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Just Around the Corner


The Urban Neighborhood Design Alliance is the pending not-for-profit arm of map-lab inc, a management, architecture, and planning laboratory located in Boston. UNDA encompasses educational programs originally supported through Historic Neighborhoods such as City/Build and Just Around the Corner. UNDA embodies the spirit and expands upon the vision of Historic Neighborhoods with new programs in sustainability, research, and urban design. map-lab, inc 21 Drydock Avenue, 7th fl Boston, MA

www.map-lab.com

office: 617. 426 . 5401


Just Around the Corner The Just Around The Corner program gives city youth a new understanding of their school and home neighborhood’s social and architectural heritage with field trips, interactive activities, and art projects. Working with local residents, architects, and other professionals, children develop an appreciation of the landmarks and treasures they never knew existed.


Boston Renaissance Charter Public School Spring 2010 marks the rebirth of the Just Around the Corner program. A pilot session was held at the Boston Renaissance Charter Public School introducing Twenty-three 6th grade students from Ms. Sabins’ class to the social and architectural history of the Hyde Park neighborhood.

South End South Boston

Roxbury Jamaica Plain

Roslindale

Dorchester

Hyde Park

Students in the class live in the following Boston Neighborhoods


Just Around the Corner Curriculum Overview


Urban Context: Macro scale Neighborhood Context: Micro scale

Neighborhood Visit: affiliation

Design Project: inginuity


Charlestown

East Boston

Urban Context: Students come from all

Allston/ over the city and each identify on a personal level with their neighborhood and the place Brighton Beacon they reside. Students give depth to the urHill ban fabric by investigating what makes theirFenway own neighborhood unique and a great place Back Bay to live. Through drawings students chart the physical similarities and differences between South the various neighborhoods represented by End members of the class.

South Boston

Jamaica Plain

Roxbury

Dorchester Roslindale West Roxbury

Hyde Park

Mattapan


Urban Context The Urban Context portion of the program focuses on working from the macro scale of Boston to the micro scale of each student’s neighborhood. Each student is given a pre-test to determine their understanding of their home neighborhood, as well as the neighborhood that is the focal point of the course. The students are asked to identify the positive traits of where they live to share with the class. Starting with a mapping activity, students find their neighborhood on a large map of the City of Boston, which allows them to see the size and proportion of Boston and its neighborhoods. This is the first of many maps that are used in the course. Students are asked to visually and orally define the characteristics of their neighborhood and home, acclimating them to their own personal architectural vocabulary. Students often work together to share their work and draw comparisons or differences in the places that they live. The Urban Context works to familiarize the students with the built environment in relationship to what they already know, so in future classes they can apply this knowledge to the neighborhood they are studying.

Student work samples


Activities

Charlestown

Pre- test

East Boston

Locating Neighborhoods on a Map

Allston/ Brighton Drawing and Understanding

Beacon Hill Fenway Back Bay

neighborhoods

Positive Neighborhood Initiatives

Compare/Contrast neighborhood features

South End

South Boston

Roxbury

Jamaica Plain

Goals:

Dorchester

Understanding of the size and proportion of Boston and its neighborhoods Roslindale Familiarity with maps West Roxbury

Mattapan

Defining characteristics of neighborhoods Creating a personal architectural vocabulary Introduction of architectural drawing

Hyde Park

Comparing and contrasting


Urban Context


Neighborhood Context:

Hyde Park

Students are introduced to the social and architectural history of a Boston neighborhood. Students investigate the history of the neighborhood through hands on group activities and are encouraged to draw conclusions between the historical context of the time and the neighborhoods growth. Students expand their architectural vocabulary and learn to identify building styles and types.


Neighborhood Context The students learn about Hyde Park’s extensive history through reading and hands on activities. In groups students create a timeline based on handouts detailing the area’s growth. Students use their reasoning skills to determine key information and its context within the growth and industrialization of Hyde Park. Throughout this process, historic and current day maps of Hyde Park are reviewed so students can see the impact of the historical data they are learning. The architectural history and vocabulary is introduced through studying the architectural styles of Historic Hyde Park. The students created their own homes for Historic Hyde Park based on their timelines. Using the historical context they determined the year their theoretical house was built, and the occupation of its residents. Once they had the background, they were able to choose the style of the house they were building. They made sure it fit within the time period their home was built. It was wonderful to hear them discuss the different architectural styles, saying, “I have a roof of a queenanne and windows from an Italianate.” These activities are aimed at preparing them for the neighborhood visit.

