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The University of Michigan School of Music, Theatre & Dance Student Handbook 2012 - 2013

Bachelors and Masters Information Mission Statement..................................................................................................3 School of Music, Theatre & Dance General Information.................................................3-11 Financial Aid and Scholarship Information..............................................................11-12 Information for Bachelor Students General and Academic Information.......................................................................14-15 Bachelors Degree Programs Degree Program Listing..........................................................................................17 Degree Program Information..............................................................................18-25 Bachelor Degree Program Curricula Curriculum Outlines..........................................................................................27-61 Bachelor Degree Course Descriptions Course Listings................................................................................................63-98 Performance Course Information Bachelors and Masters...................................................................................100-103 Information for Masters Degree Students General and Academic Information...................................................................105-109 Masters Degree Programs Degree Program Listing..................................................................................111-112 Curriculum Outlines......................................................................................113-123 Masters Degree Course Descriptions Course Listings............................................................................................125-144 University Academic Calendar Fall 2012 / Winter 2013 / Spring/Summer 2013............................................................145 Information Index Contact Numbers / Websites............................................................................146-147 Index Directory....................................................................................................148-149


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Mission Statement It is the mission of the University of Michigan School of Music, Theatre & Dance to create an environment of educational and artistic excellence by nurturing creativity, academic integrity, and professionalism in its faculty and students. As a comprehensive performing arts school set in one of the world’s finest public institutions of higher education, the School is deeply engaged in the creation, practice, scholarship, and pedagogy of music, theatre, and dance. We aim to provide leadership, nationally and internationally, in all three fields. We assert and celebrate the value of the arts to the mission of the University of Michigan. We serve the community, the region, and the State of Michigan through public performances, cultural resources, arts education, and outreach programs. The School’s mission is predicated on the belief that the study and practice of the performing arts depend upon a diverse community of learning in which a spirit of social responsibility and principled entrepreneurship is fostered. School of Music, Theatre & Dance General Information This Handbook is the student’s academic contract with the University of Michigan School of Music, Theatre & Dance. The curriculum of the student’s degree program is listed within this Handbook, and outlines the requirements for earning each degree. If a curriculum changes during matriculation, the student has the option of completing the original curriculum or the new one, but not a combination of both. Silent advisors can assist in course selection, though in the event of any discrepancy between the Handbook and the silent advisor, the Handbook is the official document of requirements. General Standards for Students The University of Michigan is committed to the basic principle of entrusting each student with a high degree of academic and personal freedom throughout enrollment. The School of Music, Theatre & Dance encourages its students to protect and utilize this freedom with wisdom and good judgment, and to accept the responsibility inherent in such freedom. Academic Code of Conduct Honesty, fairness, and trust are fundamental values upon which the University is founded. The academic conduct of students enrolled in the School of Music, Theatre & Dance is governed by its rules and policies. Each member of the School of Music, Theatre & Dance should realize that deception for the purposes of individual gain or convenience is an offense against the other members of the School and the University. Such dishonesty includes, but is not limited to the following: Plagiarism: Submitting the work of another person as one’s own; stealing the ideas, data, or written work of others; copying the work of others without proper acknowledgment; or otherwise taking credit falsely. Cheating: Using unauthorized notes, study aids, or information from another student or from another student’s paper on an examination, including cheating by electronic means on a computeradministered examination; altering a graded work after it has been returned and submitting the work for re-grading; allowing another person to do one’s work and submitting the work as one’s own; or submitting one’s own work previously submitted for another course without fully revealing the circumstances to the instructor. Aiding and Abetting Dishonesty: Providing material or information to another person with knowledge that these materials or information will be improperly used. Dishonesty in Reporting the Results of Research: Misrepresenting data or information, or reporting false or misleading data or information including fabrication, improper adjustment of results, selective reporting for purposes of deception, omission of conflicting data for purposes of deception, or presenting information not gathered in accordance with appropriate methods for collecting or analyzing data, and failing to include a substantially accurate account of the method by which the information was gathered or analyzed. Falsification of Records and Official Documents: Altering documents affecting academic records; providing false information with intent to undermine the orderly functioning of the School of Music,

