Issuu on Google+

  Cooling Tower Oxidant Study

Cooling Tower Oxidant Concentration and Time Summer 2015  

INTERN PROJECT: TECUMSEH ENERGY CENTER 7/9 AND 8/10 COOLING TOWER CHEMICAL OPERATION STUDY CONDUCTED BY: RACHEL KOSSE, ENVIRONMENTAL SERVICES INTERN  

  Taking energy to heart.


Tecumseh Energy Center 7/9 & 8/10 Cooling Tower Oxidant Concentration and Time Scope of Work 48 gallons 12.5% sodium hypochlorite (Bleach) and 6.3 gallons 30% 

  Scope of Work (SOW)    The Scope of Work (SOW) is the area in an agreement where the work to be performed is described. The  SOW will contain our milestones, reports, deliverables, and end products that are expected to be provided  by the Environmental Services Department. The SOW will also contain a time line for all deliverables.    Glossary     TRO:  Total Residual Oxidant describes the total oxidant concentration.     FAO:    Free  Available  Oxidant  describes  oxidant  available  to  oxidize  biological  material;  often  describes free chlorine such as hypochlorous acid and/or hypochlorite ion.     DPD:  Indicator used to show the oxidant level during test.     pH:  A measure of the acidity and alkalinity of a solution on a scale of 0‐14 where 7 is neutral.   Lower  numbers  indicate  increasing  acidity  (acids)  and  higher  numbers  represent  increasing  alkalinity (bases).  Each unit of change represents a tenfold change in acidity or alkalinity.     Cooling Tower Supply:   Cooled water leaving the tower.     Cooling Tower Return:  Heated water returning to the cooling tower.     Cooling  Tower  Approach:    The  difference  between  cooling  tower  supply  and  the  wet  bulb  temperature.  Problem Statement    Our current NPDES permit identifies compliance based on TRO (i.e. 0.27 mg/L or 264 µg/L as TRO).  We  want to ensure we are not exceeding our current permit limits when we blowdown from Cooling Tower  Units (CT) 7/9 or 8/10.  Due to the results of our last study, the current cooling tower chemical application  was modified.  We plan to analyze how this modification affected the blowdown schedule.  In order to  complete our study we will use analytical standard methods (SM) 4500‐CL G for TRO and SM 4500 H+B  for pH analysis.  These tests will allow us to formulate a timeline of the TRO concentration within the  cooling tower water following oxidation.  We will then use this timeline to establish a blowdown schedule  for both CT 7/9 and 8/10.        Page 1 of 4   


Tecumseh Energy Center 7/9 & 8/10 Cooling Tower Oxidant Concentration and Time Scope of Work 48 gallons 12.5% sodium hypochlorite (Bleach) and 6.3 gallons 30% 

  Goals of the Study    The goal of the project is to determine when we can blowdown CT 7/9 and 8/10 without exceeding the  NPDES permit limits in light of the recent changes in application.  The goal will be met by sampling the  cooling tower supply once oxidation is started when the oxidant level is  the  highest until  the water is  blown down to ensure that the oxidant level has decreased enough to be below the permit limits.    Objectives of the Deliverables    Task:  Test the cooling tower supply from the time oxidation is started until 30 minutes after the water  TRO  residuals  are  below  264  µg/L  (pH  and  temperature  values  will  also  be  analyzed  and  recorded).   Samples will be collected at 15 minute intervals and tested according to SM 4500‐CL G and SM 4500 H+B.   The tests will define the TRO concentration and pH level of the samples.  The definition of these samples  will allow the identification of our cooling tower water relative to our permit limits.      Calibration  of  the  equipment  (HACH  DR890  spectrophotometer  and  the  HACH  HQ11  pH  meter  and  combination electrode) will be performed according to the steps laid out in SM 4500‐CL G and SM 4500  H+B.  Once the equipment is calibrated, the aforementioned tests will be carried out within 15 minutes  of collection as prescribed.  A check will be implemented on the equipment after completion of all tests.   Any  questionable  readings  will  result  in  further  research  into  possible  causation  factors  (interferences  listed in part seven (7) of SM 4500‐CL G and SM 4500 H+B).    Deliverable:       To  provide  TEC  staff  with  updated  knowledge  on  TRO  concentrations  within  a  specified  temperature range for CT 7/9 and 8/10.     Certainty on compliance defined in our permit limits (less than 264 µg/L TRO).    Administration    Environmental  Services  will  be  responsible  for  a  holistic  conclusion  to  our  problem  statement  by  coordinating testing efforts, data synthesis, and collective presentation of results.    Samples will be collected and measured for TRO, pH, and temperature from each cooling tower supply  before oxidant chemistry is added to establish an analytical baseline and then after oxidation chemistry is  started at 15 minute intervals.  Analysis will be conducted according to SM 4500‐CL G (TRO) and SM 4500  H+B (pH), temperature readings will be obtained using pH meter and probe.  Before the tests are initiated 

