Kafka’s Metamorphosis and even of The Castle, but only partly as I will discuss below. “The self-accuser is herewith empowered to reveal publicly every law and secret of the League’s archives. Moreover, the whole of the League’s archives are placed at his disposal for his work.” Leo, it turns out is President of the League, and he personally forgives H.H., however, he points out that the sins he has admitted are not what’s serious at all. Rather: “Brother H. was led to despair in his test, and despair in the result of each earnest attempt to understand and vindicate human life. Despair is the result of each earnest attempt to go through life with virtue, justice and understanding and to fulfill their requirements . . .” It is here that Hesse goes far beyond Kafka. Joseph K never really understands what has happened, and he can’t really go forward. Not so H.H. who begins his own rehabilitation and path back toward the League. He actually succeeds, but only at the first level of his rehabilitation, and that has to await a later novel (which perhaps Siddhartha really is).

This was a very strange, otherworldly and fascinating novel. I’m not sure what to really make of it, perhaps it will take some time for it to leaven within my head. If so, I’ll just come back and add to these notes later on. HERMANN HESSE

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LEADERSHIP THROUGH THE

INTERNET ARTICLE BY CHLOÉ GUTMANN

ILLUSTRATIONS BY DIANA WHITNEY

BEING A SERVANT LEADER IN THE AGE OF THE INTERNET MEANS USING SOCIAL MEDIA AS A LEARNING AND COMMUNITY BUILDING TOOL.

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he Journey to the East is a text that revolves around finding the “Ultimate Truth” through pilgrimage. The society on this quest are a group of males, or brothers, called the League. All of this is amounted into a transformation, which seems to be a parallel to heaven. Paradise is a place where the past, future, and fictitious are the present moment, where there is freedom to experience everything imaginable at once. This is what the journey to the East amounts to - truth and happiness. At the core of this text is a discussion of leadership and being a servant leader. Throughout the text, H.H. documents his experiences. This documentation and journey through servant leadership provides a thought provoking message about leadership in modern times.

The law of service is the central theme in Journey to the East and is introduced by a character named Leo. Leo, a man who is eventually revealed as the leader of the League, talks about the law of service as

“HE WHO WISHES TO LIVE LONG MUST SERVE, BUT HE WHO WISHES TO RULE DOES NOT LIVE LONG.” Leo is insightful in understanding how power functions, having experienced both roles, and manipulating the experience of H.H. throughout

the journey. Leo leads through guidance, management, influence and supervision. “The servant-leader is servant first – as Leo was portrayed. It begins with the natural feeling that one wants to serve, to serve first. Then conscious choice brings one to aspire to lead. That person is sharply different from one who is leader first…the leader-first and servant-first are two extreme types. Between then there are shadings and blends that are part of the infinite variety of human nature.” As Greenleaf points out, there is an infinite range between servant and leader. The documentation of H.H’s experiences with the League acts as parallels to history, and is in some ways like looking at one face of a cube.

“SERVANT LEADERSHIP IS A PHILOSOPHY AND SET OF PRACTICES THAT ENRICHES THE LIVES OF INDIVIDUALS, BUILDS BETTER ORGANIZATIONS, AND ULTIMATELY CREATES A MORE JUST AND CARING WORLD.” H.H. is eventually faced with documents of his experience and his faith is tested when the archives are presented. “I read through the two others with the strangest feelings. Basically, both writers described the events of that day not very differently from the way I had done, and yet how different they seemed to me!”

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The search for ultimate truth is centered around finding the good in the bad and bringing that good to other people. This twisting of good and bad is exposed at the end of the Journey to the East when H.H. sees his own image resembling the servant and President Leo. “ I perceived that my image was in the process of adding to and flowing into Leo’s, nourishing and strengthening it. It seemed that, in time, all the substance from one image would flow into the other and only one would remain: Leo. He must grow, I must disappear.” It was only when the author continued his questioning and investment in the journey that the journey to the east made sense. “That is, according to Mahayana Buddhism, “individual” salvation is not enough, rather, our work must be in the service of others, not least because, in the ultimate analysis, there really isn’t something like the “I that is separate from the rest.”Leadership is a question of ethics.” All of this information sparked an interest in wondering “what makes now a great time to be a leader? What about leading is different today from prior decades?” Communication has always been a key component of leadership. During the Nomad Era, people were moving from place to place searching for food, an leaders were chosen by power, often to delegate responsibilities to small groups. As the agricultural era started and people learned how to farm, tribes began to grown and structure started to emerge - communication flowed from the leader to the tribe. Once the printing press was invented, leaders could distribute their message to millions of people for very little cost.