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Theatre & Dance or the University; forging signatures or falsifying information on an official academic document, election form, drop/add form, late drop form, grade report, transcript, letter of permission, petition, or any document designed to meet or exempt a student from a regulation or procedure of the School of Music, Theatre & Dance or the University, including making alterations after a document is signed. Unauthorized or Malicious Interference or Tampering with Computer Property: Stealing, destroying, or tampering with the computer software, files, or data of others for purposes of academic gain or convenience. When a complainant believes that academic dishonesty may have taken place, he or she should present the evidence to the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs or the Associate Dean for Graduate Studies. The Dean will arrange for a hearing to determine whether the evidence is admissible. In the event that it is not, the case shall be dismissed. If the evidence is admissible, the Hearing Board must determine whether the evidence is sufficient. In the event that it is not, the case shall be dismissed. If the evidence is sufficient, the defendant is adjudged guilty of the infraction and the Hearing Board must take such action as is appropriate. Penalties for plagiarism, cheating, aiding and abetting dishonesty, dishonesty in reporting the results of research, falsification of records and official documents, and unauthorized or malicious interference or tampering with computer property are spelled out in the Manual of Procedures for Dealing with Infractions of the Code of Academic Conduct for the School of Music, Theatre & Dance. This is available in the office of the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs and the Associate Dean for Graduate Studies. Non-Academic Conduct Students at the University of Michigan expect members of their community to be responsible for their actions and to respect the rights of others. These expectations are not meant to limit students’ constitutional right to freedom of expression. The non-academic conduct of students enrolled in the School of Music, Theatre & Dance is governed by the rules and policies of the University, which can be found through the Office of Student Conflict Resolution, Division of Student Affairs. Information is available on the following website: www.oscr.umich.edu. MPlanner MPlanner is a day planner and insider’s guide to the University of Michigan edited by the Office of New Student Programs and contains information on many topics relating to student life in Ann Arbor. Incoming students receive a copy of the MPlanner at orientation. A limited number of copies are sold at some of the local bookstores, or you may download a PDF of the Insider’s Guide at the following link: www.onsp.umich.edu/current_students/mplanner. Signatures Except for office staff specifically authorized to sign for their supervisors, no person may sign the name of another person to any University document. Forging the name of a faculty member or administrator is a serious offense and may result in disciplinary action under the School of Music, Theatre & Dance Code of Academic Conduct. Alcohol and Other Drugs Policy While the emphasis of this policy is on prevention and assistance for problems associated with alcohol and other drugs, the offer of help and the willingness to accept assistance do not preclude sanctions or excuse students, faculty, or staff members from their obligations to the School of Music, Theatre & Dance or their liability under relevant laws. Consideration of sanctions may be necessary when alcohol or other drug use is associated with problems such as poor work performance, poor attendance, destruction of property, injury to individuals, and unlawful possession, use, manufacture, or distribution of alcohol and other drugs on University property or as part of University activities. Observance of Religious Holidays It is the policy of the University of Michigan to make every reasonable effort to allow members of the University community to observe their religious holidays without academic penalty. Absence 4

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from classes or examinations for religious reasons does not relieve students from responsibility for any part of the coursework required during the period of absence. Students who expect to miss classes, examinations, or other assignments as a consequence of their religious observance shall be provided with a reasonable alternative opportunity to complete such academic responsibilities. It is the obligation of the students to provide faculty with reasonable notice of the dates of religious holidays on which they will be absent. Students who are absent on days of examinations or class assignments shall be offered an opportunity to make up the work, without penalty, unless it can be demonstrated that a makeup opportunity would constitute an unreasonable burden on the faculty. Should disagreement arise over what constitutes an unreasonable burden or any aspect of this policy, parties involved should contact the Department Chair, the Dean of the School of Music, Theatre & Dance, or the Ombudsperson. Conflict Resolution The Office of Student Conflict Resolution (OSCR) is responsible for administering the University’s Code of Student Conduct. The Code sets forth the values of our University Community, establishes the types of behaviors which violate those values, and establishes a process for resolving allegations of misconduct. The Resolution Coordinator reviews and investigates alleged student misconduct and provides support to alleged violators as well as complainants. The Resolution Coordinator also educates the University community about the standards set forth in the Code. The involvement of any student in the resolution process is confidential. For further information please call 734-936-6308. Student Grievance Procedure A. Any student of the University of Michigan having a complaint against a member of the School of Music, Theatre & Dance faculty or staff, or a School of Music, Theatre & Dance policy should attempt to resolve the matter through informal discussion or other appeal to teaching or administrative personnel of the School of Music, Theatre & Dance. This procedure may be used in any matter relating to discrimination in violation of University or School Policy. B. If a satisfactory resolution of the matter cannot be achieved informally, the student should follow these procedures: · Within ninety (90) days of the date of the alleged offense or the date of origin of the alleged condition, the student should write directly to the Dean of the School of Music, Theatre & Dance, setting forth as succinctly and clearly as possible the nature of the complaint together with specific suggestions for a satisfactory remedy of the matter. · The Dean’s Office will contact the faculty or staff member involved in writing, advising him/her that the complaint has been received and that it is being referred to the appropriate Associate Dean. · The Associate Dean’s Office will contact the defendant within five (5) academic calendar days after receipt of the complaint from the Dean and arrange a meeting as soon as scheduling permits. · The Associate Dean and the complainant will meet privately and confer regarding a resolution. · After the meeting, the Associate Dean will meet with the relevant individual(s) to confer regarding a resolution. · The Associate Dean will write a report within five (5) academic calendar days and provide copies to the Dean and the complainant. · If the issue is not resolved to the complainant’s satisfaction, he/she may, within three (3) academic calendar days, make further appeal to the Dean by calling the Dean’s Office and asking for a meeting as soon as scheduling permits. · After the meeting, the Dean will meet with the relevant individual(s) to confer regarding a resolution. · If the Dean is unable to reach a resolution to the problem, he/she will write a report and place the matter on the Executive Committee’s agenda as soon as possible. · The Executive Committee will be provided with copies of the student’s complaint, the Associate Dean’s report, and the Dean’s report. · The Executive Committee may, at its discretion, appoint an ad hoc committee to investigate the matter within five (5) academic calendar days. · The disposition of the further appeal by the Executive Committee or by the ad hoc committee will be described in writing to the appellant and the complainant.

