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UNANZ NEWS

UNANZ NEWS DECEMBER 2012

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UN Day Reception

John Allen, Secretary of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade addresses UNANZ friends and supporters on 24 October at Premier House.

ISSN 1179足8009 (print)

ISSN 1179足0817 (online)


UNANZ News UNANZ NEWS DECEMBER 2012

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Contents In this issue:

UN Day Reception

International Day of Peace in Wanganui

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Helen Clark on Improving Global Governance: Making Global Institutions fit­for­purpose in the 21st Century 9 Biodiversity Convention

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Cooperatives have a role to play in driving global economic sustainability 11 UNANZ Renewable Energy in the Pacific Round Table

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UNA Tauranga asks Local MP, the

Honorable Simon Bridges, tough questions on NZ’s position on climate change and sustainability and a response by Hon Simon Bridges 15 Opportunities for global engagement

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WFUNA 40th Plenary

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UN Action on sustainability

Introduction to UNANZ Special Officer for Humanitarian Affairs 18 President’s Column

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Branch Reports

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UN Youth President’s Report

Upcoming events: 10 December: Human Rights day ­ Christmas lunch with our affiliates. 12:15 pm at the St Andrew's on The Terrace Conference Centre (behind the church and upstairs)

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UN Day Reception

Lachlan Mackay, UNANZ Vice­President

On Wednesday 24th October, UNANZ hosted a special UN Day on the theme of ‘NZ and Global Security’ with guest speaker, Mr John Allen, Chief Executive of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs.

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UNANZ National Executive members at UN Day Reception:

L to R: Prof Graham Hassall, National President, Robin Halliday, National Treasurer, Lachlan Mackay, Vice President, Mary Davies­Colley, Vice President, Anton Smith, UN Youth National President, Michael Powles, Immdiate Past­President and Izolda Kazemzedah, National Council Representative on the National Executive

The event was held at Premiere House with the permission of the Rt. Hon. John Key, Prime Minister. Over 70 people attended including diplomats, Members of Parliament, ministry staff, NGO colleagues and the Chief of Defence, Lt. Gen. Rhys Jones.

John Allen gave a very impassioned speech which was well received by all who attended. We had John’s keynote speech videoed and it is available on a DVD! Email our National Administrator for a copy or you can view it online on our website: unanz.org.nz or on: youtube.com/watch?v=7ApLCmfIfC0

Former National Presidents, Carrick Lewis and Dame Laurie Salas along with Norina Lewis enjoying the celebration. Photo: Hyde Hassall

Further to focusing on ‘New Zealand and Global Security’, we reflected upon the message of the UN Secretary­General Ban Ki­Moon. THE SECRETARY­GENERAL

MESSAGE ON UNITED NATIONS DAY 24 October 2012

Graham Kelly serenades the crowd from behind the grand piano. Photo: Hyde Hassall

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We are living through a period of profound turmoil, transition and transformation. Insecurity, inequality and intolerance are spreading. Global and national institutions are being put to the test. With so much at stake, the United Nations must keep pace across the spectrum of its activities – 3

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The United Nations is not just a meeting place for diplomats. The United Nations is a peacekeeper disarming fighters, a health worker distributing medicine, a relief team aiding refugees, a human rights expert helping

peace, development, human rights, the rule of law, the empowerment of the world’s women and youth.

There has been important progress on many fronts. National President, Graham Hassall, delivers the opening remarks and Extreme poverty introduces our speaker, John Allen and the theme. Photo: Hyde Hassall has been cut in half since the year 2000. Democratic deliver justice. transitions are under way in many In carrying out this global mission we rely countries. There are encouraging signs of on countless friends and supporters. Non­ economic growth across the developing governmental organizations, scientists, world. scholars, philanthropists, religious leaders, Now is the time to raise our collective business executives and concerned ambitions. With the 2015 deadline for the citizens are critical to our success. No Millennium Development Goals fast single leader, country or institution can do approaching, we must intensify our efforts everything. But each of us, in our own to reach all of these lifesaving targets. We way, can do something. must prepare a bold and practical post­ 2015 development agenda. And we must continue to combat intolerance, save people caught in conflicts and establish lasting peace.

On this UN Day, let us reaffirm our individual commitment and our collective resolve to live up to the ideals of the United Nations Charter and build a better world for all.

UNANZ National Executive. (L to R): Graham Hassall, President, Robin Halliday, Treasurer, Lachlan Mackay, V.P., Mary Davies­Colley, V.P., Anton Smith, UN Youth National President, Michael Powles, Immediate Past­President, Izolda Kazem, National Council representative. Photo: Hyde Hassall

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International Day of Peace – Wanganui 2012 celebration By Gita Brooke

2012 marked the 10th anniversary of the dedication of the Wanganui Peace Sculpture, Handspan, to a Culture of Peace and Non­violence for the Children of the World, by H.E. Governor­General of New Zealand, Dame Silvia Cartwright. This year, as in previous years, the community again gathered at 12 noon to link with people throughout the world, also meeting at midday local time to unite in prayers and to confirm their

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group of U3A members; followed

­ on 20th September by a speaking engagement in Alexander Heritage & Research Library where they spoke about their two books: ‘Security Without Nuclear Deterrence’ and ‘A Thorn in their Side’.

­ on 21st September, in the afternoon, we met again for a final celebrative tea and birthday cake at the Quaker Settlement, before entering the Quiet Room, decorated with the flags of all UN member countries. We then, as in previous years, mentioned each and every nation asking that peace will prevail in them all.

Our key speaker, Kate Dewes, spoke to the theme for this year’s Peace Day: “Sustainable Peace for a Sustainable Future”. And, as tradition would have it, we all finally gathered in Brooke House for a simmering down communal meal. The text of Kate Dewes’ notes follows Kaumatua John Maih opens with a blessing. Photo: Gita Brooke

commitment to peace and goodwill to all beings: Kaumatua John Maihi opened with a blessing, followed by prayers and invocations by representatives from the Christian, Muslim, Hindu, and Baha’i faiths, concluding with Cr Sue Westwood re­dedicating the sculpture to a Culture of Peace. Before the release of 10 white balloons with white paper doves attached, Meg Hartfield read her beautiful poem written specially for this occasion. On this beautiful sunny day, we all followed the flight of the cluster of balloons until out of sight. We were so delighted that Dr. Kate Dewes and Commander Robert Green had agreed to join our celebrations, and we kept them busy with several engagements to speak: ­ on 19th September Kate and Rob spoke on the theme: “Where Next for Nuclear Disarmament” to an enthusiastic THE PEOPLE'S MOVEMENT

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Sustainable Peace for a Sustainable Future

Thank you Gita and others for this opportunity to share some ideas with you about how we can create ‘Sustainable Peace for a Sustainable Future’.

There are many negative indicators about the current state of international politics which could make us despair about achieving a sustainable peace in the future. Here is a brief summary of some of the bad news: • Last year, the world community spent over US $1.7 trillion on armaments which amounts to $4.6 billion per day.

• Governments were unable to reach agreement at the UN on an Arms Trade Treaty earlier this year. Despite this, there is a solid draft document and useful discussions on which to build agreement in the future.

• There is intransigence in the Conference on Disarmament with progress blocked for over 16 years. However, this may force deliberations, similar to the Oslo process on landmines, to happen outside 5

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the UN.

• There are still over 20,000 nuclear weapons and over 2000 of these are still on hair­trigger alert.

