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CONTENTS Welcome.............................................................................. 1 Obituaries............................................................................ 2 The Bucket List................................................................... 3 Terms to Know.................................................................... 3 Class Attendance................................................................ 4 Plagiarism........................................................................... 4 Health Service/Welfare/Youth Allowance........................... 4 Tight for Cash...................................................................... 5 Downsides of Youth Allowance........................................... 5 Alternative Study Spaces.................................................... 5

COURSE GUIDE BACHELOR OF ARTS.......8 Ancient World Studies . and Classics.....................8 Arts History .....................9 Asian Studies...................9 Australian Studies...........9 Criminology......................10 English and . Theatre Studies . .............10 History..............................11 Indigenous Studies..........11 Languages.......................12 Linguistics . .....................12 Media and . Communication................12 Philosophy........................13 Politics and . International Studies.......14 Screen and . Cultural Studies...............14 Sociology .........................14

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BIOMEDICINE.................15 Biomolecules and . Cells/Genes and Environment.....................15 Chemistry for . Biomedicine.....................15 Calculus...........................15 Physics.............................15 Statistics..........................15 COMMERCE....................17 Accounting.......................17 Management....................17 Marketing.........................17 Economics........................17 ENGINEERING................18 Chemical . Engineering......................18 Electrical . Engineering......................18 Mechanical Engineering..18 Computing and . Software Systems............19

COUNTERCOURSE GUIDE 2013

ENVIRONMENTS.............20 Architecture.....................20 Landscape . Architecture.....................20 Environmental . Geographies.....................21 Urban Design . and Planning....................21 MUSIC............................22 Breadth............................22 SCIENCE.........................24 Botany..............................24 Chemical Systems...........24 Defence . and Disease......................24 Electrical Systems...........24 Human Structure . and Function....................24 Neuroscience...................24 Pathology.........................25 Plant Science...................25 Zoology.............................25


WELCOME The aim of the Counter-Course Handbook is to provide you with an introduction into university that it is driven by students.

One of the problems with the university guides is that they are often bland, boring and don’t really cover the reality of the student experience. Furthermore, as you will come to learn at Melbourne University, the handbook often lies to you about a lot of things such as course costs and hurdles that may seem impossible to jump but can be avoided if you can find the right information. This guide hopes to fill the information gap that students often experience in their first year at uni. You may notice some inconsistencies in the way some of the content has been written. This is because the handbook is a collection of reviews that were made by different students across a range of faculties. It is a range of different opinions, so use what you read wisely. Unfortunately, the Counter-Course Handbook does not provide information on every single subject as it is just impractical. We have instead made a guide that reviews faculties and their most prominent majors. The guide outlines a basic explanation into the structure of each major. What are the compulsory subjects if any and what are the extra course costs that come with each major. We encouraged students to review their favourite subjects and their favourite academics. This will be the first volume of what will hopefully be an annual guide published by the Education Public Department.

Thanks to everyone who contributed and for making this all possible! Louis Gregory, . Education Public Officer 2012

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OBITUARIES

DURING 2007, MELBOURNE UNIVERSITY UNDERTOOK A RADICAL CHANGE. FORMALLY, THE UNIVERSITY OF MELBOURNE HAD A TRADITIONAL COURSE STRUCTURE WHERE THERE WAS MUCH MORE SPECIALISATION AT UNDERGRADUATE LEVEL. IN 2005, THE UNIVERSITY RESTRUCTURED ITS COURSE STRUCTURE INTO 5 SINGLE UNDERGRADUATE DEGREES WHICH ARE THE BACHELOR OF ARTS, MUSIC, SCIENCE, BIOMEDICINE AND ENGINEERING. AS A RESULT A SIGNIFICANT NUMBER OF UNDER-GRADUATE DEGREES AND SUBJECTS WERE CUT. HERE FOLLOWS AN HONOUR ROLL OF SOME OF THE UNDERGRADUATE DEGREES AND SUBJECTS WHO WERE SACRIFICED BY THE UNIVERSITY. WE SHALL REMEMBER THEM… • Bachelor of Arts/Bachelor . of Commerce • Bachelor of Arts/Bachelor of Engineering, (BA/BE) and Bachelor of Arts/Bachelor of Engineering (Information Technology) • Bachelor of Arts/Bachelor of Geometric Engineering, BA/ BGeomE course structure • Bachelor of Arts/Bachelor . of Laws, Combined arts/. law degree

• Bachelor of Creative Arts/ Bachelor of Teaching, Creative Arts/Teaching • Bachelor of Arts (Media and Communications)/ Bachelor of Commerce, The Bachelor of Arts (Media and Communications)/Bachelor of Commerce degree • Bachelor of Arts (Media and Communications)/Bachelor of Laws, The Bachelor of Arts (Media and Communications)/ Bachelor of Laws degree

• Bachelor of Arts/Bachelor of Medicine/Bachelor of Surgery, Bachelor of Medicine/Bachelor of Surgery/Bachelor of Arts

• Bachelor of Arts (Media and Communications),

• Bachelor of Arts/Bachelor of Music, Bachelor of Arts/ Bachelor of Music

• Bachelor of Creative Arts (Honours), Bachelor of Creative Arts (Honours)

• Bachelor of Arts/Bachelor of Science, Bachelor of Arts/ Bachelor of Social Work, Social work combined degrees

• Bachelor of Arts and Sciences, Bachelor of Arts/Bachelor of Science (BA/BSc)

• Bachelor of Arts/Bachelor of Teaching, Bachelor of Arts/ Bachelor of Teaching • Bachelor of Arts/Bachelor of Theology, Arts/theology combined degree • Bachelor of Creative Arts/ Bachelor of Laws, Combined creative arts/law degree • Bachelor of Creative Arts/ Bachelor of Music, Bachelor of Creative Arts/Music • Bachelor of Creative Arts/ Bachelor of Social Work, Creative Arts/Social Work

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• Bachelor of Creative Arts

• Bachelor of Letters (Honours), Bachelor of Letters (BLitt), BLitt (Hons) • Bachelor of Public Policy and Management, Public Policy and Management • Bachelor of Public Policy and Management (Honours), BPPM Honours • Bachelor of Social Work, . Social Work • Bachelor of Social Work (Honours), Bachelor of Social Work (Honours) degree

COUNTERCOURSE GUIDE 2013


HONG KONG CINEMA FILM AND THE BODY, ART HOUSE CINEMA & FILM FESTIVAL CULTURE, ITALIAN NATIONAL CINEMAS, FEMINIST FILM AND TELEVISION THEORY ,COMMODITY CULTURE GENRE STUDY, THE ENTERTAINMENT EXPERIENCE , FILM NOIR: STYLE AND HISTORY1, SURREALISM AND THE CINEMA2, AUSTRALIAN CINEMA2, CONTEMPORARY AUSTRALIAN CINEMA 2, GAME STUDIES1, THE CINEMA OF MARTIN SCORSESE, THE MUSICAL: FROM HOLLYWOOD TO

BOLLYWOOD2, THE 1950S: FILM, PERFECTION & PROPAGANDA, FROM ROCK TO RAVE: CULTURAL FORMATIONS, IMAGINING HOLLYWOOD, JAPANESE POPULAR CULTURE1, CYBERSOCIETY1, SURREALISM AND THE CREATIVE IMAGINATION2, FILMIC TEXT: SPECIAL STUDY1, SPECTACLES: MUSEUMS TO THEME PARKS2, FILM AND PHILOSOPHY1, IMAGING AUSTRALIAN SPACES, STARDOM, MEDIA, CULTURE1, THEORISING THE SPECTATOR, INDIGENOUS FILM, TELEVISION & NEW MEDIA, CONTEMPORARY FILM THEORY1, FILM CRITICISM AND THE CANON, ETHNOGRAPHIC AND DOCUMENTARY CINEMA, POSTMODERNISM AND THE CINEMA, MELODRAMA, CLASS AND THE CINEMA1, HITCHCOCK, FILM AND ART, AFFECT RISING: CULTURE, BODIES, EMOTION, DREAM SCREEN: FILM AND PSYCHOANALYSIS, THE CARNIVALESQUE AND THE CINEMA AUSTRALIAN COLONIAL1, MEDIEVAL EUROPE: PLAGUE, WAR & HERESY1, RENAISSANCE AND REFORMATION EUROPE, AUSTRALIAN MODERN2, GREAT CIVILISATIONS A, GREAT CIVILISATIONS B, USA TODAY: SOCIETY, CULTURE, IDENTITY1, THE WORLD SINCE