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Identification Card Students can have an ID card made at the Entree Office in the Pierpont Commons on North Campus or in the basement of the Student Activities Building on Central Campus. ID cards are distributed to incoming students during orientation and become valid upon registration for the current term. An ID card is needed to register, check out library books, use the health service or recreation facilities, buy tickets to athletic events, etc. If a card is lost or damaged, students may apply for a replacement in the Entree office for a fee. Wolverine Access Wolverine Access (www.wolverineaccess.umich.edu) is the University’s central website for student business. It allows students to conduct many tasks from any computer with internet access. They can update their address information, view course schedules and complete registration tasks, access class schedules, and review their academic and financial aid records. Students must have access to their University assigned uniqname and password in order to use any features of Wolverine Access other than the course schedule. Specific information and help in using the website is available in the on-line help section of any Wolverine Access panel. Directory Information Public faculty, staff, and student information is electronically accessible via the on-line campus directory service (www.mcommunity.umich.edu). This directory can be used from most computers to locate the addresses, telephone numbers, and email addresses of members of the University community. The directory is protected so it cannot be used to produce mass mailing lists, but the information is otherwise publicly available on a world-wide basis. Changes to the address information contained in the on-line directory can be made through Wolverine Access (www.wolverineaccess.umich.edu). Electronic Documentation and Recording The University will request permission from students to create photographs, videotape, film, audio recordings, web-cast or cable-cast content, or other documentation that the University feels may benefit education or research. This documentation may also be sold or published for academic purposes or other professional forums determined proper by the University. Hall Use Policy The three halls located on the first floor of the Moore Building - the Rehearsal Hall, Britton Recital Hall, and McIntosh Theatre, as well as the Cady Room in the Stearns Building - are primarily used for School of Music, Theatre & Dance courses, concerts, recitals, special performances, and rehearsals. The use of these spaces for rehearsal purposes is highly restricted. For more details regarding scheduling policies, please consult the Coordinator in the Scheduling Office at 936-2214. Theatre Department rehearsal and performance space is scheduled by the Theatre Department and by University Productions. Classroom Use Policy When available, classrooms located on the second floor of the Moore Building (rooms 2019-2058) may be used for practice for up to two hours a day per student or ensemble. Classrooms are not to be used for private instruction. For more information and scheduling policies regarding classroom use, please consult the Coordinator in the Scheduling Office. Theatre Department classroom requests may be made to the Department of Theatre and Drama. Practice Room Policy Practice rooms are available on the lower level of the Moore Building for the use of all students enrolled in the School of Music, Theatre & Dance. Please observe the following guidelines when using these rooms and when practicing in the second floor classrooms: •DO NOT leave instruments unattended in practice rooms. The School of Music, Theatre & Dance will not be held responsible for stolen items anywhere within the building. •DO NOT smoke, eat, or drink in the practice rooms. •DO NOT practice in the lounge, hallways, stairwells, or rest rooms. •Practice rooms with grand pianos (odd numbered rooms 1141-1181) are available for use by authorized piano majors and principals only. A key card and reserved practice time system is in place 6