Student work sample


Activities Include:

Study Architectural Styles Learn Architectural vocabulary Understand Architectural drawings Research a Boston neighborhood Create visual time lines synthesizing history and architecture

Goals:

Understand a Neighborhood’s development Gain knowledge of key landmarks and features Increase understanding of maps Develop an architectural vocabulary Increase familiarity with architectural drawings Use critical and creative thinking skills

Hyde Park


Neighborhood Context


Neighborhood Visit

Neighborhood Visit: During a Field trip to the neighborhood students utilize their Architectural vocabulary and view historical sites. Students draw connections between what they have been studying in class, and what they see while walking through the neighborhood. Students also visit a positive example of neighborhood development where volunteers give students an overview of their construction project and host the students on the job site.

Hyde Park


Park Bulletin June 3, 2010

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The second portion of the visit is a tour of positive neighborhood development. Students toured the new Boston Renaissance Charter Public School with the architectural and construction teams. Students are exposed to neighborhood development as well as careers within the building trade. The architectural and construction teams discuss building techniques and design decisions with the students. Members of the Cecil Fogg-Thomas Roberts American Legion Post in Hyde Park raise the flag in observance of Memorial Day on May 31.

PHOTO BY IGNACIO LAGUARDA

residents and veterans, before the it is when we, do that we underStaff Reporter congregation traveled to the Most stand,� said Comer. Mayor Thomas M. Menino Precious Blood Church for a Mass The attended the service in which The Cecil Fogg-Thomas service. Jake Comer, former com- state Rep. Angelo Scaccia also Roberts American Legion Post was decorated with American mander of the American Legion, gave a speech. Later in the day in West flags all along the outer fence was emphatic in his speech in in the audience Roxbury, a larger ceremony feaand seemingly everywhere you asking everyoneJune 3, 2010 Volume 9, Issue 22 to help him “take back our coun- tured many speakers and mullooked on Memorial Day. try� and fight for the rights of vet- tiple messages of gratitude and John M. Moran, the comTrees and ice cream Fogg P ost honor vve eterans on Da Post honorss remembrance Dayy forMemorial American solmander of the post, led a cer- erans. discussed at “When we hear, we forget, emony that included a flag serMemorial Da Dayy when we see, we remember, but vice Fairmount and a number of awards Continued on page 6 Hill tomeeting

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Hyde Park Bulletin Ignacio Laguar da Laguarda

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a problem because of its height. The branches touch the electrical cables overhead. “We don’t take taking down trees lightly,� said Lynch, after mentioning that the trees currently on the site are far from ideal. “They’re not great trees, to say the least.� Many in attendance asked about the significance of the name of the square, but no one had any information regarding HoraceCampbell

Renaissance school lets students through the door for first time Staff Reporter

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The session starts with an architectural scavenger hunt throughout the neighborhood. Students are challenged to identify historical sites and architectural styles that they have been investigating. The scavenger hunt integrates residential, commercial and historical sites so they can see the various changes that have occurred in the neighborhood. Students continue to sketch what they see, identifying characteristics and drawing connections between the neighborhoods where they live.

The Horace Campbell Woodworth Square at the intersection of Beacon Street and Metropolitan Avenue in Fairmount Hill could have a completely new look by this fall, if a proposed plan from the Boston Parks and Recreation Department is approved. Bernie Lynch, assistant commissioner of the parks and recreation department, pre-

Members of the Cecil Fogg-Thomas Roberts American Legion Post in Hyde Park raise the flag in observance of Memorial Day on May 31.

