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Uncharted Volume 2, Issue 1

Under the Skin A photo story explores the art of tattoos

Sweet Living HeARTs for Haiti

Using the power of art to help those in Haiti

Pastry Chef Camille Cogswell turns Hinton James into a confectionery


a letter from the editor. Art is important! Ok, so you’re not completely shocked to hear that from the editor of an arts magazine. But at Uncharted we believe that everyone should realize the value of art. Art is accessible to everyone, and we want everyone to appreciate it. In this issue we include articles that show how you can appreciate art in everyday ways, through food, or crafts or tattoos. But art is especially important in times of hardship as a way to heal and to appreciate life. Although the economy has made life hard for many Americans, we are so fortunate compared to others who have faced complete disaster in places such as Haiti or Chile. We must not forget art in hard times because it can help us get through them. Uncharted has faced its fair share of hardships this year, both personal and economic, but our love of art and our love for this magazine have allowed us to overcome difficulties and put this issue together. So I hope you enjoy this issue and that you realize that art can be found in any situation, mundane or dramatic, and that everyone’s life is made better by adding a little art.

Uncharted.

4

HeARTs for Haiti

Rebecca Collins Editor-in-Chief

6

Under the Skin photo story

Jessica Shorland Managing Editor

10 View From the Audience

Nicole Yang Design Editor Sarah Riazati Web Designer

Stephanie Bullins Daniel Byrnes Kathryn Carlson Chelsea Gabardine

16 Lexicon photo story

writer, copy editor writer photographer public relations

Trey Green

writer, design

Geoff Kelly

photographer

Heejoo Park Caitlin Vargas

Rebecca Collins Editor-in-Chief Uncharted Magazine

14 Sweet Living

writer public relations

Columns: What Makes Art, Art?

18

Let Them Make Crafts 20 Get Cultured!

22


a letter from the editor. Art is important! Ok, so you’re not completely shocked to hear that from the editor of an arts magazine. But at Uncharted we believe that everyone should realize the value of art. Art is accessible to everyone, and we want everyone to appreciate it. In this issue we include articles that show how you can appreciate art in everyday ways, through food, or crafts or tattoos. But art is especially important in times of hardship as a way to heal and to appreciate life. Although the economy has made life hard for many Americans, we are so fortunate compared to others who have faced complete disaster in places such as Haiti or Chile. We must not forget art in hard times because it can help us get through them. Uncharted has faced its fair share of hardships this year, both personal and economic, but our love of art and our love for this magazine have allowed us to overcome difficulties and put this issue together. So I hope you enjoy this issue and that you realize that art can be found in any situation, mundane or dramatic, and that everyone’s life is made better by adding a little art.

Uncharted.

4

HeARTs for Haiti

Rebecca Collins Editor-in-Chief

6

Under the Skin photo story

Jessica Shorland Managing Editor

10 View From the Audience

Nicole Yang Design Editor Sarah Riazati Web Designer

Stephanie Bullins Daniel Byrnes Kathryn Carlson Chelsea Gabardine

16 Lexicon photo story

writer, copy editor writer photographer public relations

Trey Green

writer, design

Geoff Kelly

photographer

Heejoo Park Caitlin Vargas

Rebecca Collins Editor-in-Chief Uncharted Magazine

14 Sweet Living

writer public relations

Columns: What Makes Art, Art?

18

Let Them Make Crafts 20 Get Cultured!

22


Heeled

HeARTs for Haiti

By Heejoo Park The 7.0 magnitude earthquake that shook Haiti January 12 ended the lives of approximately 100,000 people. According to the U.N., more than 3 million people were severely affected by the earthquake. Port-au-Prince, the capital of Haiti, is still rubble after one month and hearts are broken everywhere. The earthquake not only caused physical destruction but also psychological damage to the survivors and those affected around the world. Children are especially susceptible to sustained shock from the earthquake, as well as the diseases caused by poor sanitation. UNICEF is in the process of immunizing the children; however, healing their hearts will require more. Heeled HeARTs for Haiti, part of the UNC Haiti Disaster Relief, seeks to raise money and send relief in a creative way. Those who donate can also request a piece of artwork from the artists who are participating in this fundraiser. The artists’ styles include cartoons, photography, religious and detailed arts, poetry, tarot, and stylized line arts. The project celebrates the healing power of art by using it to help Haitians.

...

Worthia Yem, a sophomore, came up with the idea. He and five other artists — Caroline Johnson, Joe Morton, Charlene Joy Ruiz, Chingching Chen, and Anna Shelton — contributed to the project. The artists have used their unique strengths to their advantages. Chen contributed to the project by giving tarot card readings which has been one of the most successful fundraisers. Johnson, a sophomore environmental studies major, set up the Facebook event for the project. “[Yem] is so good at making comics and he wanted to help Haiti using his artistic abilities. I thought it was a fantastic idea, so I agreed to help,” Johnson said. Heeled HeARTs for Haiti started January 26. By January 31, more than 160 people had joined the Facebook event. Donors were excited to help children in Haiti as well as have artwork made by request. Overall the contributing artists feel the project has been a success. “We definitely made a real difference!” Johnson said. “Even if only a few people participate in the end, this has been a major success because it shows other students that everyone can help even if they don’t have a lot of money to give.”

...

A Valentine’s Day card by Worthia Yem

4

Photos by Heejoo Parks

Art inspired by victims of the earthquake by Worthia Yem

5


Heeled

HeARTs for Haiti

By Heejoo Park The 7.0 magnitude earthquake that shook Haiti January 12 ended the lives of approximately 100,000 people. According to the U.N., more than 3 million people were severely affected by the earthquake. Port-au-Prince, the capital of Haiti, is still rubble after one month and hearts are broken everywhere. The earthquake not only caused physical destruction but also psychological damage to the survivors and those affected around the world. Children are especially susceptible to sustained shock from the earthquake, as well as the diseases caused by poor sanitation. UNICEF is in the process of immunizing the children; however, healing their hearts will require more. Heeled HeARTs for Haiti, part of the UNC Haiti Disaster Relief, seeks to raise money and send relief in a creative way. Those who donate can also request a piece of artwork from the artists who are participating in this fundraiser. The artists’ styles include cartoons, photography, religious and detailed arts, poetry, tarot, and stylized line arts. The project celebrates the healing power of art by using it to help Haitians.

...

Worthia Yem, a sophomore, came up with the idea. He and five other artists — Caroline Johnson, Joe Morton, Charlene Joy Ruiz, Chingching Chen, and Anna Shelton — contributed to the project. The artists have used their unique strengths to their advantages. Chen contributed to the project by giving tarot card readings which has been one of the most successful fundraisers. Johnson, a sophomore environmental studies major, set up the Facebook event for the project. “[Yem] is so good at making comics and he wanted to help Haiti using his artistic abilities. I thought it was a fantastic idea, so I agreed to help,” Johnson said. Heeled HeARTs for Haiti started January 26. By January 31, more than 160 people had joined the Facebook event. Donors were excited to help children in Haiti as well as have artwork made by request. Overall the contributing artists feel the project has been a success. “We definitely made a real difference!” Johnson said. “Even if only a few people participate in the end, this has been a major success because it shows other students that everyone can help even if they don’t have a lot of money to give.”