THE PRINTING PRESS WAS ONE OF THE FIRST TIMES WHERE COMMUNICATION WITH A LEADER GREW CHALLENGING. 10 | MIAD BRIDGE

because the leader is not in immediate reach. Jump forward a few years and we have the invention of radio, the Internet… and now, social media. We are able to communicate with digital media tools and technology to spark conversations with virtually anyone. Leaders are now able to receive feedback from the largest audiences ever. Today, virtually anyone can assume the identity of a leader, and information can be spread from around the world in seconds. The Pope, for example has upwards of 20 million digital media followers.

“THE POPE, FOR EXAMPLE, HAS UPWARDS OF 20 MILLION DIGITAL MEDIA FOLLOWERS.” His messages can reach people effectively through media. There are also celebrities with upwards of 75 million digital followers on social media (among the like of Miley Cyrus, Snoop Dogg, Kim Kardashian) that are influencing people with their message. Leo’s insight with leadership certainly validates this notion, “There are a few who are born to be masters; they remain happy and healthy. But all the others who have only become masters through endeavor, end in nothing” (Hesse). Social media is a platform for us to perform ourselves for other people - are people so blinded by their own conceits of themselves and how they’re being performed that they are missing the greater good? Is there a way to be an ethic leader Online? Rules and hierarchy are virtually disdained on the Internet, because nobody is in charge. We live in a world full of information and sorting through that information and establishing your own voice is one of the greatest ways to communicate calmly and clearly. What does leadership look line in an environment that

shuns leadership? Being a servant leader in the age of the Internet means using social media as a learning and community building tool. We are able to seek and offer help, voice our concerns, and effect deep change in attitude. A massive part of changing this attitude is showing up and physically serving and benefiting a community for the greater good. The spread of information should never displace the physical act of serving your community. Lao Tzu said

“A LEADER IS BEST WHEN PEOPLE BARELY KNOW HE EXISTS, WHEN HIS WORK IS DONE, HIS AIM FULFILLED, THEY WILL SAY: “WE DID IT OURSELVES.” The followings of individuals on the Internet catapult them to leadership roles where they hold a position of power and influence. We need to invest genuinely and sincerely in order to expand the ideas of others. The Journey to the East ends with a reminder of a conversation H.H. had with Leo about “the creations of poetry being more vivid and real than the poets themselves.” Perhaps assuming the identity of a servant leader in the digital age means the transferring of authentic, needful, virtuous information and experiences to a larger audience; and then LOGGING OFF. •


BRIDGE TALK

CONDUCTED BY ETHAN KEISTER

ETHAN: Let’s start at the beginning. ERIC: Sure, I spent the first years of my life in Queens and Long Island. I was born in a hospital in the Bronx. My parents divorced when I was young and my step dad moved us out to Las Vegas along with my mom and siblings. My mom had been wanting to get out of the city so she pushed my step dad to take the job offered to him in Nevada. I basically grew up in Las Vegas. My step dad was a very authoritative figure and I wanted to be that guy who rebelled. I was into the punk scene so believe it or not I had spiked blonde hair and wore eyeliner. I didn’t give a fuck. When I was older I had two options: attend a trade school or go into the military. I decided to enlist and for 4 years I was an army paramedic. After my 4 year stint I had the option of becoming an occupational therapist, but that would’ve meant more school.

I can see the correlation of your experience in the army to who you are now. It’s safe to say that had a real impact on who you were to become as a person. Oh, hell yeah. The army taught me selflessness. It taught me to stay calm in stressful situations. You always have to take a deep breath. You can either

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On a drizzly autumn day, I had the pleasure to sit and interview Mr. Eric Addeo. Eric is a local Milwaukeean with over 20 years of marketing, advertising, and leadership experience. In midSeptember, I reached out to Eric for an interview for this month’s issue. A few weeks later we met at Lakefront Brewery over a few cold ones to catch up and discuss his life and extensive career.

panic and cause more problems for yourself and others or you can be the one to take a step back and assess the situation. Be the guy that steps back then takes action.