WORLD WAR TWO: 1945-1972, THE WORLD SINCE WORLD WAR TWO: 1973-2002, SCREEN WRITING HISTORY: HISTORY ON FILM2, MEDIEVAL WORLD A, MEDIEVAL WORLD B, TOTAL WAR IN EUROPE: WORLD WAR ONE, TOTAL WAR IN EUROPE: WORLD WAR TWO, EUROPE: IDEAS AND NATIONS 1600-2000, SEX, GENDER AND POWER: AN INTRODUCTION, ANCIENT ROME: MYTH AND EMPIRE2, ANCIENT GREECE: MYTH, ART AND TEXT1, SEARCHING FOR THE AMERICAN DREAM2, VARIETIES OF HISTORY: MEMORY AND HISTORY2, YOU BEAUTY! SPORT & AUSTRALIAN IDENTITY, THE BODY: HISTORY, SEX & GENDER, EMPIRE, RACE AND HUMAN RIGHTS: 1800-2000, AUSTRALIAN, BIRTH OF INDUSTRIAL SOCIETY IN BRITAIN, THE CRISIS ZONES OF EUROPE, A HISTORY OF SEXUALITIES1, GENDER, CULTURE AND IDENTITY POLITICS2, PIRATES AND THEIR ENEMIES, GENDER AND DEVELOPMENT1, THE RISE OF MODERN JAPAN 1850S-1990S, THE RENAISSANCE IN ITALY2, ROMAN HISTORY: 500 YEARS OF OLIGARCHY1, RENAISSANCE NUREMBERG & CENTRAL EUROPE, GREAT EMPIRES OF ISLAMIC CIVILISATION, FROM GREAT EXHIBITION TO GREAT WAR, HITLER’S GERMANY, THE RUSSIAN REVOLUTION 1890-1924, ABORIGINAL & PACIFIC ISLANDER HISTORIES, THE HOLOCAUST & GENOCIDE, THE IRISH

ABROAD: AUSTRALIA, UK & USA, TWENTIETH-CENTURY BRITAIN, THE RISE & FALL OF THE GERMAN EMPIRE, GOD THROUGH HISTORY2, MUSEUMS, OBJECTS, SPECTACLES1, SOUTH AFRICA UNDER APARTHEID: 194819941, HUMAN RIGHTS IN AUSTRALIAN HISTORY, ASIA, THE PACIFIC & THE WEST IN HISTORY, CITY & THE BUSH: AUSTRALIAN IDENTITIES, SLAVERY & FREEDOM: US HISTORY 1790-1901, AMERICAN MODERN: USA 1890-1990, FRANCE 1870-1952 ,THE DECLINE & FALL OF THE SOVIET EMPIRE, WITCHES AND WITCH HUNTING IN EUROPE1, TOTAL WAR: ASIA & THE PACIFIC 1931-1945, THE HISTORY OF THE ARAB-ISRAELI CONFLICT, SCREENING THE HOLOCAUST , UNDERSTANDING DISASTERS, SCOTLAND: STATELESS NATION, 1707-1999, MODERN SOUTHEAST ASIA, THE CONQUEST OF IRELAND, 1500-1603, DIGGING FOR GOLD: CULTURAL LANDSCAPES1, MAKING NEWS: MAKING HISTORIES, MEDIA FREEDOM: A HISTORY, THE STRUGGLE FOR UNIVERSAL HUMAN RIGHTS, HISTORY IN THE FIELD, INVENTING ASIAN TRADITIONS, RESISTING COLONIALISM: AUSTRALIA-PACIFIC, TERROR AND COUNTER TERROR, 1789-1945 , ELIZABETH I: POWER AND PATRIARCHY, CIVIL WAR AND REVOLUTION IN BRITAIN2, VIOLENCE AND GENDER IN EUROPE, 1400-19002 FAMINE IN HISTORY2, THE USA & THE WORLD: DEMOCRACY AND EMPIRE1, THE CRUSADES1, EARLY MEDIEVAL EUROPE: CULTURES OF POWER, THE CENTURY OF WAR: FRANCE 1914-2005, AUSTRALIA IN THE WORLD: 1914-2001, MCD-SECULAR AND SACRED IN AUSTRALIA, AUSTRALIA AND AMERICA1, FROM MATESHIP TO MARDI GRAS, THE GREAT ARCHAEOLOGISTS1, CLASSICAL ATHENS2, FROM CYRUS TO ALEXANDER THE GREAT2, ANALYSING INDONESIA: CONCEPTS AND ISSUES1, VIKING STUDIES, CULTURE AND INFLUENCE1, VIKING STUDIES B: SOCIETY AND LANGUAGE2, A HISTORY OF NATURE ENVIRONMENTAL HISTORY OF AUSTRALIA1, ON COUNTRY LEARNING: INDIGENOUS STUDIES, INDIGENOUS PEOPLE, HISTORY AND THE LAW, HISTORICAL THEORY AND RESEARCH2, RENAISSANCE AND BAROQUE ROME 1450-1750, THE BODY: HISTORY, SEX & GENDER, A HISTORY OF SEXUALITIES, GENDER, CULTURE AND IDENTITY POLITICS, GENDER AND DEVELOPMENT

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MELBOURNE UNIVERSITY BUCKET

L I S T

„„ Sign a petition

„„ Vote in the student elections „„ Join an election ticket during the student elections „„ Audition for a musical or a play „„ Alternatively, consider going to plays or musicals within Union House Theatre or the Guild Theatre „„ Get mobbed by crazy people during the student elections Attend rad sex and consent week Visit the Arts Lab „„ Conquer the 7 wonders of the world in your college „„ Go to a ball. Go to your faculty clubs camp Vote in the student elections „„ Read every issue of Farrago Submit an article for Farrago „„ See the band on live music day „„ Go to a club BBQ „„ Join a club „„ Start your own club Attempt to get quorum at your club AGM „„ Report a sighting of the Vice Chancellor. If you see Glynn give him a high five! „„ Sunbathe at the south lawn Vote in the student elections. It’s really important „„ Drink at each cafe on campus Write an essay comparing and contrasting each flat white and try and pass it off as a Sociology essay „„ Drink at each surrounding bar on campus( The Prince Alfred, The Clyde, Tsubu bar, INU Bar and Pug Mahones Go on a pub crawl „„ Grow a hipster beard „„ Get your essays in on time „„ Get an extension „„ Go on exchange. „„ Fall asleep in your lecture (make sure you’re not in the front row) „„ Paddle in the moat on the south lawn „„ Meet your student office bearers „„ Join a team during Prosh week „„ Streak in buff across campus „„ Don’t forget to vote in the student elections

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COUNTERCOURSE GUIDE 2013

TERMS TO KNOW: IF YOU WANT TO SURVIVE UNI

CENSUS DATE The Census date is the last day you can withdraw from a subject without being financially viable.

Faculty . The different divisions of academia within the University. If you’re and Arts Student you’re in the Arts Faculty, Science Students are in the Science Faculty and so on. LMS Learning Management System: The website where you can access online materials about your subjects including lectures (most of the time) and readings (if you’re lucky). Most importantly, it is where assignment topics are generally released. You can get to it through the portal or at lms.unimelb.edu.au Major . Your major area of study within your degree. Different faculties and schools have different requirements for their different majors often including and not limited to capstone and foundation subjects.

Minor Secondary Unit of Study

Portal. The University’s main online hub for students. It allows access to your emails, course administration, library services, the LMS, information/ notices and more. School The different areas of study within a faculty from the different schools within which different administrative decisions are made. For instance all History and Philosophy subjects belong to the School of Historical and Philosophical Studies. SWOTVAC. Study Without Teaching Vacation. This is a week directly before exams where no subjects hold classes. It is a time where you are given an opportunity to finish essays and cram for incoming exams. Student Centre. In principle Student Centres are supposed to provide information for students and help with administrative issues. In practice, try to work out your issues online first. Its pretty annoying to wait in line for ages only to be redirected back to the portal.


CLASS ATTENDANCE

PLAGIARISM

Overall, you should attempt to attend all of your classes. After all, you’re paying upwards of $600–$800 for the subject so you may as well get value for the money that you pay. However, don’t panic if you can’t make it to all of your classes. Most classes have a 70% attendance hurdle requirement so there is some flexibility if you’d rather work on that 2500 essay that’s due tomorrow rather than attending a tute with a pretty ordinary group.

One of the best things to learn when you make transition from High School to University is how to avoid committing plagiarism in your assessments. When you write a University essay, copy and pasting from the internet doesn’t result in a slap on the wrist. If you had an annoying teacher who made you footnote during year 12, you should be thankful that you’re already in the habit of making citations. The University requires the online submission of essays where a program called Turnitin which is used to detect whether your have adequately sourced your references. The penalties for plagiarism can vary. Sometimes your tutor will ask you to re-submit the assessment and will only grade your essay on a pass or fail basis. This is rare and generally only happens to first year students. Normally you will be called to attend an academic misconduct hearing where you will have to explain yourself to the faculty. A student representative from the Union will always be included in the committee. The penalties for academic misconduct range from a fail for the assignment, a fail for the subject, exclusion from university resources, suspension of your enrolment or expulsion.

HEALTH SERVICE/ WELFARE/ YOUTH ALLOWANCE

Here are some tips of how to avoid plagiarism

Your health is very important in university. All those pub crawls and essays can take a serious toll on your mental well being. However, seeing a doctor who doesn’t bulk bill can be seriously expensive. Here are some tips on how to save on costs.