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to ensure that only authorized users have access to the grand pianos. See the Piano Use Guide available in Room 1245 for details. •Rooms 1169, 1182, 1188, and 1190, used by graduate student instructors in voice, and rooms 1183 and 1185, used by graduate student instructors in piano, are not available for practice if a lesson has been previously scheduled. •If a practice room is empty for more than 10 minutes, it will be assumed available. Students cannot hold a place in a practice room with books, music, etc. This includes both assigned and unassigned rooms. Recital Policy and Recital Grace Periods Degree recitals are a requirement for graduation in a student’s chosen degree. Recitals to be given in the Fall term may be booked beginning August 1st. Recitals to be given in the Winter term may be booked beginning November 1st. Non-degree recitals (performances for which there is no written degree requirement) may be booked beginning the first day of classes for the desired term. Every effort will be made to accommodate these requests. With the permission of their major instructor, students may present their Senior or Master’s Recital in the first four weeks of the next term after the recital was originally scheduled (or two weeks of a half term). This grace period, which may not be extended by use of an Incomplete (I) grade, applies in the situations of Winter term to Spring Half-term, Winter to Fall, and Fall to Winter. An information sheet may be found outside the Scheduling Office. It is recommended that students consult the calendar a few weeks in advance to ensure their first or second choices do not conflict with other School of Music, Theatre & Dance events. Leave of Absence Policy Students may choose to take time off from their college courses to pursue other studies or special initiatives. Any School of Music, Theatre & Dance student may take off one full term (Fall or Winter) without applying for readmission. A student choosing to take off two consecutive terms (Fall-Winter or Winter-Fall) or more must apply for re-admission (see Re-admission Policy). Any student wishing to take a leave must inform the School of Music, Theatre & Dance Registrar in writing. Re-admission Policy Any undergraduate student who has not been enrolled for two consecutive terms (Fall-Winter or Winter-Fall) or more, must contact the School of Music, Theatre & Dance Office of Admissions and Student Services to apply for re-admission. Applications for re-admission are evaluated based on the criteria and expectations in effect at the time of re-admission, rather than those in effect at the time of original admission. Similarly, a student who is re-admitted must satisfy the degree requirements in effect at the time of re-admission rather than those in effect at the time of original admission. A student seeking re-admission will normally be required to re-audition. Non-Candidate for Degree Non-Candidate for Degree (NCFD) status is intended for persons who wish to increase their knowledge or improve their skills but who do not wish to pursue a degree. It carries no implication with respect to subsequent regular admission to a degree program. All course elections of NCFD students are subject to the availability of faculty time and classroom space. Only full-time NCFD students are eligible to enroll for performance instruction. Because degree-seeking students at any level are given priority, it is unlikely that an NCFD student will be able to enroll for performance instruction with a regular faculty member. Jobs Finding a job while you are a student: Music students interested in work-study or hourly employment may contact the Coordinator of Ensembles, the Assistant Dean of Enrollment Management and Student Services, the Circulation Supervisor in the Music Library, or the Administrative Associate of the Department of Theatre and Drama. There is also a “Jobs Board” outside of Room 2315 Moore. Finding a job upon graduation: The Career Planning and Placement Office in Room 3200 of the Student Activities Building provides information about careers and occupations as well as occupational supply and demand. Each student is urged to register and to create a credentials file in the Career

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Planning and Placement Office. Information concerning job openings in music is available in the Music Library, and in the Associate Dean’s Office, Room 2277 Moore. School of Music, Theatre & Dance Academic Information Advising An important part of a student’s education is to develop self-reliance and the ability to make choices, as well as to appraise one’s own performance and intellectual growth. Likewise, the responsibility for earning a degree rests with the student. To aid in this development and to assist in making educated decisions, advisors are provided in all programs within the School of Music, Theatre & Dance. The advisor can be key to learning what resources are available and how to make the most of them. The more an advisor knows about a student and her/his goals, the more useful the counseling will be. Advisors can interpret degree requirements, explain school policies and procedures, describe appropriate course options for a student’s interests and aspirations, help plan strategies, and assist with any academic difficulty a student might encounter. The advisor should be consulted at least twice each semester, preferably at the beginning, and again approximately halfway through the term (during the early registration period). As with any resource, consulting an advisor early can be extremely helpful in remedying any problem a student may experience. Progress Toward a Degree A student is expected to elect courses consistent with the curriculum of his or her declared major and is expected to make satisfactory progress toward the completion of that degree. Although academic advisors assist with course selections, the completion of degree requirements is the student’s responsibility. Attendance and Absences Students should account for their absences to their instructors and advisor when appropriate and may expect unexcused absences to be reflected in their final grade. Those who have been absent from any one course for more than three consecutive weeks will not receive credit for the course unless permission to continue is granted by the instructor and the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs. Students who are absent from all courses for more than three consecutive weeks may be required to withdraw from the School for the rest of the term. Application for permission to continue enrollment must be made to the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs. Changing or Adding a Program Degree Students who would like to change the program or degree they are pursuing, or add a second program or degree within the School of Music, Theatre & Dance, should complete the Change of Degree/Field form found on the web at www.music.umich.edu. After approval by the appropriate departments, the completed form should be returned to the School of Music, Theatre & Dance Registrar. PLEASE NOTE: In some cases an audition is required before a student can change degree programs. Registration Before registering for classes, students should meet with their advisors to help determine a class schedule based on degree requirements and personal goals. Advising appointments should be scheduled separately from such meetings as private instruction or coaching. Together with the advisor, a student will fill out a registration worksheet and any necessary performance request forms. Students must see individual instructors for overrides for any independent study courses, or courses which require either departmental or instructor’s consent. Before attempting to register, check Wolverine Access (www.wolverineaccess.umich.edu) for information on closed courses. Registration appointments are sent to the student electronically through their e-mail account and can be verified through Wolverine Access, where information regarding the registration process can be accessed through the online help panels. Students will need both their uniqname and password in order to view any information other than the University’s Course Schedule. Students may make changes to their class schedules freely through the end of the third week of classes. Electronic registration is disconnected at the end of week three and any changes made thereafter require the student to appear in person at the University Registrar’s Office located in the 8

