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the mirror Friday, Nov. 19, 2010

Volume 93, Number 38

uncm i r r o r . c o m

Look in The Mirr or Page 10

Bears beat Santa Clara

News Frequency of crime detailed The annual UNC Police Department report lists how many crime incidents took place. PAGE 8

Sports Men’s hoops bound for Vegas UNC men’s basketball team will par ticipate in Las Vegas Invitational this week. PAGE 10

Online Gear donations taken during drive Delta Tau Delta fraternity will accept critical supplies for a homeless shelter. Read at uncmirror.com

DAN OBLUDA | THE MIRROR

Juniors Lizzie England, left, and Jonna Leyrer look at items on display Thursday at the Great American Smoke Out in the University Center.

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Upcoming In Monday’s issue of The Mirror, read about a program that gives leftover dining hall food to charity.

SOURCE: WEATHER.COM

w w w. u n c m i r r o r. c o m C A M P U S N E W S . C O M M U N I T Y N E W S . Y O U R N E W S .


News

2 The Mirror

Friday, Nov. 19, 2010

Kits provided to tobacco users wanting to kick habit KRISTEN MARTIN news@uncmirror.com

Thousands of cigarette butts filled two three-gallon canisters on the table in the University Center as a visual aid from the Drug, Alcohol and Tobacco Education Program for Tobacco Awareness week. The “Great American Smoke Out” was hosted Thursday in the UC by the Center for Peer Education and DATE. Members of the groups were present to inform students and faculty members about the health and environmental hazards produced by cigarettes. The vast amount of cigarette butts took members of DATE a week to acquire, and not all of the designated smoking areas were visited. “What was really surprising

DAN OBLUDA | THE MIRROR

Lacie Grunsky, a sophomore human services major, looks at items on display at the Great American Smoke Out table sponsored by the Center for Peer Education in the University Center Thursday. were the smokers’ reactions,” said Jessica Ellis, a senior early childhood education major. “We told them what we were up to, and they even helped us pick them up. And all the while, they still stood there

and smoked.” Members of the two offices provided passersby with information and “quit kits” to help smokers and chewers to quit. “Our concept is if you can quit

smoking for one day, then you can quit for a lifetime,” Ellis said. In the UC dining hall, pamphlets sat on the tables with general information on the harmful effects of tobacco and the body’s healing process after quitting smoking. The pamphlets said after 20 minutes off tobacco, blood pressure, pulse rate and body temperature return to normal. After two weeks, circulation improves, walking becomes easier and lung function increases by 30 percent. Finally, 10 years after quitting smoking, the risk of lung cancer is that of a non-smoker. Ashley Frierson, a recent UNC graduate, said she found the event helpful. “I only smoke once or twice a month socially, but it is not worth it because of the statistic that one cigarette butt takes 25 years to fully decompose,” Frierson said.

Passers by said they came for various reasons, most commonly to receive information on quitting for them or a loved one. “My son is a chewer, and I got him a chewing ‘quit kit’ and brochure,” said Janice Beers, an associate in customer sales and services for the Wells Fargo bank in the UC. “I think he will find these helpful because an old friend of ours got throat cancer and lost enough teeth to get implants. I wish more students would stop at the table to talk about quitting.” Lizzie England, a junior speech and audiology major, said she thinks smoking is disgusting and intends to give a few quit kits to her friends because she is concerned about their future health. For more information on quitting smoking or chewing tobacco visit www.unco.edu/date.

Environmentally conscious program lets students swap apparel BRIDGETT WEAVER news@uncmirror.com

In an attempt to give old clothes a new life and simultaneously allow students to save money on new garb, UNC’s

Campus Recreation Center hosted its first Swap-O-Rama Wednesday in the CRC racquetball courts. Swap-O-Rama is a clothing exchange between University of Northern Colorado students. For every article of clothing a student

brings, they get to choose something new to go home with. “Everyone wants to save money,” said Jessica Weiderspon, a UNC graduate student pursuing her doctorate in exercise physiology. “It’s the holiday season, so everyone is trying to find gifts.” Weiderspon also said the goal of the swap was to create opportunities to re-use someone else’s clothes instead of letting them sit in a closet. She said swapping

with someone makes it easier to part with once-favored pieces of clothing because it will then get new use. “If we switch with each other, nothing gets wasted,” Weiderspon said. The Career Services office in the University Center was a drop-off location for students who wanted to swap clothing articles. Career services also donated professional clothing

to the cause. This was the first year for Swap-O-Rama and though the student turnout was smaller than organizers hoped for, Weiderspon said she thought it was very successful for its first time. All leftover clothing was donated to local thrift stores and women’s shelters.