• Germany has recently overturned a commitment to get rid of US nuclear weapons stationed on its soil, and it is now upgrading them. • Wars are being waged in Sudan, Syria, Cote d’Ivoire, Somalia, Colombia, Mali, Libya, Afghanistan, Iraq and Palestine. There is growing concern that Israel will bomb Iran, and China and Japan are heading for a spat over islands in their region. There has also been sabre rattling by the UK over the ownership of the Falklands Islands. Rio+20 outcome

Rio+20 was intended as a follow up on the 1992 Earth Summit, which put in place landmark conventions on climate change and biodiversity, as well as commitments on poverty eradication and social justice. Since then, however, global emissions have risen by 48%, 300m hectares of forest have been cleared and the population has increased by 1.6bn people. Despite a reduction in poverty, one in six people are malnourished. After more than a year of negotiations and a 10­day mega­conference involving 45,000 people, the wide­ranging outcome document – The Future We Want – was lambasted by environmentalists and anti­ poverty campaigners for lacking the detail and ambition needed to address the challenges posed by a deteriorating environment, worsening inequality and a global population expected to rise from 7bn to 9bn by 2050. Now more than ever today’s security threats, such as climate change, resource depletion and population pressures, require cooperative, non military responses. We need to replace the culture of violence with the culture of peace. Ordinary citizens are mobilising and working creatively with governments and the UN to try to turn things around. I will share some exciting examples because I THE PEOPLE'S MOVEMENT

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believe in the power of the human spirit to overcome adversity and create a sustainable peace for the future.

Today (September 21) is the UN International Day for Peace and it is being marked in 192 countries by millions of people. The organisers of Peace One Day – Jeremy Gilley and his team – have organised a Global Truce 2012 campaign and have a commitment from the African Union to institutionalise Peace Day across the African continent. For Peace Day 2010 in Afghanistan, WHO/UNICEF and the Afghan Ministry of Public Health vaccinated over 50,000 children and women in 23 locations against all vaccine preventable diseases. The organisers have coordinated coalitions around the world committed to getting Peace Day institutionalised in all communities so it becomes self­sustaining. They are encouraging football matches, Peace Concerts, One Day One Dance, Skypetalks with school kids and use of social media to promote the day. There are free peace education resources available at peaceoneday.org which feature interactive, student centred lesson plans exploring issues such as anti­ bullying, the UN and stories of peacemakers. A US teacher called John Hunter has made a film about his work teaching complex international relations to nine­year­olds through the World Peace Game he invented. The film is called World Peace and Other Fourth Grade Achievements. Peace One Day organisers believe that if we can achieve a Global Truce on one day, it will be easier to do it on another day and build up from there. October 3 is now UN Day for Peace and Non­violence and marks the birthday of Mahatma Gandhi. We are fortunate to have strong leadership for peace and disarmament from UN Secretary­General Ban Ki­Moon who this week called on all states to urgently comply with the basic principles of the 1999 UN Declaration and Programme of Action on the Culture of Peace which calls on all UN member states 6

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to commit to peaceful settlement of conflicts.

He said: “Around the world, the economic crisis is exacerbating xenophobia and other forms of dangerous – and deadly – discrimination. Terrorism, human trafficking, rights abuses and violence against women threaten millions of people.

War causes the largest­scale destruction … but even in countries at peace, senseless violence takes too many lives. I have made a point of listening to the victims. Here is what they are saying:

They are exhausted from war. They are angered and impoverished by decisions to spend on military weapons at the expense of health, education and the future. And they are crying out for a culture of peace. People intuitively understand that there can be no military solution to conflicts … that the world’s scarce resources should be spent to help people flourish, not to fund weapons that cause more suffering.

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small arms and light weapons are urgently needed.

We must address basic human needs and achieve the Millennium Development Goals. We are also fortunate to have Helen Clark in a key position as the head of the UN Development Programme to promote these. She is someone who really understands why we need more women in decision making roles in relation to conflict areas (and the importance of implementing UN Security Council Resolution 1325). This year marks the final year in the UN Decade of Education for Sustainable Development and it is also the Second International Decade of the World’s Indigenous Peoples. This gives an opportunity for our country to promote the 500 year old Peace Tradition of the Moriori at Rekohu and the non­violent direct action led by Te Whiti and Tohu Kakahi at Parihaka. There are moves to have a Peace Week around 5 November to replace Guy Fawkes and commemorate the peace leadership by indigenous peoples in our own country.

But too many decision makers The UN Study on do not get this simple logic. Disarmament Education The world spends almost which was adopted twice as much on weapons in The 'Culture of Peace' flag on unanimously by the UNGA in prominent display. one day than the United 2002 calls for peace and Photo: Gita Brooke Nations spends for our global disarmament education at all mission of peace, human rights and levels of society and the UNSG has development in one year.” become a strong advocate of this report. I believe that some of the current conflicts We are seeing many examples of this regarding territorial disputes being put into action through Muslims & *(China/Japan, Falklands etc) could be Christians working together in Nigeria to solved by using the International Court of talk about Creating a Peaceful Future Justice – the legal arm of the UN – as NZ together, and Jews and Palestinians did with France over nuclear testing in the creating peace education resources Pacific. together. The Non Violent Peace Force Money invested in training mediators and teams are working in many conflict areas sending in teams of men and women from getting warring parties to build the region trained in conflict prevention relationships. Here is a wonderful photo of and transformation could reduce the Sudanese fighters from opposing sides number of wars. Controls on arms traders hugging each other. at government level and via illicit trade in THE PEOPLE'S MOVEMENT

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It was through creative coalitions between government and civil society that the Nuclear Weapon Free Zones (now covering over 40% of the world’s population living in 115 States) were declared, and the Landmines and Cluster Munitions Treaties were successfully adopted by the UN. We are seeing groups such as Mayors for Peace ( 5,400 cities in 154 countries and regions) and Parliamentarians for Nuclear Non Proliferation and Disarmament working closely together to put pressure on governments to get rid of nuclear weapons and redirect money from weapons to peace. The International Campaign to Abolish Nukes (iCAN) is having an impact and former leaders are speaking out for Global Zero. 2005­2014 United Nations Decade of Education for Sustainable Development

With leadership from UN Secretary­ General Ban Ki­moon, UN­Energy – a coordinating group of 20 UN agencies – is undertaking a new global initiative called Sustainable Energy for All. This initiative will engage governments, the private sector, and civil society partners globally to achieve three major goals by 2030:

• Ensure universal access to modern energy services. • Reduce global energy intensity by 40 per cent. • Increase renewable energy use globally to 30 per cent.

One exciting project is The Green Jobs Initiative which is a partnership between the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), the International Labour Organisation (ILO), the International Organisation of Employers (IOE) and the International Trade Union Congress (ITUC).

The United Nations General Assembly has also declared 2012 as the International Year of Cooperatives, highlighting the contribution of cooperatives to socio­ economic development, particularly their impact on poverty reduction, employment generation and social integration. THE PEOPLE'S MOVEMENT

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There are increasing numbers of both co­ operatives and community benefit societies being formed to install sustainable energy microgeneration using modern hydro, wind, solar and biomass technologies. They are selling community shares to ordinary people to make these projects a reality. There are over 60 energy co­operatives already registered across the UK and the idea is growing fast. Plan for a peaceful sustainable future

One of the most exciting examples of building a sustainable future, was the Green Belt Movement, which was initiated by the late Professor Wangari Maathai and the National Council of Women of Kenya (NCWK) in 1977 which organised the planting of trees in local communities. As Dr Maathai said in her Nobel Peace Prize acceptance speech:

‘Tree planting is simple, attainable and guarantees quick, successful results within a reasonable amount of time. This sustains interest and commitment.’ It provides a forum for women to be creative and effective leaders by giving them the ability to change their environment and make their own decisions.