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basement of Pierpont Commons, or at 1207 LSA Building on Central Campus. During weeks four, five, and six, students must complete the Drop/Add worksheet to add a class, change class status from visit to credit, or increase the number of credit hours. Drop/Add worksheets require signature approval from the academic advisor and class instructor and must be validated by the appropriate staff member before being carried by the student to the Office of the Registrar. After the sixth week, the School does not expect further changes in a student’s program. School of Music, Theatre & Dance policy is that no such changes will be permitted, except for medical reasons, and provided that an incomplete is unacceptable to the instructor of the course, and that a written statement is submitted by a physician confirming that continued enrollment in the course is not feasible. If there are still necessary changes, a late drop/add petition is required along with the drop/add worksheet. This form can be found on the web at www.music.umich.edu. Please see page 15 for LSA and School of Music, Theatre & Dance drop/add policies. Unsatisfactory progress or a failing grade in a course are not considered acceptable reasons for dropping the course after the sixth week (fourth week of a half-term). Similarly, being too busy is not an acceptable reason for dropping a course after the sixth week (fourth week) unless there are compelling circumstances. Overrides An override is authorization to elect a course that requires either departmental or instructor consent, or which is already closed due to enrollment limits. If the instructor approves a student’s request for an override, he/she reports the student’s name, ID, and appropriate class number information to the School of Music, Theatre & Dance Registrar, who then enters the override electronically. An instructor’s permission does NOT constitute registration for the course. Students must still register using Wolverine Access within 24 hours after the override is reported. Part-Time or Overload Enrollment Full-time enrollment in the School of Music, Theatre & Dance for undergraduates is 12 to 18 hours during full terms and 6 to 9 hours during half terms. Full-time enrollment for graduate students is 9 to 15 hours for full terms, and 4 to 6 hours during half-terms. Permission to elect other than full time enrollment must be requested by completing the Part-Time/Overload Enrollment form found online at www.music.umich.edu, and then approved by the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs in Room 2277 Moore. Although undergraduate students taking more than 18 hours are charged extra tuition for each additional hour, there are no extra fees for graduate students taking more than 15 hours. Because Wolverine Access will not allow registration beyond 18 hours for undergraduates and graduates, students should visit the Registrar’s Office in person to register for additional credit hours. The election of performance instruction only does not represent satisfactory progress toward a degree, and will not ordinarily be approved. Disenrolling from Courses Disenrollment refers to canceling an early registration before the term’s first day of regular registration. A student who withdraws or drops a course after the deadline will be liable for tuition. This applies also to courses for which the student completed “early registration” during the preceding term, and failed to disenroll even though she/he may never have attended classes. Withdrawing from All Courses To withdraw from all courses after a semester begins, a student should obtain a Withdrawal Notice from the School of Music, Theatre & Dance Registrar and present the form, with his or her student ID card, to the University Registrar’s Office. A student withdrawing before the end of the sixth week of classes (third week of classes in a half-term) may be eligible for a partial refund of tuition. Performance Instruction Performance studio assignments are determined by the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs in consultation with the department chairs. While every effort is made to accommodate the wishes of both students and faculty members in making studio assignments, all elective instruction is subject to the availability of faculty time. New students requesting performance classes should submit the Application for Private Instruction in Music Performance form found online at www.music.umich.edu. A complete list of the performance faculty is available on the School of Music, Theatre & Dance web page. Instructional assignments are