Read the University statutes on plagiarism and collusion. All your subjects should provide them to you.

Make sure you familiarise yourself with different referencing systems as different faculties use different models. eg. MLA or Oxford Cambridge style

Make sure you’re careful when you reference. If you don’t follow the citation system properly, you will lose marks.

Check if you qualify for a health care card. It can be a pain filling out the forms and dealing with Centre link but it will mean cheaper fees for prescription drugs, cheaper fees at the doctor as well as concession fares on public transport and at the movies!.

When it doubt always make a citation during your essay. Its better to be marked down for using too many citations rather than using too few citations and getting accused of cheating.

Make use of the student health service on campus. It can sometimes take a while to get an appointment but the advantage is that they bulk bill which can save $60-80 for a consultation. That’s money that can be better spent on rent, bills, food clothes, books and entertainment.

What do you do if you receive an accusation of academic misconduct? •

If you ever get accused of plagiarism there are people who can help you. The student union provides a free advocacy service to assist you with your defence. Furthermore, if you ever have to front an academic tribunal, you don’t have to attend by yourself alone. You are allowed to bring someone with you although they are not allowed to speak. We advise you to bring someone from the Advocacy as they will know if the committee isn’t following the proper procedures. Occasionally, committees are staffed by people who are unfamiliar with the statutes and may be overexcessive with their choice of punishment.

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TIGHT FOR CASH ARE YOU WORRIED YOU DON’T HAVE ENOUGH MONEY TO GET YOURSELF THROUGH THE SEMESTER? DON’T FRET! THERE ARE HEAPS . OF WAYS TO GET FINANCIAL SUPPORT IF . YOUR FEELING SKINT. Check if you qualify for rent assistance and youth allowance. Again it can be very tedious making a claim but you have to suck it up. One of the perks of youth allowance is you get an upfront scholarships of up to $1000 which subsides things like buying new clothes for the semester or text books. Science students don’t have to purchase their lab coats at university. There are always lab coats available at the union house info desk for hire. If you’re short on cash for the day. You can receive an emergency $5 or $10 loan at the info desk. One of the biggest problems of uni particularly if you’re a commerce/ science students is the money you have to spend on text books. There are several ways of beating the costs. The library will almost always have core readings on reserve or online on the blackboard, the student union regularly sells second hand text books and there is also a book co-op in union house where you can borrow text books. You can sometimes purchase university text books online on sites such as the book depository. Because the exchange rate is currently really good, sometimes you might find your text book for half the price.

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If you don’t qualify for Youth Allowance, try getting a grant from the Loans and Bursaries office. They offer zero interest loans for students seeking funds for university expenses and living costs. If you find yourself tight for cash, have no money for food and can’t afford to take out a loan, they can provide you with emergency assistance (usually around $50). They are located in the Baldwin Spencer building in between the union house and the union lawn.

If you’re frustrated about not having enough money to go to the theatre, make use of union house. There are a number of different theatre groups on campus which regularly hold plays and musicals. You will rarely ever have to pay more than $20 for a ticket. If you’re an Artist trying to add your portfolio, you can apply for an arts grant of up to $500 through the UMSU Arts Committee. Check out the Arts office in union house.

IF YOU NEED ANY MORE HELP. HAVE A CHAT WITH THE UMSU WELFARE OFFICER IN UNION HOUSE. SHE WILL HELP YOU FIND SERVICES THAT CAN HELP YOU.

COUNTERCOURSE GUIDE 2013

DOWNSIDES OF YOUTH ALLOWANCE Current youth allowance payments are 48% below the Henderson poverty line. Rent assistance payments are usually only $70/80 which is barely half of what students are often required to pay for rent. If you’re unhappy about the level of benefits you receive, one the best things you can do is to get involved in the student union. There are regularly campaigns run on campus directed at improving youth allowance.


ALTERNATIVE

STUDY SPACES Zoe Efron

EVERY YEAR I TRY TO PRETEND THAT THIS PART OF SEMESTER WILL NEVER COME. CLASSES ARE DONE. THE FREE BBQS ARE OVER. I NEED TO DUST OFF MY SUBJECT READERS AND PREPARE FOR AN ONSLAUGHT OF ESSAYS AND EXAMS. SWOTVAC WILL PROVE, I’M SURE, TO BE A DESPERATE WEEK IN WHICH I TRY TO RE-LEARN FOUR COURSES OF UNIVERSITY SUBJECTS IN THE SPACE OF FIVE DAYS. WE ALL DO IT. ONE THING THAT I FIND ALWAYS HELPS IS HAVING A NICE SPOT TO SETTLE DOWN AND STUDY, AND IDEALLY IT’S NOT A LIBRARY CRAMMED FULL OF ANXIOUS STUDENTS SNORTING RED BULL. TO HELP YOU OUT, HERE ARE SOME OF MY TOP LOCATIONS ON CAMPUS TO STRETCH OUT THE SPINES OF YOUR TEXT BOOKS.

#5

LATE NIGHT FRANK TATE Late night studying is grossly underrated. The ability to study well into the night helps me justify some of my procrastination during the day. To help facilitate my wasting time under the sun, the Frank Tate centre on campus is open until 2am every night. There are cosy leather couches downstairs or snug little booths on the second floor that make the perfect venue for late night essay drafting.

#4

University Square University Square is one of the better places to study during second semester when the weather begins to turn. During this period, the most academically stressful week of the year will now also be the most temptingly sunny and warm. My response to this is to study outside. Sunshine on my books looks a lot more inviting than fluorescent lights. While South Lawn offers itchy grass, its less popular brother University Square offers tables and benches under green, shady trees. The quiet scenery makes it a great place to revise under the sun.

#3

Tsubu Tsubu is an old favourite of mine. The open courtyard and the umbrella-like tree provides the perfect amount of cosy shade. Not only are you well within reach of the uniwireless while studying at Tsubu, you’re also within reach of some very valuable study resources. If you feel you need some brain food, their salmon sushi is rolled fresh every morning. Their giant mugs of coffee make for a great concentration aid and I’ve found the perfect thing to loosen up my essay writer’s block is a glass of their cabernet sauvignon.

#3

#2

#1

Alice Hoy Courtyard The balance between indoor facilities and outdoor sun. The Alice Hoy courtyard has a giant, sculpturelike thing that’s fitted out with benches, shelters, desks and power points. It’s nestled between the Asia Centre, the Alice Hoy and Frank Tate, so it’s fairly quiet and secluded. I can spend my SWOTVAC outdoors, with a charged laptop and full wifi signal without having to sit on the ground. It’s a much needed silver lining to an otherwise torturous week.

#2

Botany Gardens Another sunny study destination. The grass is somehow softer in the Botany Gardens. I can sprawl out with my books across the lawn and wallow in comfort while I study. So long as the colourful flowers don’t get too distracting, these gardens are the perfect place to avoid being disturbed. No one ever goes there.

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COURSE GUIDE BACHELOR OF ARTS Ancient World Studies and Classics A major in Ancient World Studies is an example of what a history major used to be like at Melbourne.

ONE THING ARTS STUDENTS SHOULD BE AWARE OF ARE THE ARTS FOUNDATION SUBJECTS. These are quite similar to the University Breadth subjects as they combine a range of different disciplines together. The idea is to expose you to as many different aspects of the Arts program to help you better understand what you want to major in. You’re required to do one IDF per semester in first year. This may leave you feeling pretty restricted as you also have to do Breadth subjects in first year. However all IDF subjects can be accredited for any major or minor.

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It is a major where you focus on a much more specialised area. You can chooose Egypt, Mesopotamia, Greece Rome or you can mix and match. The major covers the ancient world through a variety of different feilds. Some subjects have a have a historical focus like Egypt Under the Pharaohs (ANCW20003) where you study the cultural development of the Egyptian state. There are also subjects will look purely at philosophy such as Greek Philosophy (PHIL20040). If you’re more interested in literature or ancient mythology, have a look at Egyptian and Near Eastern Mythology (ANCW20013) or Ancient Greece: Archaic to Classical (ANCW20010). As well as studying topics like the development of the Greek city states, these subjects also explore the great epics such as the Iliad and tragedies like Oedipus. There are several subjects that are a history student’s dream. The electives covering The Roman Empire include subjects such as Mad Roman Emperors where you study the reign of Caligula and Nero. If you’re really into the Classics, you should consider the Classics major where you can study Ancient Greek or Latin while taking Ancient World subjects as electives. Both majors

COUNTERCOURSE GUIDE 2013

also have a practical component. There is one subject which will allow you to go to Greece to take part in an archaeological dig. Furthermore, it is imperative that you take advantage of the Baillieu Library. There is a huge range of different translations of Greeks play’, epics together as well as collections of the works of Plato and Aristotle. Academics Look out for Dr KO Chong Goddard and Dr Parshia Lee-Stecum. They both specialise in Ancient Greece and are very lovable. Expect lots of extravagant hand-gestures and very good visual sources. Parshia does a great lecture which explores the interpretation of the classical world in different stages of the 20th and 21st centuries. If you ever get a chance, ask him why the Hollywood musical Seven Brides for Seven Brothers is a modern version of The Rape of the Sabine Women. Another notable lecturer is Dr Frederik Vervaet who co-ordinates some of the Roman subjects. He can sometimes provide you with a bit of an information overload but he genuinely gets to the point quite quickly. He is a selfconfessed simpleton so don’t try and impress him by writing essays that are too wordy and flowery.