Page 2 of 4   


Tecumseh Energy Center 7/9 & 8/10 Cooling Tower Oxidant Concentration and Time Scope of Work 48 gallons 12.5% sodium hypochlorite (Bleach) and 6.3 gallons 30% 

  we will calibrate all necessary equipment and after the tests are completed we will check the equipment  for accuracy.       Once testing is complete, the data must be analyzed in an adequate manner to evaluate the solution to  the original statements.  We will gather the data to determine appropriate blowdown times for CT 7/9  and 8/10 at TEC and then present all results.    Timeline    Testing – July 20th  Analysis – July 21th – July 28th  Results – July 29th   Safety    Our  study  includes  field  work,  therefore  safety  precautions  outlined  in  the  Field  Safety  Manuel  under  section  500  Personal  Protective  Equipment  (PPE)  will  be  reviewed  ahead  of  time  and  followed.    The  following sections are necessary for review:     Section 502:  Gloves are necessary for decontamination processes when harsh chemicals will be  used.   Section 506:  Appropriate work attire should be worn.   Section 508:  Appropriate footwear should be worn since there will be risk of slipping and falling.      Prior to initiating testing, a pre‐job briefing will be completed including, but not limited to:     Identifying specific equipment  o Kimwipes  o AccuVac  o Syringe and filters  o pH baselines (4, 7, and 10)  o HACH DR890 spectrophotometer  o HACH HQ11 pH meter and combination electrode     Identifying the work practices  o See objectives and deliverables (task)     Identifying the hazards  Page 3 of 4   


Tecumseh Energy Center 7/9 & 8/10 Cooling Tower Oxidant Concentration and Time Scope of Work 48 gallons 12.5% sodium hypochlorite (Bleach) and 6.3 gallons 30% 

  Fall hazard  Material handling    Determine the energy control points  o N/A    PPE necessary for the job  o Hardhat  o Safety glasses/slide shields   o Primary work clothing  o Chemical resistant gloves (as needed)    Special precautions  o Environmental    Specific hazards and mitigation  o Specific hazard: Slips, trips, and falls / mitigation: working boots  o Specific hazard: bites and stings / mitigation: bug spray and ointments  o Specific hazard: general wildlife / mitigation: stay alert at all times  o o

 

 

 

Page 4 of 4   


Tecumseh Energy Center  7/9 & 8/10 Cooling Tower Oxidant Concentration and Time Report  32 gallons 12.5% sodium hypochlorite (Bleach) and 4.2 gallons 30% sodium bromide (CB‐70) 

  Introduction    On June 15, 2015 Environmental Services Department, Generation Chemistry Staff, and NALCO Company  conducted an oxidant residual study of cooling tower (CT) 7/9 and cooling tower (CT) 8/10.  This study  was  conducted  to  evaluate  oxidant  residual  compliance  in  accordance  with  our  NPDES  Permit  Total  Residual Oxidant (TRO) effluent limit provided for Outfall 005A1 cooling towers blowdown.  Additionally,  this study is a continuance of our 2008 study where we evaluated compliance based on Free Available  Oxidant  (FAO).    All  testing  was  conducted  in  accordance  with  our  current  field  laboratory  Quality  Assurance Manual, approved Standard Operating Procedures, and project’s Scope of Work.    Utilizing the results derived from testing, we formulated a timeline of the TRO concentration just before  and following oxidation.  This timeline provided data on when we can blowdown without exceeding the  NPDES permit limits.  Safety measures within section 500 (Personal Protective Equipment) were followed  including appropriate work attire, hard hat, and goggles.    Study Details:    Samples  were  collected  from  the  7/9  and  8/10  Trasar  units.    These  locations  were  chosen  based  on  accessibility and water quality sample representation of the cooling towers.  The pH and temperature  analyses  were  conducted  immediately  upon  collection.    All  TRO  samples  were  analyzed  at  the  TEC  laboratory.  The pH and TRO equipment was calibrated before conducting the aforementioned analyses  and checked for accuracy upon completion.      We  monitored  TRO  levels  using  a  DPD‐indicator  test  that  turned  the  sample  varying  shades  of  pink  depending on the amount of oxidant present (shown below).  Image 1 below displays the test results of  the DPD indicator test for CT 7/9.  It shows the 13 total tests run and how the residual peaked relatively  early (at the end of oxidation) and how long it took for that residual to drop back down.      Image 1 

  Image 1 shows the progression of the results of the TRO analysis for CT 7/9.  The concentration of the pink  color expresses the concentration of the TRO level.    Page 1 of 9   


Tecumseh Energy Center  7/9 & 8/10 Cooling Tower Oxidant Concentration and Time Report  32 gallons 12.5% sodium hypochlorite (Bleach) and 4.2 gallons 30% sodium bromide (CB‐70) 