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CASSIE NUCKOLS | THE MIRROR

Katie Wiseman, a first year graduate student, goes through shirts Thursday in the recreation center.


News

Friday, Nov. 19, 2010

The Mirror 3

Speaker discusses same-sex unions, gender DEVON NAPLES news@uncmirror.com

UNC’s Life of the Mind program hosted an event Wednesday in Kepner Hall for students interested in the legal rights and concerns of homosexual couples. The presentation, “Same Sex Marriage, Proposition 8, and Martha Nussbaum’s From Disgust to Humanity,” featured Mindy Barton, an advocate from the Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual and Transgender Community Center of Colorado. Barton, an attorney, has spent her career advocating for GLBT rights. Barton communicated how her experience with these cases has been a result of years of working with diverse groups of people at the GLBT Community Center and in her work for the American Civil Liberties Union. One of Barton’s initial statements was she does not make assumptions concerning sex or gender when meeting or addressing new people. She said she identifies as a woman and is comfortable with the pronoun “she.” She also said

When you’re talking about marriage between two people of opposite sexes, it’s called marriage, but when it’s between two people of the same sex, it’s samesex marriage.

— Mindy Barton, an advocate from the Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual and Transgender Communication Center of Colorado.

she provides this information almost every time she formally introduces herself. “I don’t make gender assumptions because I have no way of telling someone’s gender identity just by looking at them,” Barton said. The presentation included a brief history of homosexualcouple rights and explained the

logistics of civil unions/domestic partnerships and same-sex marriage, or “equal marriage,” a term Barton uses as a tool to counteract discrimination. “When you’re talking about marriage between two people of opposite sexes, it’s called marriage, but when it’s between two people of the same sex, it’s same-sex mar-

riage,” she said. “I say ‘equal marriage’ because that name communicates more clearly that it is equally legitimate.” One legal setback for proponents of equal marriage is the Defense of Marriage Act. The 1996 federal law defines marriage as a legal union between one man and one woman, and exempts states from honoring same-sex marriages performed in other states. Forty-two states have passed “mini-DOMAs,” manifestations of the flexibility state governments are given with regard to laws the federal government passes without the United States Constitution’s stipulated permission. Most of these mini-DOMAs define marriage as between one

man and one woman, and some proposals deny same-sex couples domestic partnerships and civil unions. Colorado’s 2006 Amendment 43 is what Barton calls a “good mini-DOMA” because it does not deny same-sex couples the opportunity to be legally recognized through civil unions. Barton said her priority is to see marriage between two people of the same sex legalized. Though the ban on same-sex marriage is widely supported, Barton said it defies the Due Process Clause and the Equal Protection Clause of the U.S. Constitution. “Marriage can have religious significance, but it is also a contract,” Barton said. “It is a civil right.”

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AMANDA NEIGES | THE MIRROR

Mindy Barton, an advocate from the GLBT Communication Center of Colorado, lectures to students Wednesday in Milne Auditorium in Kepner Hall. The discussion focused on gender identity and same-sex marriage.

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Editor: Eric Heinz

4 The Mirror

Friday, Nov. 19, 2010

LETTERS The Mirror appreciates your opinions. You can submit your columns or letters to the editor to editor@uncmirror.com. Columns can be no longer than 400 words. Include your name, year and major.

POLL This week’s poll question: Do you or your family celebrate Thanksgiving?

Cast your vote at www.uncmirror.com

Mirror Staff 2010-2011 KURT HINKLE | General Manager khinkle@uncmirror.com ERIC HEINZ | Editor editor@uncmirror.com BENJAMIN WELCH | News Editor news@uncmirror.com JORDAN FREEMYER | Sports Editor sports@uncmirror.com RUBY WHITE | Arts Editor arts@uncmirror.com MELANIE VASQUEZ | Visual Editor photo@uncmirror.com ERIC HIGGINS | Advertising Manager ads@uncmirror.com RYAN ANDERSON | Ad Production Manager adproduction@uncmirror.com

Text language may lead to de-evolution of English De-evolution of language has been occurring for hundreds of years. No longer do people speak in words of the King James Bible era such as “thee” and “sayeth.” Over the last few centuries, vernacular has changed to increase simplicity, utility and ease in speaking and writing. Though words have changed, proper grammar, sentence structure and intelligibility in writing has always existed. That is, at least, until the beginning of the 21st century, the dawn of the socalled information age. In the infancy of the social

The Mirror’s mission is to educate, inform and entertain the students, staff and faculty of the UNC community, and to educate the staff on the business of journalism in a college-newspaper environment.