...

A Valentine’s Day card by Worthia Yem

4

Photos by Heejoo Parks

Art inspired by victims of the earthquake by Worthia Yem

5


Under the

skin

Chauncey Bruton "Me and my mom used to say the serenity prayer every morning before she dropped me off for school, but I didn't really understand it. Last year, I went through a really rough break up and I was unsure how to handle it. Then I thought back on this prayer and realized there are some things that I can't change and if I could, I wanted God to show me the way."

Photo story by Kathryn Carlson

Anonymous "I was never the girl who wanted a tattoo to be small and delicate on my body — because then what's the point in even getting one? I chose a tree because, in my opinion, there is nothing more beautiful than a tree in the spring. It reminds me to see beauty of life in everything, no matter what."

6

Mike (tattoo artist at Glenn’s Tattoo Parlor in Carrboro) “I like weird tattoos.”

7


Under the

skin

Chauncey Bruton "Me and my mom used to say the serenity prayer every morning before she dropped me off for school, but I didn't really understand it. Last year, I went through a really rough break up and I was unsure how to handle it. Then I thought back on this prayer and realized there are some things that I can't change and if I could, I wanted God to show me the way."

Photo story by Kathryn Carlson

Anonymous "I was never the girl who wanted a tattoo to be small and delicate on my body — because then what's the point in even getting one? I chose a tree because, in my opinion, there is nothing more beautiful than a tree in the spring. It reminds me to see beauty of life in everything, no matter what."

6

Mike (tattoo artist at Glenn’s Tattoo Parlor in Carrboro) “I like weird tattoos.”

7


Michael Clemmons “Something like three years ago, I was going through a fairly transformative part of my life where I was traveling and getting involved in community projects. It was at a community low-fi radio project that I hit it off with a person named Pecan. We ended up spending the next month together, laying out future plans and different ideas to transform communication infrastructure. Near the end of our time together we ended up getting this tattoo as a promise to ourselves to maintain those goals.�

Dipa Desai "I got a question mark because Life, or at least my life, is uncertain. For me, things have always been up in the air, so to speak, a mystery: It is a personal symbol. But on another plane, it's a reminder for myself and to others who see it peeking out to constantly question the changing world, and to never be deceived by the promise of constancy."

Minesh Patel "I got an Om tattoo- a common sign for Hinduism and its philosophy and theology- because it is a very meaningful symbol in my life."

8

Michael Clemmons "The computer pointer was a stick and poke (self-done) and since I am a computer nerd I personally thought it would be cool."

9


Michael Clemmons “Something like three years ago, I was going through a fairly transformative part of my life where I was traveling and getting involved in community projects. It was at a community low-fi radio project that I hit it off with a person named Pecan. We ended up spending the next month together, laying out future plans and different ideas to transform communication infrastructure. Near the end of our time together we ended up getting this tattoo as a promise to ourselves to maintain those goals.�

Dipa Desai "I got a question mark because Life, or at least my life, is uncertain. For me, things have always been up in the air, so to speak, a mystery: It is a personal symbol. But on another plane, it's a reminder for myself and to others who see it peeking out to constantly question the changing world, and to never be deceived by the promise of constancy."

Minesh Patel "I got an Om tattoo- a common sign for Hinduism and its philosophy and theology- because it is a very meaningful symbol in my life."

8

Michael Clemmons "The computer pointer was a stick and poke (self-done) and since I am a computer nerd I personally thought it would be cool."

9


a

What are you doing now?

View Audience from the

Danny Cameron’s local and international commitment to supporting the arts

By Stephanie Bullins

If you’ve ever been to Cameron’s in University Mall, you’ve probably seen the quirky shrine on the top floor. It’s filled with random objects — everything from mock Egyptian art to Reptar toys — and the faint sound of “Always Look on the Bright Side of Life” follows you even after you leave through the beaded curtain. But few people know how the shrine came about — and who is this Esther Carp woman who seems to be responsible for all of this anyway? Danny Cameron, the original owner of the store — opened in 1977 — sat down with Uncharted to explain the mystery once and for all. Cameron, who graduated from UNC in 1973, now lives in San Miguel, Mexico. A theater junkie, Cameron still continues to support the arts, just as he did locally for decades.

10

I started doing my own artwork about five years ago and so I’m busy doing my own art, learning Spanish three school days a week. People ask me, “What do you do all day?” I get up usually at 7:30 and the next thing I know, it’s bedtime and I’ve been busy all day. I’ve got a really good group of friends, both Mexicans and Americans. I’m just enjoying life, to be honest. You worked as the Executive Producer at Iguana Productions. What all did you do? That really means I was the fundraiser. I’ve been given a lot more credit than I deserve. They basically came to me and said, “This is a production we want to do. Would you like to help?” And it’s great for San Miguel. One of the things I really miss there is theater. It’s a big retirement community and the little theater we have, when I go to it — it’s like something you’d see in a little retirement village where anyone can play a part. So Iguana is definitely a first-class production. Do you still work with the group? No. No, I’m supportive of them but I’m not involved with them. But actually Little Green Theater — it’s a theater company in Durham — and Jay O’Berski – I’ve known him for, god, 20 years now — he’s bringing 14 to 16 people to San Miguel this summer to do a production so I am really involved in that. We’re going to actually do it in my house. So I’m really excited that they’re coming. The play they’re going to do is a funny play. We’re going to have a little more than 30 friends each night — it’ll be up close and personal.

Photo courtesy of camerons-gallery.com

You also wrote for the Independent Weekly, didn’t you? I wrote an advice column called “Ask Esther” and I did that for eight years. It was a lot of fun. Is that where the Esther Carp at Cameron’s came from? No, actually, it all started that I did a cartoon strip with our ads by Esther Carp. Then we had the café — Esther Carp’s Café Deluxe — and when I had the café I would write as her. And then I was writing ads in the Independent that were sort of ramblings of Esther’s. And that was where one of their ad reps asked me if I’d be interested. So what kind of advice did you offer people?