  We performed this process before oxidation began and every 15 minutes thereafter until CT 8/10 dropped  below permit limits and it was decided to be worth waiting to test every 30 minutes until CT 7/9 dropped  below permit limits.  We sampled at this time interval to accurately monitor fluctuating data trends.  The  original plan was to test from the time oxidation is started until 30 minutes after the TRO is below our  permit limits.  We did not do this because the length of time necessary for TRO to drop was much longer  than anticipated.      According to Standard Methods “oxidant demand” is the difference between the added oxidant dose and  the residual oxidant concentration measured after a prescribed contact time and at a given pH.  Since our  current disinfectants (sodium hypochlorite and sodium bromide) are a non‐selective oxidants, almost any  substance  in  the  water,  in  a  reduced  valance  state,  will  react  with  and  consume  the  oxidant  (i.e.  the  demand).    The  oxidant  demand  must  be  satisfied  before  disinfection  is  fully  achieved.    Variables  affecting the oxidant demand include: pH, temperature, contact time, and the desired oxidant residual.    In this study we reviewed all four (4) referenced variables in order to determine how our current oxidant  dosages  impact  our  regulated  oxidant  concentrations  in  blowdown  waters.  Additionally,  since  the  blowdown schedules (for both cooling towers) are governed by specific conductivity, we also evaluated  specific conductivity values.     Two (2) different types of oxidants are added to the cooling tower water, sodium hypochlorite (Bleach)  and sodium bromide (CB‐70).  The pH level influences the efficiency of the oxidant by the formation of  hypochlorous acid (Bleach) and hypobromous acid (CB‐70).  Sodium hypochlorite is more stable in alkaline  states, but not as stable as sodium bromide.  Our average pH for each cooling tower during the study  was  determined  to  be  7.7  SU,  providing  relative  stability  for  both  sodium  hypochlorite  and  sodium  bromide.  The temperature boosts the level of activity of reactions in the water.  In doing this, as the  temperature  increases,  more  reactions  occur  and  there  is  less  available  oxidant.    Furthermore,  a  temperature increase causes the oxidant demand to be satisfied sooner.  As temperature decreases, it  takes longer for the demand to be satisfied and there is more available oxidant.  The desired TRO acts as  the buffer to ensure that an adequate disinfection is taking place so the demand is sufficiently satisfied.      Results    Conductivity:    Historically, blowdown of CT 7/9 and 8/10 occurs when the conductivity, in the circulation water, reaches  3,500 µS/cm.  The conductivity throughout the period of this study was graphed to reveal if blowdown  would have occurred before TRO levels were below limit and to gather a relationship of the progression  of conductivity along with the TRO levels.   

Page 2 of 9   


Tecumseh Energy Center  7/9 & 8/10 Cooling Tower Oxidant Concentration and Time Report  32 gallons 12.5% sodium hypochlorite (Bleach) and 4.2 gallons 30% sodium bromide (CB‐70) 

  Graph  1.1  below  is  the  conductivity  progression  for  CT  7/9.    Generally,  the  conductivity  would  trend  upward in a linear pattern and this graph follows that trend.  Any spikes downward could potentially be  due  to  the  addition  of  makeup  water,  use  of  circulation  water  for  ash  sluicing  or  blowing  down,  or  a  combination of the three (3).  The conductivity is right about 3,000 µS/cm at 18:30, which was just after  the TRO level dropped below permit limits.    Graph 1.1   

7/9 Conductivity (µS/cm) 3000 2980

Conductivity (µS/cm)

2960 2940 2920 2900 2880 2860 2840 2820 10:48

12:00

13:12

14:24

15:36

16:48

18:00

19:12

Time (Actual)

  Graph 1.1 displays conductivity for CT 7/9 from time 12:00 (noon) to 18:30.  The black arrow marks 12:23,  when oxidation began and the red arrow marks 18:17, when TRO level dropped below permit limits.    Graph 1.2 below is the conductivity progression for CT 8/10.  The conductivity trends upward linearly over  time.  The conductivity is right about 3,000 µS/cm at 14:30, two hours before the TRO level dropped below  permit limits.  The average increase in conductivity of other two hour intervals (6:00‐8:00, 8:00‐10:00,  10:00‐12:00, and 12:00‐14:00) was 45 µS/cm, therefore a good prediction for the conductivity at 16:30  (when TRO levels dropped below limit), is about 3,045 µS/cm.     

Page 3 of 9   


Tecumseh Energy Center  7/9 & 8/10 Cooling Tower Oxidant Concentration and Time Report  32 gallons 12.5% sodium hypochlorite (Bleach) and 4.2 gallons 30% sodium bromide (CB‐70) 

  Graph 1.2 

8/10 Conductivity (µS/cm)  3050

Conductivity (µS/cm)

3000 2950 2900 2850 2800 2750 2700 21:36

0:00

2:24

4:48

7:12

9:36

12:00

14:24

16:48

Time (Actual)