About us The Mirror is published every Monday, Wednesday and Friday during the academic year by the Student Media Corp. It is printed by the Greeley Tribune. The first copy is free; additional copies are 50 cents each and must be purchased from The Mirror office.

alarming decrease in language capability? Laziness, over-population of the public education system and conformity to the poor standards of literacy on popular websites are all main culprits. In an online social realm where poor writing is accepted, students should take care to practice the correct style of writing to both keep themselves in shape for their classes and future careers and show their peers that being smart is anything but stupid. Wit out intervenshon, it !s 2 b xpected tht soon, all r readynqs w!ll b n a typ-set 2 dyffycult &&;; frustratin 2 evn comprehend.

Beloved warlock cause of widespread mental incapacitation Joanna LANGSTON

editor@uncmirror.com

Front Desk „ 970-392-9270 itizens of Greeley General Manager beware: Pottermania is „ 970-392-9286 upon us. I know many Newsroom of you are already surfing the surg„ 970-392-9341

Mission Statement

exclamation points instead of ‘I’s, and use a grossly inappropriate amount of Zs at the end of sentences, to name a very few. The future of the English language is in jeopardy. If history repeats itself, writing will slowly digress to three-word sentences separated by ellipses and phonetic spelling of all words in as few letters as possible. According to the American College Testing website, both English and reading ACT scores have dropped in recent years, with writing scores plummeting almost a full point since 2006. What is to be blamed for this

Mirror Reflections are the opinion of The Mirror’s editorial board: Jordan Freemyer, Eric Heinz, Melanie Vasquez, Benjamin Welch and Ruby White. Let us know what you think. E-mail us at editor@uncmirror.com.

Contact Us Advertising „ 970-392-9323 Editor „ 970-392-9327 Fax „ 970-392-9025

media explosion, users discovered the ability to create profiles with information about themselves, search the Internet for videos, pictures and information on nearly any subject they desired, and talk to complete strangers online in chat rooms. Seemingly over the last five years, the English language has been increasingly degraded. Gone are the days when the intellectuals griped about others typing with the caps lock key on or using text-speak, such as “U” for “you” and “2” for “to.” Today, Internet users substitute lowercase Qs for lowercase Gs, write

C

ing tidal wave of excitement, but I feel a word of caution is appropriate given the recent emergence of a little phenomenon I like to call “cult-crazed movie addiction.” Symptoms of this syndrome include delirious thoughts of belonging to a cast of a movie or of the fictional characters portrayed being existent in the actual, physical world outside of cinematography. This may sound irrelevant, but due to recent

reports of wacky fan behavior, including teens who bite each other’s necks in emulation of Twilight, I feel it would behoove you to quickly assess your mental fitness with the criteria that I have obligingly assembled for you. It is completely normal to be excited about Harry Potter; one should never feel guilty over liking something that is awesome, epic, captivating or any combination thereof. But, as a Harry Potter fan whose zealous thirst for cinematic realization will finally be quenched, you might want to abstain from these enumerated follies to ensure that your mind doesn’t become addled with frenzy. Harry Potter paraphernalia? Always classic. A couple pieces from Hogwarts can really make a statement in your wardrobe.

Handbags, shirts, watches, face towels, pajamas — whatever the economy thanks you for your frivolous purchases. But if you’re toting a wand around and whispering curses at people under your desk, chances are, you’re a crazy person. Overuse of wizarding vernacular. You know how if you’re white you should never use the N- word? Well its kind of the same with the M-words: muggle, mudblood, etc. It is usually acceptable to discuss these words in an objective way, but it is never supportable to use these words as an adjective for another person. And that pertains to people of all races. Fabricated wizarding words just aren’t applicable here in the factual world. Referring to the character Voldemort as “He-Who-Must-Not Be-Named” or referring to any character as if they were real.