What happened after the army? I went back to Vegas. I worked construction for a while and that sucked - I hated it. After that I had a retail job. I actually really enjoyed it. I got to expand on my people and customer service skills. In about a year and a half I was top salesman and became assistant manager.

So you went from army paramedic, construction worker, to retail sales manager? It seems that no matter what job you did, you made the best of it and learned from those experiences. That’s what it’s all about. You have to know what to pull from. It doesn’t matter what you do. If you put your best foot forward and give it your all you will learn something. My true passion is music. While I didn’t necessarily play in a rock band or have musical talent, I liked being immersed in that whole scene. While working retail, I started promoting local Las Vegas bands on my own time. I was dating a girl then


and we moved to Los Angeles – this was around 1991. I had a job lined up there as a waiter at a restaurant one of my friends worked at. I really dove into the L.A. music scene. I remember attending and promoting bands for Psychofest – a music festival on Venice Beach that hosted 5 bands - all different genres.

You were living the dream. Oh God yeah. It gets better: a buddy and I purchased this old ice factory. It was a worn down warehouse. We converted it into the place where we promoted our bands. I believe the building is still there but it’s something else now. We were doing about 15-20 shows a month. We hosted the band Sublime. This was about 2 months before their single “Date Rape” made it big on the radio and they became famous. On top of that I was also trying to promote a comic book and cartoon series I was working on with some artist buddies of mine. We pitched our ideas to studios like 20th century fox and Klasky Csupso.

So wait, let me get this straight: not only were you heavily involved in the L.A. music scene, learning the business inside and out, but on top of that you were trying to pitch cartoon and show ideas to networks?

You’ve had quite the career. Any further words of advice for young, ambitious folk out there? There is zero meaning in a title. It’s not what you do it’s who you are. Are you willing to work with others? What is your passion? Do you have good ideas? Having good ideas is easy, but bringing those ideas to life is the hard part and it’s not always very glamorous. You have to keep in mind: in business you are always expendable and sometimes it simply boils down to money. Now, if you find something you’re incredibly passionate about the money isn’t always a priority. My career is half luck. The other half was meeting the right people, hard work, and determination. It’s all about the people you interact with. Just be a decent human being and know when to listen to people and their ideas. The rest will fall into place.

Great advice. Eric, thank you so much for taking the time to talk! No problem, Ethan. Thank you.

Unsuccessfully but yes. I really dove into what interested me. That, and I was constantly surrounding myself with creative people and doing creative work. I wasn’t the smartest or most talented in the room but I knew who to hang out with. I’m a chameleon: I can blend in anywhere and become anyone depending on the situation. People skills, respect, and integrity-that’s what it’s all about. I’m not that guy with a label. The music industry was a hell of a time but I wanted a change of pace – it was starting to drain me. When I came to Milwaukee I got into marketing and advertising at different agencies around the area; Zizzo Group, GMR Marketing to name a few. For GMR Marketing I was doing things for Bud Light, going to the Superbowl- it was a crazy time. But the best gig I had was at The Rave. Even though I was doing different things with marketing I never lost that drive and passion for music. ERIC M. ADDEO

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NEW ALBUM. SAME MISCHIEF.

This summer, New Orleans-based alternative swing -punk band, The Painted Hands, releases their second EP. Check out their first album, RAPSCALLIONS, available now at Bandcamp. 14 | MIAD BRIDGE

VINYL | DELUXE CD | DIGITAL MP3


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BY MICHAEL MARTEN


FORMER MIAD STU DENT MICHAEL MARTEN GIVES HIS DEFIN ITION OF SERVICE: ARTICLE BY MICHAEL MARTEN | PHOTOS BY ETHAN KEISTER

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he term “service” means something different depending on who you ask. Providing dinner once a week at a homeless shelter, joining the armed forces, talking with a friend, chaining yourself to an old oak tree as loggers enter the forest, leaving your car at home and biking to work every day, giving $50 to the Red Cross, choosing professional work that makes a difference, writing a letter to a congressional leader about campaign finance reform, developing a micro-lending project for low-income teens to start small businesses, serving on a committee at a religious institution, giving blood, tutoring a migrant worker, adopting an eight year old boy. These are all examples of service. As far as I can see between all examples of service the key interrelating component here is an absence of self. So often our goals – in fact, our entire mindsets – are uniformly self focused. Immanuel Kant was a philosopher who went so far as to say that, with a few exceptions, everything we do is motivated for