  Graph 1.2 displays conductivity for CT 8/10 from time 0 (midnight) to 14:30.  The black arrow marks 12:23,  when oxidation began.      Temperature:    Temperature  plays  a  major  roll  on  the  availability  of  oxidant  in  our  circulating  water  supply.    Several  mechanisms in our water chemistry impact the availably of oxidant in our water supply which is governed  by temperature.  In summary, as water temperatures decrease, the availability of our oxidant increases;  therefore  our  oxidant  availability  is  greater  in  decreased  water  temperature.    Furthermore,  as  water  temperatures  increase,  availability  of  our  oxidant  decreases,  thus  our  oxidant  availability  is  less  at  an  increased temperature.  Consequently, during decreased water temperature ranges our oxidant contact  time should be greater as the rate at which oxidant passes through microorganisms’ cell walls decreases  at cooler temperatures.      All results were obtained within a water temperature range of 95.1 ‐ 96.9 ⁰F for CT 7/9 and 97.3 – 100.2  ⁰F  for  CT  8/10.    Based  on  the  information  above,  we  concluded  that  CT  7/9  operated  at  a  lower  temperature range than CT 8/10, also the maximum temperature for 7/9 was lower than the minimum  temperature for 8/10.  This can provide some reason for why the oxidant residual in 7/9 was greater  than 8/10 and why it took longer to drop.  Page 4 of 9   


Tecumseh Energy Center  7/9 & 8/10 Cooling Tower Oxidant Concentration and Time Report  32 gallons 12.5% sodium hypochlorite (Bleach) and 4.2 gallons 30% sodium bromide (CB‐70) 

  pH:    The pH level affects the efficiency of the oxidant applied.  When sodium hypochlorite is dissolved in water,  hypochlorous acid (HClO) is formed.  Similarly, when sodium bromide dissolves in water, hypobromous  acid (HBrO) is produced. When these acids are formed, they dissociate into equilibrium mixtures of the  acid and their ionized form (hypochlorite ions [OCl‐] and hypobromite ions [OBr‐]), the concentrations of  the acid vs. the ion are dependent on pH.   The acids are active biocides and the ions are less effective  biocides.    At  a  pH  of  3‐7  SU  is  when  hypochlorous  acid  is  most  present,  at  a  pH  of  8  SU  and  above,  hypochlorite ion is more present.  However, hypobromous acid persists at a higher pH, maintaining higher  concentration up to a pH of 8 SU; at 8 SU and above the hypobromite ion is more present (all expressed  in graph 3.1). Below is a graph depicting the trend of the concentrations of both hypochlorous acid and  hypobromous acid vs. hypochlorite ion and hypobromite ion, in red and blue respectively, at a given pH.      Graph 3.1    Percent Acid (HClO and HBrO) vs. Percent Ionized (OCl‐ and OBr‐) at a given pH  

  Graph 3.1 (obtained from Power magazine) depicts the dissociation of hypochlorous acid (in red) at a given  pH, i.e. HClO ↔ H+ + OCl.‐  The blue line identifies the dissociation of hypobromous acid at a given pH, i.e.  HBrO ↔ H+ + OBr‐.      Page 5 of 9   


Tecumseh Energy Center  7/9 & 8/10 Cooling Tower Oxidant Concentration and Time Report  32 gallons 12.5% sodium hypochlorite (Bleach) and 4.2 gallons 30% sodium bromide (CB‐70) 

  The  concentrations  of  hypochlorous  acid  vs.  hypochlorite  ion  (red)  and  hypobromous  acid  vs.  hypobromite ion (blue) are displayed with the percent acid on the left of the graph and the percent ionized  on the right side all dependent on the pH level.    Our average pH for CT 7/9 and CT 8/10 was 7.7 SU (marked by the black line and the yellow dot on each  curve), which would yield approximately 40% HClO and 60% OCl‐ and 96% HBrO 4% OBr‐ for both cooling  towers.  Therefore, as stated in study details above, our average pH for each cooling tower provides  relative stability for both sodium hypochlorite and sodium bromide.      TRO:    CT 7/9 contains 0.63 million gallons of water and is treated with 32 gallons 12.5% sodium hypochlorite  (Bleach) and 4.2 gallons 30% sodium bromide (CB‐70).  Graph 4.1 below displays the progression of the  TRO levels in CT 7/9.  Oxidation ended and peaked at 13:23, marked by the blue arrow.  From this point,  it took five (5) hours for the TRO levels to drop below permit limits (0.264 mg/L).  The peak residual was  1.57 mg/L as TRO suggesting that there should be sufficient disinfection provided to manage biological  growth.     Graph 4.1 

7/9 Cooling Tower TRO 1.8 1.6

TRO (mg/L)

1.4 5 hours from end of oxidation  to TRO below permit limits

1.2 1 0.8 0.6 0.4

0.2525

0.2 0

12:22 12:40 12:54 13:09 13:23 13:38 13:51 14:19 14:50 15:31 16:01 16:30 17:02 17:31 18:17

Time (Actual)

  Graph 4.1 depicts the TRO level of CT 7/9 at approximately 15 minute intervals between 12:22 and 15:31  and approximately 30 minute intervals from 15:31 until 17:31, with one last point at 18:17.  Marked on  the graph with the black arrow is when oxidation began at 12:23, the blue arrow when oxidation ended at  13:23, and with the red arrow is when TRO level fell beneath our permit limit (0.26 mg/L) at 18:17.  Marked  Page 6 of 9   