The project quickly spread throughout Kenya and to numerous countries in Africa where the Peace baloons ready to fly. women planted Photo: Gita Brooke over 40 million trees that now provide fuel, food, shelter and income to support their children’s education and household needs. It also creates employment and improves soils and watersheds. Since 2006, having partnered with UNEP and other organizations, over 12.5 billion trees have been planted 8

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throughout the world.

futures”. (Ban Ki­Moon)

• citizen­centered efforts to create more disaster­resilient communities (Helen Clark talked about this recently in Christchurch);

“Sustainability is fundamentally about how we choose to live our lives, with an awareness that everything we do has consequences for the 7 billion of us here today, as well as for the billions more who will follow, for the centuries to come.”

Other examples of the proactive engagement of local communities to create a peaceful sustainable future might include:

• linking up with other communities to increase the degree of local production and consumption; • working cooperatively to make waste reduction and recycling an intrinsic part of people’s lives;

• and encouraging the introduction of renewable energy sources. We come from Christchurch where Creative projects post­ 12,000+ Earthquakes are helping create wellbeing and a sense of control for residents: eg building bommunity gardens from the rubble.

Deaf Aotearoa are partners in the project and have loaned and helped to construct timber raised­beds, rescued from their quake­damaged previous site. Students at Catholic Cathedral College contributed to the project each week in Term One, also visitors from Hagley Community College and Te Whare Roimata garden. The site’s Northern neighbour Career Force are also supportive – they hosted a morning tea for 25 volunteers, mostly a group from ANZ and National Bank. These are the models for building a peaceful, sustainable community and future. They are exciting and satisfying for the participants and good for the environment. They implement the 3 Rs – Reduce, Re­use, Recycle and in Christchurch’s case – Repair.

At an international level, we need to heed the words of the UNSG and “dramatically cut spending on nuclear weapons, and invest instead in social and economic development, which serves the interests of all by expanding markets, reducing motivations for armed conflicts, and in giving citizens a stake in their common THE PEOPLE'S MOVEMENT

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With our former Prime Minister Helen Clark now holding the 3rd highest position in the UN, I feel it is appropriate to give her the final word:

Helen Clark: Improving Global Governance: Making global institutions fit­for­purpose in the 21st century Lachlan Mackay, UNANZ Vice­President

L to R: Graham Hassall, UNANZ President, Karim Dickie, Wellington UNANZ, Helen Clark, UNDP Administrator and Lachlan Mackay, UNANZ Vice President. Photo: Lachlan Mackay

Rt Hon Helen Clark, Administrator, UN Development Programme, spoke to a capacity audience at Victoria University Institute for Governance and Policy Studies on Tuesday 13 November 2012 in Wellington. Her speech considered how to make global institutions “fit­for­purpose” and covered what is working and what is not in the arena of global institutional governance with many examples to highlight the different facets.

The key theme, especially for UN­related institutions, was that external peer review mechanisims helped keep the spotlight on how institutions are going in working towards their global commitments as well as providing general oversight and a higher degree of transparency. 9

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Graham Hassall, UNANZ President, was able to ask Ms Clark the question of how UN associations, such as ours, are able to help the UN and her reply was “to keep on doing what we can to raise awareness and consciousness raise within New Zealand”. Amongst the large turnout were many UNANZ members from Wellington and we were fortunate enough to be able to meet Ms Clark over drinks and nibbles. Ms Clark’s full speech can be read on the UNDP website at s.coop/improvingglobalgovernance

Biodiversity Convention Robin Halliday

In September UNANZ was invited to send a representative to a Ministry of Foreign Affairs (Environment Division) briefing on the review Meeting in Hyderabad India on two important environment treaties – the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) and the Cartagena Protocol on Biosafety.

CBD: New Zealand’s areas of interest include in­depth reviews of the implementation of programmes of work on marine and coastal biodiversity: biodiversity and climate change, inland waters biodiversity; agricultural biodiversity; biofuels and biodiversity; forest biodiversity; invasive alien species; incentive measures and consideration on sustainable use of biological diversity by indigenous and local communities. The Cartagena is a supplementary agreement to the CBD which aims to ensure the safe handling, transport and THE PEOPLE'S MOVEMENT

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use of living modified organisms (LMOs). New Zealand’s area of interest included considerations of the operation and activities of the Biosafety Clearing House; handling, transport, packaging and identification of living modified organisms; unintentional transboundary movements and emergency measures; risk assessment and risk management; and socio­economic considerations. UNDP unveils ambitious global strategy to protect biodiversity

Up to 1.4 billion hectares of land, bodies of water in 100 countries to benefit Hyderabad, India – The United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) today unveiled a robust environmental strategy to address unprecedented levels of global biodiversity loss.

The new strategy – entitled “The Future We Want: Biodiversity and Ecosystems – Driving Sustainable Development” – was adopted during the Eleventh Conference of Parties (COP) to the Convention on Biological Diversity in Hyderabad, India and calls for a significant scaling up of investments in 100 countries by 2020. As part of the plan, UNDP will work with national governments to protect biodiversity and manage ecosystems across 1.4 billion hectares of land and bodies of water, comparable to the area of Australia, India and Argentina combined. “Human survival depends heavily on biodiversity and healthy ecosystems, yet in recent decades, the world has experienced unprecedented biodiversity loss and ecosystem degradation, undermining the very foundations of life on earth,” said UN Under­Secretary­ General and UNDP Associate Administrator Rebeca Grynspan. “As 1.2 billion people living in severe poverty depend directly on nature for their basic needs and livelihoods, this needs urgent international attention.” Under this new strategy, UNDP will work with governments to find new ways to finance biodiversity management through 10

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domestic revenue, innovative financial mechanisms, and donor funding from a range of sources. This includes the Global Environment Facility (GEF), which serves as the financial mechanism of the Convention on Biological Diversity and has been a major driver for conservation in the past two decades. The funding will be used for projects which foster economic growth, create jobs, protect endangered species and habitats, and help build resilient communities that maintain natural areas for agricultural support and as a buffer against natural disasters such as droughts and floods.

According to the Executive Secretary of the Convention on Biological Diversity, Braulio Dias, “the launch of UNDP’s new Framework is very timely. I believe it will be vital in guiding UNDP’s support to countries to speed up implementation of the Aichi Biodiversity Targets. We have a window of opportunity between now and 2020 to help countries shift the course of development to maintain and enhance their natural capital, and UNDP’s work will be crucial in this regard.”

The new UNDP strategy on biodiversity has three focus areas:  Integrating biodiversity and ecosystem management into development planning and production sector activities;  Unlocking the potential of protected areas so that they are better managed and financed, and can contribute to sustainable development; and  Managing and rehabilitating ecosystems for adaptation to and mitigation of climate change. UNDP manages the largest portfolio of biodiversity and ecosystems work in the UN system, with 512 projects in 146 countries, worth US$1.5 billion in funding from the GEF and other sources, and US$ 3.5 billion in co­financing from a range of partners. ­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­

UNDP’s future approach to supporting the integration of biodiversity and ecosystem management with development, climate THE PEOPLE'S MOVEMENT

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change risk reduction, and poverty alleviation is outlined in the framework’s three Signature Programmes.

The first Signature Programme outlines a commitment to expanding a concern for biodiversity across key productive sectors, including agriculture, fishing, forestry, mining, petroleum production, forestry, and tourism.

The second Signature Programme outlines a commitment to unlocking the potential of protected areas by ensuring that they are properly managed, sustainably financed, and contributing to sustainable development. The third Signature Programme outlines a commitment to pro­poor ecosystem­based adaptation and mitigation approaches that promote inclusive and sustainable development in the face of climate change.

Cooperatives have role to play in driving global economic sustainability Nicola Huckerby | huckerby@ica.coop | ICA Communications Team

The UN International Year of Cooperatives closes in New York New York 19 November 2012: Dame Pauline Green, President of the global representative body for cooperatives, the International Cooperative Alliance (ICA), today declared a new era open for cooperatives.

