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Ed Clark, Richard W. Franklin, and Kenneth Young


Ed Clark, Richard W. Franklin, and Kenneth Young


Catalog published in conjunction with the exhibition The Language of Abstraction: Ed Clark, Richard W. Franklin, and Kenneth Young UMUC Arts Program Gallery March 4–June 24, 2018 © 2018 University of Maryland University College. All rights reserved. Copyright credits and attribution for certain illustrations are cited internally proximate to the illustrations. ISBN: 13:978-0-9842265-0-4 ISBN: 10:0-98442265-0-8

COVER ARTWORK DETAILS:

Ed Clark, Untitled, 1981–85 Kenneth Young, Untitled, 1972 Richard W. Franklin, Moonstruck, 2016


Katherine Lambert

Javier Miyares President University of Maryland University College

As you know, UMUC—since its inception in 1947—

we are invited to explore and expand our own under-

has focused on bringing affordable, quality education

standing of color, light, and art itself. As I have so

within reach for women and men everywhere. Our

often said, art fires our imaginations, drives innova-

Arts Program supports that mission, allowing us to

tion, and enriches our world. It is truly a privilege to

On behalf of University of Mary-

introduce the work of emerging and established artists

showcase the talent and unique perspectives of these

land University College (UMUC)

to new and broader audiences, including our own local

remarkable artists.

and the 80,000 students we serve

and regional communities.

Steven Halperson

each year, let me say what an honor it is to host The

I sincerely hope that you enjoy this wonderful exhibi-

Language of Abstraction: Ed Clark, Richard W. Franklin,

Through the work of these three internationally

tion, and I thank you for your continued support of the

and Kenneth Young.

acclaimed abstractionists—Clark, Franklin, and Young—

arts and our Arts Program in 2018.

Eric Key Director, Arts Program University of Maryland University College

Richard W. Franklin describes his works as having a

and Jumaane N’Namdi for contributing essays to the

powerful and unique color voice. He explores the

catalog. I extend a huge thank-you to Margot Stein of

boundaries between vibrant colors by creating com-

Margot Stein Gallery and Bethesda Fine Art, Connie

plex bleeds and blurs. The late Kenneth Young used

Tilton of Tilton Gallery, and of course the artists them-

The Language of Abstraction

a technique of blotting acrylic paints to create works

selves. We started this project before Young passed

exhibition features the works of

representative of the galaxy and nature. His science

away and Clark’s health began to decline, and we are

three artists: Richard W. Franklin,

background is displayed in his art. Ed Clark creates his

so grateful to have conversed with both of them. Their

Kenneth Young, and Ed Clark. These abstractionists

signature style with the use of a broom—a process he

representatives have worked hard to provide the paint-

create works that are explosive in color and movement.

began in the early 1960s. Since then, Clark has pro-

ings for this exhibition. It goes without saying that the

Their painting styles and color palettes draw the viewer

duced works by throwing paint, letting gravity chart

Arts Program owes a great deal of gratitude to Leslie

to the work and encourage conversation between artist

its course, and using the broom to guide the paint. By

Young and Melanca Clark, who embraced this project

and viewer through abstraction. This conversation—

dictating movement, depth, and color, the artists use

on behalf of their fathers. Finally, I would like to thank

a mental dialogue in which the viewer tries to under-

paint as a means to communicate.

UMUC for all that it does to support the arts.

questioning how and why and concludes with under-

This exhibition would not have been possible without

Please enjoy the conversation that lies within each

standing the meaning of the work. Within that frame-

the generosity and commitment of all those involved,

painting in The Language of Abstraction: Ed Clark,

work, the language of abstract painting emerges.

including the staff in various departments at UMUC.

Richard W. Franklin, and Kenneth Young.

stand the message within the painting—begins with

I would like to thank Virginia Adams, Jennifer Cohen,

3


Ed Clark was born in New Orleans in 1926 and moved

Clark’s early abstract work, with its active, colorful,

with his family to Chicago at a young age. He served in

allover brushwork, placed him squarely within the

the U.S. Army Air Corps during World War II and grad-

New York abstract expressionist camp. Clark has cited

uated from the Art Institute of Chicago in 1951. From

Willem de Kooning, Joan Mitchell, and Russian-born

1952 to 1956, he studied, painted, and exhibited his

Nicolas de Staël as influences. By the time he returned

work in Paris among a group of French and American

to Paris for a second sojourn, from 1966 to 1969, Clark

artists, including Beauford Delaney, Sam Francis,

had developed his signature approach: making large,

Ellsworth Kelly, and George Sugarman. When Clark

horizontal abstract paintings by wielding a push broom

returned to New York, he joined the Brata Gallery,

to achieve the sense of speed and wide sweeping

a new artist-run storefront gallery on Tenth Street

paths of color that have characterized his work for

came of age as abstract painters in the middle of the

in lower Manhattan. In a group exhibition in 1957,

much of his career. Having placed his canvas on the

20th century. They entered art worlds that were famil-

Clark showed a painting shaped by the application

floor and marked spaces for broomstrokes with tape,

iar with, if not always receptive to, abstract forms of

of paper fragments that extended the pictorial space

Clark would deposit pools of paint along the edges to

artistic syntax.