Well, I only used real questions. And I would say that 80 percent of the questions had to do with relationship advice. We covered everything — there was no topic we didn’t. And the great thing about the IndeI read in an article in the Independent Week- pendent is I turned it in ready. There was never any ly that you like to be involved in theater but editing, never that many rules, so we could deal with any issue, and I did. It was fun. It’s a great paper. And only from the audience. when Esther started, it was really to be more like a Definitely. I’ve helped them with fundraising — that’s cartoon in the classifieds, and we were really all surprobably the primary way — and helped with word prised that she ended up having the following that of mouth, just being enthusiastic, or hopefully having she did. I think the paper was surprised — I was surenthusiastic audience members, just telling friends prised, and that made it a lot more fun for me. about productions that they shouldn’t miss. Do you have any particular memories from the column? So have you ever been in any shows? Never and never will be. I can guarantee that. I know my weaknesses.

There was one funny one about a lesbian wedding and they wanted to know — I can’t remember what

11


a

What are you doing now?

View Audience from the

Danny Cameron’s local and international commitment to supporting the arts

By Stephanie Bullins

If you’ve ever been to Cameron’s in University Mall, you’ve probably seen the quirky shrine on the top floor. It’s filled with random objects — everything from mock Egyptian art to Reptar toys — and the faint sound of “Always Look on the Bright Side of Life” follows you even after you leave through the beaded curtain. But few people know how the shrine came about — and who is this Esther Carp woman who seems to be responsible for all of this anyway? Danny Cameron, the original owner of the store — opened in 1977 — sat down with Uncharted to explain the mystery once and for all. Cameron, who graduated from UNC in 1973, now lives in San Miguel, Mexico. A theater junkie, Cameron still continues to support the arts, just as he did locally for decades.

10

I started doing my own artwork about five years ago and so I’m busy doing my own art, learning Spanish three school days a week. People ask me, “What do you do all day?” I get up usually at 7:30 and the next thing I know, it’s bedtime and I’ve been busy all day. I’ve got a really good group of friends, both Mexicans and Americans. I’m just enjoying life, to be honest. You worked as the Executive Producer at Iguana Productions. What all did you do? That really means I was the fundraiser. I’ve been given a lot more credit than I deserve. They basically came to me and said, “This is a production we want to do. Would you like to help?” And it’s great for San Miguel. One of the things I really miss there is theater. It’s a big retirement community and the little theater we have, when I go to it — it’s like something you’d see in a little retirement village where anyone can play a part. So Iguana is definitely a first-class production. Do you still work with the group? No. No, I’m supportive of them but I’m not involved with them. But actually Little Green Theater — it’s a theater company in Durham — and Jay O’Berski – I’ve known him for, god, 20 years now — he’s bringing 14 to 16 people to San Miguel this summer to do a production so I am really involved in that. We’re going to actually do it in my house. So I’m really excited that they’re coming. The play they’re going to do is a funny play. We’re going to have a little more than 30 friends each night — it’ll be up close and personal.

Photo courtesy of camerons-gallery.com

You also wrote for the Independent Weekly, didn’t you? I wrote an advice column called “Ask Esther” and I did that for eight years. It was a lot of fun. Is that where the Esther Carp at Cameron’s came from? No, actually, it all started that I did a cartoon strip with our ads by Esther Carp. Then we had the café — Esther Carp’s Café Deluxe — and when I had the café I would write as her. And then I was writing ads in the Independent that were sort of ramblings of Esther’s. And that was where one of their ad reps asked me if I’d be interested. So what kind of advice did you offer people?

Well, I only used real questions. And I would say that 80 percent of the questions had to do with relationship advice. We covered everything — there was no topic we didn’t. And the great thing about the IndeI read in an article in the Independent Week- pendent is I turned it in ready. There was never any ly that you like to be involved in theater but editing, never that many rules, so we could deal with any issue, and I did. It was fun. It’s a great paper. And only from the audience. when Esther started, it was really to be more like a Definitely. I’ve helped them with fundraising — that’s cartoon in the classifieds, and we were really all surprobably the primary way — and helped with word prised that she ended up having the following that of mouth, just being enthusiastic, or hopefully having she did. I think the paper was surprised — I was surenthusiastic audience members, just telling friends prised, and that made it a lot more fun for me. about productions that they shouldn’t miss. Do you have any particular memories from the column? So have you ever been in any shows? Never and never will be. I can guarantee that. I know my weaknesses.

There was one funny one about a lesbian wedding and they wanted to know — I can’t remember what

11


the original question was — but whatever it was, Esther was saying, “This isn’t the problem. The problem is you have two mothers of brides and you’ve gotta stake out your dress color early.” And what happened is that through the years the questions became more and more serious, which was also a surprise. And I actually enjoyed dealing with the serious questions. I like that Esther’s kind of humorous — so she could kind of lay it on the line with humor — but basically she would give good advice.

proached the store like putting on a show every day. So I was trying to think of something to do for the millennium and I don’t how I landed on that idea. But it was a big hit and it was a lot of fun. One thing that was fun about that is we put an announcement out but we didn’t promote it, so people would just sort of happen on it and then they’d step in it and it’s like, “What is this? These people are crazy.”

I’ll tell you another thing I did. I can’t remember the question, but she mixed up Universalists with — what are Moonies? Unificationists. Anyway, she referred to the Universalists as Moonies and I got this really funny letter from the minister of the Universalist church. So then the next week she did a really funny thing about how stupid she was. And everybody kind of joined in on the fun with her. People — a lot of people — most people — didn’t know I was Esther. Even people who did, they’d come to the store and say, “Are you Esther?” “Well, I know her. She’s a friend of mine.” They’d even ask if Esther was available for a conference and I never, never said, “I’m Esther.” And everyone kind of played along.

When I first started the store, I had no art background at all either — no art history, no studio art — so luckily, right after I opened the store, I went to the first American Craft Council wholesale market. It

What all did you initially sell there?

was their first year. And that’s where I just found work from all over the country. In those days, there were a lot more potters than there are now. So I was finding work, right from the start, from all over the country. Initially people wondered, “Why do you have work from California and New York when you have artists here?” and I was surprised that I got a little bit of flack for that. But mainly what I realized really quickly was that I had a definite eye for what I like and, luckily, pretty quickly had a clientele that seemed to like what I like. But I really dove in not knowing what I was doing. The first year I’d get a letter from my accountant every month saying he thought I should close and cut my losses. You said you majored in business — how did you get interested in the arts? I worked in retail from the time I was 13 so it was really more from a love of retail. I knew I wanted my own business and I wanted a retail store. I traveled around and saw other galleries so that’s where I got the idea. When we first opened we were called Cameron’s Craft Gallery. And then we changed to Cameron’s when we moved to where we are now.

Where did you come up with the pseudonym?

Where did your love of retail come from?

There’s a play called “Greater Tuna” and one of my favorite characters is Vera Carp. And I don’t know how it came up as Esther Carp, but that’s where Carp came from anyway.

Well, as a kid, I used to love playing store — I mean, as a little kid — I’d take all the canned vegetables and line them up and had a little cash register. I was probably five or six, playing grocery store. And then when I was 13, I got a job at a pet store — mostly cleaning out cages but I could work the cash register. There was just something I loved about retail. And then in high school, I worked in a clothing store. So I don’t know — I just like working with the public. Also, I can’t sit still so I couldn’t have an office job. I would go crazy if I had to stay in an office. With the store, I could always be running here and there and running down the mall and traveling a lot to do the buying.