Voldemort is not real. Fake people cannot be offended by use of the name. It is a law of physics. Fake people cannot be your friends. That’s another law. Lying, cheating, stealing, etc. in the name of procuring Potter tickets is strictly unethical. If the Harry Potter franchise has superseded your moral beliefs, your deity, and/or your drug of choice, you have a definite case of mania and should seek medical help. Those are the cardinal offenses; steer clear from these, and you’ll be well on your way to a pleasurable and invigorating viewing experience without being annoying to your fellow man. Happy movie watching. — Joanna Langston is a senior psychology major and an arts reporter for The Mirror.


News

Friday, Nov. 19, 2010

The Mirror 5

Professor works to halt extinction of bat species

To be or not to be extinct? This is the question Rick Adams, a UNC professor of biology, is asking. Adams said he has a passion for bats and their survival and has studied them and their nature since he was a child. At the University of Colorado, he organized a project with graduate students to conduct field research on bats. He said this was the moment he became “hooked” on bats. Bats have a life span of about 40 years, and Adams has found their reproduction has gone down, which means their population size is suffering. This is only one factor in their declining population. “Bat populations decline globally due to outright human killing, human destruction of global habitats and ecosystems, and human-caused changes in global climates,” Adams said. In New England, a European fungus has taken over caves and the bats within them. The fungus grows on the bats’ faces and then covers their bodies while they hibernate. This makes them wake up in the middle of their hibernation and burn off their food. Most of them starve to death. This is called white-nose syndrome

If you have fruit in your house, chances are those are the product of bat-pollinated plants. — Rick Adams, a UNC professor of biology and bat enthusiast.

and has been moving west at the rate of 800 miles a y e a r because of the bats’ m i g r a n t Rick Adams p a t t e r n s said human culand people ture relies on w h o bat existance for u n k n o w - sustainability. ingly transport it. Scientists are trying to figure out how to stop the spread of the fungus. One option being

considered is stopping people from going into certain caves and mines for a year. Adams said many people may not know is that bats are extremely essential to the environment. At night, bats consume billions of insects such as mosquitoes and other agricultural pests. Without their nightly feedings, the insect population would increase immensely. “The effects of this have been estimated in the billions of dollars for crop losses, increased spraying of pesticides and loss of tourist dollars from private and public parks

because people will not be able to deal with the increase in mosquitoes and other insects at night,” he said. Bats are also responsible for pollinating many species of plants humans use for food and the construction of many building materials. “If you have fruit in your house, chances are those are the product of bat-pollinated plants,” Adams said.

Adams said people are now witnessing the sixth mass extinction of bats on the planet, and this is the first time it is being induced by humans. He said scientists estimate three species go extinct every hour at any given location on earth because of habitat destruction, excessive hunting and species exploitation. “In a sense, it is not about bats; it’s about helping ourselves,” Adams said.

Create and solve your Sudoku puzzles for FRE E.

Play Sudoku and win prize s at:

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Sudoku rules: Fill all empty squares so the numbers 1 to 9 appear once in each row, column and 3x3 box. Some numbers are provided to give you a head start.

See solution to puzzle on Page 11

COURTESY OF UNC’S SCHOOL OF BIOLOGY | THE MIRROR

Rick Adams, a UNC professor of biology, holds a bat in a cave while on a nature expedition. Adams’ latest research is in the field of bat habitats and how they are facing possible extinction.

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The Mirror’s ‘Best of UNC’ 2010

6 The Mirror

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News

8 The Mirror

Friday, Nov. 19, 2010

Student Senate Update

Budget reviews conclude, grants receive new proposal CARMEN BRADY news@uncmirror.com Student Senate entered the second half of the Student Fee Allocation Process reviews of the 2009-10 budgets for the Drug, Alcohol, and Tobacco Education program; University Program Council; University Club Sports; UNC Student Radio; the Graduate Student Association; Student Senate and the Student Activities Office. Each organization had to review what its goals were last year, how they benefited students and how the money allocated by SFAP was used. After the presentations, mem-

bers of the Senate or students in attendance could ask for further details from the representatives of organizations. Benjamin Schiffelbein, director of Academic Affairs, opened a proposal to amend the Conference Grant Allocation process. Currently, undergraduates enrolled in at least 12 credit hours who have a 2.8 cumulative GPA and are approved by a Conference Grant committee are eligible to apply for retroactive funding for an academic conference. Schiffelbein proposed a change to the amendment to require students to be enrolled in one class credit hour, be in good

academic standing (2.0 GPA) with the university and be sponsored by a UNC professor, which would eliminate the need for a committee. Also, because all funding for academic conferences is retroactive, Schiffelbein proposed the student must request funding within the same academic year. Currently, it has to be within the academic year, and the student still has to be an undergraduate, but Schiffelbein argued that the student may be a graduate student when requesting funding even if they attended as an undergraduate. The proposal was met with approval, and Graduate Student