Tecumseh Energy Center  7/9 & 8/10 Cooling Tower Oxidant Concentration and Time Report  32 gallons 12.5% sodium hypochlorite (Bleach) and 4.2 gallons 30% sodium bromide (CB‐70) 

  with the green line is the time from the end of oxidation to when TRO feel below permit limits (five (5)  hours).  The red line represents the permit limit on TRO.    CT 8/10 contains 1.12 million gallons of water and is treated with 32 gallons 12.5% sodium hypochlorite  (Bleach) and 4.2 gallons 30% sodium bromide (CB‐70).  Graph 4.2 below shows the trend of TRO levels for  CT 8/10.  Oxidation ended at 13:23 and peaked at 13:24.  From this point, it took three (3) hours for the  TRO levels to drop below permit limits (0.264 mg/L).  The peak residual was 0.68 mg/L as TRO suggesting  that there should be sufficient disinfection provided to manage biological growth.      Graph 4.2 

8/10 Cooling Tower TRO 0.8 0.7

3 hours from end of oxidation to  TRO below permit limits

TRO (mg/L)

0.6 0.5 0.4 0.3

0.26

0.2 0.1 0 12:15 12:40 12:54 13:09 13:24 13:38 13:51 14:20 14:50 15:31 16:01 16:30 17:02 18:17

Time (Actual)

  Graph 4.2 depicts the TRO level of CT 8/10 at approximately 15 minute intervals between 12:15 and 15:31  and approximately 30 minute intervals from 15:31 until 17:02, with one last point at 18:17.  Marked on  the graph with the black arrow is when oxidation began at 12:23, with the blue arrow is when oxidation  ended and with the red arrow is when TRO level fell beneath our permit limit (0.26 mg/L) at 16:30.  Marked  with the green line is the time from the end of oxidation to when TRO fell below permit limits (3 hours).   The red line represents the permit limit on TRO.    Demand    The results from both CTs were analyzed to solve for demand (mg/L) in order to analyze chemical dosage  (mg/L).  The relationship used to solve for demand is:  ‫ ݁݃ܽݏ݋ܦ‬െ ‫ ݀݊ܽ݉݁ܦ‬ൌ ܴ݁‫݈ܽݑ݀݅ݏ‬   

Page 7 of 9   


Tecumseh Energy Center  7/9 & 8/10 Cooling Tower Oxidant Concentration and Time Report  32 gallons 12.5% sodium hypochlorite (Bleach) and 4.2 gallons 30% sodium bromide (CB‐70) 

  The  peak  oxidant  residual  and  the  dosage  information  from  each  CT  was  converted  from  the  percent  oxidation chemicals (sodium hypochlorite NaClO and sodium bromide NaBr) into mg/L to estimate and  analyze demand.      After conversion, the estimated dosages of oxidation chemicals are 7.00 mg/L NaClO and 2.00 mg/L NaBr  for  CT  7/9  and  3.94  mg/L  NaClO  and  1.13  mg/L  NaBr  for  CT  8/10.    Therefore,  given  the  relationship  between  dosage,  demand,  and  residual,  the  demands  for  each  cooling  tower  are:  7/9  Demand  =  8.57  mg/L 8/10 Demand = 4.62 mg/L.      Conclusion    Results from our study show that TRO levels do not fall below our permit limit until approximately five (5)  hours after oxidation for CT 7/9 and three (3) hours for CT 8/10.  Based on the aforementioned data, our  current oxidant dosage regimen, and postulating for variable biases that affect oxidant demand (e.g. pH,  temperature, contact time, and the desired oxidant residual) the following blowdown schedule has been  determined in order to maintain compliance with our current NPDES permit:      Cooling Tower 7/9:   six (6) hours following oxidation.    Cooling Tower 8/10:  four (4) hours following oxidation.    Recommendations:    In an effort to ensure proper oxidation does not interfere with cooling tower blowdowns triggered by  conductivity levels that exceed 3,500 µS/cm the following recommendations include, but are not limited  to:    Initiating blowdown prior to chemical application    Use cooling tower water to sluice ash   Measure TRO if values are less than 0.264 mg/L, then blowdowns can be initiated 

Page 8 of 9   


Tecumseh Energy Center  7/9 & 8/10 Cooling Tower Oxidant Concentration and Time Report  32 gallons 12.5% sodium hypochlorite (Bleach) and 4.2 gallons 30% sodium bromide (CB‐70) 

  "Biofouling Control Options for Cooling Systems ‐ POWER Magazine." POWER Magazine. Web. 2 July 2015.    