So how did the little shrine upstairs at Cameron’s come into being? That came about because the millennium was approaching and, going back to theater, I’ve always seen the store like theater, so I ap-

12

“I approached the store like putting on a show every day.”

Photos by Stephanie Bullins

That’s one thing I miss. I would go to New York and probably spend four weeks out the year there. How did your passion for theater develop? It was a combination — I remember vividly seeing the first performance that Jay O’Berski was in and they did it at Brightleaf Square in one of the empty spaces. I don’t remember what the play was but I remember just going, “Oh my god, this is incredible.” So from that point on I kind of discovered Manbites Dog, Jay O’Berski, and made a point to see everything I could. And when I go to New York, my typical thing is to see eight plays in six days. I love eating out but eating out at restaurants is not what I do when I go to New York. I just cram in everything I can. I just find it really fascinating when acting is really good and they’re just live and in front of you and believable characters. I’m just amazed — like, “How could they do that?” Especially, I love little small theaters like Manbites or Deep Dish. To me, that’s really amazing when it’s not all about props and costumes but the acting is just so good that you’re drawn in. Do you have any particularly fond memories of your time at UNC? I have four years worth. I was here during the Vietnam days so there are memories about peace marches and when we shut down the University. And then, in contrast to that, I was Sigma Nu and it was like Animal House — smoking pot and being wild and crazy. But I’m really glad I was here in those years. There was so much turmoil. I come from this little conservative town and immediately I’m in this liberal oasis. I was aware of what a sheltered life I had lived in some ways, politically. I’m glad I was here. That’s why I stay here. I do miss living in a university area. You know, there’s just an energy from all these young people. I miss that.

13


the original question was — but whatever it was, Esther was saying, “This isn’t the problem. The problem is you have two mothers of brides and you’ve gotta stake out your dress color early.” And what happened is that through the years the questions became more and more serious, which was also a surprise. And I actually enjoyed dealing with the serious questions. I like that Esther’s kind of humorous — so she could kind of lay it on the line with humor — but basically she would give good advice.

proached the store like putting on a show every day. So I was trying to think of something to do for the millennium and I don’t how I landed on that idea. But it was a big hit and it was a lot of fun. One thing that was fun about that is we put an announcement out but we didn’t promote it, so people would just sort of happen on it and then they’d step in it and it’s like, “What is this? These people are crazy.”

I’ll tell you another thing I did. I can’t remember the question, but she mixed up Universalists with — what are Moonies? Unificationists. Anyway, she referred to the Universalists as Moonies and I got this really funny letter from the minister of the Universalist church. So then the next week she did a really funny thing about how stupid she was. And everybody kind of joined in on the fun with her. People — a lot of people — most people — didn’t know I was Esther. Even people who did, they’d come to the store and say, “Are you Esther?” “Well, I know her. She’s a friend of mine.” They’d even ask if Esther was available for a conference and I never, never said, “I’m Esther.” And everyone kind of played along.

When I first started the store, I had no art background at all either — no art history, no studio art — so luckily, right after I opened the store, I went to the first American Craft Council wholesale market. It

What all did you initially sell there?

was their first year. And that’s where I just found work from all over the country. In those days, there were a lot more potters than there are now. So I was finding work, right from the start, from all over the country. Initially people wondered, “Why do you have work from California and New York when you have artists here?” and I was surprised that I got a little bit of flack for that. But mainly what I realized really quickly was that I had a definite eye for what I like and, luckily, pretty quickly had a clientele that seemed to like what I like. But I really dove in not knowing what I was doing. The first year I’d get a letter from my accountant every month saying he thought I should close and cut my losses. You said you majored in business — how did you get interested in the arts? I worked in retail from the time I was 13 so it was really more from a love of retail. I knew I wanted my own business and I wanted a retail store. I traveled around and saw other galleries so that’s where I got the idea. When we first opened we were called Cameron’s Craft Gallery. And then we changed to Cameron’s when we moved to where we are now.

Where did you come up with the pseudonym?

Where did your love of retail come from?

There’s a play called “Greater Tuna” and one of my favorite characters is Vera Carp. And I don’t know how it came up as Esther Carp, but that’s where Carp came from anyway.

Well, as a kid, I used to love playing store — I mean, as a little kid — I’d take all the canned vegetables and line them up and had a little cash register. I was probably five or six, playing grocery store. And then when I was 13, I got a job at a pet store — mostly cleaning out cages but I could work the cash register. There was just something I loved about retail. And then in high school, I worked in a clothing store. So I don’t know — I just like working with the public. Also, I can’t sit still so I couldn’t have an office job. I would go crazy if I had to stay in an office. With the store, I could always be running here and there and running down the mall and traveling a lot to do the buying.

So how did the little shrine upstairs at Cameron’s come into being? That came about because the millennium was approaching and, going back to theater, I’ve always seen the store like theater, so I ap-

12

“I approached the store like putting on a show every day.”

Photos by Stephanie Bullins

That’s one thing I miss. I would go to New York and probably spend four weeks out the year there. How did your passion for theater develop? It was a combination — I remember vividly seeing the first performance that Jay O’Berski was in and they did it at Brightleaf Square in one of the empty spaces. I don’t remember what the play was but I remember just going, “Oh my god, this is incredible.” So from that point on I kind of discovered Manbites Dog, Jay O’Berski, and made a point to see everything I could. And when I go to New York, my typical thing is to see eight plays in six days. I love eating out but eating out at restaurants is not what I do when I go to New York. I just cram in everything I can. I just find it really fascinating when acting is really good and they’re just live and in front of you and believable characters. I’m just amazed — like, “How could they do that?” Especially, I love little small theaters like Manbites or Deep Dish. To me, that’s really amazing when it’s not all about props and costumes but the acting is just so good that you’re drawn in. Do you have any particularly fond memories of your time at UNC? I have four years worth. I was here during the Vietnam days so there are memories about peace marches and when we shut down the University. And then, in contrast to that, I was Sigma Nu and it was like Animal House — smoking pot and being wild and crazy. But I’m really glad I was here in those years. There was so much turmoil. I come from this little conservative town and immediately I’m in this liberal oasis. I was aware of what a sheltered life I had lived in some ways, politically. I’m glad I was here. That’s why I stay here. I do miss living in a university area. You know, there’s just an energy from all these young people. I miss that.