Association President Shanda Crowder said she thought lowering the credit requirements was a good idea because it provides non-traditional students with the ability to receive funding for conferences. Katelyn Elliot, director of Student Organizations, made a proposal to change the name of the Student Organizations Team to the Organization Funding Board and to make bylaw changes to help discern the way the SOT allots fees. Elliot said she is looking to implement changes by requiring clubs to submit their rosters on the third Friday of the semester, requiring a roster from chartered clubs and organizations and changing the hiring

process for the team members. Both proposals will enter second readings at the next Student Senate meeting on Wednesday. Student Rights Advocate Samantha Fox reported the Student Judiciary’s first meeting this Tuesday went well and they have clarified the grievance process for SOT funding. Fox said there are still two vacancies open on the Student Judiciary, and it has been decided the applications for the positions will be re-opened until Dec. 3 with the two spots officially announced by the end of January. Anyone interested in applying can access the application at www.unco.edu/studentsenate/rights_appeals.html.

Campus crime report published BENJAMIN WELCH news@uncmirror.com

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Though crime is low at UNC, students and faculty members have the opportunity to be informed of crime on campus through the recently released University of Northern Colorado Police Department’s “Annual Campus Security Report.” This report provides a rundown of crime occurrences on campus policies UNCPD is enacting to make the school safer. Each year, UNC reports its

crime statistics to the Uniform Crime Reports, a branch of the Federal Bureau of Investigation that collects data from police departments around the nation. It uses this information to publish statistics police departments and municipalities utilize to determine how they will distribute their funding and resources. In 2009, 445 incidents of crime were reported by UNCPD. This number is slightly higher than the number of occurrences in previous years. In 2008, 434 incidents were

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reported, with 419 in 2007. Rape, robbery, assault and arson are all crimes that have declined in numbers since last year. Theft-related crimes are the most prevalent on campus. Vehicle break-ins, bike, smallitem and backpack theft are the most common types of crime on college campuses. The UNCPD operates numerous security cameras that film high-risk areas, and suspects can be identified in case See Security, Page 12


Editor: Jordan Freemyer

Friday, Nov. 19, 2010

The Mirror 9

UNC football coaching search begins JORDAN FREEMYER sports@uncmirror.com

If it were up to former UNC quarterback Tom Beck, who led the program to a national championship in 1996, the team’s new head coach would be someone from the past. “There are a lot of good guys out there coaching with ties to UNC,” Beck said. “They can recruit Colorado and bring us back to a championship level.” Several former University of Northern Colorado players and assistant coaches are currently head coaches at smaller schools and could be candidates for the vacant head coaching position at UNC. Former UNC linebackers coach and defensive coordinator Jed Stugart is in his first season as head coach at the University of Sioux Falls in South Dakota. Stugart led the Cougars to a 10-0 record this season and the No. 1 seed in the NAIA playoffs.

Stugart was the linebackers coach at UNC from 1999-2002 before being promoted to defensive coordinator in 2003, staying in that position through the 2005 season. Alcorn State head Cody Deti c o a c h has been UNC’s E a r n e s t defensive coordiCollins was a nator for the past d e f e n s i v e five seasons. back at UNC from 1991-94 and holds the school record for punt return yards in a season. He was also the Bears’ secondary coach and special teams coordinator from 2000-02. Collins is in his second season as Alcorn’s head coach and has led the Braves, who are a Football Championship Subdivision team in the Southwestern Athletic Conference, to an 8-11 record following back-to-back two-win sea-

There are a lot of good guys out there coaching with ties to UNC. — former UNC quarterback Tom Beck, who won a national championship in 1996 sons for Alcorn under his predecessor. The Braves close their season Saturday against Jackson State. University of Wyoming defensive coordinator Marty English is a graduate of UNC and was an assistant coach for the Bears for 16 seasons under head coaches Joe Glenn and Kay Dalton. English joined Glenn at Wyoming in 2003 and has been there for eight seasons. “Marty English is a great guy,” said Andy Klatt, who played offensive line for the Bears from 199599. “He has a good rapport in the state with recruits.”