beyond the canvas, noted then as the first shaped

produce particular color blends and gradations as he

painting ever exhibited.¹

swept the broom from one side to the other. As Clark

Virginia K. Adams, PhD

Ed Clark, Richard W. Franklin, and Kenneth Young

The three artists’ careers have overlapped in time and

once said, “I began to

included some similar experiences: professional educa-

believe . . . that the real

tion in schools of fine arts; extensive international travel

truth is in the stroke.”²

and, in the cases of Clark and Franklin, substantial periods of living abroad; early adoption of abstraction

In this exhibition, two

as an approach to painting; and employment of a wide

untitled works, one from

variety of materials and painting practices, including

1983 and the other from

working on large-scale canvases on the floor. Yet Clark,

1981 to 1985, reflect this

Franklin, and Young did not know each other, and their

process. Another untitled

work has not previously been shown together. Their

work from the early 1990s

separate paths as artists reflect the vicissitudes of the

shows a variation in the

art world and the influences of place and time. In the

process, with broom-

cases of Clark and Young, changing views on African

swept arcs emanating

American abstract painters have affected the reception

from both sides or the

and promotion of their work.

top and bottom of the Ed Clark, Untitled early 1990s, acrylic on canvas 55¼ x 70½ inches Courtesy of the artist and Tilton Gallery, New York

4

canvas, divided by a broad horizontal stroke.


An untitled work on paper from the early 1970s,

Kenneth Young (1933–2017) was born in Louisville,

although smaller in size, is indicative of many larger

Kentucky, but spent his career in Washington, D.C.,

paintings he made throughout the 1970s that include

working within the sphere of the Washington Color

a central elliptical form. An untitled work from 2005 is

School painters. Having earned a degree in physics

a reprise of Clark’s early explosive abstraction.

at Indiana University, he enrolled at the University of Louisville intending to study chemical engineering

As an African American abstractionist, Clark has cred-

but switched to painting instead. Young’s time in

ited his stays in Paris with giving him the freedom to

Louisville immersed him in that city’s cultural milieu

develop his art without some of the limitations and

with Sam Gilliam, Bill Hutson, and others who engaged

rejections he would have experienced in the United

in endless discussions of philosophy, music, and art.⁷

States. “Over there, rejection had nothing to do with being black. I was viewed as American,” he has said.³

Young moved to Washington, D.C., in 1963 and began a three-decade career designing exhibitions

Until recently, African American artists working in ab-

for the Smithsonian Institution while continuing to

straction often faced disinterest and rejection by major

paint. His early exhibition history reveals that he

museums and lacked the regular gallery representation

showed his work in Louisville at the university and

that can guide and promote an artist’s career. During

other venues but more often in the Washington, D.C.,

the course of the civil rights and Black Power move-

region.⁸ His first one-man show took place at the

ments in particular, abstract painting by black artists

Franz Bader Gallery, where curator Jacob Kainen

was considered by some as “white art in blackface.”⁴

described his approach: “Thus, while Young shares

According to curator Valerie Cassel Oliver, “There was

some technical concerns with other members of

this manifesto with the Black Arts Movement that you

the color school, his point of view is basically that

did work that reflected the beauty of that community

of an expressionist.”⁹ This statement encapsulates

in no uncertain terms.”⁵ In essence, nonfigurative art

Young’s position on the periphery of the Washington

that “Although black separatists and social-protest

by black artists was seen as insufficiently connected

Color School despite his friendship and rivalry with

artists use specifically black subject matter, others,

to the causes and concerns of the African American

Sam Gilliam.¹⁰

while employing the forms and techniques of modern

Kenneth Young, Red Dance, 1970, acrylic on canvas, 841/2 x 67 inches National Gallery of Art, image courtesy of Bethesda Fine Art

art, refer either implicitly or explicitly to the black

community and experience. Young’s painting Red Dance (1970) was featured

experience as content. In deliberately ‘funky’ idioms,

Clark’s paintings have been shown in many solo and

with works by other young African American artists

they allude, in forms, materials, techniques or images,

group exhibitions over the years, including a retro-

with “special promise” in an article published in Art

to an environment different in many respects from

spective at the Studio Museum in Harlem in 1980.

in America titled “Black Art in America.”¹¹ As an

white America.”¹²

The Museum of Modern Art acquired its first painting

example of the difficulty some writers had with the

by Clark in 2014.⁶

“dilemma”of black abstraction and definitions of “black art,” art historian Barbara Rose asserted