Page 9 of 9   


Tecumseh Energy Center  7/9 & 8/10 Cooling Tower Oxidant Concentration and Time Report  32 gallons 12.5% sodium hypochlorite (Bleach) and 4.2 gallons 30% sodium bromide (CB‐70) 

  Introduction    On July 20, 2015 Environmental Services Department, Generation Chemistry Staff, and NALCO Company  conducted an oxidant residual study of cooling tower (CT) 7/9 and cooling tower (CT) 8/10.  This study  was  conducted  to  evaluate  oxidant  residual  compliance  in  accordance  with  our  NPDES  Permit  Total  Residual Oxidant (TRO) effluent limit provided for Outfall 005A1 cooling towers blowdown.  Additionally,  this  study  is  a  continuance  of  our  June  study  where  we  evaluated  compliance  based  on  the  previous  applications amounts.  All testing was conducted in accordance with our current field laboratory Quality  Assurance Manual, approved Standard Operating Procedures, and project’s Scope of Work.    Utilizing the results derived from testing, we formulated a timeline of the TRO concentration just before  and following oxidation.  This timeline provided data on when we can blowdown without exceeding the  NPDES permit limits.  Safety measures within section 500 (Personal Protective Equipment) were followed  including appropriate work attire, hard hat, and goggles.    Study Details:    Samples  were  collected  from  the  7/9  and  8/10  Trasar  units.    These  locations  were  chosen  based  on  accessibility and water quality sample representation of the cooling towers.  The pH and temperature  analyses  were  conducted  immediately  upon  collection.    All  TRO  samples  were  analyzed  at  the  TEC  laboratory.  We monitored TRO levels using a DPD‐indicator test that turned the sample varying shades  of pink depending on the amount of oxidant present. The pH and TRO equipment was calibrated before  conducting the aforementioned analyses and checked for accuracy upon completion.      We performed this process before oxidation began and every 30 minutes thereafter until both cooling  towers dropped below permit limits.  We sampled at this time interval to accurately monitor fluctuating  data trends.     According to Standard Methods “oxidant demand” is the difference between the added oxidant dose and  the residual oxidant concentration measured after a prescribed contact time and at a given pH.  Since our  current disinfectants (sodium hypochlorite and sodium bromide) are a non‐selective oxidants, almost any  substance  in  the  water,  in  a  reduced  valance  state,  will  react  with  and  consume  the  oxidant  (i.e.  the  demand).    The  oxidant  demand  must  be  satisfied  before  disinfection  is  fully  achieved.    Variables  affecting the oxidant demand include: pH, temperature, contact time, and the desired oxidant residual.    In this study we reviewed all four (4) referenced variables in order to determine how our current oxidant  dosages  impact  our  regulated  oxidant  concentrations  in  blowdown  waters.  Additionally,  since  the  blowdown schedules (for both cooling towers) are governed by specific conductivity, we also evaluated  specific conductivity values.     Page 1 of 9   


Tecumseh Energy Center  7/9 & 8/10 Cooling Tower Oxidant Concentration and Time Report  32 gallons 12.5% sodium hypochlorite (Bleach) and 4.2 gallons 30% sodium bromide (CB‐70) 

  Two (2) different types of oxidants are added to the cooling tower water, sodium hypochlorite (Bleach)  and sodium bromide (CB‐70).  The pH level influences the efficiency of the oxidant by the formation of  hypochlorous acid (Bleach) and hypobromous acid (CB‐70).  Sodium hypochlorite is more stable in alkaline  states, but not as stable as sodium bromide.  Our average pHs for CT 7/9 and CT 8/10 during the study  were  determined  to  be  7.8  SU  and  7.9  SU  respectively,  providing  relative  stability  for  both  sodium  hypochlorite and sodium bromide.  The temperature boosts the level of activity of reactions in the water.   In  doing  this,  as  the  temperature  increases,  more  reactions  occur  and  there  is  less  available  oxidant.   Furthermore, a temperature increase causes the oxidant demand to be satisfied sooner.  As temperature  decreases, it takes longer for the demand to be satisfied and there is more available oxidant.  The desired  TRO acts as the buffer to ensure that an adequate disinfection is taking place so the demand is sufficiently  satisfied.      Results    Conductivity:    Historically, blowdown of CT 7/9 and 8/10 occurs when the conductivity, in the circulation water, reaches  3,500 µS/cm.  The conductivity throughout the period of this study was graphed to reveal if blowdown  would have occurred before TRO levels were below limit and to gather a relationship of the progression  of conductivity along with the TRO levels.    Graph  1.1  below  is  the  conductivity  progression  for  CT  7/9.    Generally,  the  conductivity  would  trend  upward in a linear pattern and this graph follows that trend.  Any spikes downward could potentially be  due  to  the  addition  of  makeup  water,  use  of  circulation  water  for  ash  sluicing  or  blowing  down,  or  a  combination of the three (3).  The conductivity is right about 3,000 µS/cm at 18:30, which was just after  the TRO level dropped below permit limits.    Graph 1.1   

Page 2 of 9   


Tecumseh Energy Center  7/9 & 8/10 Cooling Tower Oxidant Concentration and Time Report  32 gallons 12.5% sodium hypochlorite (Bleach) and 4.2 gallons 30% sodium bromide (CB‐70) 

 

7/9 Conductivity (µS/cm) 3000 2980

Conductivity (µS/cm)