UNC’s current offensive and defensive coordinators, Greg Peterson and Cody Deti, will also likely be considered for the head coaching job. Beck said recruiting would be a key trait for Greg Peterson UNC’s next came to UNC from CSU as offensive head coach. “We need coordinator for the s o m e o n e 2010 season. that can recruit Colorado,” Beck said. Someone with ties to UNC and a track record of success in Colorado is Bob Stitt, the head coach at the Colorado School of Mines in Golden. Stitt is in his 11th season at Mines, a Division II program, and has a 76-48 career record with the Orediggers. The Orediggers never won more than three games in the seven seasons before Stitt’s arrival.

He earned his master’s degree from UNC in 1989. The Orediggers’ lowest scoring output this season was 19 against Colorado State University-Pueblo, a program in just its third year of existence. CSU-Pueblo is led by head coach John Wristen, who is 20-12 with the Thunderwolves in three seasons since the program was revived, and could be a good fit for UNC. Klatt said it will be crucial for the new coach to be able to generate support from the university and the community. “He needs to have the support of the administration, and he needs to have the support of the alumni,” Klatt said. Beck said that when looking for a head coach, one criterion should rise above all others: winning. “We need someone that can bring back the days we had in Division II,” Beck said. “We need to compete for Big Sky championships and get into the playoffs.”

Top wrestler declared ineligible for semester UNC wrestling coaches to face alma mater, No. 2 Boise State, in home-opening dual tonight BEN WARWICK sports@uncmirror.com

The UNC wrestling team faces a tough challenge when No. 2 Boise State comes to Butler-Hancock Sports Pavilion tonight. That challenge got a lot tougher now that senior Justin Gaethje, ranked No. 7 in the nation at 157 pounds, has been ruled ineligible for the match.

University of Northern Colorado head coach Ben Cherrington would not specify on his ineligibility, but he said Gaethje will not return to the team until the beginning of the spring semester. “Justin (Gaethje) won’t be wrestling,” Cherrington said. “He won’t be eligible until second semester. Otherwise (his match) would be critical.” Gaethje would have wrestled

They taught us a lot of things when we were up there. It’s fun to compete against them. The students become the teachers a little bit.

— UNC head wrestling coach Ben Cherrington against Boise State senior Adam Hall, the nation’s top-ranked 157-pounder. Cherrington and his two assistant coaches, Ben VomBaur and Nate Lee, all

graduated from Boise State. He said the coaches look forward to competing against their former team, one they said they have a lot of respect for. “I would say it’s exciting,”

Cherrington said. “Those guys up there are great guys, great coaches. They taught all of us a lot of things when we were up there. It’s fun to compete against them. The students become the teachers a little bit.” Cherrington won two Pacific-10 Conference championships as a Bronco. One was at See Wrestlng, Page 11


Sports

10 The Mirror

Friday, Nov. 19, 2010

Women’s hoops survives comeback attempt PARKER COTTON sports@uncmirror.com

If you look up the word resilient in the dictionary, you might see a picture of the UNC women’s basketball team during its 65-57 win over Santa Clara on Wednesday at ButlerHancock Sports Pavilion. The University of Northern Colorado (2-1) held a 33-21 lead at halftime and survived a second half run by the Broncos (02) to win its second game of the young season. “We kind of felt it slipping away when they were getting it inside,” head coach Jaime White said. “I don’t feel like we got the shots that we wanted. For us to fight back and then push ahead is huge because I don’t even know if last year’s team could have done that.” Santa Clara went on a 22-10 run in the second half to tie the game at 43 with 12 minutes to play. After UNC sophomore forward Lauren Oosdyke hit a jumper and the Broncos added a free throw, the Bears pulled

HEATHER SAVINO | THE MIRROR

UNC freshman guard D’shara Strange drives the ball in the Bears’ 65-57 win over Santa Clara Wednesday. Strange had 16 points, five steals and six rebounds in the game. away for good as Santa Clara never got closer than three points the rest of the game. It was a coming-out party of

sorts for freshman guard D’shara Strange, who tied for a team-high 16 points on 6-for-11 shooting in addition to five

steals and six rebounds. “Tonight, she looked really good,” White said. “Tonight, I thought she really played the way we thought she could.” The opening minutes of the game were marred with turnovers by both teams, but the Bears got things together, and Strange made her presence known as she led the team with 12 points at intermission. “We came out with intensity, and that’s how we got our lead,” Strange said. “I think the past few games, I haven’t been playing so well, so I came out and I played hard.” UNC went on a 19-10 run in the last nine minutes of the half. Junior guard Kaisha Brown nailed three 3-pointers in the first half and finished the game with 16 points. Brown also became the 13th player in school history with 100 career 3-pointers. Before UNC regained the lead, it looked as if the Bears were going to have a repeat of last Friday’s performance when they lost a seven-point lead in