5


Red Dance, mistakenly pictured on its side in the article,

Richard W. Franklin, born in 1939 in Rutherford,

Since the late 1960s, Franklin’s paintings have been

belies Rose’s statements about implicit black subject

New Jersey, is a graduate of the Art Institute of

shown in a variety of settings, in solo and group shows,

matter and allusions to an environment different from

Chicago and earned an MFA at the Yale School of Art.

from Seoul to Chicago to New York to Washington, D.C.,

“white America.” It is a luminous mélange of globular

After teaching art and color theory at Queens College

and now Hong Kong.

forms in colors ranging from dark to light red, with

and Fordham University in New York during the 1970s,

accents of bright orange. It is a vibrant abstract painting

Franklin worked as a design consultant for museum

His works speak a language very different from those

emblematic of Young’s abstract expressionist approach

exhibitions throughout the world from 1982 to 2004.

of Clark and Young. They are organized by a barely

working within the context of the Washington Color School. It is now in the collection of the National Gallery of Art. As evidenced by works in this exhibition, Young’s paintings of the 1960s and early 1970s show rich and varied palettes and his predilection for orb-shaped motifs. He often painted on the floor, pouring acrylic paint onto unprimed canvas and diluting it with water to make it flow and become absorbed in unpredictable patterns. Young sometimes used an airbrush to soften edges, which gave his orbs the appearance of floating. However, some later paintings—notably an untitled work (2000) and Blue Nile River (2010)—offer evidence of a turn to landscape. Three of Young’s abstract paintings in this exhibition

Richard W. Franklin, Moonstruck, 2016, acrylic and mixed media on silver leaf, 36 x 70 inches On loan from the artist

refer specifically to matters important to the artist.

6

Riot (1969), featuring vertical and angular imagery,

As a Fulbright fellow in Seoul, South Korea, from 1977

discernable grid overpainted by fields of color. Small,

suggests an allusion to the disturbances of the civil

to 1979, he produced a body of work that can be seen

hard-edged squares of contrasting colors and patterns

rights era. Sun Ra Dance (2000) connects the jazz com-

as a structural foundation for the work in this exhibi-

dispersed at random disrupt the color fields. The

poser and performer Sun Ra to Young’s love of jazz,

tion.¹³ Although Franklin used indigenous materials

paintings exude the sense of a slow and deliberative

which dated from his student days in Louisville, while

in Korea—Hanji paper, bamboo, ink, and string—the

process, in contrast to the swift strokes of Clark’s push

Blue Nile River is a clear reference to a trip Young took

geometric aspects of his early abstract “wall sculp-

broom or Young’s energetic color swirls. Materials

to Egypt for his work at the Smithsonian.

tures,” with open spaces intersected by narrow strips

such as encaustic, acrylic, silver leaf, twigs, thread, and

of bamboo, presage elements of his paintings of the

images transferred from magazines form the body of

last 15 years.

Franklin’s work.


The artist refers to color as a voice. Although appearing

The juxtaposition of the paintings of Ed Clark,

Virginia K. Adams practiced corporate law for more

monochromatic at first glance, the paintings reveal

Richard W. Franklin, and Kenneth Young in this ex-

than 20 years before earning master’s and doctoral

expanses of color overlaid transparently with other

hibition encourages conversations about three very

degrees in art history at University of Maryland,

colors poured from above as the painter worked

different forms of abstract personal expression.

College Park (UMCP). She has taught at UMCP,

over the canvas on the floor. With the notable excep-

This overarching discourse, in turn, inflects the

Loyola University Maryland, and Maryland Institute

tion of Moonstruck (2016), in which a horizontal slash

conversations about each group of paintings and

College of Art. Adams lectures and writes on issues

of reflective squares of silver leaf are covered by a

the variations in style each artist developed over

of modern and contemporary art.

pattern of delicate twigs,¹⁴ the palettes are nearly

a long career.

indescribable. Eschewing primary colors, Franklin develops mixtures of blues and greens and pinks and browns that speak softly.

NOTES

7. Fred F. Bond, “Art Is an Old Man’s Game,” in An Exhibition of Recent Paintings by Kenneth Victor Young (Nashville, TN: Carl Van Vechten

1. Melissa Rachleff, Inventing Downtown: Artist-Run Galleries in

Gallery of Fine Arts, Fisk University, 1973). Exhibition catalog.

The contrasting colored squares float across the color

New York City, 1952–1965 (New York: Grey Art Gallery, New York

fields without apparent direction and create strong

University, 2017), 71.

contrasts with the base, while palimpsests of indeci-

2. Quincy Troupe, “An Interview with Ed Clark,” in Edward Clark:

the 1969 Maryland Regional Exhibition at the Baltimore Museum

pherable shapes swim below the surface. The large

For the Sake of the Search, eds. Barbara Cavaliere and George R.

of Art. He had solo exhibitions at the Corcoran Gallery of Art in 1974

N’Namdi (Michigan: Belleville Lake Press, 1997), 17.

and the University of Louisville in 1985.

color blends, suggests being under water or in a

3. Troupe, “An Interview with Ed Clark,” 18–19. Speaking of his

9. Jacob Kainen, Kenneth Young (Washington, D.C.: Franz Bader

dense fog. As elements of Franklin’s private language,

experience in the United States, Clark said, “The art establishment

Gallery, 1968). Exhibition announcement.

scale of the works, coupled with their atmospheric

the squares are beacons that could be glowing sea creatures or distant headlights. According to the artist, the harmonies and dissonances of forms, colors, and spatial ambiguities constitute a multivocal language.