Arts History

Asian Studies

Art History involves looking at Art as a medium and understanding its historical context.

Asian Studies is the study of the Asian region and individual Asian countries. You can study Asian countries through literature, art, culture, politics, history, commerce and media.

You also study the major changes in various artistic movements and theory. The major includes one compulsory capstone subject in third year which is Art History in the World (AHIS30019). Other than that, you can elect any of the Art History subjects to count towards your major. Costs are mostly for readers. One notable subject is the New York Art Intensive which you do over four weeks while living in New York. One student said that “it is ‘by far the most eyeopening, exciting and interesting art history subject I have ever had!” Stand out lecturers include Anthony White who is described as ‘quite structured, very articulate and always reliable when seeking advice for essays/topics etc’.

All subjects focus on understanding Asian societies and their place in our world and emphasise the importance of analysing Asia society from a Asian and a Western perspective. There are extra readings for some subjects. Most subjects will require students to purchase a subject reader and or text book[s]. These books are drawn on heavily throughout the course and are invaluable resources. There is a compulsory subject at level 2 and a mandatory capstone subject at level 3. In addition, students must complete at least one subject from the ‘core’ list at both levels. Generally, students at level 1 should complete an Asian Studies focused subject and/or the offered level 1 Asian Studies subject.

Charles Green was also another favourite. One student said that “I got to know him more than any of the other lecturers because he travelled with us to New York.”

The level 1 Language and Power in Asian Societies (ASIA10001) was rated as an excellent course and a great introduction to the Asian Studies department. It involved a number of staff from each of the major areas of study the department has to offer. The subject integrates these regions well within the context of analysing

the relationship between language and power in these communities. Depending on your entry level, a major will generally involve completing language-based subjects. A major/minor will also entail the completion of subjects which extend language ability and involve the study of society through the medium of the language. One such subject is Modern Chinese Literature. Generally, the languagebased subjects are poorly run and ordinarily taught. However, the resources provided are extremely useful and are to be retained for future reference. However, the subject Modern Chinese Literature which is run by Dr. Emily Dunn is truly excellent. It was described as a stimulating, fascinating and intelligently designed course which requires you to go beyond the mere mechanical application of Chinese language. Our reviewer said ‘we learned how to more deeply express ourselves in Chinese and appreciate the original works of some of the greatest Chinese authors and poets of the 20th Century.’

AUSTRALIAN STUDIES Australian Studies is sadly one of the many majors that is slowly being phased out since the introduction of the Melbourne Model in 2008. It is a major that allows you to study Australia through a variety of different areas such as Sociology, Anthropology, History, Politics and the Environment. Some stand out subjects that were reviewed by students included Migrant Nation and Urban Legends. Many of these subjects will eventually be incorporated into broader majors

such as History. It is certainly worth giving areas of Australian Studies a second look when you’re planning your degree. The University has several good academics such as Sean Scalmer and Stuart Macintyre who are renowned experts in areas like Australian radicalism in the early 20th century and more modern debates such as the History Wars.

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Criminology

ENGLISH AND THEATRE STUDIES

Criminology is basically studying crime, statistically and theoretically. What is crime? How do we fix it? Does it need to be fixed?

THESE ONCE TWO SEPARATE MAJORS HAVE NOW BEEN COMBINED INTO A SINGLE BROAD MAJOR.

Lots of depressing social inequality fun facts. Subjects vary from specific areas like policing to broad areas like indigenous politics. Generally, you just have to buy your stock standard arts degree readers etc. You will have limited text-book exchange options because it’s more specialized than sociology but with some research in exchange partner’s websites you can find ways around it. The staff in this major are described as ‘cynical lefties’ but overall ‘pretty solid’. Steve James was described as a ‘Cynical Santa Claus who swears like a sailor but explains things well.’

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English is essentially focused on Literature. It involves learning about how novels, plays and poems can be used to interpret the social and political context of a particular time period. For example, using a Dickensian novel to analyse the effect of industrialisation or trying or reading Pride and Prejudice to better understand the place of women in society. You do this by analysing selected passages, pulling apart metaphors and similes and then explaining any implied ideas issues and values you can identify from the text. There is not much choice in first year. Your only options are ENGL10002 Literature and Performance and ENGL10001 Modern and Contemporary Literature. Literature and Performance is an introduction to theatre and literature. You start off by looking at Shakespearean tragedy and then you move on to the 19th century where you look at primarily realism and romanticism. Modern and Contemporary literature looks at the 20th century and introduces you to range of different writing conventions and styles which emerged over the course of the century. You are allowed to study more specific subjects such as ENGL20023 American Classics with authors such as Mark Twain and Emily Dickenson. If that’s too tame for you, you can study Gothic Literature, Decadent Literature. There are also more political subjects like ENGL20025 Reverberations of Terror: 1789–1900 where you look

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at revolutionary pamphlets, poems and novels during the period of the French Revolution, the Napoleonic Wars and the Chartist period. Students studying history and politics majors should consider something like this as an elective. English and Theatre studies is one of the more expensive Arts majors as you will generally be required to read a novel, a play or a collection of poems every week during your first year and up to two novels by your third year. Sometimes you will also have additional readings from your subject reader. It is much more cost effective to either buy your books from a second hand store or to use online web-stores such as the book depository. Otherwise, you are looking at wasting a lot of money at the University bookstore. If you decide you want to buy new copies, it can pay to shop around. Readings is a good store on Lygon Street. It has very friendly and helpful staff and is normally quite well stocked. If you’re are looking at doing foreign literature, you should make full use of the Baillieu Library as it has a very extensive collection of different translations of Russian and French literature. Also, if you are required to study a piece of foreign literature, you are generally required to use a specific translation. Keep this in mind as you go as you can lose a lot of marks in an essay which references the wrong translation.


History

Indigenous Studies

The purpose of History is not simply memorising Indigenous studies are dates and various facts. the study of indigenous culture from a wide Historians attempt to find patterns compulsory subject in your third variety of different through time and to establish year where you look at different perspectives. meaning through the rigorous categories of historiography. study of documents and artefacts left by people of other times and other places. The History major of Melbourne University is fairly wide ranging but has been substantially scaled back since the introduction of the Melbourne model. In first year, you have a choice of three subjects which cover a wide variety of subject areas. One of these subjects is Age of Empires (HIST10010) where you cover the development of the modern world from 1720–1914, studying key developments such as the decline of the Ottoman Empire and the Industrial revolution. Your other options are Medieval Plague, War and Heresy (HIST10007) and The World Since World War II (HIST10012. In second and third year, the subjects become more specialised. You can study the Russian Revolution (HIST20064) and Hitler’s Germany (HIST30010). Again, the subjects are still very broad like Modern South East Asia HIST20034 where you study the development of the entire region over the 19th and 20th centuries. Not all of the subjects focus solely on great wars and great revolutions. The major also includes Viewing History: History on Screen (HIST30062) where you look at how different events and leaders have been portrayed in television and film and how they have come to influence historical memory. There is also Making History which is a

Overall the major has a great collection of staff although it lacks professors that specialise in Medieval or European studies. Previously, the department was full of specialists and offered subjects as specific as Viking Studies. Dr Sean Scalmer is a very good authority on Australian history with particular regard to the development of Australia’s democracy in the early 20th century. Dr Divir Abramovich who takes the Israeli-Palestinian subject is one of the really passionate academics and gives a very objective guide to studying his subjects. Other notable lecturers are Richard Pennel whose field is the great Islamic Empires and the Modern Middle East. He may come across as a little frosty but he has affable dry wit, he can do hilarious impressions and will suggest the odd good book. Course costs are pretty slim as the History department now puts all of the reading content online. In each subject, you will typically do one research essay and a document analysis. There is also a compulsory capstone in third year called Making History where you look at different areas of Historiography. There are also a few intensive subjects where you go overseas. One is Searching for the American Dream where you travel to Washington D.C, Boston and. New York studying American culture and history.

These range from sociology, politics, history and cultural studies. Many of the subjects which are covered in the major can be incorporated into other majors such as history and linguistics. It is one of the more challenging areas of study and includes a lot of confronting material. One subject of note was Aboriginal Women and Coloniality (AIND20008). Some of the readings included graphic and confronting discussion of rape and White women’s so-called “rape fantasy”. Another area which people might find interesting is the Aboriginal Language unit taught by Rachel Nordlinger. It can be credited as part of the Linguistics or Indigenous Studies major or as breadth. It is described as well taught with a very good overview of what is a huge subject area. It also involves actually going to the Northern Territory where you spend a few weeks learning Murrinh-Patha, a language spoken in Wadeye in NT.