2960 2940 2920 2900 2880 2860 2840 2820 10:48

12:00

13:12

14:24

15:36

16:48

18:00

19:12

Time (Actual)

  Graph 1.1 displays conductivity for CT 7/9 from time 12:00 (noon) to 18:30.  The black arrow marks 12:23,  when oxidation began and the red arrow marks 18:17, when TRO level dropped below permit limits.    Graph 1.2 below is the conductivity progression for CT 8/10.  The conductivity trends upward linearly over  time.  The conductivity is right about 3,000 µS/cm at 14:30, two hours before the TRO level dropped below  permit limits.  The average increase in conductivity of other two hour intervals (6:00‐8:00, 8:00‐10:00,  10:00‐12:00, and 12:00‐14:00) was 45 µS/cm, therefore a good prediction for the conductivity at 16:30  (when TRO levels dropped below limit), is about 3,045 µS/cm.     

Page 3 of 9   


Tecumseh Energy Center  7/9 & 8/10 Cooling Tower Oxidant Concentration and Time Report  32 gallons 12.5% sodium hypochlorite (Bleach) and 4.2 gallons 30% sodium bromide (CB‐70) 

  Graph 1.2 

8/10 Conductivity (µS/cm)  3050

Conductivity (µS/cm)

3000 2950 2900 2850 2800 2750 2700 21:36

0:00

2:24

4:48

7:12

9:36

12:00

14:24

16:48

Time (Actual)

  Graph 1.2 displays conductivity for CT 8/10 from time 0 (midnight) to 14:30.  The black arrow marks 12:23,  when oxidation began.      Temperature:    Temperature  plays  a  major  roll  on  the  availability  of  oxidant  in  our  circulating  water  supply.    Several  mechanisms in our water chemistry impact the availably of oxidant in our water supply which is governed  by temperature.  In summary, as water temperatures decrease, the availability of our oxidant increases;  therefore  our  oxidant  availability  is  greater  in  decreased  water  temperature.    Furthermore,  as  water  temperatures  increase,  availability  of  our  oxidant  decreases,  thus  our  oxidant  availability  is  less  at  an  increased temperature.  Consequently, during decreased water temperature ranges our oxidant contact  time should be greater as the rate at which oxidant passes through microorganisms’ cell walls decreases  at cooler temperatures.      All results were obtained within a water temperature range of 91.5 – 99.7 ⁰F for CT 7/9 and 91.4 – 106.5  ⁰F  for  CT  8/10.    Based  on  the  information  above,  we  concluded  that  CT  7/9  operated  at  a  lower  temperature range than CT 8/10.  This can provide some reason for why the oxidant residual in 7/9 was  greater than 8/10 and why it took longer to drop.    Page 4 of 9   


Tecumseh Energy Center  7/9 & 8/10 Cooling Tower Oxidant Concentration and Time Report  32 gallons 12.5% sodium hypochlorite (Bleach) and 4.2 gallons 30% sodium bromide (CB‐70) 

  pH:    The pH level affects the efficiency of the oxidant applied.  When sodium hypochlorite is dissolved in water,  hypochlorous acid (HClO) is formed.  Similarly, when sodium bromide dissolves in water, hypobromous  acid (HBrO) is produced. When these acids are formed, they dissociate into equilibrium mixtures of the  acid and their ionized form (hypochlorite ions [OCl‐] and hypobromite ions [OBr‐]), the concentrations of  the acid vs. the ion are dependent on pH.   The acids are active biocides and the ions are less effective  biocides.    At  a  pH  of  3‐7  SU  is  when  hypochlorous  acid  is  most  present,  at  a  pH  of  8  SU  and  above,  hypochlorite ion is more present.  However, hypobromous acid persists at a higher pH, maintaining higher  concentration up to a pH of 8 SU; at 8 SU and above the hypobromite ion is more present (all expressed  in graph 3.1). Below is a graph depicting the trend of the concentrations of both hypochlorous acid and  hypobromous acid vs. hypochlorite ion and hypobromite ion, in red and blue respectively, at a given pH.      Graph 3.1    Percent Acid (HClO and HBrO) vs. Percent Ionized (OCl‐ and OBr‐) at a given pH  

  Graph 3.1 (obtained from Power magazine) depicts the dissociation of hypochlorous acid (in red) at a given  pH, i.e. HClO ↔ H+ + OCl.‐  The blue line identifies the dissociation of hypobromous acid at a given pH, i.e.  HBrO ↔ H+ + OBr‐.      Page 5 of 9   


Tecumseh Energy Center  7/9 & 8/10 Cooling Tower Oxidant Concentration and Time Report  32 gallons 12.5% sodium hypochlorite (Bleach) and 4.2 gallons 30% sodium bromide (CB‐70) 