The UN International Year of Cooperatives had provided the platform from which the global cooperative movement had redefined its goals and strategy through a ratified plan of action, a blueprint for future growth, she said. 11

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“The Blueprint for a Cooperative Decade is a framework which will take the global cooperative movement through to the end of the decade with a plan to see cooperatives grow as financially and environmentally sustainable businesses,” said the Director­General of the ICA, Charles Gould. “We have built a global strategy which positions cooperatives as the fastest growing business model by 2020.”

Cooperatives could also fill a key role in a strategy led by multilateral organisations to solve the pressing, interlinked problems of poverty and hunger, particularly in Africa, where hunger is a growing trend according to the Food and Agricultural Organization of the United Nations' 2012 Hunger Report, said Dame Pauline. The ICA has dedicated itself to working with the United Nations in reaching its Millennium goals by supporting the development of cooperatives in emerging markets through its work at policy and grassroots level.

One of its key initiatives during the year has been launching the Global Development Cooperative, a fund designed to provide loans to cooperatives in emerging markets, particularly on the African continent, to help expand their businesses. The first drawdown from the fund is anticipated to take place in the first quarter of 2013. Youth, suffering from a loss of jobs and diminished hope for the future, could look to the formation of cooperatives to provide a fairer economic playing field. Dame Pauline highlighted the role cooperatives are playing in Europe where they have demonstrated their willingness to dip into surplus capital to pay workers, instead of taking the short­term solution to get rid of jobs. “Human capital is a key to any business, and cooperatives are demonstrating in an extremely tough economic environment that they believe retaining people and expertise is more important in the long term to their business success than holding surplus financial capital,” she said. THE PEOPLE'S MOVEMENT

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“There is no question that cooperatives have demonstrated their model of business is stable, sustainable and people­ centred in what have been the most difficult global economic circumstances I have witnessed in my lifetime.” In spite of the varying levels of difficulty being experienced by national economies worldwide, the largest cooperatives – the top 300 co­operatives around the globe – now have a turnover of USD 2 trillion in 2010, according to the newly­launched measurement tool The World Cooperative Monitor.

“Ban Ki­Moon, the Secretary­General of the United Nations, made the profound statement at the beginning of this international year of celebration that cooperatives do prove that it is possible to be both socially responsible and economically viable,” said Dame Pauline. “Fitting then that cooperatives have proven exactly that including in Japan where the Japanese Consumers’ Cooperative Union (JCCU) has an enormously powerful business with more than 25 million members, representing more than 35 per cent of Japanese households, and invests funds and time in the development of the Sanchoku concept of sustainable food production.”

“Sanchoku, with its conviction in the sustainability benefits of moving food directly from producer to consumer, is even being held up as a means to quicken the pace of recovery in the region affected by the Great East Japan Earthquake of 2011.” One of the most successful cooperative development programmes in Africa has been that of mothers’ associations in Benin, supported by USAID and World Education.

“In Benin, these cooperatively organised associations of women organise themselves in groups in industries like agriculture,” said Dame Pauline. “With their surplus funds, the women members have the capital to send their daughters to school. And, unlike many other development programmes, these 12

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cooperative associations survive once development aid wanes.”

UNANZ Renewable Energy in the Pacific – Lunch hour Roundtable Robin Halliday

Some of the attendees at the Renewable Energy in the Pacific Round Table. Photo: Graham Hassall

This was the fourth of the roundtables organised in conjunction with Wellington Branch this year and took place on 31st October. 2012 is the United Nations Year for Renewable Energy and New Zealand has been developing Solar power in the Pacific – notably in Tonga. The Hon Murray McCully highlighted this when he addressed the UN General Assembly in September and Michelle Bachelet, speaking on the Secretary General’s behalf, praised the Pacific Island States for their commitment to Sustainable Energy for all. To quote Hon Murray McCully, “One of the highest priorities within our region is the need for practical initiatives in the area of renewable energy. Ours is a region heavily dependent upon fossil fuels for the generation of electricity. The cost of expensive imported diesel on most small Pacific economies is absolutely crippling. The climate change impact is obvious.

After a decade of climate change conferences and hundreds of millions of dollars in so­called climate change initiatives, one might be forgiven for imaging that the Pacific, over­endowed as it is with good sunlight, would be by now positively festooned with solar power plants. Sadly, I must report that this is not in fact the case. Indeed one of the most THE PEOPLE'S MOVEMENT

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striking features of our region has been the complete lack of progress in putting lofty climate change rhetoric into any form of renewable energy practice.

In our year as chair of the Pacific Forum we have set out to correct this serious shortcoming. A small but important illustration lies in our work in the tiny Tokelau islands. Until now, Tokelau has been 100% dependent upon fossil fuels for the generation of electricity. By the end of 2012 Tokelau will be over 90% resourced with renewable solar energy. Good progress has been made too in Tonga, where I recently participated in the opening of a solar plant supplying around 20% of the electricity requirements of the main island Tongatapu. And we are working with the Cook Islands government to assist in meeting their bold aspiration of 50% renewable electricity by 2015, mostly through solar initiatives. These New Zealand­funded programmes are an important part of our commitment in the region. Our parting legacy from our year in the Chair of the Pacific Forum is a renewable energy pledging conference to be held early next year with the objective matching donors, suppliers of concessional and commercial finance, and others with the renewable energy plans of our Pacific neighbours. Here I must acknowledge the commitment of the European Union in co­ leading this initiative, and the support of the World Bank, Asian development Bank and the governments of Australia, the United States and others who are generously supporting this initiative.“ The roundtable was able to discuss these issues and progress so far with an informed and experienced panel. This included Joseph Mayhew Development Manager Energy Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade acknowledged that NZAid is focussing more on infrastructure in the Pacific region and see replacement of a reliance on fossil fuels as an important contribution to not only Climate Change but to the sustainability of their economies. 13

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Murray Hill Meridian Energy Project Engineer for the Popua Solar Farm in Tongatatapu involving an alliance between Tonga Power Ltd, the Government of Tonga with the support of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade. He outlined the technology used, the generation achieved and the overall social impact including employment opportunities offered. Shreejan Pandey a Postgraduate student Canterbury University who with Engineers without Borders installed PV systems in

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The Tokelau’s becoming the first country in the world to be 100% renewable. It was a very interesting discussion and we thank all who contributed.

A full report is going to the Ministers of Environment and Foreign Affairs and an electronic version is available on request.

UNA Tauranga Branch Correspondance with Simon Bridges on sustainability Gray Southon 1

We are concerned about the large gap

between:

 the measures that science tells us that are necessary to prevent serious environmental degradation, and  the measures that seem to be considered politically and economically viable.

One of a series of slides from the Maama Mai Solar project in Tonga. Presentation by Murray Hill.

high schools in Tonga said the students undertook all the technical design and component procurement while in New Zealand and then travelled to Tonga for on­site installation. While he valued the experienced gained there were co­ ordination difficulties and he acknowledged the limitations of total dependence on solar energy and called for more investigation of biomass alternatives. Comments came from Fiona Natusch analyst with Castalia advisors who have prepared an Energy Roadmap for Vanuatu, Riyad Mucadam, Phd student from Marshall Islands who has worked at grassroots with community enterprises in the Northern Pacific assembling solar PV kits, and Hon Nandi Glassie who tabled the Cook Islands Chart for Renewable Energy. Juliet Clendon outlined the work of Engineers without Borders in the Pacific and Paul Bruce, Wellington Regional Councillor, spoke of his involvement with small scale community projects in Wellington that may be applicable in the Pacific. We cut three small ring cakes to celebrate THE PEOPLE'S MOVEMENT

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2 Many people are saying that we can no longer rely on our national and international leaders to address the problem, and that people need to rely on their own initiatives. We are very concerned about this development. 3 While we applaud the call for people to take initiatives, provided that they are constructive, we believe that only strong national and international leadership can bring together the resources and coordination required to address these massive global challenges sufficiently quickly and effectively.