Baltimore Museum of Art, 1970), 29–37. Young also participated in

paid me no attention, though. They assumed the whole Abstract Expressionist movement and anything related to it was inhabited only by white painters.” 4. Kellie Jones, “To the Max: Energy and Experimentation,” in Energy/Experimentation: Black Artists and Abstraction, 1964–1980 (New York: Studio Museum in Harlem, 2006), 15. There is a significant

Abstract painting is a language with as many dialects, accents, and voices as there are painters and paintings. Languages themselves are systems of abstraction, as individual words gain meaning only in the context of other words, and their meanings are malleable depending on how they are used. So, too, are brushstrokes, colors, and materials.

8. Diane F. Johnson, ed., Washington: Twenty Years (Baltimore:

10. Bond, “Art Is an Old Man’s Game.” 11. Barbara Rose, “Black Art in America,” Art in America 58, no. 5 (October 1970): 54–67. 12. Rose, “Black Art in America,” 54.

critical discourse around this subject. See, for example, Darby English,

13. Richard Franklin, “Structure as Drawing—Analysis and Expression,”

1971: A Year in the Life of Color (Chicago: University of Chicago Press,

in Richard Franklin: Recent Works, 1977–1979 (Seoul, South Korea:

2016) and Robert Doty, Contemporary Black Artists in America

National Museum of Modern Art, 1979). Exhibition catalog.

(New York: Whitney Museum of American Art, 1971), 7–13. 14. The scale and spare spatial structure of Moonstruck, with its 5. Hilarie M. Sheets, “Black Abstraction: Not a Contradiction,”

attached twigs, are reprised in Franklin’s Wallendas in Flight (2016)

ARTnews 113, no. 6 (June 2014): 62.

now on exhibit at the U.S. Consulate in Hong Kong under the U.S.

6. Roberta Smith, “Late-Life Explosions of Energy,” New York Times,

Department of State’s Art in Embassies program.

December 29, 2017, sec. C.

7


and a wide stroke, so in the early 1960s he introduced the broom as his tool of choice—the wider the broom head, the better. He began producing strong, large paintings in which the paint was thrown and moved Ray Llanos, Courtesy of N’Namdi Contemporary

by gravity and the stroke of a large broom. In 1966, he began a new series of oval paintings, including The Big Egg (1968), which now hangs in the Smithsonian’s National Museum of African American History

Clark spent most of the 1970s traveling and creating in places such as Nigeria, Mexico, Morocco, and his

Colleen Garibaldi

and Culture.

home state of Louisiana. Wanting to create more By Jumaane N’Namdi Director, N’Namdi Contemporary

Ed Clark was born in 1926 in New Orleans, Louisiana. He attended the Art Institute of Chicago in 1947, and in 1952 he moved to Paris to attend the L’Académie

have much space to paint, he often used the palm of his hand to apply pastels to paper, giving a soft yet rich effect.

de la Grande Chaumière.

In the 1980s, Clark started to relax his grip on the

In the 1950s, Clark made history with the creation of

fluid motion compared to his earlier work. He pro-

the first shaped canvas. While working on a piece, he ran out of paint, so he began gluing painted paper to the canvas. In doing so, he left a few of the pieces hanging beyond the edge of the canvas. Deciding that they were in their rightful place, he created two shaped canvases. One shook the New York art scene when it was exhibited at the famed Brata Gallery in 1957. Clark wanted to continue to work beyond the confines of the canvas, but he also wanted the paint itself to show force and motion. For that, he needed speed

8

complexity in his work and knowing he wouldn’t

broom and give the paint a less structured and more duced large, vibrant pastel pieces with palettes influenced by his travels to New Mexico in the American Southwest and to Martinique, Brazil, and China. He created the powerful and inventive works in his China series by working dry pigments onto rice paper. He also began to play with collaging on his canvases. At an age when another artist might be slowing down, Clark continues to innovate and paint. His works can be found in museums around the globe.

By Richard W. Franklin Artist

Richard W. Franklin was born in Rutherford, New Jersey, in 1939. Minoring in truancy as a kid, Franklin frequently hopped the bus to Manhattan to wander the streets and haunt its museums and galleries. He dropped out of the University of Chicago at the end of his first year in premed and spent the next nine years in and out of art schools. Occasionally living in abandoned houses and derelict storefronts in Chicago’s working class neighborhoods, Franklin supported himself periodically as a small-time gambler and as a merchant seaman until an accident in a heavy storm aboard an Asian-bound freighter ended his sailing days. After receiving a BFA from the Art Institute of Chicago and an MFA from Yale University, Franklin moved to New York and found work as a cabinetmaker at the Museum of Modern Art. He then taught fine arts at


Queens College, City University of New York, and art

designer—a position he would hold for more than

history at Fordham University for nearly a decade.