the self. Our society facilitates, even encourages, this line of thinking. The “American Dream” is one of personal gain and triumph and capitalism urges harsh competition and values corporate Darwinism. Those things can grow a prospering economy (or sometimes not) and lead to business success, but they stress self-centric thinking and they dismiss empathy. My personal definition of service is anything that requires sacrifice. It is a response to brash individualism and even selfishness and an affirmation of the more compassionate form of the human spirit. It’s remembering that we are social creatures and that none of the amazing privileges our society affords us could’ve ever existed without working for, and with, each other While I stress that one’s goal for service should be purely altruistic it is, however, important to have the content of that service be catered to the one’s self. One’s

skills, gifts, talents, and interests are vital in searching out a way to serve. I am interested in, and have a growing skill set concerning, digital art and design, and related technological tools. I see the importance of the Internet and computers in art, graphic design, and business ventures of all natures, is only going to increase as time goes on. I also know that my High School in Sun Prairie, WI is far behind the times when it comes to learning programs. In searching for a way to give back that would work with my strengths, thus allowing me to give a higher quality of service, I saw a prime opportunity at Sun Prairie High School. Giving high schoolers the chance to jump start their skills in various design programs may not seem like the traditional method of public service, but this sort of mentoring would give students fundamental knowledge of an ever-increasing industry and the chance to explore new interests.

ON E’S SKILLS, GIFTS, TALENTS, AN D INTERESTS ARE VITAL IN SEARCH ING OUT WAYS TO SERVE A WAY TO SERVE.

EDITOR'S PICK

I came to MIAD knowing nothing about these programs, and having some previous experience and knowledge of them would have benefited me greatly. Photoshop, Illustrator, Web Design are the fundamental tools in pursuing any career in design. The knowledge of design aesthetic is meant to be taught with personal critiques and collaborative projects which I plan on imploring at d LUMINARY: LIVING A LIFE OF LEADERSHIP | 17


I

every chance I get. Helping kids learn these things now is helping them find success in their future and possible careers. I have benefited from others’ service in countless ways. My uncle, Wes enlisted in the army to help protect our country. My sister’s finance’s father is a police officer in Madison, WI. My art teacher in High School really motivated me to push myself and work hard to get into Art School. My parent’s sponsor a child in Kenya and I’ve benefited from knowing how hard other people’s lives are and how lucky I am to have loving, supportive parents. Mother Teresa said in her 1996 interview when asked how youth in America can help her cause:

f everyone would just serve others without even thinking twice, the world would be a much better place. A little boy sent a measly 3 dollars, but that was probably a significant amount of money to him and if everyone in the world would be selfless enough to sacrifice his equivalent of 3 dollars, perhaps world hunger would not be such a prevalent problem in this world. Perhaps the boy sent his 3 dollars after watching his parents be selfless and generous. The world is one big continuous cycle. Service, more than anything, is about people, so there is no better way to understand this topic than through the people who have

WHERE THERE IS LOVE, THERE IS JOY, THERE IS PEACE, THERE IS UNITY. THAT IS WHY IT IS VERY IMPORTANT IF WE REALLY WANT TO GIVE THE KIN DNESS OF GOD’S LOVE, WE MUST FIRST EXPERIENCE THAT IN OUR OWN LIFE-HIS LOVE. THE OTH ER DAY, I HAD A LETTER FROM A CHILD FROM AMERICA…I CAN ’T REM EMBER THE NAM E OF THE PLACE…AND HE WROTE ME IN BIG, BIG WRITING MOTHER THERESA, I LOVE YOU SO MUCH…AND UNDERLINES UNDER “SO MUCH”. I’M SEN DING YOU MY POCKET MON EY, AND INSIDE THE LETTER THERE WAS A CHECK OF 3 DOLLARS. ALL A BEAUTIFUL GIFT OF GOD.

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MOTH ER TERESA

experienced it. My older sister, Abby, was kind enough to give me some of her insights on the nature of service: “I define service as anything you can do to make the world better and not worse. Service is important because it is what makes humans human. Doing something for the greater good even though it’s not exactly fun. Service builds good character. I used to volunteer at Lakeshore Kid’s Camp as a lifeguard every summer. I helped in the kitchen, cleaned the pool and the bathrooms and did odd jobs around the camp. It helped me to build a good work ethic and a lot of kids that came through the camp looked forward to the


...W E DEVELOPED STRONG FRIENDSH IPS AND BONDED THROUGH SERV ING OTHERS.

week they were there more than anything else all year. I’ve benefited from the service of the other staff members at the camp because we developed strong friendships and bonded through serving others. Showing kindness and setting good examples for children is going to make future generations better. Children tend to mimic how they’re treated. Therefore if you’re nice to kids and support them and encourage them, they will be more likely to grow into nice, supportive, encouraging adults.