4 While many international leaders have demonstrated an acute awareness of the magnitude of the problem, they are constrained by the reluctance of most national leaders to address the threat effectively.

5 While we have some understanding of the magnitude and complexity of the issues and the many competing interests involved, we seek a much clearer leadership from the government. In particular  We seek greater recognition by the government of the threat that is facing our future generations, and evidence 14 UNANZ.ORG.NZ


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that they take the threat seriously.  We seek stronger measures to stimulate the changes in community attitudes, industry structures and resilience required for NZ to manage the forthcoming challenges.  We seek evidence that the government is doing its utmost diplomatically to promote the level of international cooperation required for global sustainability.  We seek a more proactive engagement of the government with community groups in developing ways in which NZ can address the challenges of sustainability. This process should make the best of UN and other international resources to promote NZ’s sustainability.

6 We suggest that an effective leadership position which demonstrates the capability of the government to engender a community commitment to ensuring sustainability, would do much to revive youth and general community faith in political leadership. 7 We look forward to discussing ways in which we might contribute to these objectives.

Hon Simon Bridges replies:

Thank you for the attached document outlining your concerns regarding the Government’s leadership on climate change, I will try and address the points you have raised.

The Government is committed to reducing New Zealand’s carbon emissions and ensuring that we play our part on the global stage. We are taking the necessary measures to make this happen, based on the best scientific data and research available. I agree that while it is great for individual people to take their own initiatives, it requires leadership on a national level in order to coordinate efforts and resources effectively to address this issue. Your call for clearer leadership has been noted. I can assure you the Government THE PEOPLE'S MOVEMENT

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recognises the magnitude of the issues we face and takes them very seriously. I appreciate your view that the Government needs to seek stronger measures to stimulate changes in community attitudes industry attitudes. This is something we are constantly reviewing and seeing where improvements can be made.

Global cooperation is imperative if we are to properly address the challenges we face, and diplomatically we are doing everything we can to promote this. Minister Groser is incredibly active at the international level representing New Zealand and lobbying for this. As I believe I have mentioned to you before, New Zealand does a lot of work especially in the area of agricultural emissions, which is important given this country’s unique emissions profile. The Global Research Alliance on Agricultural Greenhouse Gases, which involves more than thirty countries, is focused on finding ways to reduce greenhouse emissions produced from food production and agriculture. We have committed $45 million to this over the next four years. I also note your comments regarding the need for more proactive engagement of the Government with community groups, and is something I will pass on to Minister Groser and the Ministry of Environment. I would be interested in hearing your views on ways in which we can achieve this. Thank you again for for taking the time to share your views regarding this very important issue. Kind regards,

Hon Simon Bridges

Member of Parliament for Tauranga

Opportunities for global engagement Gray Southon

New Zealand relies for its prosperity on effective engagement with the rest of the world, and prides itself on its innovative, 15

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forward looking, morally based green initiatives. But is this really the case? Let us look at some of the opportunities to really put our principles into action.

Rio+20: The recent summit on sustainability in Rio de Janiero, featured a Corporate Sustainability Forum in which approx 1,400 business and investment participants combined with the same number from civil society, academia, cities, government and the United Nations (1). This was a magnificent opportunity to learn about what is happening around the world and share experiences. New Zealand had one business representative and one business journalist there. We missed a great opportunity to engage with the wider global action – but we can still get some idea of these activities through the Rio+20 web site uncsd2012.org Green Economy Initiatives: The United Nations reports on the notable initiatives that countries around the world are undertaking as shown in the map below (2). Note the lack of action reported in New Zealand. Are we not doing anything significant, or are we merely too complacent to promote it? Whatever, that needs to be rectified smartly. Global Compact web site: unglobalcompact.org

A network of businesses to advance the standards of business and to promote their contribution to global development.

NZ has four small participants, in contrast to Australia’s 110, (including major banks and companies such as BHP Billington), Singapore’s 66 and Sweden’s 147.

The Global Compact has 8,700 corporate participants in over 130 countries and is widely subscribed to around Asia. NZ could be much better networked into regional and global companies interested to find partners and to navigate the tricky territory of new markets. Academic Impact web site: academicimpact.org Academic Impact is a UN related global initiative that aligns institutions of higher education with the United Nations in PEOPLE S MOVEMENT THE TPHE EOPLE 'S M'OVEMENT FOR

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actively supporting ten universally accepted principles in the areas of human rights, literacy, sustainability and conflict resolution. New Zealand has one very small university in membership. This contrasts with Australia’s 19 (including most major universities), China’s ~40, and over 200 in the United States. NZ universities can also engage globally in this way. PRME UN Principles for Responsible Management Education web site: unprme.org

This was established to inspire and champion responsible and sustainable management education, research and thought leadership globally. New Zealand has three of its 10 management schools participating, comparing favourably with Australia’s 15 out of 70. It is good to see the business schools getting involved.

The UN and associated organisations are bringing countries together on many fronts. NZ needs to be part of the action!! References

1. unglobalcompact.org/docs/news_events/20 12_CSF/Rio_CSF_Overview_Outcomes.pdf 2. sustainabledevelopment.un.org/gepolicies. html

UN Action on Sustainability Gray Southon

After the comedown from the exotic heights of Rio+20 it is tempting to conclude that the balloon has collapsed and everyone has returned to their daily pre­ occupations. But this is certainly not the case, and there is a wealth of information and resources telling us what is going on. For instance: Sustainable Development Web Site. sustainabledevelopment.un.org

This is the UN’s “Knowledge Platform,” A guide to everything UN on Sustainability. It has sections for

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• Intergovernmental Processes – detailing the conferences and proceedings, with access to details for each country • The UN System – detailing how each section of the UN is involved in driving the sustainability objectives agreed at Rio+20.

• Major Groups – (community sections) Business and Industry, Children and Youth, Farmers, Indigenous Peoples, local authorities, NGOs, Scientific and Technological Community, Women and finally Workers and Trade Unions. It just demonstrates how complex this whole process is. • Topics – around 50 topics from Climate Change to Africa, with things like education and finance included. • SD (Sustaina ble Developm ent) in Action, Partnershi ps, commitm ents and policies (with a map to show who is involved where).

• Resources (all the documents you could ever wish for, like 6,040 of them!!) • This is still rather a work­in­progress with the occasional faulty link, but it presents a wealth of knowledge Rio Conventions Pavilion riopavilion.org

This is a platform for raising awareness and sharing information about the latest practices and scientific findings on the co­ benefits that can be realized through implementation of the three Rio Conventions, which are on Biological Diversity (CBD), Combating Desertification (UNCCD) and on Climate Change

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(UNFCCC).

International Institute for Sustainable Development (iisd) iisd.org

This is an independent, Canadian based organisation that is engaged with global sustainability negotiations, and analysis the politics and processes involved. It provides a compendium of news, statements, commentary and events related to sustainable development, as well as a calendar of events and daily news feeds. It also provides topic–based pages on Water, Sustainable Energy, Climate Change, Sustainable Development, Biodiversity, Small Island Developing States, Africa, and the Latin America and Caribbean Region. For instance, the Climate Change site can be

found at:

Climate Change Policy and Practice climate­l.iisd.org

A very interesting analysis of the challenges of the upcoming Doha COP18 can be found at s.coop/durban2020

Just these three sites provide a bewildering plethora of resources, that make it clear that there is an enormous amount going on. The fact that one can easily become quite overwhelmed is frustrating, and you might wonder why the apparent duplication. Diversity of perspectives, of course, is a protection against a dominant bias, but it does demand greater effort to get on top of it all. One wonders what resources NZ 17

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authorities are able to put into ensuring we are able to make the best of it.