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Languages

Linguistics

Melbourne has a wide variety of languages you can study. You can choose from Swedish, Spanish, French, Italian, German, Japanese, Chinese, Russian and Arabic.

The Linguistics major is languages, grammar, sounds and meaning but also the social and cultural side of how language affects how we think. You have to do three compulsory subjects. These are phonetics, articulation and acoustics of speech, syntax, grammar and a capstone. And then there is also recommended subjects for honours too. The first year subject, The Secret Life of Language (LING10001) is described as a good overview of the rest of the topics in other subjects and had a very good lecturer but now has a different lecturer, Janet Fletcher. She also taught Phonetics. She is very nice, funny and a good lecturer with good clear power points.

There a few different ways you can incorporate a language into your degree. If you’re an Arts student, you can simply pick a language as your major or minor. Another option is to apply for the Diploma in Languages. This allows you study a language as a separate course concurrently with your degree. It should be noted that students from any degree can apply to do a concurrent Diploma. The diploma allows you to do additional language electives but results in a extra year of study to cover the extra load. Some faculties offer courses over the summer like the Spanish intensive where you can cover all of second year in a seven week period. This enables you go straight to third year level Spanish thereby allowing you to graduate faster. Some students prefer this model as it allows you keep up the practice over the summer. Doing a language can be very challenging if you start from beginners level. You will effectively squeeze what you would normally learn over four years in High School into two semesters. It requires you do a lot of independent study in order to keep up with the workload. There are ways you can do this and have fun. There is a university club for every language and most of them generally include senior students who may tutor you or organise events where you can have conversation practice. Another way to get the best out of studying a language is go on Study Exchange or Study Abroad for a semester or a year. Several students often come back fluent in their chosen language. Don’t be freaked out by the cost of exchange. There are a lot of grants you can receive from the University as well as a government program called OS Help which can provide you a loan of up to $5500 which is put on yur HECS debt. This combined with 12

$2500 you grant which exchange students are normally provided by the University is roughly 70% of what it generally costs to go on exchange.

Course Structure Languages courses are generally divided into three different streams. These include a beginner’s stream where you start from the basics and two post-VCE streams which include an intermediate and an advanced stream. If you have studied a language previously and want to continue your study, the faculty will allow you to sit a test to see which stream you’re best qualified for. Don’t freak out if they put you in the advanced stream and you’re finding it too difficult. It’s normally a fairly easy process to transfer. The structure of each subject is different to the average Arts subject. You normally do three seminars during the week. In your first year, the main focus is basic grammar, vocabulary, listening and speaking. Your assessment is divided up into a series of homework exercises, oral exams and an end of year written exam. This generally works quite well as it is very rare to be given an assessment task worth more than 30%. Language exams are also commonly at the end of the exam period which gives you more time to study. As the course progresses into second year, you do less grammar. In your third year, you get to choose from elective subjects. These range according to language but generally focus on studies of film, literature, cultural studies and history. These subjects can be challenging as you have to apply all the skills you have learnt from the grammar subjects to compose academic essays.

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Media and Communication There aren’t that many theories of media and communications. There are plenty, but not enough to sustain a three year major without a great deal of inspiration behind the scenes. So, there’s a lot of repetition. How do feel about effects theory, semiotics, discourse, the fourth estate, globalisation and gender? You’ll get a week on them in most of your subjects. If you double major with cultural studies, there’s a good chance you’ll learn nothing but how to apply these things to every aspect of your entertainment. Do any subject that Robert Hassan teaches, as he’s three times more interesting than any other media academic. Jen Cook is a legend for the “practical” writing subjects, and Doug Hendrie’s top notch. The first year textbook is pretty pricey, but because of the repetition, there’s a good chance you’ll be able to find a reference in it for every essay you write thereafter..


Philosophy Notable Academics Karen Jones is described as great lecturer however there is some subtle agenda pushing going on in the background so just keep that in mind.

Philosophy is the study of the most fundamental aspects of reality and value. Every area of inquiry and endeavour—from art and history through politics and economics to biology and mathematics—generates philosophical issues about our world and our place in it. In other words, Philosophy is thinking about thinking and other metaphysical stuff. Expect thought experiments that look like star trek plots, trolley problems, the categorical imperative and that debate between realism and anti-realism that never seems to get resolved. During first year, your subjects are Philosophy: The Big Questions (PHIL10002) and Philosophy: The Great Thinkers PHIL10003. These two subjects give you an introduction into understanding the broad themes you will study such as knowledge and scepticism, morality and personal responsibility. The Great Thinkers is a fast paced chronology of the big weather makers of philosophy. You mostly look at western philosophers starting with the Greeks, progressing through to the Italians like (Machiavelli) and then moving on to the Germans such as Kant and Marx. From then on you can follow different paths. You can explore themes in Asian philosophy or you can focus on ideas involving Existentialism or even look at more specific issues such as Social Philosophy: Ethics and War (PHIL30051). There are also subjects for people that are more mathematically inclined such as Logic: Language and Information UNIB10002. The unib in the code means it is a subject that any student can take as a Breadth subject.

Another stand out academic was Chris Cordner. Take the time to read his book. The mellow tone of his voice is also great for naps. One of the sad things about doing philosophy these days is the penalties for not handing in work on time. You now lose 10% of your mark for each day you submit something late. This is a shame as most philosophy academics will tell you that the best essays they wrote when they were undergrads were the late submissions as they were the ones they pondered over most.

Finally, join the Melbourne Uni Philosophy Community, a bunch of philosophers who don’t take themselves too seriously and love to debate morality over a few drinks.

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Politics and International Studies

Screen and Cultural Studies

Politics was one of the areas that was scaled back during the first year of the Melbourne Model but Screen and Cultural has since become one of the healthier Arts majors. studies is another There are a lot of different areas advantages of astro-turf in school major where two you can explore. Some subjects are playgrounds. That is a true story. different disciplines country specific like American Politics The stand out submission we had was (POLS30030) where you focus on a review of Sexual Politics. It stood have been merged; American political institutions and out as one of the more challenging cinema and gender political culture. Other subjects take a and confronting subjects that you studies.

more conceptual approach to political science like Contemporary Political Theory (POLS20006) where you pull apart ideas such as Cosmopolitism or Communitarianism. If you’re interested in the more economics aspect of political science, you can study subjects like Political Economy (POLS20031) where you study the politics of neo-liberalism, economic regulation and international trade. There are also more vocational subjects such as The Public Affairs Internship (POLS30003) where you can work in an NGO doing genuine policy research. Another options is the Parliamentary Affairs Internship (POLS30001) where you do policy research for a state of federal MP Doing the internship with an NGO might be a better option as you have much greater leeway to choose where you want to go. The parliamentary internship can be a bit hit and miss as it will depend on which MP’s are available to take you on. Some MP’s will make you do really interesting research projects while others will make you write a 3000 word policy document on the

can take as part of the major. We highly recommend doing political subjects that explore issues of gender. It will broaden the way you look at the world as you will learn to see how gendered the political sphere can be. Another stand out was International Politics Key Questions. Our reviewer said it is a perfect subject if you ever wanted a good grounding on international politics. One recent change has been to the subject has been the inclusion of a compulsory subject is second year together with the capstone in third year. These two subjects are a twostage process. The first subject is Critical Analytical Skills (MULT20003) and the second subject is Applied Research Methods (MULT30018). These subjects involve the really science intensive aspect of politics which involves understanding different ways of researching politics such as quantitative and qualitative methods. Its very useful information but it is dry with a capitol D. The subjects are taken by Dr Aaron Martin who is really nice and does his best to make the subject as accessible as possible.

Sociology

Sociology covers the social sciences. It is the study of the people and the institutions which shape society. There are a lot of overlapping subjects between Sociology, International Studies and Criminology. Compulsory subjects are Critical Analytical Skills in second year and Applied Research Methods in third year. One subject that is often taken by students in second year is Sexual Politics which is taught by Sheila Jeffreys. Sheila Jeffreys is one of the most well known academics at Melbourne. Sheila is a radical

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feminist who includes a lot of eye opening topics in her lectures which is exactly what you want at University. One student commented that the subject had given her an entirely new perspective on gender and was keen to learn more. Another notable subject was Law and Society which lectured by Juliet Rogers. It was described as an amazing subject with very interesting reading material.

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The major mostly covers TV and movies and their influence on society and culture in both the past and the present day. However, the subjects within the Cultural Studies component focus on issues of gender and sex such as Thinking Sex (CULS30004). In this subject, you study things like sexual orientation and learn to identify why sexual categories such as heterosexuality, homosexuality and bisexuality have formed, how they changed and how they have been represented in different forms of media. You’re required to attend screenings for some subjects which is cool because you watch them in big lecture theatres on a large screen. You may want to buy a camera if you want to make movies for assessments but there are often many other options like essays, posters or blogs, so don’t stress. The first year subject, Culture, media and everyday Life is described as ‘very fun and interesting.’ There are lots of different topics and a variety of assignment options. It has two main lecturers and plenty of guest lecturers which keeps things interesting. In 2011, the lectures and assessments were on the same day which can be good or bad depending how you think about it, getting it finished early or having no time to think about the topics between the lectures. The lecturers have partially changed but Fran Martin is still a lecturer who is very clear and makes good PowerPoint presentations.