I think children in our society are “lost” because some of them don’t have good parents to show them the way. We can improve the lives of less fortunate children by leading with example.” My future brother in law, Thad, was also able to provide a take on what service is: “I worked with kids at a public access cable station. The same station I got to be a part of, and that instilled a love of and fascination of television production when I was little. Not only was I able to d


guide kids creatively, I was also able to return the gift that was given to me at a young age. It feels right to give back, because once you’ve benefited from truly selfless people you realize how much brighter and surer the world seems, especially to children. It cultivates a value to help and improve the world around you when you are small and people come out of nowhere to do something nice for you. It makes you want to live your life with those principles in mind. If everybody felt similarly, and everybody gave just a little, I can’t see how that wouldn’t be a better place to live.”

IT MAY SOUND CLICHÉ...

Service is about people. Not just about the people who are the recipients of the service, but also about those who give. A symbiotic sort of relationship forms as a result of serving others whether it is apparent or not. The served are more likely to serve, with an example set of how we may help each other, it is easy to see how it makes sense. It may sound cliché to say that you get just as much value out of giving as receiving; but in reality things are only cliché because they are true, and holds true for so many people.

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GET

INVOLVED Are you interested in volunteer opportunities? Here are a few volunteer facilities in the greater Milwaukee area. Get involved today and make a difference!

VOLUNTEER MILWAUKEE The Volunteer Center located at 2819 W. Highland Blvd. here in Milwaukee is the city’s primary volunteer resource center. Connecting organizations and non-profits , the program is sponsored by the Nonprofit Center of Milwaukee (NPC). CONTACT INFO: (414) 344-3933 info@npcmilwaukee.org www.volunteermilwaukee.org

VOLUNTEERS OF AMERICA Spanning both Wisconsin and Minnesota, this social service volunteer organization focuses on opportunities regarding senior citizens, the disabled, and home care. Their main facility in Milwaukee is located at 1661 N. Water St. Suite 401. CONTACT INFO: (414) 847-1515 www.voamnwi.org

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CAPTAIN TODD DOUGLAS AN EXCLUSIVE BRIDGE STORY

ARTICLE BY TODD DOUGLAS | INTRO BY ETHAN KEISTER

A leader is somebody that embodies strength. They are flexible, keep their cool when shit hits the fan, and choose to complete a task thoroughly rather than take a shortcut. Some have chosen this path as a career, regardless of the day-to-day risks. In this exclusive BRIDGE story, New York State trooper Todd Douglas Keister, tells the tale of his extensive 30-year career in law enforcement.

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Waiting to head out on patrol. Catskill Mountains, NY. 1992.

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s I assumed my new post as Captain at New York State Police, Troop “C” Headquarters, I began to contemplate the long journey that took me from a nervous twenty-twoyear-old college grad that was just entering the New York State Police Academy, to today, where I am second in command of seven counties of state police operations. I had wanted to be a veterinarian as a young teen with a great love of animals, wildlife, and the outdoors. Somewhere along the way, I developed a desire to serve, fight crime, and protect the innocent from criminal predators. Later there were times when I would wonder why the hell anyone would deliberately seek out a career that involves constant exposure to conflict, anger, violence, death, and hopelessness. Before enlisting in the troopers, I could not have fully appreciated the toll police work takes on a human being. The training was terrifying for Mrs. Keister’s little boy Todd. The New York State Police Academy was a 27-week-long boot camp that combined military discipline 24 | MIAD BRIDGE

reminiscent of Stanley Kubrick’s war film Full Metal Jacket. The intensive training consisted of in law (Penal, Criminal Procedure, Vehicle & Traffic, Environmental, and others), firearms training, defensive tactics, criminal and accident investigation, street survival, first aid, courtroom testimony, station operations, report writing, ethics, rules & regulations, emergency driving, radar and laser operation, and crime scene processing. To put it mildly, the experience was shocking; drill instructors screaming in your face, marching to cadences, push-ups, endless runs through the cold, New York nights, physical training at 5:30AM, twelve minutes to shower and change for flag-raising, followed by a strictly regimented breakfast and class for more yelling and physical training. Some recruits were so shell shocked, they slipped away into the night to escape. We would fall out for morning PT and find ourselves missing one or two classmates; troopers would have to be sent to their far-flung homes and bring them back to complete the resignation process.