35 years—he devoted himself to painting. His first

Awarded a senior Fulbright fellowship, Franklin spent

solo exhibition in Washington, D.C., took place at

two years as a visiting artist in Korea, where he became

the Franz Bader Gallery in 1968.

the first American to be honored with a solo show at During the late 1960s and early 1970s, Young pushed

returning to the United States, he launched Franklin

the formal boundaries of color painting while invok-

Associates, a fine arts exhibition design firm, and was

ing a wide range of sources and allusions. His works

the principal designer of more than 100 fine arts exhi-

referred to beauty found in nature, the history of art,

bitions internationally. His work and intense curiosity

and the politics of the civil rights era. He used diluted

about other cultures have led him to explore Europe, Africa, India, and East Asia.

Leslie Young

the National Museum of Modern Art in Seoul. Upon

acrylic pigments on raw canvas to explore, as he put it, “beginnings and endings,” probing the boundaries between vibrant colors with complex bleeds and blurs.

Franklin’s paintings, with their powerful and unique color voice, have attracted increasing critical attention over the last decade. The artist and his wife live on the outskirts of Washington, D.C., where a converted stable serves as his studio.

By Jennifer Cohen, PhD Lecturer, University of Chicago

Working on the floor or a table, Young would introduce

Born in Kentucky in 1933, Kenneth Young seemed des-

brush. Then, with a sponge and spray bottle at hand,

tined for a career in the sciences. As a scientist working at DuPont, he enrolled in a graduate program in chemical engineering at the University of Louisville. While there, he joined the local black artists’ group Gallery Enterprises, whose members included Bob Thompson, Sam Gilliam, and Robert Douglas. Turning his focus to art, Young received the Allen R. Hite Scholarship to study fine arts and graduated with a bachelor’s degree

pigments to a selectively dampened canvas with a he would control the bleeds by alternately dampening and drying areas of the composition. Cited by the critic Barbara Rose in her 1970 essay “Black Art in America” as an example of the kind of “fresh energy and creativity that black artists are in a unique position to contribute today,” Young had important solo exhibitions at the Carl Van Vechten

in that field in 1962.

Gallery at Fisk University in Nashville, Tennessee, in

Young moved to Washington, D.C., in 1964, following

in 1974.

in Gilliam’s footsteps. He soon became acquainted with the artists who would participate in the landmark Washington Color Painters exhibition at the Washington Gallery of Modern Art in 1965, including Gene Davis, Howard Mehring, and Thomas Downing. While working full-time at the Smithsonian Institution as an exhibition

1973 and the Corcoran Gallery in Washington, D.C.,

Young continued to paint even after he retired from the Smithsonian in 1994. His work was included in the exhibition Washington Art Matters at the American University Museum at the Katzen Arts Center in 2014. He died on March 23, 2017, in Washington, D.C.

9


ED CLARK

RIGHT: Ed Clark, Untitled 1983, mixed media on paper 291/2 x 413/8 inches Courtesy of the artist and Tilton Gallery, New York 10


Ed Clark, Untitled, not dated, acrylic on unbleached canvas, 503/8 x 583/16 inches Courtesy of the artist and Tilton Gallery, New York

12


Ed Clark, Untitled, early 1970s, ink on paper, 27 x 3411/16 inches Courtesy of the artist and Tilton Gallery, New York

13


Ed Clark, Untitled, 2006, acrylic on canvas, 477/8 x 66 inches Courtesy of the artist and Tilton Gallery, New York

14


Ed Clark, Untitled, 2000, dry pigment on paper, 38 x 473/4 inches Courtesy of the artist and Tilton Gallery, New York

15


Ed Clark, The Tilt, 2006, acrylic on canvas, 40 x 30 inches Courtesy of the artist and Tilton Gallery, New York

16


Ed Clark, Untitled, early 1990s, acrylic on canvas, 551/4 x 701/2 inches Courtesy of the artist and Tilton Gallery, New York

17


Ed Clark, Untitled, 1981–85, acrylic on canvas, 621/8 x 791/8 inches Courtesy of the artist and Tilton Gallery, New York

18


Ed Clark, Untitled, 2009, acrylic on canvas, 5513/16 x 48 inches Courtesy of the artist and Tilton Gallery, New York

19


Ed Clark, Untitled, 2005, acrylic on canvas, 531/4 x 66 inches Courtesy of the artist and Tilton Gallery, New York

20


Photo courtesy of John Woo

Ed Clark, Untitled, 2005, acrylic on canvas, 36 x 48 inches On loan from private donor