BIOMEDICINE First year

Biomolecules and Cells/Genes and Environment These are probably the most enjoyable subjects of first year biomed. For those who did year 12 biology, there is some repetition, but not so much that they are boring, and means they are a bit easier to study for. The subject coordinators/ lectures/tutors are all lovely and look after you a lot in this subject, making the transition to uni less daunting. Pracs are interesting and again, the tutors will help you out. Make sure you read over the prac before you do it so you have some idea what is going on (good to do for all pracs, always).

Chemistry for Biomedicine Definitely a step up from year 12 chemistry, and textbooks/frequent revision of lecture notes is needed to stay on top of things. The pracs are a bit daunting at first, as they are real and you can’t make up results as easily as in VCE. However, they are good fun and not too bad once you get into the swing of them.

Calculus Good for those who like maths!! (though a bit irrelevant to the rest of the degree). Not too hard — just the right step-up from VCE. Maths is pretty easy to study — just do a million practice questions and you will be fine. Most of the tutors/lecturers are very lovely and generally happy to meet up outside of lecture/tute times to clarify things you don’t understand.

Physics Not everyone’s favourite subject, especially those who chose not to do VCE physics for a reason. As with maths, practice is the key, and textbooks/tutorial problems are good for this. Pracs are relatively easy and similar in requirements to chemistry, so will not be too daunting.

Statistics Again, not really a crowd pleaser. It can be hard to get your head around some of the stats lingo, and so using a textbook might be handy. Statistics has quite a lot of maths, and this is the basis for a lot of the assignments and tests, so again, do as many practice questions as you can. Study tips: It can be easy to let work slip away from you, as a large amount of assessment is at the end of semester and so there is not always incentive to keep on top of things. However, you will thank yourself A LOT if you make an effort to revise the lectures week by week and don’t let it pile up. Of course, this is sometimes easier said than done! But some useful tips are to jot down a couple of key points from each lecture at the end of the day/end of the week (doesn’t have to be

a massive summary), just so it sticks in your head and you’ve got some points to job your memory when you go back to it. Textbooks: For both biology subjects, the prescribed book is Life, which is a good book that is probably worth buying. However, as a general rule for textbooks: you will use them a lot less than you think you will, and they can be difficult to re-sell. Try to hold off buying the books until a couple of weeks into semester when you’ve seen how much other people seem to be using them/how much you seem to borrow from the library (as there are tonnes of copies of all prescribed texts in the biomed library). Textbook exchange is a good online website to find second hand books, and the uni Book Coop is always worth a look. Also, the Melbourne Uni International Students Society usually has a second hand book sale at the start of each semester. For chemistry, the prescribed texts are Organic Chemistry and Chemical Principles. The first one is probably worth buying; the second one probably not. Calculus — prescribed book is a waste of money. If you really want to buy it, there are lots of second hand copies floating around, especially at the Book Coop. Physics — textbook good, especially for those who haven’t done much physics before. Has lots of problems that are useful practice/revision for exams. The textbook for statistics is quite useful, as it is written in a basic, easy-to-understand format that is handy for those who haven’t done any statistics before. There are also examples and problems to work through that are handy. If 15


you don’t want to purchase it, there are copies in the library, as well as other equally good stats books. Other items: Lab coats and goggles are necessary to buy as you will use them in pracs for every year of your degree. The chemistry labs used to sell coats at a discount, so that is worth looking into. Dissecting kits aren’t super helpful as you only use them a couple of times in first year biol and then that’s it. If possible, consider buying a set to share with someone who has a different prac time to you. Chemistry molecule kits (where you make 3D structures to help visualise organic chemistry) ARE good but expensive and you won’t ever use them again — see if you can get a cheap one second hand/share one with a friend.

Second year Second year is a good year! It is really the first time in the degree where you start to focus exclusively on human/medical science. Both MCB and HSF are BIG subjects, but cover lots of interesting things such as immunology, microbiology, biochemistry, genetics, physiology, pathology and anatomy. For those wanting to go onto study medicine (and especially at Melbourne Uni), these subjects will be the most important foundation for your pre-clinical year(s). For everyone, and especially those interested in pursuing research, this year is a good taste of lots of different areas, and points you towards what you might like to major in and perhaps do honours in.

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Tips for study: Initially, the workload for these subjects seems overwhelming, but don’t forget, they are equivalent in credit points to two subjects, so it is ok (and necessary!) to spend a fair amount of time on them. There is lots of content covered and much of it is assessed via multiple choice tests and exams, so it is handy to stay on top of lectures and pracs. With HSF, there are some online tasks (CALs) that are not assessed and therefore not very tempting to do. However, they are worth making a bit of time to do now and again, as they are useful revision and have been known to come in handy for exams. Textbooks: MCB — the prescribed textbook is Molecular Biology of the Cell, which is a good textbook and probably worth buying (however, see under first year re buying books). The other texts that are recommended are useful resources for various topics covered in MCB, but definitely not worth buying. For pathology, they recommend Robbins Basic Pathology, but a better path textbook is Robbins and Cotran Pathological Basis of Disease. HSF: both the anatomy and physiology textbooks prescribed are useful for this subject and worth owning. There is an anatomy CD that comes with the textbook, but this is NOT worth buying as it is expensive and available on all the computers in the med building. Other useful anatomy books are Gray’s Anatomy for Students, and Moore’s Clinically Oriented Anatomy (this one is a bit more detailed and properly more useful for those doing anatomy in third year).

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Choosing subjects for third year A large number of biomed students will be keen to go onto post-graduate medicine, and when choosing third year subjects may be inclined to pick ones that they think will be most helpful for that. But! Don’t be sucked in by this! There is no one major that is more useful for medicine than another. All of them will cover be useful to some degree, but preclinical medicine is HUGE, and there will be lots to learn. The best advice for choosing third year subjects is to pick ones you enjoy! This is really the only year of the degree where you get a lot of choice over what you study, so make the most of it! And (obviously), the more you enjoy a subject, the better you will do, and THAT does count towards medicine/honours/ other post-grad study.


COMMERCE Accounting

Economics

Accounting is learning about accounting principles and procedures. Accounting has many prerequisites throughout the degree if you want professional accreditation after you graduate.

Economics is divided into 3 main areas of study.

Management Management is planning, organising, staffing, leading or directing, and controlling an organisation for the purpose of accomplishing a common goal. It encompasses the deployment and manipulation of human resources, financial resources, technological resources and natural resources.

Marketing Marketing involves innovatively creating, communicating, delivering, and exchanging offerings that have value for customers, clients, partners, and society at large. Emphasis is placed on building strong customer relationships, in order to capture value from customers in return.

Macroeconomics: The study of how economies work in a macro (larger) scale, how economic policies are created and the theory that underlines them. Microeconomics: The study of how industries and firms operate with a focus on the individual. Econometrics: The mathematical side of Economics focusing mainly on regression models. It shows us the mathematics is behind most of the theories we learn in the other two subjects. There is a very rigid structure in terms of subject choice. You do not get a choice in level and in levels two and three you have a choice of only two subjects. The previous level one subjects serve as prerequisites for the next level. You will need to purchase a scientific calculator to get through the mathematical component. Moreover, tutorial attendance will help you immensely.

Subjects of Note Introductory Microeconomics (Level One) is lectured by Jeff Borland. He is described as ‘incredibly likeable and engaging.’ For anyone who is interested in doing basic economics subjects, Jeff Boland also takes a University breadth subject called Generating the Wealth of Nations which is basically a short history of economic development of economic theory. It is normally packed with great

guest lecturers from places like Harvard and Oxford. This is a fairly good subject for politics students seeking to get a basic grounding in Keynes, Neoliberalism, and basic micro and macro-economics together with that old ideological conflict between the benefits of free trade and fair trade. Intermediate Microeconomics (Level Two) is taken by Andrew Clarke. He is described as a fairly good lecturer but apparently he tends to get angry if he is interrupted during his lectures so prepare for interruptions. His lecture slides do not always contain all the material, so you will often have to refer the textbook. Make sure you clear up with your tutor whether the text book is compulsory or not. Introductory Econometrics (Level Two) was described as one of the more difficult subjects of the economics major. There is a LOT of math involved during the semester. Exams however have turned out to be very essay-like which has been incredibly frustrating for some students. This should serve as a word of caution to Arts students. You will need a solid grounding in mathematics if you want to do well in this major. If you have done Maths Methods or specialist maths previously in High School, it would be wise to brush up on your skills. The best way to get through it as described by one student is to practice the basic equations over and over again.