13


S

weet Living Culinary prowess in the middle of Hinton James Written by Dan Byrnes

W

Photos by Kathryn Carlson

hile most college students reach the climax of their culinary careers with a bowl of Ramen noodles, freshman Camille Cogswell is a trained pastry chef. “It’s my biggest passion,” Cogswell said. “It’s a cathartic process - relaxing and calming. When I’m cooking I don’t think of anything else. When I’m upset, the first thing I want to do is cook. It’s great knowing something is going to turn out the way it will.” Cogswell learned how to cook when she was a sophomore at Asheville High School. Asheville High has a culinary program that is now one of the top in the state with a fully-equipped kitchen and restaurant chef. “He was a really great teacher,” Cogswell said. “He was a mentor for me.” In her first year of this two-year program, Cogswell realized she was more interested in pastries than any other thing. She had an internship and later a job at a local bakery. She even gave thought to going to culinary school. “I’m not ready to devote myself completely to that,” Cogswell said. She has not declared a major and wants to keep her

Strawberry Pastry Cream Tart

Twelve Layer Mocha Cake

14

options open. Currently, Cogswell finds any chance she can to explore her hobby while living on campus in Hinton James. This has been a challenge for her because the kitchens in Hinton James are very small and out-of-date. “I was adamant about being able to cook in college as a stress reliever,” Cogswell said. “I take a bus to Carrboro, get ingredients, and cook in the HoJo kitchen.” Cogswell has incorporated her hobby of photography and turned her passion for pastry into an art. “Presentation is a huge part of baking,” Cogswell said. “Cooking engages all of your senses.” She has created a portfolio of her photographed goodies. She equally enjoys baking, taking photos, and sharing with others. “I think it has taken a long time to make it regarded as an art compared to other forms,” Cogswell said. “There’s something about taking ingredients from the earth and transforming it into something totally unidentifiable.” Cogswell gets most of her ideas for cooking from cooking magazines and some of her favorite cook books. “I usually don’t make the same thing twice,” Cogswell said. “I love trying out elaborate multilayered cakes.” Being Cogswell’s friend really pays off. Her roommate, Alex McClelland, is a first year student and journalism major. “In our room she’s got a huge Tupperware tub full of her different cooking utensils: pots, pans, wax papers, cutting boards,” McClelland said. “It’s really interesting to me, because sometimes they look like torture devices.” McClelland has tried many of Cogswell’s tasty treats. “My favorite was definitely the apple pie,” McClelland said, “I pretty much ate the entire pie singlehandedly. Camille’s got a gift.” Despite the challenges faced by a pastry chef living on campus, Cogswell has pleased the pallets of many people with her hobby. She is still considering making it into a career by opening a family business. “I’m gaining knowledge, and I can be more creative,” Cogswell said. “If there’s something you really like to do, you’re going to make it happen.”

Chocolate Friands

Chocolate Croissant

Camille makes the campus kitchen her own, cooking all types of tasty treats during the week.

15


S

weet Living Culinary prowess in the middle of Hinton James Written by Dan Byrnes

W

Photos by Kathryn Carlson

hile most college students reach the climax of their culinary careers with a bowl of Ramen noodles, freshman Camille Cogswell is a trained pastry chef. “It’s my biggest passion,” Cogswell said. “It’s a cathartic process - relaxing and calming. When I’m cooking I don’t think of anything else. When I’m upset, the first thing I want to do is cook. It’s great knowing something is going to turn out the way it will.” Cogswell learned how to cook when she was a sophomore at Asheville High School. Asheville High has a culinary program that is now one of the top in the state with a fully-equipped kitchen and restaurant chef. “He was a really great teacher,” Cogswell said. “He was a mentor for me.” In her first year of this two-year program, Cogswell realized she was more interested in pastries than any other thing. She had an internship and later a job at a local bakery. She even gave thought to going to culinary school. “I’m not ready to devote myself completely to that,” Cogswell said. She has not declared a major and wants to keep her

Strawberry Pastry Cream Tart

Twelve Layer Mocha Cake

14

options open. Currently, Cogswell finds any chance she can to explore her hobby while living on campus in Hinton James. This has been a challenge for her because the kitchens in Hinton James are very small and out-of-date. “I was adamant about being able to cook in college as a stress reliever,” Cogswell said. “I take a bus to Carrboro, get ingredients, and cook in the HoJo kitchen.” Cogswell has incorporated her hobby of photography and turned her passion for pastry into an art. “Presentation is a huge part of baking,” Cogswell said. “Cooking engages all of your senses.” She has created a portfolio of her photographed goodies. She equally enjoys baking, taking photos, and sharing with others. “I think it has taken a long time to make it regarded as an art compared to other forms,” Cogswell said. “There’s something about taking ingredients from the earth and transforming it into something totally unidentifiable.” Cogswell gets most of her ideas for cooking from cooking magazines and some of her favorite cook books. “I usually don’t make the same thing twice,” Cogswell said. “I love trying out elaborate multilayered cakes.” Being Cogswell’s friend really pays off. Her roommate, Alex McClelland, is a first year student and journalism major. “In our room she’s got a huge Tupperware tub full of her different cooking utensils: pots, pans, wax papers, cutting boards,” McClelland said. “It’s really interesting to me, because sometimes they look like torture devices.” McClelland has tried many of Cogswell’s tasty treats. “My favorite was definitely the apple pie,” McClelland said, “I pretty much ate the entire pie singlehandedly. Camille’s got a gift.” Despite the challenges faced by a pastry chef living on campus, Cogswell has pleased the pallets of many people with her hobby. She is still considering making it into a career by opening a family business. “I’m gaining knowledge, and I can be more creative,” Cogswell said. “If there’s something you really like to do, you’re going to make it happen.”

Chocolate Friands

Chocolate Croissant

Camille makes the campus kitchen her own, cooking all types of tasty treats during the week.

15


“My purpose for rapping is due to its therapeutic effect on me. Also I am trying to be an inspiration to others from a similar backgrounds as mine, and show everyone that it’s okay to be yourself.”

Lexicon Photos by Geoff Kelly

Lex is currently a sophomore at UNC majoring in Political Science. Samples of his music can be found at myspace.com/lexicon919

16

17


“My purpose for rapping is due to its therapeutic effect on me. Also I am trying to be an inspiration to others from a similar backgrounds as mine, and show everyone that it’s okay to be yourself.”