21


Ed Clark, Untitled, 2004, acrylic on linen, 40 x 491/2 inches Courtesy of the artist and Tilton Gallery, New York

22


Ed Clark, Untitled, 1990, acrylic on canvas, 57 x 451/4 inches Courtesy of the artist and Tilton Gallery, New York

23


RICHARD W. FRANKLIN

RIGHT: Richard W. Franklin Carp and Autumn Leaves 2009, mixed media on Arches paper, 30 x 42 inches On loan from the artist Photo courtesy of John Woo

24


Richard W. Franklin, Double Dutch, 2015, acrylic on canvas, 40 x 46 inches On loan from the artist

26


Richard W. Franklin, Dust Devils, 2013, acrylic and encaustic on Arches paper, 60 x 40 inches On loan from the artist

27


Richard W. Franklin, Marrakesh, 2017, acrylic and transfer images on canvas, 46 x 40 inches On loan from the artist

28


Richard W. Franklin, The Arrangement, 2017, acrylic and transfer images on canvas, 46 x 40 inches On loan from the artist

29


Richard W. Franklin, Mariana, 2013, acrylic on canvas, 84 x 56 inches On loan from the artist

30


Richard W. Franklin, Pinwheel Galaxy, 2016, acrylic on canvas, 42 x 64 inches On loan from the artist

31


Richard W. Franklin, Pentimento 1, Pentimento series, 2017, mixed media, 11 x 18 inches On loan from the artist

32


Richard W. Franklin, Pentimento 2, Pentimento series , 2017, mixed media, 11 x 18 inches On loan from the artist

33


Richard W. Franklin, Pentimento 3, Pentimento series, 2017, mixed media, 16 x 24 inches On loan from the artist

34


Richard W. Franklin, Pentimento 4, Pentimento series, 2017, mixed media, 16 x 24 inches On loan from the artist

35


Richard W. Franklin, Moonstruck, 2016, acrylic and mixed media on silver leaf, 36 x 70 inches On loan from the artist

36


Richard W. Franklin, Waiting to Cross, 2017, acrylic on canvas, 40 x 46 inches On loan from the artist

37


ABOVE: Richard W. Franklin Jakachu’s Ghost Three Aspects of the Absolute series 2017, acrylic on canvas 66 x 96 inches On loan from the artist LEFT: Richard W. Franklin Larsen “D” Three Aspects of the Absolute series 2017, acrylic on canvas 66 x 96 inches On loan from the artist

38


Richard W. Franklin The Heart of the Matter Three Aspects of the Absolute series 2017, acrylic on canvas 84 x 60 inches On loan from the artist

39


KENNETH YOUNG

RIGHT: Kenneth Young Blue Nile River 2010, acrylic on paper 25 x 40 inches On loan from Bethesda Fine Art 40


Kenneth Young, Riot, 1969, acrylic on canvas, 66 x 57 inches On loan from Bethesda Fine Art

42


Kenneth Young, Untitled, 1972, acrylic on canvas, 52 x 58 inches On loan from Bethesda Fine Art

43


Kenneth Young, Butterfly, 1968, acrylic on canvas, 46 x 55 inches On loan from Bethesda Fine Art

44


Kenneth Young, Sun Ra Dance, 2000, acrylic on canvas, 60 x 48 inches On loan from Bethesda Fine Art

45


Kenneth Young, Untitled, 1972, acrylic on canvas, 35 x 68 inches On loan from Bethesda Fine Art

46


Kenneth Young, Untitled, 1972, acrylic on canvas, 46 x 54 inches On loan from Bethesda Fine Art

47


Kenneth Young, Untitled, 2000, acrylic on canvas, 58 x 64 inches On loan from Bethesda Fine Art

48


Kenneth Young, Untitled (3), 1968, acrylic on canvas, 60 x 60 inches On loan from Bethesda Fine Art

49


Kenneth Young, Untitled, 2000, acrylic on canvas, 64 x 60 inches On loan from Bethesda Fine Art

50


Kenneth Young, Untitled, not dated, acrylic on paper, 27 x 31 inches On loan from private donor

51


ED CLARK The Tilt 2006, acrylic on canvas 40 x 30 inches Courtesy of the artist and Tilton Gallery, New York

52

Untitled 2000, dry pigment on paper 38 x 473/4 inches Courtesy of the artist and Tilton Gallery, New York Untitled 2004, acrylic on linen 40 x 491/2 inches Courtesy of the artist and Tilton Gallery, New York

Untitled early 1970s, ink on paper 27 x 3411/16 inches Courtesy of the artist and Tilton Gallery, New York

Untitled 2005, acrylic on canvas 36 x 48 inches On loan from private donor

Untitled 1981–85, acrylic on canvas 621/8 x 791/8 inches Courtesy of the artist and Tilton Gallery, New York

Untitled 2005, acrylic on canvas 531/4 x 66 inches Courtesy of the artist and Tilton Gallery, New York