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ENGINEERING Chemical Engineering

Electrical Engineering

An Undergraduate major of Chemical Engineering gives you a direct pathway to the Masters of Chemical Engineering.

This is the type of stuff that is not for the faint hearted. It involves maths (complex analysis and probability), physics (electromagnetism and electrodynamics), electronic system design & analysis signals and systems, electrical system design & analysis

The major has a large number of required subjects focusing on chemistry and mathematics. Chemistry: Chem 1, Chem 2, Reactions and Synthesis Maths: Calculus 1, Calculus 2, Linear Algebra, Engineering Mathematics Engineering Subjects: ESD 1, CPA 1, CPA 2, Transport Processes, Heat and Mass transport processes, Reactor Engineering, Fluid Mechanics and Thermodynamics, Process Control case studies. Not a lot of free room for variation. Transport Processes is tough, you need to keep up with the work the whole time or you’ll fall behind and it’s a hard subject to get your head around. This is a bad one to fail because it puts your degree back one year as it only runs during semester two.

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Noted academics are: Peter Farrel ‘A Fun lecturer who makes up the subject as you go.’ Peter Dower ‘A good lecturer but seems to have no spare time.’ Michael Cantoni ‘Genius who struggles to understand we’re not all as smart as him but is helpful nonetheless.’

Mechanical Engineering

Mechanical engineering is a discipline of engineering that applies the principles of physics and materials science for analysis, design, manufacturing, and maintenance of mechanical systems. It is the branch of engineering that involves the production and usage of heat and mechanical power for the design, production, and operation of machines and tools. It is one of the oldest and broadest engineering disciplines.

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Computing and Software Systems

Year 2 Design of Algorithms. This, from my understanding is a more advanced continuation of Foundations of Algorithms, to be introduced next year, also in C. Object Oriented Software Development. This subject serves as an intro to the discipline of Software Engineering through the Java language.

Year 3 Software Modelling and Design. IT Project, plus two additional, specialised subjects from the major.

The major is a combination of computer science and software engineering. The subjects aim to give students technical experience working across different programming languages and environments particularly Python and C early on. The subjects provide a theoretical basis in the development, implementation and critical evaluation of algorithms which allow computers to perform a wide variety of processing tasks. From this basis, students can choose subjects which encompass specialised applications of information technology according to personal interest.

Year 1 Foundations of Computing which can be skipped upon passing a programming proficiency test. This subject is a broad introduction into programming through Python which is suitable for Beginners Foundations of Algorithms. This subject provides a basis for learning the more advanced C programming language (typically ANSI C), as well as undertaking a theoretical study into the formation, execution and critical evaluation of major data processing algorithms for a variety of purposes. You will also need to complete 25 points of Level 1 mathematics. It was suggested by our reviewer that Linear Algebra and a Calculus subject be taken to keep options open for future mathematics elective subjects.

Electives: you can take any science subjects to fill the space, though COMP electives are hard to come by in early years, aside from Discrete Structures. You may be inclined to undertake Informatics or Mathematics subjects to fill the space if you have a particular dislike of the life sciences. Course costs: there are no costs outside HECS, though note that your costs for mathematics subjects will be around half the cost of your IT subjects. Library resources are nothing special, though the vast variety of programming material on the Internet makes up for this. Assessments: Generally, most subjects will have at least two mid-semester tests or exams. You will likely have to write and analyse code/algorithms and projects are done on a computer. Often the exam will be around 70% of the assessment, though it varies by subject. There is a trend for some projects to be due on the last day of semester, so be organised and start as soon as you can.

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ENVIRONMENTS Architecture

Landscape Architecture

Architecture was described by our reviewer as ‘minimal sleep... lots of extra individual research and lot of money for assignments.’

Landscape Architecture is a design profession which provides the bridge between design and the environmental sciences.

Again, make sure you consult the student union or people in the faculty club for advice in meeting the course costs. There is always someone who can help work the system to your advantage. There are a lot of compulsory subjects notably Construction design. The student who reviewed the subject said that it was the ‘worst subject ever.’ The student found that the course was poorly structured and that more support was required some staff in order to for students to be better equipped to complete the assessment tasks.

This major explores the practice, theory, history, and long-standing ecological sensibilities of the discipline. Our student who reviewed the major said that in reality, most people associate it with gardening. The student nonetheless raved about it and said that major integrates ‘everything I like about course such as the dynamic and complex nature of science and arts/designs.’ While architecture in many respects only deals with buildings, landscape architecture is about gaining multiple knowledge of the terrain before something is built. Many projects involve the basic approaches to the landscape such as playing with small furniture or the orientation and materials of benches, sculptures. Trash bins in the park can even sometimes become significant to the site. For instance, if trash bins have to be put inside a national park, they will be considered safe for the inhabitants if the trash bins have protective materials that prevent bad air to pollute the park. Large scale areas are also included in landscape architecture such as the design of a national park itself. Because many landscape architects learn and integrate many different things that occur in the landscape and conditions, especially the rapid development of urban areas. Students can choose to learn deeper areas of knowledge that interest them by

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the presence of elective and breadth subjects under the University of Melbourne model. The growing environmental problems around us have meant that more students study landscape architecture as their understanding of many disciplines and the environments of a landscape can help to facilitate a project to combat these problems. Notable subjects Landscape Studio 2 is a compulsory subject for any Landscape Architecture student. In semester 2 2011, students went on three day and two day field trips to Apollo Bay where you to do a presentation for assignment 1 about ecotourism and site analysis. Whenever there were breaks in between, students were free to explore the area and surroundings. It was described as ‘fun and enjoyable.’ You learn how to engage once again with shore and ocean, and you will see seals on the harbour while watching the sunrise. In the next assignment, you redesign the place into a complex for an ecotourism area by using your graphic and/or drawing skills in A1 board - Photoshop, AutoCAD, Google sketch up, hand drawing and so on. Here you strive to explore lots of ideas that can be applied into the site while still had to maintain the eligibility and suitability with the site analysis.


Environmental Geographies

Urban Design and Planning

This major educates about contemporary environmental issues.

Urban Design and Planning (Envi). Their executive officers should involves looking at how be able to give you good advice on we build and live in cities. managing costs.

The major blends a variety of disciplines including physical geography, ‘green’ ethics and environmental psychology. There are a few field trips (usually) 2 per semester and about $20 each). The core subjects are Society and Environments (GEOG20001) ,Environmental Politics and Management (GEOG20003 ) and Sustainable Development (GEOG30019).

Strong emphasis is placed on sustainability and the importance of social, environmental and economic factors being considered in tandem.

One subject which was described as the best subject so far was Human behaviour and Environment. It is taught by Kath Williams (who is always smiling and makes you feel she wants to be teaching). This subject explores environmental psychology. If you have never studied psychology before, the content is provided in an easily understood manner that allows flexibility within assignments. You have the option of setting your own topics to research. The topics are also very practical and it can be easily seen how this research could be applied to policy decision making. An unpopular subject was Society and Environment. Although there are some parts of this subject that can be particularly enlightening, the overall course content was described as very abstract. Much of the course is couched in a sort of quasi-socialist dialogue that seems to believe the cold war is still continuing. Rather than helping you to find solutions to environmental problems. The subject explores many contradictions within the environmental movement.

The major borrows from architecture designs subjects (studios) and more sociology-based subjects. Compulsory subjects are listed in the University handbook. As with all Environments majors, subject choice is quite prescriptive.

First year Mapping Environments is described as ‘excellent, fairly cruisy and relaxed. Cliff Ogilvy is known as the stand out standout first year lecturer.

Course Costs All studios come with extra course costs such as design materials and stationery. A studio can easily cost you upwards of a couple of hundred dollars for a semester if you include (colour) printing, model making materials, fine liners, pencils, cut knives etc. This is excluding the cost of purchasing Adobe Design Suite or other software such as CAD. Our reviewer suggested doing a few courses on the software so you’re more proficient with assessment tasks. According to the reviewer there are unfortunately no compulsory or optional, subjects that teach CAD, Rhino or any other architectural design software. You should go to the union house information desk and ask if you can hire out any equipment. They generally keep a range of different things stockpiled for Environment and Science students. Otherwise, talk to The Environment Students Society

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This was an alternate guide to the Bachelor of Music by one of our reviewers

MUSIC A Bachelor of Music is divided into three different areas of specialisation. These are Performance, Composition and Musicology. Each area is fairly straightforward. Performance is the performance aspect of the degree where you can specialise in voice, piano, violin e.c.t. Composition involves composing music. Ethno- musicology involves asking why do people make music the way that they do? For example, how did the classical develop. What influenced Beethoven to develop new techniques? What impact did historical events such as the Russian Revolution have in the way music was compared?