WFUNA 40th Plenary, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Richard Evans

The members of the Youth Forum at Rio de Janiero, Brazil. Photo: Richard Evans

Earlier this month (November) I attended the 40th WFUNA Plenary, in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. I did so as a member of WFUNA's Youth Advisory Group, which I joined in 2010 after stepping down as National President of UN Youth New Zealand. This is a group of young people from UN Youth Associations and UNA youth sections who advise WFUNA’s Secretary­General on the organisation's work with young people.

Alongside the main plenary assembly, a Global Youth Forum was held. This comprised a series of capacity building workshops, focussing on media and communication strategy, project management and other skill­sets relevant to the work of UN Youth Associations. The Forum was an invaluable opportunity for participants to learn from each other's experiences and have input on WFUNA’s agenda as regards young people. You can read more about the Plenary on WFUNA's website: wfuna.org THE PEOPLE'S MOVEMENT

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Introduction to UNANZ SO Humanitarian Affairs Mikaël Gartner

In mid­November I met with Jean­Paul Bizoza, the outgoing SO for Humanitarian Affairs, to transfer command and continue the efforts that Jean­ Paul has pursued. UNANZ acknowledges the very significant work that Jean­Paul Bizoza has put into the National Role and continues to put into the Auckland Branch. Jean­Paul has been a strong refugee advocate and leader involved with numerous organizations beyond the call of duty; even serving as the Deputy Representative for the Burundian Community in New Zealand. During the next few months, Jean­Paul Bizoza and I will be working in conjunction to provide a smooth transition between incoming and outgoing.

I am a structural engineer working for the Canterbury Earthquake Recovery Authority (CERA) in Christchurch. I have substantial disaster response experience in Urban Search and Rescue (USAR) after various natural disasters. In 2008, I deployed under FEMA USAR to Hurricane Gustav and Ike. I also deployed under USAID/UN OCHA with an INSARAG Heavy USAR Team to the 2010 Haiti Earthquake, 2011 Christchurch Earthquake, and 2011 Japan tsunamis. In Los Angeles, I served as a Fire Academy Instructor and wildland fire fighter. After moving from California to New Zealand, I joined and provided training to New Zealand USAR personnel. I look forward to working with UNANZ membership and liaising with partner organizations. If you have any questions or requests, please do not hesitate to email: humanitarianaffairs@unanz.org.nz 18

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National President Graham Hassall

President’s Column The updates provided by UNANZ branches for this newsletter show the spirit of our Association in action. This is, our Constitution advises, a “peoples’ movement for the United Nations, through which the principles of the UN Charter can be shared widely and its vision realised.” Given the state of world events, “the people” have much work to do. The first task is to inform ourselves of circumstances not only in New Zealand and this region of the world, but on a global scale, following which we will be better placed to share our considered views with others. This objective, as the UNANZ constitution explains, is “To promote research, information, education and general public knowledge about the treaties, conventions and resolutions agreed in the UN General Assembly by the governments of the world and furthermore

Jim Carruthers and Gray Southon with the UNA Tauranga Branch panel added to the Sokka Gakai International display on Sustainability. Photo: Graham Hassall

provide the Government of New Zealand with information as to the evaluation of UN policies and actions by the New Zealand public.” So there is much to do.

In October and November I had the opportunity to participate in events run by THE PEOPLE'S MOVEMENT

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the Tauranga, Canterbury and Wellington Branches, and to note these experiences in discussions with some government officials.

On October 18th, I attended the opening of an exhibition in Tauranga on sustainability, in which the Tauranga Branch collaborated with Sokka Gakai International. This was followed by a discussion over dinner about future Branch activities.

Graham Hassall enjoys dinner and conversations with members of the Tauranga Association. Photo: Graham Hassall

The following day, October 19th, I met members of the Canterbury Branch to discuss the rejuvenation of their work, which has been greatly hampered as a consequence of the Christchurch earthquake. The members at that meeting demonstrated not only resilience but enthusiasm for expansion of UN activities in Christchurch, and increased collaboration with affiliates and like­ minded organizations in the region.

I have also participated in several seminars organized in this period by the Wellington Branch, and at Victoria University I have met with Portia Holt, President of the Wellington Branch of UN Youth, and have met with Richard Evans, who represented UNANZ at the WFUNA conference in Rio de Janiero. At Victoria University I have acquainted the Dean of the Business School, Professor Bob Buckle, and Pro Vice­Chancellor International, Professor Rob Rabel, with such UN­related activities as the Global Compact, and the 19

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A group of Canterbury UNANZ members turned out to meet National President Graham Hassall to discuss the rejuvenation of their work in Christchurch. Photo: Graham Hassall

Academic Council on the United Nations System (ACUNS).

This month we welcome Joy Dunsheath as a member of the National Executive Committee, and Mikael Gartner as Special Officer for Humanitarian Affairs.

UNANZ members and Branches bring together considerable expertise about the UN system with a concern for the trajectory of world affairs, whether in relation to such urgent matters as climate change, sustainable use of resources, enhancing peace and security, promoting human rights awareness – or to other concerns. Government officials and diplomats have respect for UNANZ and have expressed their general support for our future activities.

Our reception at Premier House to mark United Nations Day, for instance, on 24th October, led to several inquiries as to how the work of UNANZ could be assisted. A Model UN has been held in Christchurch, and around the country UN Youth continue their busy schedule. THE PEOPLE'S MOVEMENT FOR THE UNITED NATIONS

On October 13th, Helen Clark, currently Administrator of UNDP, made a presentation at Victoria University on “fit for purpose governance”. Although the event was organized by the Institute for Governance and Policy Studies, the presence of UNANZ members in the audience was acknowledged. Whilst in Port Vila on October 23rd I met with Hannington Alatoa, President of the United Nations Association of Vanuatu, who is keen to support future collaboration with UNANZ. The National Executive Committee has continued to meet on a monthly basis in Wellington, and is currently making plans for 2013, including a National conference in May, and additional support for Branch activities. A new Branch is being planned for Dunedin. On December 10th we will hold events around the country to mark Human Rights Day, a timely a reminder, if one were needed, of the fundamental values that still need to be championed in all countries and on a daily basis. 20

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President, UN Youth Aotearoa New Zealand anton.smith@unyouth.org.nz Kia ora tatou

UN Youth is heading towards a somewhat quieter time of the year, one when all of our volunteers will get a short reprieve from the rigours of a year working for their peers to educate them about the UN and world affairs!

We have accomplished a great deal this year. Our 80 staff across the country have organised numerous events for secondary and tertiary students, ranging from Model UN General Assemblies, Model Security Councils to Model International Courts of Justice and Model European Unions. We have sought the opinions of rangatahi from all walks of life on domestic policies at Youth Declaration. We have even sent students to Australia, Hong Kong, Switzerland, France, Germany, Belgium and The Netherlands to experience international conferences and witness diplomacy overseas, and to Vanuatu to engage in development work to benefit a Pacific community. It has been a year well spent. There are a couple of very important developments we are very excited about progressing in the New Year. One such development will be a new online competition for high school students. It is being planned to allow young people to experience a Model UN from the comfort of their own home, without having to worry about travelling large distances if they are unable to do so, and we are anticipating a swell of participants who are eager to take part in this new initiative. Another development will be the establishment of our new charitable trust to promote better accessibility of our opportunities to young THE PEOPLE'S MOVEMENT

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people and we hope that our alumni will see the trust as a way to help the organisation grow steadily into the future.

Finally, UN Youth was thrilled to be nominated for the Community of the Year Award 2013, a prestigious category of the New Zealander of the Year Awards! It will certainly be an honour to be considered and we know that our members, the ‘UN Youth Community’, contribute every day towards continuing New Zealand’s proud history of international leadership. More than ever, we are thankful for the support of all those people and organisations here and abroad who value what we provide to young Kiwis.