Lexicon Photos by Geoff Kelly

Lex is currently a sophomore at UNC majoring in Political Science. Samples of his music can be found at myspace.com/lexicon919

16

17


What Makes Art, Art? edition

By Rebecca Collins

People can sometimes be intimidated by art. They go to museums and don’t understand why what seems like a bunch of squiggles on a canvas is art. Or they listen to Beethoven and think he’s pretty good but are bored to death by classical music. These people then assume that they’re just not art people, that art goes over their heads and they just can’t get it. Wrong! There is no such thing as “art people” and “not art people.” Sure, some people are better at expressing themselves artistically, but art itself is a human invention: something that we are all capable of understanding and appreciating. You just have to know what to look for. As an amateur art appreciator myself, I decided to write a series of columns to help those of you who are, let’s say, “artistically challenged” understand what makes art “good” or more accurately, important, and why certain works have become classics. I’m starting with music because it’s my personal favorite expression of art, but keep a look out in future issues for columns on painting, photography, poetry, and other art forms. Of all art forms, music is the most accessible to the masses. From the beginning of time, music has played an important role in human culture. How-

18

ever, one of the most debated questions of all time is “What is good music?”. Everyone has an opinion based on his or her personal listening preferences. People continually argue the merits of The Beatles over The Rolling Stones, or Tupac over Biggie, despite not having any sort of factual basis for the argument. However, there are a number of composers and musicians that are universally considered to be important. But how do we judge what is musically important? Now before I get started, I will say that I’m not a serious music critic, and I may not use terms used by professional critics. So before I get angry emails from music people, let me say that this is just my way of understanding music, and I admit it is not by any means a comprehensive way to look at music, but maybe it will help you start to understand how both Mozart and Miles Davis are considered to be musical geniuses. I’ll give you five basic qualities of music or musicians to look for when listening to music. Those qualities are: innovation, emotion, musicianship, complexity, and sound (timbre). Every great musician doesn’t have all of these qualities, but they all exhibit at least one.

Innovation:

This is probably the most important aspect in determining an artist’s importance. All those composers you’ve heard of and think of as oldfashioned and boring were all the rage back in the 17th, 18th, and 19th centuries because they did new things musically. Stravinsky is a composer especially known for innovation. His ballet “The Rite of Spring” actually caused riots on its opening night because people hated it so much. But his use of atonality influenced western music history. And even composers we see as “classic,” such as Beethoven, were ground-breaking in their time. Innovation can be seen in other genres of music as well. Improvisation was a jazz technique that completely changed musical performance. The Beatles’ use of Indian influences and The Ramones’ fast, choppy style are two more examples of musicians pushing the boundaries.

Complexity:

Complexity usually most affects the rhythmic aspect of a piece. Some composers use layers of rhythms that work together or complicated rhythms that are fast or syncopated (not landing on the beat). But let it be known that complex does not equal good. Rather, it’s a composer’s ability to make complex elements come together that determines the value of the piece. Also let it be known that some of the best music is not complex at all. Sometimes less is more.

Sound (Timbre):

I mentioned timbre before. Basically, it is the distinct sound an instrument makes (think the difference between a flute and a trumpet). Some music is great because of the sounds the musician makes or the unique instruments the composer chooses. The tone of a guitar or the wail of a trumpet can make a song come alive. Sound is probably the most subjective of the qualities I’ve mentioned because there is always a difference of opinion as to what sounds good.

Emotion:

Real music is an artistic expression. That means that real musicians use it as an authentic way to express feelings and stories or comment on society (and yes, this means that by my definition a lot of popular bands and singers are not real musicians). There are certain artists that are able to capture raw emotion through music. Listen to Billie Holiday or Janis Joplin for proof of this. Emotion is found in classical music in more refined ways. The great composers were able to use different timbres (characteristic sounds of different instruments), dynamics and chords to portray happiness, sadness, anger, boredom, excitement and a whole array of other emotions. The ability of a song to capture a mood is one of the best indicators of its value.

Musicianship:

This is probably the most obvious indicator of a musician’s importance — his or her ability to flawlessly execute a piece of music. This includes not only playing intricate passages but also using dynamics (how loud or soft the music is) and emotion to convey the true meaning of a piece of music. But one doesn’t have to play every note right to play with musicianship. It’s more about making artistic choices about what is important in the performance of the piece. These are very basic guidelines for judging music. Obviously there’s a lot more to it than this, but this will get you started. If you’re really interested, take a music theory class or pick up a book to learn more. But hopefully now you can listen to a piece of classical music or some current musician you’ve never really understood and at least have some understanding of why they’re important and why so many people consider them “good.”

MUSIC 19


What Makes Art, Art? edition

By Rebecca Collins

People can sometimes be intimidated by art. They go to museums and don’t understand why what seems like a bunch of squiggles on a canvas is art. Or they listen to Beethoven and think he’s pretty good but are bored to death by classical music. These people then assume that they’re just not art people, that art goes over their heads and they just can’t get it. Wrong! There is no such thing as “art people” and “not art people.” Sure, some people are better at expressing themselves artistically, but art itself is a human invention: something that we are all capable of understanding and appreciating. You just have to know what to look for. As an amateur art appreciator myself, I decided to write a series of columns to help those of you who are, let’s say, “artistically challenged” understand what makes art “good” or more accurately, important, and why certain works have become classics. I’m starting with music because it’s my personal favorite expression of art, but keep a look out in future issues for columns on painting, photography, poetry, and other art forms. Of all art forms, music is the most accessible to the masses. From the beginning of time, music has played an important role in human culture. How-

18

ever, one of the most debated questions of all time is “What is good music?”. Everyone has an opinion based on his or her personal listening preferences. People continually argue the merits of The Beatles over The Rolling Stones, or Tupac over Biggie, despite not having any sort of factual basis for the argument. However, there are a number of composers and musicians that are universally considered to be important. But how do we judge what is musically important? Now before I get started, I will say that I’m not a serious music critic, and I may not use terms used by professional critics. So before I get angry emails from music people, let me say that this is just my way of understanding music, and I admit it is not by any means a comprehensive way to look at music, but maybe it will help you start to understand how both Mozart and Miles Davis are considered to be musical geniuses. I’ll give you five basic qualities of music or musicians to look for when listening to music. Those qualities are: innovation, emotion, musicianship, complexity, and sound (timbre). Every great musician doesn’t have all of these qualities, but they all exhibit at least one.

Innovation:

This is probably the most important aspect in determining an artist’s importance. All those composers you’ve heard of and think of as oldfashioned and boring were all the rage back in the 17th, 18th, and 19th centuries because they did new things musically. Stravinsky is a composer especially known for innovation. His ballet “The Rite of Spring” actually caused riots on its opening night because people hated it so much. But his use of atonality influenced western music history. And even composers we see as “classic,” such as Beethoven, were ground-breaking in their time. Innovation can be seen in other genres of music as well. Improvisation was a jazz technique that completely changed musical performance. The Beatles’ use of Indian influences and The Ramones’ fast, choppy style are two more examples of musicians pushing the boundaries.

Complexity:

Complexity usually most affects the rhythmic aspect of a piece. Some composers use layers of rhythms that work together or complicated rhythms that are fast or syncopated (not landing on the beat). But let it be known that complex does not equal good. Rather, it’s a composer’s ability to make complex elements come together that determines the value of the piece. Also let it be known that some of the best music is not complex at all. Sometimes less is more.