Breadth The School of Music is an area which all students should take advantage of regardless of whether you are studying Arts, Bio-Medicine, Commerce, Environments or Science. Very few undergraduate students are aware that several of the electives in the Bachelor of Music can be taken as Breadth. Music is a very unique field and can potentially offer you a chance to really enrich your major. For example, someone studying the Russian Revolution should study the composures who were around during the social upheaval of the revolution and students how the major events influenced composition. A person studying psychology should consider studying music therapy. Commerce and Science students might find some of the practical subjects like Choir and African Drumming dance a break for those tiresome lab classes and complex equations. If you studied an instrument in High School but chose to study Commerce, you should ask your school whether this pathway where you can keep studying your instrument as part of your breadth. Survival Guides If you area in Music is performance, should make the most out of the services that are provided by the student union. There are a number of theatrical clubs that perform musicals in Union House theatre. Getting involved in a production is a great way to get experience performing in live shows as well as a great way to meet people. It’s a very reading experience to see a production take shape. You should also make sure you join you join the Music Students Society. They do a camp at the start of every year which is quite intense but is a great way to get to know your fellow music students. The music balls are apparently one of the classier balls probably because people in the School of Music have a better sense of rhythm than your average Commerce student.

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Music to your ears: 3 simple directives for the effortless attainment of a BMus. ‘If music be the food of love, play on…and you’ll have to for three years.’

The first thing you should know about the BMus is that it requires you to learn some music. The lecturers will tell you that you must learn a lot, but some is enough to get you by. How much you choose to learn is totally dependent on your level of ambition. Practice makes perfect but Ps get degrees. The second most important skill of the work-shy music student is choosing the right ensemble subjects. For example, subjects with a low number of participants where you are constantly receiving attention and tutelage will require a lot of work. Subjects with a high number of enrolments (*cough*Faculty Choir) will enable you to slip under academic radars and cruise your way to passing on the magic carpet of distraction. Third, suck up to the teachers. If they like you they’re less likely to be hard on you. But be warned; it takes a being of exceptionally adept indolence to be able to charm academics and simultaneously get away with doing nothing. In other words, you have to put effort in this type of laziness. To conclude, it is entirely possible to pass a music degree with little to no effort, you just have to be smart enough to get away with it. Also, be aware that in following the above rules you accept the title of a

‘talentless, slack, butt-kissing ignoramus’.

However if you’re likeable enough no one will think the worse of you for it.


BREADTH FOR ALL

ONE THING WHICH ALL MELBOURNE UNIVERSITY UNDERGRADUATES ALL HAVE IN COMMON IS BREADTH. BREADTH IS COMMONLY DESCRIBED AS THE BANE OF THE UNDERGRADUATE’S EXISTENCE. EVERY UNDERGRADUATE AT MELBOURNE UNIVERSITY HAS TO DO 50 POINTS OF BREADTH IN ORDER TO COMPLETE A DEGREE. THIS EQUATES TO ONE SUBJECT PER SEMESTER OUTSIDE YOUR MAIN FIELD.

For example, if you’re an Arts student you can use you breadth to do Science subjects. If you’re a Commerce student you can do subjects in the faculty of Music. Breadth works really well for some students and terribly for others. The advantage of Breadth is that it forces you to explore other faculties allowing you to learn different ways of thinking. The desired outcome according to the University is for its graduates to be better rounded academically and more employable in the workforce. Breadth works well if you’re doing a degree such as Commerce or Music where most of the subjects are compulsory. Breadth subjects will be one of the few areas in your degree where you will have an extensive range of choice over the subjects you do. Breadth enables you to study subjects in as many fields as you want provided you meet the pre-requisites. Arts students on the other hand often complain that compulsory breadth is counterproductive as an Arts degree can be broad enough on its own. Many students have also complained that the breadth component has prevented them from doing additional minors or exploring study in languages. There are many ways you can fill your breadth quota. Some students use breadth to focus on one particular subject area. ie, a stream of history subjects on top of a Science degree or a stream of commerce subjects to compliment an Arts degree.

Another option is to do University breadth subjects. These are a collection of University Breadth or multi-disciplinary subjects. These are quite broad subjects where you study an issue such the global food shortage or the Internet by incorporating different disciplines such as History and the Environments. They can be a good introduction to History if you’re a Science student or a good introduction into Science student or Commerce if you’re an Arts student. The most important thing to avoid doing is not taking breadth seriously. Some students believe that breadth isn’t a component where they have to do well and use it as an excuse to bludge. As it accounts for the equivalent of a minor, breadth is something you should plan carefully as it will all appear on your academic transcript. If you’re interested in doing Law or a Masters of Education, you should take advantage of the Law and Education subjects that are available in the Handbook. If you previously learnt an instrument in High School but are doing an Arts degree, you should use it as an opportunity to do University level music. If you’re an Arts student who did well in Maths, you may as well use breadth as an opportunity to see how you handle Commerce. Furthermore, as University increasingly becomes ever more costly, you may as well get value out of your HECS debt.

READ ME! I WILL POSSIBLY SAVE YOUR LIFE

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SCIENCE Botany In the Botany major, you study taxonomy, phylogeny, and distribution of Australian plants. Considerable focus is placed on Victorian plants which include analysing bryophytes, gymnosperms, angiosperms and fungi. The major involves a lot of field trips ranging from one day to a week. Extra fees are often required but shorter ones are sometimes included in the subject for free. To complete the major, you are required to complete two first year Biology subjects. Biology of Australian Flora and Fauna (First year) has excellent lecturers from both Botany and Zoology with plenty of interconnections between them and also covers a range of environments, plants and animals. It can be taken instead of or as well as Genetics and Evolution of Life in second semester. The lectures are clear and well organised and the assessment is interesting and relevant.

Chemical Systems Chemical Systems focuses on the area of producing as many outputs as possible with as few inputs as possible, using chemical processes.

Defence and Disease

Defence and Disease is a The study of the human combination of immunology body essentially. and pathology. You must do one subject in both immunology and pathology as well as a practical subject from either discipline. The final subject is an elective from a selection on immunology or pathology subjects. Compulsory subjects include Principles of Immunology and Mechanisms of Human Disease. There are no extra readings, screenings or costs involved in the major. Principles of Immunology and Medical and Applied Immunology with Sumone Chakravarti and Andrew Brooks are fantastic choices! The immunology department was also described as ‘incredibly well organised.’ Lectures are succinct and easy to follow, and the lecturers are always willing to help you achieve the best in their subject.

Electrical Systems Electrical systems involves learning about electrical engineering stuff such as how to make a simple design for a microprocessor, integrated circuit, signal processing, electronic devices, etc. It includes four core subjects that have to be completed in third year. Our reviewer listed Engineering mechanics and Engineering computation as THE stand out subjects.

The subject involves lots of teamwork, lab work and mathematics.

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Human Structure and Function

COUNTERCOURSE GUIDE 2013

This involves studying its structure and how it works through different fields of science. Practical classes will require lab coats/glasses. Unfortunately the majority of third year subjects have specific second year pre-requisites so be sure you think about what you may want to study and cover your bases in second year. That said, sometimes prerequisites stated in the handbook aren’t always definite so email the subject coordinator if you have any problems.

Neuroscience Neuroscience is all about learning the structures and functions of the human nervous system. You also cover the scientific background knowledge required to understand the information, which consists mostly of biochemistry and molecular biology. Dr Peter Kitchener is a great lecturer and is really open to working out ways of accomodating individual study needs (e.g. if you have a disability and need information in a different format). His interests include history and philosophy of science so he provides useful contextual information and more realistic expectations of science than in other courses.


Pathology

Plant Science

The major focuses on biology of plants; their physiology, response to environmental stimuli and their evolutionary It has three compulsory second year history.

Zoology

Pathology is the study of disease processes in the body and the body’s reaction.

Zoology is the study of animals, their evolution, behaviour and their characteristics.

subjects. Path20001, BCMB20002 and BCMB20005.

You study how they function from an internal level to a species or community level.

These 2nd year subjects also have 1st year compulsory prerequisite subjects. Vicki Lawson and Theo are the subject coordinators and they are described as ‘wonderful!’ During third year ,you get a lot of different lecturers who are researchers in more specific fields. Prof Duncan McGregor is a great lecturer as well as Mimi Tang and Amanda Fosang.

As with Botany, first year Biology, second year Botany subjects are compulsory. A suggested text book is Biology: An Australian Focus our reviewer said that it is really helpful throughout first and second year. Flora of Victoria (intensive summer subject) was amazing, and Mike Bayly is a really excellent lecturer.

Most subjects have a one or two day excursion, and some subjects are week-long field camps. Subjects with field camps often involve an extra cost for accommodation of $180–300 which cannot be put on HECS. It’s definitely worth it though — camps are always a lot of fun and it really helps to lighten the load during semester. Animal Structure and Function is a notoriously intense second year subject but you’ll survive according to our reviewer. Look forward to the fact that Zoology gets far less technical in third year. It has also been recommended that you do Experimental Animal Behaviour in third year. Our reviewer said it’s great because you get practical experience designing a research project, completing it and writing it up which is incredibly useful for further study.

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COUNTERCOURSE GUIDE 2013


UMSU CounterCourse Handbook 2013