On behalf of UN Youth and our volunteers I wish you all the very best for the holiday season and a Happy New Year. Nga mihi nui

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BRANCH REPORTS UNANZ has active regional branches in Auckland, Waikato, Tauranga, Whanganui, Wellington and Canterbury.

The best way to get involved in UNANZ is through your nearest regional branch: Auckland: auckland@unanz.org.nz Waikato: waikato@unanz.org.nz Tauranga: tauranga@unanz.org.nz Whanganui: wanganui@unanz.org.nz Wellington: wellington@unanz.org.nz Canterbury: canterbury@unanz.org.nz

TAURANGA BRANCH Gray Southon

This year has been a little slower with no external speakers scheduled. Nevertheless we had an interesting range of activities: Activities

Speech Awards 27th March We had 6 contestants with Claire Esterman winning. Daniella Schroder, our student exec member, joined the adjudicating team where she contributed very well.

Ethnic Festival 17th March A team of 5 maintained a stall and distributed stickers and pamphlets. There was considerable interest in the stall, but no commitment to membership. It was particularly valuable to have students involved. Merivale Festival 31st March A team of 3 circulated distributing stickers to the children and pamphlets to the adults where appropriate. These stickers were welcomed by nearly all takers.

David Tong Visit We were hoping to bring David Tong to Tauranga to speak in schools on his experience at the Durban Climate Change Conference, but we were unable to get sufficient schools involved as the topic did not relate adequately with their curriculum requirements. Talk to Tauranga City Council Gray Southon made a presentation on Global Perspectives of Sustainability on 26th March. This was appreciated, but was a little beyond their central concerns.

AGM 29th March While only 13 attended THE PEOPLE'S MOVEMENT

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the AGM, there was a strong interest by some new members which produced an executive of nine. Unfortunately the exec has in fact been rather lean, as several found work commitments too onerous, one moved out of town and one has been overseas for much of the year. We were joined this year by Daniella Schroder (head girl at Bethlehem College), and Spencer Voorend (year 11 at Bethlehem College) who chaired the model UNs. They had an opportunity to develop their skills in 2011, and have done very well. Gray also presented the talk he had given to the City Council at the AGM.

Katikati Ukelele Festival 21st April One of our new members prompted our involvement in this festival with the theme of World Peace and Harmony through music. While it was an interesting experiment it was not really in tune with the environment, and attracted limited interest.

Anzac Day Parade 25th Apri. We participated in the Anzac Parade with two of our members with UN service laying the wreath in memory of the people who served in UN operations. Senior model UN 5th May The location was the Tauranga Council Chambers for the first time. This proved a most appropriate, though rather cramped, setting. The topics were the freedom of the internet and sustainability. Strong registrations gave us 22 teams and 62 students. Presentations were made by the Mayor, Stuart Crosby.

UN Forums These are occasional informal events for members which are driven by the interests and concerns of participants. They are held every two weeks when possible, numbers vary from 3 – 5 and activity varies from being very focussed and action oriented, to rather casual. One meeting resulted in a variety of outcomes related to promoting publicity on Rio+20. Another included several youth from university along with school students and was quite unstructured. Later in the year they adopted a concern about the public perception of the UN. There were 22

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exchanges with the National President, which have opened up the possibility of cooperative action. Our final meeting this year will focus on the UN’s development strategy and the role of Helen Clark.

Rio+20 has presented a bit of a focus, and we attempted a little demonstration highlighting the lack of coverage in the media. Even thought it was choreographed by a local newspaper it failed to get published. Junior Model UN 18th August Bethlehem College. This was a smaller event with only 13 teams and 45 students. The topics were again the freedom of the internet and sustainability, but the resolution had to be modified following the experience of the Senior Model UN. Both the model UNs were very successful, thanks to the expertise of the youth chairs. Sustainability Exhibition ­ The Seeds of Hope We supported Sokka Gakai (SGI) in presenting this exhibition of 24 2m x 1m panels for three weeks in Tauranga. We supplemented the exhibit with a panel about Rio+20. We also prepared brochures to explain the role of the UN in sustainability. The exhibition was opened on the 18th October by the mayor of Tauranga, Stuart Crosby, with the SGI National Director Jimi Wallace, and UNANZ National President Graham Hassall. Well over 100 attended. The exhibit was opened to the public and schools parties for three weeks until the 11th November in a city arcade and staffed by both SGI and UNAT members.

Meeting with National President, Graham Hassall During Graham’s visit he had a dinner with members where we discussed the nature of UNANZ and how it might develop. Intermediate School Model UN: on the 28th November Tauranga Intermediate School will once more run a model UN, this time on Human Rights, to be chaired by our students. UN Day event We had a simple shared meal with discussions on sustainability THE PEOPLE'S MOVEMENT

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issues.

Youth Program With Daniella Schroder moving to University, we have invited Niamh Blackman of Tauranga Girls’ College to join our executive and train to chair the model UNs. Spencer Voorend continues in those roles.

Visit to local MP, Simon Bridges (member for Tauranga, Minister for Consumer Affairs and Associate Minister for Transport and Climate Change Issues) A group of seven including four young members visited him on the 16th November to discuss the governments leadership role in sustainability action. It turned out to be a difficult time for Simon and there was limited effective exchange. It was valuable to maintain links with our local MP, however, and he was interested in meeting again.

Facebook We have a facebook page “Tauranga United Nations” with 66 members, mainly from our model UN activities. We have covered a range of UN related activities, but have yet to get many members significantly involved. End of year event On 28th November there will be a shared meal with informal discussions. WANGANUI BRANCH Kate Smith

We have had quite a busy few months, with several very successful events. Despite our fairly static membership, we are able to have respectable numbers attending our functions.

Our International Day of Peace celebrations began a few days early, when we were able to host Dr Kate Dewes and her husband Cmd Robert Green. They managed to give presentations to U3A and in the Alexander Heritage Library, where their books were in demand. We were also able to host a small dinner for them at Visions Restaurant – the training restaurant for Whanganui UCOL. The celebrations this year were extra special as it was the 10th anniversary of the 23

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dedication of Handspan – the Wanganui peace sculpture – to a Culture of Peace and Non­Violence for the Children of the World. So our gathering at noon gave us the opportunity of not only joining in prayers for peace with others around the world, but to have a local councilor, Sue Westwood (deputizing for our Mayor, Annette Main) re­dedicate the sculpture. Later in the day, we moved to the Quaker Settlement for afternoon tea, a ‘birthday cake’ and our annual International Day of Peace event. After guests were welcomed, the names of all 193 countries of the UN were read out with a plea that peace would prevail. Dr Kate Dewes was our guest speaker, taking as her topic, “Sustainable Peace for a Sustainable Future”. This was very well received.

involved in promoting peace in their home communities. After the video, there was a spirited discussion on what we might be able to do to support the Afghan youths 2000 voices appeal with the involvement of local young people. Although no clear decision was made, there will be some promotion of this initiative held on Human Rights Day, 10 December.

Nigerian peacebuilding weekend. This records a very inspiring event showing how people of different faiths and ethnic groups can, by actively listening, come together and pledge to be actively

The following are just a selection of delegations taking part.

The next function was to celebrate UN Day when we held a viewing of a DVD of a

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Early November saw our annual MUN­GA for junior students. This was well attended with 19 delegations from local schools, secondary and intermediate (see report below this for details). The younger students were very enthusiastic and took an active part all day. Those delegates who chose to ‘dress up’ had put much thought and effort into their costumes. They were also able to maintain their ‘nationality’ for the day. Some very tasty contributions were made to lunch as well!

It was a most successful day with students saying they would be back next time! 24

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We are looking forward to a function on Human Rights Day and that will bring us to the end of yet another year.