PHOTO BY IGNACIO LAGUARDA

Ignacio Laguar da Laguarda Staff Reporter

The Cecil Fogg-Thomas Roberts American Legion Post was decorated with American flags all along the outer fence and seemingly everywhere you looked on Memorial Day. John M. Moran, the commander of the post, led a ceremony that included a flag service and a number of awards to

residents and veterans, before the congregation traveled to the Most Precious Blood Church for a Mass service. Jake Comer, former commander of the American Legion, was emphatic in his speech in asking everyone in the audience to help him “take back our country� and fight for the rights of veterans. “When we hear, we forget, when we see, we remember, but

it is when we, do that we understand,� said Comer. Mayor Thomas M. Menino attended the service in which state Rep. Angelo Scaccia also gave a speech. Later in the day in West Roxbury, a larger ceremony featured many speakers and multiple messages of gratitude and remembrance for American solMemorial Da Dayy Continued on page 6

Current students from the Boston Renaissance Public Charter School took a tour of the renovated building Tom Papadopoulos, owner of Cappy’s Pizza, presented his plans for a on Hyde Park Avenue, which will open this fall and become the new home of the school. new ice cream and coffee shop on Truman Parkway at the latest Fairmount Hill Neighborhood Association meeting.

PHOTO BY IGNACIO LAGUARDA

square has a star on it, which more than likely means that Woodworth was a World War I veteran. Besides the removal of the trees, the project also involves installing a flower bed with daylilies and a host of other plants. The cost of the entire project would be just over $5,000, said Lynch. Also at the meeting was Tom Papadopoulos, the owner of Cappy’s Pizza on Truman Parkway and Fairmount Avenue. Papadopoulos does not own the building he is using for his pizzeria now, but he is the owner of some of the adjacent commercial spaces that are attached to the building. He said he has received offers from businesses in the Fairmount

The new and yet to be opened Hyde Park location of the Boston Renaissance Charter Public School was unveiled to a group of the school’s sixth grade students during a tour on

HOTO BY GNACIO

AGUARDA

The sixth graders were all The building passed its first impressed by the $40 million test with flying colors, accord- structure, which opens this fall to about 1,000 students from ing to the students. “Even if it’s not finished, it’s around the city, in grades K-6. awesome,� said sixth grader Yet, more than one was disSandy Mejia, who gleefully heartened by the fact that they chowed down on some pizza Renaissance provided atCurrent thestudents end from of the theBoston tour. Continued onrenovated page building 7 Renaissance Public Charter School took a tour of the

Woodworth. Lynch say, sented those Laguar preliminaryda Maydid26. Ignacio Laguarda plans to the Fairmount Hill however, that the sign for the

Staff Reporter Neighborhood Association on May 26. Part of the plan includes removing two of the three trees that stand on the triangle island, which has dimensions of 66', 62' and 45'. The 18" diameter pin oak tree in the middle of the site would remain, while the 14" pin oak and the 9" Norway Maple would be removed. One resident at the meeting was concerned about the removal of the Norway tree because of its historical significance, claiming that it was planted in 1966. Lynch and others in attendance said the tree was completely dead, but that if residents were against the removal of the tree, the city would perhaps reconsider their plan. The other tree slated for removal has become

Renaissance school lets students I L through the door forP first time

Continued on page 8

on Hyde Park Avenue, which will open this fall and become the new home of the school.

Ignacio Laguar da Laguarda Staff Reporter

The new and yet to be opened Hyde Park location of the Boston Renaissance Charter Public School was unveiled to a group of the school’s sixth grade students during a tour on

May 26. The building passed its first test with flying colors, according to the students. “Even if it’s not finished, it’s awesome,� said sixth grader Sandy Mejia, who gleefully chowed down on some pizza provided at the end of the tour.

June 3, 20 10 201

Renaissance continued from page 1 will not be able to attend classes in the building. “I wish we could be here,� said Willina Garcia, who during the tour asked one of the principal architects if the school could be opened up to include 6-8 grade students. “You’ll have to lobby the school board for that,� said Chin Lin, from HMFH Architects, who designed the renovation of the 7,000-square foot masonry and timber mill, which was built in 1889, and a 20,000square foot concrete block and metal siding warehouse built in 1974. The project, which also includes a 15,000 square foot addition for a total of 110,000 square feet, represents the largest charter school project to be constructed in Massachusetts, according to figures from HMFH. The new complex at 1415 Hyde Park Ave. will replace the 16-floor building on 250 Stuart St. as the home of the school. During the tour of the complex, Lin described the design to the students and pointed out many of the features of the building and some of the challenges of the construction. Lin mentioned that the original floors in areas of the building were wildly uneven, sometimes at differences of six to 10 inches, requiring a major