Sound (Timbre):

I mentioned timbre before. Basically, it is the distinct sound an instrument makes (think the difference between a flute and a trumpet). Some music is great because of the sounds the musician makes or the unique instruments the composer chooses. The tone of a guitar or the wail of a trumpet can make a song come alive. Sound is probably the most subjective of the qualities I’ve mentioned because there is always a difference of opinion as to what sounds good.

Emotion:

Real music is an artistic expression. That means that real musicians use it as an authentic way to express feelings and stories or comment on society (and yes, this means that by my definition a lot of popular bands and singers are not real musicians). There are certain artists that are able to capture raw emotion through music. Listen to Billie Holiday or Janis Joplin for proof of this. Emotion is found in classical music in more refined ways. The great composers were able to use different timbres (characteristic sounds of different instruments), dynamics and chords to portray happiness, sadness, anger, boredom, excitement and a whole array of other emotions. The ability of a song to capture a mood is one of the best indicators of its value.

Musicianship:

This is probably the most obvious indicator of a musician’s importance — his or her ability to flawlessly execute a piece of music. This includes not only playing intricate passages but also using dynamics (how loud or soft the music is) and emotion to convey the true meaning of a piece of music. But one doesn’t have to play every note right to play with musicianship. It’s more about making artistic choices about what is important in the performance of the piece. These are very basic guidelines for judging music. Obviously there’s a lot more to it than this, but this will get you started. If you’re really interested, take a music theory class or pick up a book to learn more. But hopefully now you can listen to a piece of classical music or some current musician you’ve never really understood and at least have some understanding of why they’re important and why so many people consider them “good.”

MUSIC 19


Let them make crafts By Stephanie Bullins

1. Spray paint the outside and sides of the lids with two or three coats. When dry, turn over and spray paint the inside with a few coats. It doesn’t hurt to spray the sides down again either, just don’t let the paint get so thick that it will chip off later.

Do It Yourself: Mosaic Coasters

I’m not artsy. I can’t sketch or paint. I can’t sing or dance, even though my childhood dream was to become a country music star. I’ve never acted in a play with a target audience older than 8. And the last musical instrument I played— rather poorly, might I add—was a plastic recorder in elementary school. Loving the arts but not being able to contribute anything artistic to society sucks. It’s like constantly getting rejected by that one person you just can’t get off your mind. The best way to get past the hurt and rejection? Come up with a new approach. So far, you’ve been courting art with casual conversation and subtle hints that you’d like to take the relationship to the next level, but art just isn’t having it. Don’t despair! You just have to tell art how you really feel—darn it, you love art and really want this relationship to happen. Well, it’s time to get crafty. No, really. Most of us have been doing crafts since we were tots. They can’t be that difficult if every kid that has ever been to a summer camp or whiled away the hours

These easy-to-make coasters are a great addition to any house, apartment or dorm and make great gifts when you want to give something with a personal touch. They’re easily customizable – you can create your own patterns and choose your own color palettes. And they’re earth-friendly because they’re made from the lids of salsa jars. So save the lids to your empty queso jars and make these fabulous, functional coasters!

20

1&2

in daycare can do them. Sure, that might have just been macaroni art, but the same basic principles apply—you take something already in existence, like an old piece of furniture or the dried noodles you just dropped on the floor, and make it into something beautiful and original. The project can be as simple or complicated as you like—you just need a little bit of creativity. And even if you’re having trouble producing that, a quick Google search for “arts and crafts ideas” returns 18,000,000 results (within just 0.13 seconds!). To help, I’m going to include a do-it-yourself project in every issue. I’ll take you through some basic steps to make everything from home décor to cat toys. So pick up that glue gun! If you want to make something impressive and eye-catching, you don’t have to be fantastic with felt pens or a dedicated sculptor. Find what you love—whether it’s making decoupage with recycled magazines, re-covering an old chair or just gluing macaroni to construction paper. With a little bit of imagination and commitment, even the most everyday household items can become works of art.

What You’ll Need: Four salsa jar lids, 3¼” diameter, ¾” deep 1 can of metallic spray paint Clear adhesive Two or more colors of vitreous glass mini (3/8”) mosaic tiles Resin and hardener (about 12 oz., though you probably won’t use it all) Small plastic cup Popsicle stick Felt Recommended: gloves, for spray painting and pouring resin

2. Cut circles in the felt that are slightly smaller than the outside of the lids. When the lids are completely dry, glue the felt to the outside of the lid — the bottom of the coaster — so that your furniture doesn’t get scratched. Photos by Stephanie Bullins

3

3. Turn the coasters over and arrange a design inside with the mosaic tiles. Glue each tile down with a dab of clear adhesive. Tip: Using more than one color tile makes the coaster more interesting, but more than two colors on the same coaster can be overwhelming. Keep it simple, but change the colors and patterns on each coaster to create a unique look.

4&5

4. Following the directions on the container of resin, mix the resin and the hardener in the plastic cup, using the popsicle stick to stir. Pour the mixed resin into each coaster so that it is even with the edge of the coaster, being careful not to let the resin spill over the sides. 5.Let the coasters dry completely in a dust-free area for at least 48 hours. Once dry, entertain your friends and protect your furniture with style!

21


Let them make crafts By Stephanie Bullins

1. Spray paint the outside and sides of the lids with two or three coats. When dry, turn over and spray paint the inside with a few coats. It doesn’t hurt to spray the sides down again either, just don’t let the paint get so thick that it will chip off later.

Do It Yourself: Mosaic Coasters

I’m not artsy. I can’t sketch or paint. I can’t sing or dance, even though my childhood dream was to become a country music star. I’ve never acted in a play with a target audience older than 8. And the last musical instrument I played— rather poorly, might I add—was a plastic recorder in elementary school. Loving the arts but not being able to contribute anything artistic to society sucks. It’s like constantly getting rejected by that one person you just can’t get off your mind. The best way to get past the hurt and rejection? Come up with a new approach. So far, you’ve been courting art with casual conversation and subtle hints that you’d like to take the relationship to the next level, but art just isn’t having it. Don’t despair! You just have to tell art how you really feel—darn it, you love art and really want this relationship to happen. Well, it’s time to get crafty. No, really. Most of us have been doing crafts since we were tots. They can’t be that difficult if every kid that has ever been to a summer camp or whiled away the hours

These easy-to-make coasters are a great addition to any house, apartment or dorm and make great gifts when you want to give something with a personal touch. They’re easily customizable – you can create your own patterns and choose your own color palettes. And they’re earth-friendly because they’re made from the lids of salsa jars. So save the lids to your empty queso jars and make these fabulous, functional coasters!