Untitled 1983, mixed media on paper 291/2 x 413/8 inches Courtesy of the artist and Tilton Gallery, New York

Untitled 2006, acrylic on canvas 477/8 x 66 inches Courtesy of the artist and Tilton Gallery, New York

Untitled 1990, acrylic on canvas 57 x 451/4 inches Courtesy of the artist and Tilton Gallery, New York

Untitled 2009, acrylic on canvas 5513/16 x 48 inches Courtesy of the artist and Tilton Gallery, New York

Untitled early 1990s, acrylic on canvas 551/4 x 701/2 inches Courtesy of the artist and Tilton Gallery, New York

Untitled not dated, acrylic on unbleached canvas 503/8 x 583/16 inches Courtesy of the artist and Tilton Gallery, New York

RICHARD W. FRANKLIN The Arrangement 2017, acrylic and transfer images on canvas 46 x 40 inches On loan from the artist Carp and Autumn Leaves 2009, mixed media on Arches paper 30 x 42 inches On loan from the artist Double Dutch 2015, acrylic on canvas 40 x 46 inches On loan from the artist Dust Devils 2013, acrylic and encaustic on Arches paper 60 x 40 inches On loan from the artist The Heart of the Matter Three Aspects of the Absolute series 2017, acrylic on canvas 84 x 60 inches On loan from the artist Jakachu’s Ghost Three Aspects of the Absolute series 2017, acrylic on canvas 66 x 96 inches On loan from the artist Larsen “D” Three Aspects of the Absolute series 2017, acrylic on canvas 66 x 96 inches On loan from the artist


Mariana 2013, acrylic on canvas 84 x 56 inches On loan from the artist

Pinwheel Galaxy 2016, acrylic on canvas 42 x 64 inches On loan from the artist

Untitled 1972, acrylic on canvas 35 x 68 inches On loan from Bethesda Fine Art

Marrakesh 2017, acrylic and transfer images on canvas 46 x 40 inches On loan from the artist

Waiting to Cross 2017, acrylic on canvas 40 x 46 inches On loan from the artist

Untitled 2000, acrylic on canvas 58 x 64 inches On loan from Bethesda Fine Art

Moonstruck 2016, acrylic and mixed media on silver leaf 36 x 70 inches On loan from the artist

KENNETH YOUNG

Pentimento 1 Pentimento series 2017, mixed media 11 x 18 inches On loan from the artist Pentimento 2 Pentimento series 2017, mixed media 11 x 18 inches On loan from the artist Pentimento 3 Pentimento series 2017, mixed media 16 x 24 inches On loan from the artist Pentimento 4 Pentimento series 2017, mixed media 16 x 24 inches On loan from the artist

Blue Nile River 2010, acrylic on paper 25 x 40 inches On loan from Bethesda Fine Art Butterfly 1968, acrylic on canvas 46 x 55 inches On loan from Bethesda Fine Art Riot 1969, acrylic on canvas 66 x 57 inches On loan from Bethesda Fine Art

Untitled 2000, acrylic on canvas 64 x 60 inches On loan from Bethesda Fine Art Untitled not dated, acrylic on paper 27 x 31 inches On loan from private donor Untitled (3) 1968, acrylic on canvas 60 x 60 inches On loan from Bethesda Fine Art

Sun Ra Dance 2000, acrylic on canvas 60 x 48 inches On loan from Bethesda Fine Art Untitled 1972, acrylic on canvas 46 x 54 inches On loan from Bethesda Fine Art Untitled 1972, acrylic on canvas 52 x 58 inches On loan from Bethesda Fine Art

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UMUC ART ADVISORY BOARD Javier Miyares President University of Maryland University College Anne V. Maher, Esq., Chair Attorney at Law Kleinfeld, Kaplan & Becker, LLP Eva J. Allen, PhD, Honorary Member Art Historian Myrtis Bedolla, Vice Chair Owner and Founding Director Galerie Myrtis Joan Bevelaqua Artist, Collegiate Professor University of Maryland University College Schroeder Cherry, EdD Artist, Adjunct Professor of Museum Studies Morgan State University I-Ling Chow, Honorary Member Regional President and Managing Director, Ret. Asia Bank, N.A. Nina C. Dwyer Artist, Adjunct Professor of Art Montgomery College Karin Goldstein, Honorary Member Collector and Patron of the Arts Juanita Boyd Hardy, Honorary Member Executive Director, CulturalDC Sharon Smith Holston, Honorary Member Artist’s Representative and Co-Owner Holston Originals

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Pamela G. Holt Consultant Public Affairs and Cultural Policy Administration Eric Key Director, Arts Program University of Maryland University College

Evelyn J. Bata, PhD Professor Emerita University of Maryland University College Richard F. Blewitt, Member Emeritus Managing Partner, R&B Associates, and President, The Blewitt Foundation

Thomas Li, Honorary Member Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, Ret. Biotech Research Labs, Inc.