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confirmed through email within the three week drop/add period each fall and winter term. Students are responsible for confirming accurate class election information upon notification of instructional assignments. Those who preregister for performance instruction may need to amend their registration when instructional assignments are finalized. The Term Repertory Report in Applied Music or Music Performance asks students to summarize their progress through literature studied in lessons during the current term. This form is completed at the option of the instructor. Independent Study Registering for an independent study course requires the submission of a completed Independent Study form which can be found online at www.music.umich.edu. Upon request, the completed form requires an instructor’s signature and is then returned to the School of Music, Theatre & Dance Registrar. Course Waiver or Substitution Request Students wishing to either substitute one course for another required course, or to waive a required course, must complete a Request for Course Waiver or Substitution form, which can be obtained from the School of Music, Theatre & Dance Registrar. The completed form is to be approved by the appropriate academic advisor and department chairs, and returned to either the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs or the Associate Dean for Graduate Studies in Room 2277 Moore Bldg., five days before the end of classes for that term. Waivers received after this time will not be considered. Final action will be taken by the Council of Departmental Representatives or the Faculty Council on Graduate Studies, and notification will be sent to the student once action has been completed. No credit is given for a course that is waived. Requests for waiver of major ensembles by new, transfer, and continuing students, must be filed no later than the last day of the registration period for the term in which the waiver is being sought. Transfer of Credit Transferring credit completed prior to enrollment: Some or all credits completed by undergraduate transfer students at another college or university may be accepted for transfer. The Undergraduate Admissions Office evaluates non-music academic credits and the School of Music, Theatre & Dance evaluates all professional credit. Some previous college work may be given equivalent course credit if it corresponds closely to a School of Music, Theatre & Dance course. Previous courses may transfer as departmental credit in a general area such as History or Humanities, if they are not equivalent to a specific School of Music, Theatre & Dance course. A Credit Evaluation Report is prepared from final official transcripts submitted by the previous institution. This report lists all courses and credits which transfer to the University of Michigan academic record, and a copy will be made available to the student. The Credit Evaluation Report must be shown to the advisor when choosing classes, though this report cannot be prepared until a final, official transcript from the previous institution is submitted to the School of Music, Theatre & Dance Registrar. Transferring credit from another institution while enrolled in the School of Music, Theatre & Dance: An undergraduate may transfer no more than 75 semester hours of credit toward a Bachelor’s Degree in the School of Music, Theatre & Dance, including a maximum of 62 semester hours from an accredited two year college. An undergraduate who has not exceeded these limits may take additional course work off-campus and apply to transfer it to the ongoing UM record. Once an undergraduate student has reached junior status (55 credit hours), he/she is no longer eligible to transfer courses in from a community college. Any courses taken to be transferred thereafter must come from a four year, accredited institution. Master’s level graduate students may apply to transfer up to 6 credit hours to their ongoing academic record. Though credits cannot be transferred into doctoral programs, some departments may consider a waiver of a course based on work taken elsewhere. Students should consider their doctoral advisor or department for further information. Examinations/Juries Students may be examined at any time, with or without notice, on any part of the coursework 10

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in a given class. The majority of classes will have final examinations at the end of the term. The schedule of final examinations is fixed by the University, and is distributed through the Registrar’s Office website: www.ro.umich.edu. A student should record the dates and times of exams at the beginning of the semester. No travel plans should conflict with these dates. Early purchase of plane, train, or bus tickets is NOT an excuse to miss classes or exams. Classes can extend to 5:00pm the Wednesday before the Thanksgiving holiday, so plans should be made accordingly. Juries are final examinations in performance courses. Students enrolled in performance courses with catalog numbers 100, 139, 240, 440, 539, and 639 are required to present a formal jury during the final examination period. Students enrolled in other courses may be required to present an informal jury in any semester, at the discretion of the instructor. Accompanists are required for formal juries. Grades and Scholastic Standing An Academic Report is the cumulative record of courses elected, grades, averages, and other matters relating to the progress of the student and is maintained by the Office of the University Registrar. With proper identification, an individual may obtain an official copy of his/her academic record by placing an order at the University Registrar’s Office in the basement of Pierpont Commons or 1207 LSA Building on Central Campus. An unofficial copy of the Academic Report may be obtained on-line through Wolverine Access (www.wolverineaccess.umich.edu), or at the University Registrar’s Office. School of Music, Theatre & Dance grades range from “A+” through “E,” and carry honor points. Grades of “S” (satisfactory), “U” (unsatisfactory), “I” (incomplete), “VI” (official audit), “P” (pass), and “F” (fail) are also used; these marks do not carry honor points. The decision to elect a course under the pass/fail option must be made within the first six weeks of the term, and once made, cannot be changed. Instructors are not notified of the pass/fail election, and will report grades as usual. The Office of the Registrar will translate the instructor’s grades as “A+” through “C-” entered on the transcript as “P” (pass), and any grades below entered on the transcript as “F” (fail). A course elected as pass/fail will carry credit but no honor points. Additional information regarding the pass/fail option is outlined in the appropriate undergraduate and graduate section of this handbook. Double Enrollment An undergraduate with six or fewer hours remaining to complete a bachelor’s degree in the School of Music, Theatre & Dance may apply for admission to a master’s program for the term in which the bachelor’s degree is expected. If admitted, the student may enroll for both undergraduate and graduate courses, and receive graduate credit for course work beyond the undergraduate degree requirements. Admission to the master’s program, if approved, is contingent upon receipt of the bachelor’s degree. A double-enrolled student is subject to graduate fees for all courses elected. Double enrollment may not be continued beyond one term. A student with six or fewer hours remaining to complete the master’s degree may apply for admission to the Specialist in Music program for the term in which the master’s degree is expected. Admission to the specialist program, if approved, is contingent upon receipt of the master’s degree. Double enrollment may not be continued beyond one term. Application for Graduation Students wishing to graduate must complete the Degree/Diploma Application form located on Wolverine Access under Student Business. All graduating students must inform the Registrar of the School of Music, Theatre & Dance of their intention to graduate within the first month of the term of planned graduation. Completion of the diploma application indicates that a student believes all requirements for his/her degree have been, or are about to be met. A student will not be considered for graduation without this application. Financial Aid and Scholarship Information Need Based Financial Aid University and federally funded need-based financial aid programs (including University grants and loans, Pell Grants, College Work Study, Perkins Loans, and Stafford Loans) are administered by the