overhaul and new floors. Other aspects, such as brick walls and exposed wood columns, were left untouched. None of the classrooms in the building are the same, said Lin, who informed the students that the rooms will all have daylight and motion sensor technology to shut off when no one is using them or when there is enough natural light inside the room. Skylights and windows are a big part of the design and they allow for copious amounts of sunlight to come through the building. The library, for instance, has so many windows that a light is not necessary during the day. Dasia Miles, one of the sixth graders, said she liked the environmentally conscious elements of the school. “I like how they use energy and try to stay green,� she said. Another design element involves color-coded entrances to the kindergarten classes on the first floor, which are easily accessible from the parking lot. “The reason you want them in different colors is so that the kindergarten class can identify them,� said Lin. Student Samuel Ashby, who toured the building along with his twin brother Jeremiah Ashby, said the building was more colorful than the current

PHOTO BY IGNACIO LAGUARDA

The sixth graders were all impressed by the $40 million structure, which opens this fall to about 1,000 students from around the city, in grades K-6. Yet, more than one was disheartened by the fact that they Renaissance Continued on page 7

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Renaissance School building. Nuha Futa, another student, was impressed by the state-ofthe-art features of the complex. “It’s really high-tech and better than my school,� said Futa, who added that she was jealous of her brother, who is in the third grade and will be able to go to the new building this fall. The tour was organized by the non-profit Urban Neighborhood Design Alliance as part of their Just Around The Corner program aimed at teaching children about the architecture and social history of neighborhoods. The students also toured downtown Hyde Park before visiting the school and completed assignments by identifying different architectural designs in the neighborhood.

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Activities Include:

Architectural Scavenger hunt Walking tour Site visit Meeting neighborhood members Meeting design professionals Reection paper

Goals:

Ability to identify architectural details Expanded use of architectural vocabulary Familiarity with neighborhood maps Identification of historic sites and their context Introduction to construction and design professionals

Hyde Park


Neighborhood Visit


Design Project

Design Project: Students work in groups on a final design project. Projects are a reection of the neighborhood studied and the construction project that is introduced to the class on the field trip. Students present their final projects to the class and the volunteer professionals to help instill confidence in their abilities and a sense of pride in their completed work.


The students were challenged to design the green space of the new Boston Renaissance Charter Public School. The initial phase of the project was for the students to brainstorm ideas individually, considering how the different ages of students would be able to utilize the outdoor space. Once the students successfully considered their own ideas, as a class, they generated a list of possible uses for the new green space. The students grouped the ideas into themes, which became the basis for their final projects. The students were broken down into groups based on their interests’ and asked to prepare a project proposal and schematic sketches. The students worked with recycled materials to make 3-D models to represent their proposed ideas. This challenged them to be creative with material selections and how to make their ideas a reality. The groups generated posters to accompany their models and represented some of the drawing techniques they learned throughout the course. Their posters included a site plan showing where they sited their proposed idea, perspective sketches and elevations. The project concluded with the groups presenting their ideas to the class and to visitors.


Activities Include: Green space proposal Architectural drawings 3-D models Presentation posters Final presentations

Goals: Identifying BRCPS needs Succinct proposals Use of architectural drawing skills Translation of ideas into 2-D sketches Translation of 2-D sketches to 3-D models Articulate presentations


Design Project


The Urban Neighborhood Design Alliance is the pending not-for-profit arm of map-lab inc, a management, architecture, and planning laboratory located in Boston. UNDA encompasses educational programs originally supported through Historic Neighborhoods such as City/Build and Just Around the Corner. UNDA embodies the spirit and expands upon the vision of Historic Neighborhoods with new programs in sustainability, research, and urban design. map-lab, inc 21 Drydock Avenue, 7th fl Boston, MA

www.map-lab.com

office: 617. 426 . 5401

Just Around the Corner 2010  

The Just Around The Corner program gives city middle school students a new understanding of their school and home neighborhoods’ social and...

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