Joseph V. Bowen Jr. Senior Vice President, Operations, and Managing Principal, Ret. McKissack & McKissack

David Maril, Honorary Member Journalist President, Herman Maril Foundation

David W. Bower Chief Executive Officer Data Computer Corporation of America

Christopher Shields Director, Business Operations NASDAQ.com

Karl R. Gumtow Co-Founder and Chief Executive Officer CyberPoint International, LLC

Barbara Stephanic, PhD, Honorary Member Professor Emerita of Art History College of Southern Maryland

Anne V. Maher, Esq. Attorney at Law Kleinfeld, Kaplan & Becker, LLP

Dianne A. Whitfield-Locke, DDS Collector and Patron of the Arts and Owner, Dianne Whitfield-Locke Dentistry Sharon Wolpoff Artist and Owner Wolpoff Studios Elizabeth Zoltan, PhD Collector and Patron of the Arts

UMUC BOARD OF VISTORS Mark J. Gerencser, Chair Chairman of the Board CyberSpa, LLC

Lt. Gen. Emmett Paige Jr., U.S. Army, Ret. Vice President of Operations, Ret. Department of Defense/Intelligence Services Lockheed Martin Information Technology Sharon R. Pinder President and Chief Executive Officer Capital Region Minority Supplier Development Council Brig. Gen. Velma L. Richardson, U.S. Army, Ret. President, VLR Consulting William T. (Bill) Wood, JD Founder, Wood Law Offices, LLC Joyce M. Wright Senior Consultant Fitzgerald Consulting


ABOUT UMUC

Artworks are on display throughout the College

CONTRIBUTORS

SERVING BUSY PROFESSIONALS WORLDWIDE

Park Marriott Hotel & Conference Center at UMUC

Director, Arts Program: Eric Key

University of Maryland University College (UMUC)

and the Administration Building in Adelphi as well as

Curators: Eric Key, Jon West-Bey

at the UMUC Academic Center at Largo. The main,

Editors: Sandy Bernstein, Beth Butler, Barbara Reed

lower-level gallery in Adelphi is open to the public

Director, Institutional Projects: Cynthia Friedman

from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. seven days a week, and the

Designer: Jennifer Norris

Leroy Merritt Center for the Art of Joseph Sheppard

Project Manager: Laurie Bushkoff

is open to the public from 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. seven

Production Manager: Scott Eury

them personally and grow their careers.

days a week. More than 75,000 students, scholars,

Fine Arts Technician: René A. Sanjines

and visitors come to the Adelphi facilities each year.

UMUC has earned a worldwide reputation for excel-

Administrative Assistant: Tawanna Manago

Exhibitions at the UMUC Academic Center at Largo

lence as a comprehensive virtual university and,

Artwork photography:

are open to visitors from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday

through a combination of classroom and distance-

through Friday.

specializes in high-quality academic programs that are convenient for busy professionals. Our undergraduate and graduate programs are specifically tailored to fit into the demanding lives of those who wish to pursue a respected degree that can advance

learning formats, provides educational opportunities to more than 80,000 students. The university is proud to offer a distinguished faculty of scholar-practitioners and world-class student services to educate students online, throughout Maryland, across the United States, and in more than

Richard W. Franklin: courtesy of the artist

ARTS PROGRAM MISSION STATEMENT The Arts Program at UMUC creates an environment in

Kenneth Young: John Woo (except where cited internally proximate to illustrations)

which its diverse constituents, including members of the university community and the general public, can study and learn about art by directly experiencing it.

20 countries and territories around the world. For

The Arts Program seeks to promote the university’s

more information regarding UMUC and its programs,

core values and to provide educational opportu-

visit umuc.edu.

nities for life-long learning. From the research and

ABOUT THE ARTS PROGRAM AT UMUC

Ed Clark: courtesy of the artist and Tilton Gallery, New York

study of works of art to the teaching applications of each of our exhibitions, the Arts Program will play

Since 1978, UMUC has proudly shown works from a

an increasing role in academic life at the university.

large collection of international and Maryland artists

With a regional and national focus, the Arts Pro-

at its headquarters in Adelphi, Maryland, a few miles

gram is dedicated to the acquisition, preservation,

from the nation’s capital. Through its Arts Program,

study, exhibition, and interpretation of works of art

the university provides a prestigious and wide-ranging

of the highest quality in a variety of media that rep-

forum for emerging and established artists and brings

resent its constituents and to continuing its historic

art to the community through special exhibitions and

dedication to Maryland and Asian art.

its own collections, which have grown to include more than 2,800 pieces of art.

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17-ARTS-045 (03/17)

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University of Maryland University College 3501 University Boulevard East Adelphi, MD 20783-8000 USA umuc.edu/art

UMUC Language of Abstraction Exhibition, 2018  

Learn about the Language of Abstraction exhibition at University of Maryland University College.

UMUC Language of Abstraction Exhibition, 2018  

Learn about the Language of Abstraction exhibition at University of Maryland University College.