20

1&2

in daycare can do them. Sure, that might have just been macaroni art, but the same basic principles apply—you take something already in existence, like an old piece of furniture or the dried noodles you just dropped on the floor, and make it into something beautiful and original. The project can be as simple or complicated as you like—you just need a little bit of creativity. And even if you’re having trouble producing that, a quick Google search for “arts and crafts ideas” returns 18,000,000 results (within just 0.13 seconds!). To help, I’m going to include a do-it-yourself project in every issue. I’ll take you through some basic steps to make everything from home décor to cat toys. So pick up that glue gun! If you want to make something impressive and eye-catching, you don’t have to be fantastic with felt pens or a dedicated sculptor. Find what you love—whether it’s making decoupage with recycled magazines, re-covering an old chair or just gluing macaroni to construction paper. With a little bit of imagination and commitment, even the most everyday household items can become works of art.

What You’ll Need: Four salsa jar lids, 3¼” diameter, ¾” deep 1 can of metallic spray paint Clear adhesive Two or more colors of vitreous glass mini (3/8”) mosaic tiles Resin and hardener (about 12 oz., though you probably won’t use it all) Small plastic cup Popsicle stick Felt Recommended: gloves, for spray painting and pouring resin

2. Cut circles in the felt that are slightly smaller than the outside of the lids. When the lids are completely dry, glue the felt to the outside of the lid — the bottom of the coaster — so that your furniture doesn’t get scratched. Photos by Stephanie Bullins

3

3. Turn the coasters over and arrange a design inside with the mosaic tiles. Glue each tile down with a dab of clear adhesive. Tip: Using more than one color tile makes the coaster more interesting, but more than two colors on the same coaster can be overwhelming. Keep it simple, but change the colors and patterns on each coaster to create a unique look.

4&5

4. Following the directions on the container of resin, mix the resin and the hardener in the plastic cup, using the popsicle stick to stir. Pour the mixed resin into each coaster so that it is even with the edge of the coaster, being careful not to let the resin spill over the sides. 5.Let the coasters dry completely in a dust-free area for at least 48 hours. Once dry, entertain your friends and protect your furniture with style!

21


Get Cultured! april

1 2

3

4 5

6 7

8

11 12 13 14 15 16 17

91 10 11 12 13 14 15

18 19 20 21 22 23 24

16 17 18 19 20 21 22

25 26 27 28 29 30

23

16 17

22

1 3

4 5

When a Baker and his Wife learn they’ve been cursed with childlessness by the Witch next door, they embark on a quest for the special objects required to break the spell, swindling, lying to and stealing from Cinderella, Little Red, Rapunzel and Jack (the one who climbed the beanstalk). What begins a lively irreverent fantasy in the style of “The Princess Bride” becomes a moving lesson about community responsibility and the stories we tell our children. (www.unc. edu/pauper)

6 7

8

91 10 11 12 13 14 15 21 22 23 24

16

25 26 27 28 29 30

april

April 21 – May 16. Durham Performing Arts Center – Wicked: The Untold Story of the Witches of Oz ($40 - $140) The Tony Award-winning broadway musical based on the book Wicked by Gregory Maguire shows audiences a side of Oz unseen in the movie The Wizard of Oz.

Monday, April 26. Gerrard Hall – Tallest Man on Earth, with The Nurses ($1) The last installment of the CUAB dollar concert series. Take a break from studying and check out two bands for only a dollar!

26

may

Friday, May 7. Local 506 – I Was Totally Destroying It (TBA) 7

Chapel Hill natives, I Was Totally Destroying It, are bringing their blend of powerpop and rock to the Local 506. You don’t want to miss this up and coming band that has opened for and collaborated with such acts as Motion City Soundtrack.

April 16-20. Union Cabaret – Pauper Players presents Into the Woods ($7 student, $12 gen adm.)

april

18 19 20

Each spring, the Ackland Art Museum at The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill presents New Currents in Contemporary Art, an exhibition of works by graduating UNC-Chapel Hill master of fine arts students. Marking the culmination of a two-year program, this exhibition introduces four emerging artists who interpret ideas ranging from the personal to the political in a wide variety of media, styles, and approaches. (www.Ackland.org)

may 2

April 9 – May 23. Ackland Art Museum – New Currents in Contemporary Art: UNC-Chapel Hill Masters of Fine Arts Exhibition (FREE!)

may 91 10

april

may 8

Saturday, May 8. Carborro Art’s Center – Carborro Arts Center 35th anniversary celebration (FREE!) Come out to enjoy Cirque des Artes, a combination of the many art forms the Arts Center embraces, set in the theme of a Parisian street festival.

23


Get Cultured! april

1 2

3

4 5

6 7

8

11 12 13 14 15 16 17

91 10 11 12 13 14 15

18 19 20 21 22 23 24

16 17 18 19 20 21 22

25 26 27 28 29 30

23

16 17

22

1 3

4 5

When a Baker and his Wife learn they’ve been cursed with childlessness by the Witch next door, they embark on a quest for the special objects required to break the spell, swindling, lying to and stealing from Cinderella, Little Red, Rapunzel and Jack (the one who climbed the beanstalk). What begins a lively irreverent fantasy in the style of “The Princess Bride” becomes a moving lesson about community responsibility and the stories we tell our children. (www.unc. edu/pauper)

6 7

8

91 10 11 12 13 14 15 21 22 23 24

16

25 26 27 28 29 30

april

April 21 – May 16. Durham Performing Arts Center – Wicked: The Untold Story of the Witches of Oz ($40 - $140) The Tony Award-winning broadway musical based on the book Wicked by Gregory Maguire shows audiences a side of Oz unseen in the movie The Wizard of Oz.

Monday, April 26. Gerrard Hall – Tallest Man on Earth, with The Nurses ($1) The last installment of the CUAB dollar concert series. Take a break from studying and check out two bands for only a dollar!

26

may

Friday, May 7. Local 506 – I Was Totally Destroying It (TBA) 7

Chapel Hill natives, I Was Totally Destroying It, are bringing their blend of powerpop and rock to the Local 506. You don’t want to miss this up and coming band that has opened for and collaborated with such acts as Motion City Soundtrack.

April 16-20. Union Cabaret – Pauper Players presents Into the Woods ($7 student, $12 gen adm.)

april

18 19 20

Each spring, the Ackland Art Museum at The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill presents New Currents in Contemporary Art, an exhibition of works by graduating UNC-Chapel Hill master of fine arts students. Marking the culmination of a two-year program, this exhibition introduces four emerging artists who interpret ideas ranging from the personal to the political in a wide variety of media, styles, and approaches. (www.Ackland.org)

may 2

April 9 – May 23. Ackland Art Museum – New Currents in Contemporary Art: UNC-Chapel Hill Masters of Fine Arts Exhibition (FREE!)

may 91 10

april

may 8

Saturday, May 8. Carborro Art’s Center – Carborro Arts Center 35th anniversary celebration (FREE!) Come out to enjoy Cirque des Artes, a combination of the many art forms the Arts Center embraces, set in the theme of a Parisian street festival.

23



Volume 2, Issue 1