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Office of Financial Aid (OFA), Room 2011, Student Activities Building. Continuing students who wish to be considered for the full range of need-based aid programs must complete the Free Application for Federal Financial Aid (FAFSA) and submit it before April 1 in any calendar year. Be sure all analysis forms are sent to the University of Michigan Office of Financial Aid Application materials and further instructions are available on the Office of Financial Aid website at www.ofaumich.edu. Merit-Based Scholarships Any currently admitted undergraduate or graduate student in the School of Music, Theatre & Dance may apply for a merit-based scholarship. All incoming students are automatically reviewed for a scholarship award through the admission application. First year undergraduate and transfer students currently receiving a scholarship need not complete an application. Second, third, and fourth year continuing undergraduate students, as well as continuing M.M. and Specialists who currently receive scholarship support through the School of Music, Theatre & Dance must reapply. At the beginning of January, applications are sent to the student body electronically and are available in Room 2277 Moore; completed applications for the following academic year must be returned by February 1st. Music students awarded merit-based scholarship must participate in a large ensemble as stipulated by the department. A list of applicable ensembles is available in Room 2277. Dance students who wish to be considered for merit based awards should see their department chair and must apply each year. All Theatre students are automatically ranked by faculty every year and top ranked students will receive merit awards. M.A., M.F.A., D.M.A., and Ph.D. students should consult the Associate Dean for Graduate Studies in Room 2277 Moore. Financial Hold Proper observance of financial obligation is an essential component of good conduct. Students shall pay all accounts due in accordance with regulations set forth by the University. When a student’s account shows indebtedness, a service indicator is placed on the student’s record and academic credits are withheld. No transcript of academic record or diploma will be issued, nor will future registration be permitted. Offices such as the University Libraries, Health Services, University Hospital, Student Accounts, Student Loans, and the like, can place financial service indicators on a student’s record. If a student owes money to Student Accounts or Student Loans, the bill may be paid at the Cashier’s window in the LSA Building or the Pierpont Commons. When doing so, it is necessary to tell the cashier that a financial service indicator exists. The Cashier will then enter a “paid” status in the computer. Clarity in communicating the nature of a service indicator contributes to the timely crediting of the student’s account. All other service indicators must be paid directly to the office to which a student owes money. When a service indicator is paid off, a receipt is issued, and must then be taken to the Cashier’s Office. Any outstanding bills that exist upon graduation must be paid in full before a final transcript or diploma will be issued.

12

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School of Music, Theatre & Dance

13


Information for Bachelor Students

Academic Discipline School of Music, Theatre & Dance undergraduate students are required to maintain a minimum term or cumulative grade point average (GPA) of 2.0. Cumulative averages are reported to the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs at the close of each term. At the discretion of the Dean, one of the following levels of academic discipline may be imposed: Probation: A student whose term or cumulative GPA is below 2.0 will be placed on probation. Students on probation must attain a 2.0 cumulative GPA during their next term of enrollment. Stringent Probation: A student whose term or cumulative GPA is significantly below 2.0, or whose probationary status has not been removed, will be placed on stringent probation. Students on stringent probation must attain a 2.0 cumulative GPA or demonstrate significant academic progress during their next term of enrollment. Not to Register (NTR): A student whose stringent probation status has not been removed will not be allowed to register for classes. Such students will be required to withdraw from the School of Music, Theatre & Dance and must formally apply for re-admission before permission to register will be granted. Grading System School of Music, Theatre & Dance students will be graded in accordance with the following system: A+ A excellent A- B+ B good B- C+ C fair C- D+ D poor D- E fail

4.0 honor pts 4.0 3.7 3.3 3.0 2.7 2.3 2.0 1.7 1.3 1.0 0.7 0.0

In addition to standard letter grades, the following system is used: I X ED Y Q S U P F VI W NR

incomplete absent from exam unofficial withdrawal course extends beyond one term unofficial election satisfactory unsatisfactory pass fail official audit official drop no grade reported

Incomplete Students receiving a mark of I or X in a course must make up the deficiency within the first four weeks of the next term of enrollment. If the student is not in residence subsequent to receiving the mark, credit will be allowed only if the deficiency is made up within a calendar year of the official termination of the course. Pass-Fail Option A student in an undergraduate degree program who has completed thirty semester hours with a 2.0 cumulative grade point average is eligible to take elective courses on a pass/fail basis. Only one 14