the final two minutes and eventually lost to South Dakota in overtime. “We didn’t want to do that again,” said senior guard Courtney Stoermer, who finished with 12 points. “We knew we needed to settle down and take smart shots and have confidence we could pull out a win.” The Bears will take to the road to face Central Michigan in the Hawkeye Challenge at 1:30 p.m. Saturday in Iowa City, Iowa. UNC 65 SCU 57 Team SCU UNC

Scoring by halfˇ 1 2 21 36 33 32

Final 57 65

UNC Totals: 23-52 15-22 65. Oosdyke, Lauren 4-14 1-4 9; Brown, Kaisha 5-9 3-4 16; Fernandez, Brittany 1-1 0-0 2; Strange,D’shara 6-11 3-3 16; Stoermer, Courtney 3-7 6-7 12;Marin, Amy 1-1 2-4 4; Hess, Kirsten 0-0 0-0 0; Timm, Victoria 3-6 0-0 6; Lockridge, Kim 0-1 0-0 0; Strand, Jayne 0-2 0-0 0.

SCU Totals: 18-50 14-23 57. Gipson, Lena 4-10 5-8 13; Leo, Lindsay 4-5 4-5 12; Fulps, Meagan 1-12 2-4 4; Shoji, Alyssa 5-11 2-2 16; Anderson, Telisha 1-3 1-2 3; Radanovich, Ricki 3-8 0-0 9; Willinsky, Kathy 0-1 0-0 0; Armstrong, Ashley 0-0 0-2 0.

Bears prepare for Invitational SAMANTHA FOX sports@uncmirror.com

FILE PHOTO | THE MIRROR

UNC senior forward Chris Kaba drives past sophomore guard Mike Bedford in a practice earlier this season. The Bears will face Arizona on Sunday to kick off the Las Vegas Invitational.

While most students are impatiently waiting for Thanksgiving break, the UNC men’s basketball team is getting ready to hit the road for Men’s Basketball the Las Vegas Invitational. The Invitational is made up of eight teams, including

Kansas (2-0), which is currently ranked No. 7 in the nation in the latest Associated Press poll. The University of Northern Colorado (2-0) will face Arizona (1-1) at 3 p.m. Sunday to kick off the Invitational. “Playing against better players, you really got to stay focused,” senior guard Devon Beitzel said. “You got to come ready to go; if you’re not, it’s going to be a long night.” One key area of focus for UNC will be playing consistent-

ly for the entire game. In the past two games, the Bears have had moments of great play, taking 27 and 28-point leads in the first half of each game, but they have also allowed opponents to gain momentum, especially after halftime. “I think we’ve played great in spurts, but we haven’t put it together a full 40 minutes,” head coach B.J. Hill said. The Invitational will be used See Invitational, Page 11


Friday, Nov. 19, 2010

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Men to play over break Invitational from Page 10 as a tool to practice, gain experience and possibly playing time for some of the bench players, especially freshman guard Paul Garnica and redshirt freshman forward Emmanuel Addo. After facing Arizona, the Bears are scheduled to play at Santa Clara University (1-1) Tuesday and Valparaiso on Nov. 26 in Las Vegas. UNC will play either Bethune-Cookman or Texas A&M-Corpus Christi on Nov. 27, also in Las Vegas. “I think we need to get all of our players, other than our starting five or our first six; I think we need to get our seventh and eighth guys more

incorporated in our games,” senior forward Neal Kingman said. “What you take away from those tournaments is what you come back to your home court to work on.” Some of the bench players might see more time on the court in the Invitational, but Hill said chances start in practice. “They need to earn my trust everyday in practice. That’s how they’re going to get more playing time during games,” Hill said. Growing as a team is one key component Hill wants to stress during the Invitational. “It will be a great week for us team chemistry wise,” Hill said. “Get away from Greeley,

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and be together as a unit for an extended period of time.”