  The  concentrations  of  hypochlorous  acid  vs.  hypochlorite  ion  (red)  and  hypobromous  acid  vs.  hypobromite ion (blue) are displayed with the percent acid on the left of the graph and the percent ionized  on the right side all dependent on the pH level.    Our average pHs for CT 7/9 and CT 8/10 were 7.8 SU and 7.9 SU respectively (marked by the black line  and the yellow dot on each curve) which would yield approximately 40% HClO and 60% OCl‐ and 96% HBrO  4% OBr‐ for both cooling towers.  Therefore, as stated in study details above, our average pH for each  cooling tower provides relative stability for both sodium hypochlorite and sodium bromide.      TRO:    CT 7/9 contains 0.63 million gallons of water and is treated with 32 gallons 12.5% sodium hypochlorite  (Bleach) and 4.2 gallons 30% sodium bromide (CB‐70).  Graph 4.1 below displays the progression of the  TRO levels in CT 7/9.  Oxidation ended and peaked at 13:00, marked by the blue arrow.  From this point,  it took five (5) hours for the TRO levels to drop below permit limits (0.264 mg/L).  The peak residual was  1.24 mg/L as TRO suggesting that there should be sufficient disinfection provided to manage biological  growth.     Graph 4.1 

7/9 Cooling Tower TRO 1.4 1.2

TRO (mg/L)

1

3.5 hours from end of oxidation to  TRO below permit limits

0.8 0.6 0.4 0.2 0 11:24

12:31

13:00

13:32

14:02

14:31

15:01

15:30

16:00

16:30

Actual Time

Graph 4.1 depicts the TRO level of CT 7/9 at approximately 30 minute intervals.  Marked on the graph with  the black arrow is when oxidation began at 12:00, the blue arrow when oxidation ended at 13:00, and  with the red arrow is when TRO level fell beneath our permit limit (0.26 mg/L) at 16:30.  Marked with the  Page 6 of 9   

 


Tecumseh Energy Center  7/9 & 8/10 Cooling Tower Oxidant Concentration and Time Report  32 gallons 12.5% sodium hypochlorite (Bleach) and 4.2 gallons 30% sodium bromide (CB‐70) 

  green line is the time from the end of oxidation to when TRO feel below permit limits (three and a half (3.5)  hours).  The red line represents the permit limit on TRO.    CT 8/10 contains 1.12 million gallons of water and is treated with 32 gallons 12.5% sodium hypochlorite  (Bleach) and 4.2 gallons 30% sodium bromide (CB‐70).  Graph 4.2 below shows the trend of TRO levels for  CT 8/10.  Oxidation ended at 13:23 and peaked at 13:24.  From this point, it took three (3) hours for the  TRO levels to drop below permit limits (0.264 mg/L).  The peak residual was 0.68 mg/L as TRO suggesting  that there should be sufficient disinfection provided to manage biological growth.      Graph 4.2 

8/10 Cooling Tower TRO 0.7 0.6

1.5 hours after oxidation to  TRO below permit limits

TRO (mg/L)

0.5 0.4 0.3 0.2 0.1 0 11:23

12:30

13:00

13:33

14:03

14:32

15:01

15:30

16:01

16:31

Actual Time

  Graph 4.2 depicts the TRO level of CT 8/10 at approximately 30 minute intervals.  Marked on the graph  with the black arrow is when oxidation began at 12:00, with the blue arrow is when oxidation ended and  with the red arrow is when TRO level fell beneath our permit limit (0.26 mg/L) at 14:32.  Marked with the  green line is the time from the end of oxidation to when TRO fell below permit limits (1.5 hours).  The red  line represents the permit limit on TRO.    Conclusion    Results from our study show that TRO levels do not fall below our permit limit until approximately five (5)  hours after oxidation for CT 7/9 and three (3) hours for CT 8/10.  Based on the aforementioned data, our  current oxidant dosage regimen, and postulating for variable biases that affect oxidant demand (e.g. pH,  Page 7 of 9   


Tecumseh Energy Center  7/9 & 8/10 Cooling Tower Oxidant Concentration and Time Report  32 gallons 12.5% sodium hypochlorite (Bleach) and 4.2 gallons 30% sodium bromide (CB‐70) 

  temperature, contact time, and the desired oxidant residual) the following blowdown schedule has been  determined in order to maintain compliance with our current NPDES permit:      Cooling Tower 7/9:   five (5) hours following oxidation.      Cooling Tower 8/10:  three (3) hours following oxidation.    Recommendations:    In an effort to ensure proper oxidation does not interfere with cooling tower blowdowns triggered by  conductivity levels that exceed 3,500 µS/cm the following recommendations include, but are not limited  to:    Initiating blowdown prior to chemical application    Use cooling tower water to sluice ash   Measure TRO if values are less than 0.264 mg/L, then blowdowns can be initiated     

Page 8 of 9   


Tecumseh Energy Center  7/9 & 8/10 Cooling Tower Oxidant Concentration and Time Report  32 gallons 12.5% sodium hypochlorite (Bleach) and 4.2 gallons 30% sodium bromide (CB‐70) 

  "Biofouling Control Options for Cooling Systems ‐ POWER Magazine." POWER Magazine. Web. 2 July 2015.    

Page 9 of 9   



Oxidant study