Despite it all, I managed to have a few laughs and made some good friends. At the age twenty-two, I was one of the youngest recruits. Nearly all of them had left better paying jobs for the chance to become a New York State Trooper. I was thrilled to have a shot at joining the Long Gray Line of troopers that stretched back to 1917, when America’s first troopers rode out on horseback. Those early “Gray Riders” were the stuff of legend; single handedly wrangling dangerous and violent criminals to justice, and bringing safety and security to rural communities once terrorized by predatory thugs. I could not have been more proud at graduation; striding across the stage at the convention center in Albany and shaking hands with the governor. I was a member of the New York State Police and could hardly wait to start saving the world. The reality of course was far less glamorous. I was assigned to my home troop but was still stationed more than ninety miles from home. The barracks were just outside a tiny village with one traffic light on the edge of the


Catskill Mountains. The patrol area was gigantic - more than 800 square miles - and more often than not the trooper working out of that station would be the only police officer on duty in that entire region. No matter what call came in, you handled it, and you handled it alone. For a young man out to prove something to himself and the world, it was a welcome challenge. Though I often experienced fear, I always nabbed the perpetrator and got the job done. Unfortunately, as a police officer, your job is only the first step in what is ironically referred to as the “Criminal Justice System.” In order for a criminal to receive justice, the prosecutor’s office and the courts have to do their job just as well as you’ve done yours, and often that’s not the case. Sadly justice is the exception and not the rule in the criminal justice system. The frustrations are intertwined with successes; a child taken from an abusive home, an injured driver pulled from a burning car, or a burglar sent to prison. Being a New York State Trooper is a grand adventure. I drove all night with a partner to work a week of 12-hour night shifts at the Mohawk Indian Reservation along the Canadian border - arriving in time to help fend of an attack by dozens of member of the Mohawk tribe while on a patrol making a DWI arrest. We were there to keep the peace between pro and anti gambling factions that had been engaged in a shooting war before the troopers arrived. There

were many week-long postings on “The Rez” over the course of the 2 years the troops were there to quell the infighting. I’ve been sent to western New York to deal with rioters; to the state capitol to contain protesters; to Long Island for hurricanes, and spent month in New York City in the aftermath of the September 11 attacks. I have worked in the remote mountain wilderness, urban jungles, quaint suburban towns, and gambling casinos; from New York City to the Adirondack Mountains, I have arrested toothless hillbillies, classy millionaires, and even other police officers. Six people have tried to kill me, and one paid with his life. As a supervisor and administrator, I’ve been largely removed from the daily grind and danger of police work. I’m either in an office or show up after

Waiting for a search warrant at the barracks. 1992

the fact, or at the scene of a hostage situation at a safe distance in the command post. Now nearing 50 years old, I’m generally glad to be in the rear echelon. My experiences have ranged from the hilarious to the horrifying and as a result have provided me with experiences to fill ten lifetimes. It’s a part of what makes police work so intriguing. In Peter Maas’ book Serpico, he recounts detective Frank Serpico talking about why he became a police officer: “All my life I wanted to be a cop, you know? It's like I can remember nothing else. I remember this one time...There was-- somethin' happened. A domestic argument or somethin’. Somebody stabbed somebody. And...there was this crowd around this tenement. I must have been nine, ten years d

LUMINARY: LIVING A LIFE OF LEADERSHIP | 25


old... I went over to see what was going on. I noticed the red light goin' around and around...all these people, and I couldn't see. I kept saying, 'Do you know what's goin' on? Do you know?' Nobody knew. It was like a big mystery behind that-- that crowd there. All of a sudden...the crowd just parted...like the Red Sea, you see? And there were these guys in blue, and I said... 'They know.' What do they know? What do they know? It's amazing. It's incredible..." As a police officer you are privy to what is going on behind the crime scene tape and at the scene of accidents and disasters that other people can only wonder about. While those things can take a toll on you, it makes for an interesting and engaging career. Hunting down the bad guys and solving crimes is a fascinating challenge that is rarely the same twice. There is something compelling