We continue to work with other local community groups whenever possible and this allows for a wider distribution of notices of events. The Branch is in good heart and wishes UNANZ members around the country the compliments of the season and a happy, healthy and prosperous New Year. MUN­GA for Junior Students held at Wanganui Girls’ College, Friday 2 November 2012.

We had another successful MUN with 19 delegations from 6 local schools. There were two delegations this year from Wanganui Intermediate School which is very pleasing. All the more so, as these delegates took a full part in the day’s event.

Tables were well dressed, with some going to great lengths to display their country. Where costumes were worn, much thought and effort had gone into them, and all delegates were able to maintain their country affiliation throughout the day. The contributions to lunch were generous and delicious. This is very pleasing but makes it more difficult for our committee to judge how much food to prepare! There was time to debate two of the three resolutions prepared: African Nuclear­Weapon­Free Zone Treaty Debate was generally good, although sometimes wandered into the nuclear power area. The resolution had 3 clauses with the following results:

Clause 1 Carried 12 For, 7 Against, No Abstentions Clause 2 Carried 12 For, 7 Against, No Abstentions Clause 3 Carried 12 For, 7 Against, No Abstentions

Situation of Human Rights in the Islamic Republic of Iran Debate here was vigorous, with several delegates strongly upholding the ‘right’ to apply Sharia law. However, the fact that some of THE PEOPLE'S MOVEMENT

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those on whom it was being applied, were not Muslim nor wishing to be bound by Sharia, was often overlooked. Delegates were able to retain their country allegiance without showing their own preferences. The resolution had 4 clauses with the following results: Clause 1 Carried 15 For, 0 Against, 4 Abstentions Clause 2 Carried Abstentions

16 For, 1 Against, 2

Carried

10 For, 6 Against, 3

Clause 3 Had an amendment which was lost 8 For, 11 Against Abstentions Clause 4

Carried

Unanimous

There were only two amendments proposed, one of which was declined. However, there was a lot of lobbying going on. Assistance was received from Wanganui Girls’ College staff, who once again had set up the assembly hall with flags of many nations, and two semi circular sets of desks which allowed delegates and runners to move freely between delegations. The hostel kitchen heated up our pizzas and there were students assigned to help the branch volunteers. Trade Aid again provided some chocolate bars and book marks as prizes to winning delegates. Staff from contributing schools were on hand throughout the day, coming and going as work schedules permitted. They had worked well in preparing the students ahead of the MUN. And, of course, the student delegates themselves had researched their countries well and the opening speeches were informative, often delivered in part in the local language, with touches of humour which added extra interest. Assistance was given in chairing the meeting by one of the Wanganui Girls’ College students, who has been giving valuable help for several sessions. This is part of our attempt to have more young people involved in the organization of the day. Vice President, Mary­Ann Ewing is doing 25

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invaluable work in the organization of the MUN, from dealing with the local schools as well as coaching her own teams. We are looking forward to holding further equally successful MUN­GAs next year at times mutually convenient to the local schools. WELLINGTON BRANCH Robin Halliday

Wellington branch members were able to attend the National United Nations Day reception held in the very pleasant surroundings of the Prime Minister’s residence, Premier House.

We thank Hon John Key for allowing this.

Around 75 members and supporters including a number of embassies heard the Secretary of Foreign Affairs and Trade, John Allen, emphasise the importance of the work of the United Nations and its agencies and the New Zealand bid for a Security Council seat in 2014. Other speakers included our National President Dr Graham Hassall and UN Youth President Anton Smith. Lachlan Mackay, a National Vice President, thanked the speakers and Hon Graham Kelly a former Vice President entertained us on the Grand piano.

Wellington branch have worked with National office to organise roundtables in September and October. The first was on Responsibility to Protect and the second on Renewable Energy in the Pacific.

Mary Davies­Colley, a National Vice President who had attended a WFUNA Seminar in Beijing on R2P last December, facilitated the roundtable. Contributors included Dr Andrew Ladley UN negotiator, Michael Powles former NZ representative at the UN, Dr Colin Robinson, West African security specialist and Graham Hassall UNANZ President and Assoc Professor, School of Governance Victoria University of Wellington. We were particularly pleased to have students who were writing thesis on the topic present and Ingrid Harder from Canada who had been part of the THE PEOPLE'S MOVEMENT

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team who put together the original report. Was there a conclusion? Not really but there is a growing international recognition of the damage internal conflicts do to their civilian populations. To what extent military intervention, even UN sanctions assist, is still in question but there is a growing international cry, encouraged by the Media, to do something. To quote Navi Pillay, UN High Commissioner, in a statement about Syria made the week before the Roundtable

“Bearing in mind the consistently deplorable and steadily deteriorating situation on the ground, I would like to remind states that they unanimously agreed, at the 2005 World Summit, that each state is obliged to protect its population from crimes against humanity, war crimes and other international crimes. This responsibility entails the prevention of such crimes, including their incitement, through appropriate and necessary means. When a state fails to protect its population from serious international crimes, the international community is responsible to step in by taking protective action in a collective, timely and decisive manner. The international community must assume its responsibilities and act in unison to prevent further violations. Actions that directly contribute to escalating the violence, such as providing arms, will most likely only result in more civilians being killed and injured.” In October, following on from Rio+20 and the Hon Murray McCully’s address to the UN General Assembly a Roundtable was held with MFAT NZAid Meridian Energy Engineers without Borders Hon Nandi Glassie from Cook Islands. Other contributors covered the Energy Roadmap for Vanuatu and grassroots projects in the Marshall Islands. We cut three small ring cakes to celebrate The Tokelau’s becoming the first country in the world to be 100% renewable. We also heard about the small scale 26

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community power projects being developed in New Zealand with assistance from the Hikurangi Foundation and whether they could be used as a model for small island states.

2012 is the UN Year of Renewable Energy and New Zealand has been developing Solar Power systems in the Pacific – notably Tonga, the Tokelau’s and the Cook Islands. While this assists in a small way to reduce greenhouse gasses it has real economic benefits by reducing dependence on expensive fossil fuels. There will be a Pacific Energy Summit held in March 2013 sponsored by the New Zealand Government and the European Union. A report of the discussion at the roundtable is being prepared and is available on request.

Branch members will be invited to join with affiliated organisation representatives to a Christmas lunch on Human Rights Day December 10th where we will discuss the relevance of UN Human Rights Conventions to the work of International organisations. CANTERBURY BRANCH Mary McGiven

On the October 25, the day after UN Day, Canterbury Branch ran a Model UN General Assembly in the Horticultural Hall. This was attended by over 90 students and was both very colourful, with national costumes worn, and interesting with the spoeeches made. A very enjoyable event!

2013 National Calendar Febuary 10 23

National Executive meeting

National Council meeting

April 11

May

ISSUE No 3 National Eecutive meeting

TBA Secondary Schools Speech Awards ­ Finals TBA

Annual General Meeting

TBA

UNANZ National Conference ­ Wellington

TBA

June 1

13

July

UNANZ National Conference ­ Auckland

UNANZ Newsletter

National Executive meeting

11

National Executive meeting

8

National Executive meeting

1

UNANZ Newsletter

21

International Day of Peace – (Branch Events and National Representation at Wellington Event)

August

September 14

National Council Meeting in Wellington

October 24 10

United Nations Day – UNANZ National Event National Executive meeting

November 14

National Executive meeting

1

UNANZ Newsletter

December 10

Human Rights Day ­ UNANZ National Event

March

12

14

National roundtables or seminars will be advised when dates and programmes are confirmed

1

UNANZ Newsletter

31

All Branch AGMs to be completed

National Executive meeting

THE PEOPLE'S MOVEMENT

FOR THE

UNITED NATIONS

National Executive meeting

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UNANZ News December 2012  

UNANZ quarterly newsletter of events and information related to the United Nations Association and its goals