Las Vegas Invitational Schedule: Sunday at Arizona Tuesday at Santa Clara Nov. 26 vs. Valparaiso (Las Vegas) Nov. 27 vs. BethuneCookman or Texas A&MCorpus Christi (Las Vegas)

Hard

Sudoku from Page 5

Wanted

The Mirror 11

1 7 4 9 8 3 2 6 5

3 6 8 5 2 4 1 9 7

5 2 9 7 6 1 3 4 8

7 4 2 3 5 8 6 1 9

8 5 1 4 9 6 7 2 3

6 9 3 1 7 2 8 5 4

2 1 7 8 4 5 9 3 6

9 3 5 6 1 7 4 8 2

4 8 6 2 3 9 5 7 1

Bears to face highly-ranked Broncos without top wrestler Wrestling from Page 9 the 149-pound level as a junior in 2005, and the other was as a senior at 157 pounds in 2006. Cherrington also won the national championship at 157 pounds as a senior. First-year assistant Nate Lee also wrestled for Boise State, winning two Pac-10 conference championships and finished his career with an 82-32 record and with a No. 18 ranking as a senior last season. VomBaur was a two-time allAmerican at Boise State and finished fourth in the NCAA Tournament in 2002 and sixth in 2003. He also won Pac-10 championships in 2001 and 2003. He is also in his first season as an assis-

tant at UNC. Though they won’t have their premier wrestler, the team said it is ready to go. Lee said Boise State is tough but will provide a good barometer for the Bears. The dual against Boise State begins at 6 p.m. at Butler-Hancock Sports Pavilion. The Broncos will also participate in the Old Chicago Open on Saturday. “Boise State is a good measuring tool for us to see where we’re at,” Lee said. “Every single guy they put out on the mat is going to wrestle tough and come after us. I’m anxious to see how our guys do against such an aggressive style of wrestling.”

serving UNC since 1919 uncmir ror.com


News

12 The Mirror

Friday, Nov. 19, 2010

Annual report details number of security incidents on campus Security from Page 8

of an incident. In 2009, 197 thefts were reported to UNCPD, an increase of 30 incidents since 2008. Harassment is another big crime issue. Crimes against persons include any crime that directly affect persons rather than property and includes unwanted phone calls, physical contact and offensive altercations. In the last three years, a homicide has not been committed. Last year, one case of rape was reported, bringing the total to seven since 2007. Vandalism is also a common

crime committed on campus. In 2009, police responded to 220 property crimes, many of which were related to alcohol consumption. Commander Dennis Pumphrey, the assistant police chief at UNCPD, said crime and security issues are something all students should be aware of. He said UNC is a school with minimal exposure to serious crimes relative to other universities. Pumphrey said alcohol is not normally related to larceny because theft is usually a more thought-out process. Vandalism, fights and person crimes are frequently committed by those who are drinking because people

under the influence routinely make socially bad decisions. If alcohol is going to be consumed, Pumphrey said he advises students to put a plan in place to keep themselves and others safe. He also said students should not experiment with random drugs and compromise safety. “UNC is very security-conscience, and the UNCPD does an excellent job,” said Alan Price, a professor of criminal justice and program director for the Southern Institute of Forensic Science. Colleen Fitzpatrick, a professor of criminal justice, said the UNCPD and the Greeley Police Department

In recent years, UNCPD has taken measures to increase safety around the school, including the utilization of prominent emergency dispatch boxes, increased lighting along sidewalks and in parking lots, and increasing crime prevention programs. Pumphrey said students should report suspicious activity and that it is better for UNCPD to investigate a situation and prevent crime than have to react to it after it is committed. Price offered similar advice to students about being vigilant. “Be observant of the fellow student next to you and your environment,” Price said.

communicate closely with each other, especially in neighborhoods around campus that are outside of UNCPD’s jurisdiction. Though crime is inevitable, measures can be taken to make students less susceptible to becoming a victim. “The primary thing students can do is be observant,” Pumphrey said. “I know that’s a difficult thing to do because most people are wrapped up in their own lives ,and they don’t necessarily pay attention to anything beyond their immediate sphere of influence. But if you’re walking across campus, and you see something suspicious we’d like you to give us a call.”

Number of incidents of most common crimes reported at UNC from 2007-09 Property

Larceny/Theft

Burglary

250 178

150

220

213

207

200

197 163

100 50 Year:

43 23

25

2007

2008

2009

INFORMATION COURTESY OF UNCPD | THE MIRROR

Statistics show the rate of crime occurences on the UNC campus.

The Mirror - Friday, Nov. 19, 2010  

This is the electronic version of The Mirror's Nov. 19, 2010 edition

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