about getting to the truth; solving a crime, convincing a suspect to tell you what really happened, and shining a light on something that was hidden. The experience of policing is not the way it's depicted in the movies and on television. Naturally, there are fewer shootings, car chases, and explosions, but police work involves much more than law enforcement. Sometime during the past four decades, policing has evolved into “Law Enforcement.” People entering the field tend to view themselves primarily as crime fighters and have a very narrow view of what constitutes “real police work.” Policing, by definition, means maintaining order, remedying hazardous conditions, and eliminating public nuisances. This can come as something of a surprise to someone who’s grown up watching television cops. Police investigate crime and arrest criminals, but that is only part of the job - at least for the uniformed section of an agency. Just as important, police are charged with order maintenance in their communities. They are called to referee disputes between neighbors, spouses, and business owners and customers. While sometimes minor violations of law may have occurred in these situations, arrest is not always required or even the best way to resolve the situation. The officer’s primary job is to attempt to diffuse a situation and then attempt to negotiate a compromise or steer the aggrieved party to a civil legal remedy. This prevents the problem from escalating into violence, and restores the peace for other citizens in the area who were exposed to the noise, commotion, and potential danger of the situation. Likewise, the police are likely to be called for a host of other conditions for which they are not officially trained or tasked with handling. Nonetheless, the police are often the first to be called because it is assumed that “the police will know what to do.” As a trooper, I have arrested hundreds of individuals for crimes ranging from writing

26 | MIAD BRIDGE

void checks to attempted murder, and from shoplifting to rape. Still, I have responded to just as many calls for a rabid skunk, a raccoon in the bathroom, a bat in the house, a bear in the backyard, a broken water main, power lines down, and stuck railroad crossing signals. I’ve also fielded dozens of calls for people contemplating or attempting suicide, and for schizophrenics complaining about the CIA attempting to control their thoughts through the fillings in their teeth. At one station I was posted, a trooper went each Wednesday to a poor old lady’s house to take her trash cans out to the curb because they were too heavy for her. Even when you find yourself engaged in the police work that is the stuff of TV and movies, there are two key differences; real people get hurt and killed, and there are no movie crews there to record your heroic deeds for millions to watch on the big screen. In fact, you are far more likely to find yourself accused of misconduct, or, at a minimum, having to carefully explain your actions to avoid being disciplined or worse. Still, it’s the greatest job in the world. If you do it right, you will never have to wonder whether or not your life made any real difference. You may not be a hero, but you will have the satisfaction of knowing that you helped and comforted people during the worst moments of their lives, that you have prevented crimes, saved lives, and played a role in permitting our free society to function without fear of widespread disorder and violence. Today, as the war against the police continues across the nation, I’m glad that I’m nearing the end of my career and not just starting out. I’m honored to have had the opportunity to serve and leave my mark within the Long Gray Line – a historic century of protecting and serving the people of New York State.


PHOTOS BY HALEY KEISTER


BRIDGE LIFESTYLE

PROS share their views

Throughout history, much has been written about what it means to be a leader. Ancient Chinese military general and “Art of War” author, Sun Tzu, described a leader as one who “cultivates the moral law, and strictly adheres to proper methods and discipline.” Nineteenth-century historian Thomas Carlyle, believed leaders were born and not made, while English philosopher Herbert Spencer, argued that leaders were the result of the society in which they lived. With all of these differing schools of thought, it’s clear that there’s no single definition of leadership. What works for one leader may not necessarily work for another, depending on the circumstances and personality type. But there’s one thing that nearly every academic, historian and even leaders themselves agree upon: A true leader must be able to inspire his or her team. Business News Daily spoke with current business leaders about what leadership means to them, and how leaders can achieve the ultimate goal of inspiring others.

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Leaders Can Get the Best Out of People

“Today’s top leaders are consistent with their approach, get their hands dirty and create a company culture that will last long after he or she [has left]. ‘Comfort zones’ are almost nonexistent under strong leadership, because each team member is pushed to their full potential. Great leaders also hire and inspire other great leaders, whom they trust to carry out the company mission and instill a sense of purpose that touches each and every staff member.” Tom Villante, CEO of YapStone

Leaders Can’t Stand Alone

“The out-and-out leader in today’s volatile and uncertain business environment had better not distance him or herself from the heat of the action. Demonstrating the competence to assess, decide and execute in a growing business drives confidence in the leader. Similarly, a great leader of an enterprise stands on the shoulders not of ‘managerial Muppets’ who obediently do as they are directed, but of other leadership giants who have different and complementary leadership skills. A business with only one leader will remain forever a small business.” Richard Hytner, Deputy Chairman of Saatchi & Saatchi Worldwide

28 | MIAD BRIDGE

BY NICOLE FALLON TAYLOR GRAPHICS BY ETHAN KEISTER

2 4

Leadership Requires Ambition

“Leaders are described with a mouthful of adjectives, such as passionate, visionary, charismatic, motivational and encouraging. However, I propose leadership is something simpler. It is ambition. Ambition creates hard work, determination and an unconditional desire to achieve. It generates an absolutely contagious energy that people follow and join naturally. If you are a leader in your organization, there is only one thing you need to understand about your role: never let your ambition fade.” Corey Baggett, Co-Founder of AdBoom Group

Good Leaders Have a Good Attitude

“A good leader can hold his or her emotions in check, especially in tough situations. For example, maybe you lost your best client, or a deal you’ve been working on falls through. Regardless, it’s important for leaders to guide a team through challenging times, encouraging them and remaining positive along the way. Team morale is heavily contingent upon a leader’s attitude.” David Moore, Founding Partner/Regional VP of Addison Group Staffing Firm


5

Leadership is All About Giving & Serving

“It is lonely at the top, but that’s no excuse for not giving generously of your time, your experience and your encouragement to your team — and never expecting any of that in return. You are the person in the unique position of finding or uncovering strengths in people, leveraging them and celebrating them. If you’re going to lead, and lead well, you have to put it all out there every day, regardless of the outcome. Leaders who hold back will eventually hold their teams back.” Tricia Sciortino, President of eaHELP

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Leadership Means Being in Touch With Your People

“A leader places the people around him or her in a position that sets them up for success. This is a difficult task, because a leader must have an in-depth understanding of each individual, such as understanding their career goals and knowing what motivates them. By being committed to helping each person achieve their own personal goals, the leader sets the organization up for greatness. Leaders are [also] good listeners. They listen to verbal and nonverbal cues to understand [what is] occurring in the organization. This allows you to address problems before they become big issues.” Andor Kovacs, CEO/Founder of RESTORATION 1

Leaders Set the Right Example

“Leadership is setting an example in the way you act each day, while focusing on the bigger picture. It’s about setting the tone for your team and organization in the way you interact with your own staff, your business partners and your customers. As a leader, it is your responsibility to establish goals, innovate, motivate and trust. A passionate and compassionate leader can energize a company. Set an example of cooperation, trust and openness. Focus on solutions and positivity instead of finding faults and blame for actions.” Richard Kissane, President/CEO of Premium Franchise Brands

LUMINARY: LIVING A LIFE OF LEADERSHIP | 29


BOOK YOUR TOUR TODAY! DETAILS AT: funbeertoursmke.com PHONE: (414) 202-3611 30 | MIAD BRIDGE

Whether you are a native Milwaukeean or a guest to our great city, our goal at Fun Beer Tours is to help you discover the rich brewery history & emerging craft beer world that the Good Land has to offer in a fun & engaging way. Partnered with Brenner Brewing Company in a rapidly rising neighborhood, the brewery serves as homebase for arrivals and departures. We will explore the various wonderful beer aspects that the city has to offer. In doing so, we strive to do our best in making sure your time spent with us is an experience that will be long remembered. If there is anything we can do to enhance this experience, feel free to contact us. Welcome to Brew City!


BRIDGE STAFF EDITOR IN CHIEF: Ethan Keister

ASSISTANT EDITOR: Adam Setala

CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS: Elizabeth Avila-Neuheisel Haley Keister

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS: Bob Corbett Chloe Gutmann Todd Douglas Keister Michael Marten Nicole Fallon Taylor

CONTRIBUTING ILLUSTRATORS: Ethan Keister Riley Ryan Diana Whitney

SPECIAL THANKS: Eric M. Addeo Todd Douglas Keister The Painted Hands

Designed and Produced at the Milwaukee Institute of Art & Design. Under the Radar Graphics. PRINTED IN THE U.S.A.


MIAD BRIDGE // Ethan Keister  

A publication produced at the Milwaukee Institute of Art & Design. The purpose of this magazine is to inform and inspire the reader with art...

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