School of Music, Theatre & Dance


Information for Bachelor Students

course per term or half-term may be elected pass/fail. A student may take a total of six courses on a pass/fail basis, but no more than four courses in either music or non-music electives. Non-music courses specified as degree requirements or undergraduate deficiencies cannot normally be elected pass/fail. The only exceptions are courses offered on a full or partial pass/fail basis, and language requirements with the approval of the student’s major department. Courses elected pass/fail under the terms of these exceptions are considered (and counted as) part of this option. Specific courses and distribution requirements in the teacher certification program cannot be elected pass/fail except those courses offered only on a full or partial pass/fail basis. Any course elected as pass/fail will carry credit but no honor points. Under this option, the Office of the Registrar will translate the instructor’s grades as A+ through C- entered on the transcript as P, and grades of D+ through E entered as F. After the first two weeks of the term, petitions requesting a change of pass/fail to a letter grade or vice versa will not be accepted. Adding and Dropping Courses NOTE: Drop/Add deadlines for the College of Literature, Science, and Arts differ from that of the School of Music, Theatre & Dance. Students may drop or add courses until the end of the third week of classes in the Fall and Winter Terms and until the end of the first week of classes in a Half-Term. Between the third and sixth weeks (or second and fourth week of a half-term), students must have their requests approved by the instructor, their advisor and the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs, 2277 Moore. After the sixth week (or fourth week of a half term), no such changes will be permitted, except for medical reasons, provided that an incomplete is unacceptable to the instructor(s) of the course(s) and that a written statement is submitted to the appropriate Dean by a physician confirming that continued enrollment is not feasible. Drop/Add forms are available online at www.music.umich.edu. Credit by Examination A maximum of twelve credit hours may be applied to undergraduate degrees through credit by examination. This option, applicable to all courses listed in the Handbook, is intended for students enrolled in the School of Music, Theatre & Dance who are gifted in the areas in which credit is being sought as well as those who are capable of carrying on independent study without faculty supervision. The department or area that offers the course, must be satisfied that the student seeking credit and grade by examination possesses the knowledge and skills expected of a student who completes the same course in the School of Music, Theatre & Dance. This option may not be used to acquire credit for courses completed at other institutions. In such cases, the student may transfer the credit from the granting institution (see Transfer of Credit, page 10). A student may not visit or audit a course in the School of Music, Theatre & Dance, either officially or informally and then attempt to complete that course by special examination. The total number of hours that an undergraduate student may acquire through transfer from another institution and through course completion by special examination at the University of Michigan is 75. Students must be enrolled in the term or half-term in which the examination is to take place and must pay a fee before the examination is administered. To receive credit, a student must earn a grade of C or higher. In this method of completing courses, the pass/fail option is not allowed.

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School of Music, Theatre & Dance


Bachelor Degree Programs

Degree Program Listing Bachelor of Musical Arts......................................................................................................27 Bachelor of Theatre Arts.....................................................................................................28 Bachelor of Fine Arts in Dance..............................................................................................29 Bachelor of Fine Arts in Jazz and Contemplative Studies..........................................................30 Bachelor of Fine Arts in Jazz and Contemporary Improvisation................................................31 Bachelor of Fine Arts in Jazz Studies......................................................................................32 Bachelor of Fine Arts in Jazz Studies with Teacher Certification................................................33 Bachelor of Fine Arts in Musical Theatre.................................................................................34 Bachelor of Music in Music and Technology............................................................................35 Bachelor of Fine Arts in Performing Arts Technology (Music Concentration).............................36 Bachelor of Fine Arts in Performing Arts Technology (Media Concentration).............................37 Bachelor of Science in Sound Engineering.............................................................................38 Bachelor of Fine Arts in Theatre Design and Production...........................................................39 Bachelor of Fine Arts in Theatre Performance (Acting Concentration)......................................40 Bachelor of Fine Arts in Theatre Performance (Directing Concentration)..................................41 Bachelor of Music in Composition.........................................................................................42 Bachelor of Music in Harp Performance.................................................................................43 Bachelor of Music in Choral Music Education..........................................................................44 Bachelor of Music in Instrumental Music Education................................................................45 Additional Information For Music Education Degrees.....................................................................46 Bachelor of Music in Music Theory.........................................................................................47 Bachelor of Music in Music History........................................................................................48 Bachelor of Music in Ethnomusicology..................................................................................49 Bachelor of Music in Early Music............................................................................................50 Bachelor of Music in Organ Performance and Church Music......................................................51 Bachelor of Music in Organ Performance with Teacher Certification.........................................52 Bachelor of Music in Piano Performance................................................................................53 Bachelor of Music in Piano Performance with Teacher Certification..........................................54 Bachelor of Music in Performance: String Instruments...........................................................55 Bachelor of Music in Performance: String Instruments with Teacher Certification.....................56 Bachelor of Music in Voice Performance................................................................................57 Bachelor of Music in Voice Performance with Teacher Certification..........................................58 Bachelor of Music in Performance: Wind Instruments and Percussion......................................59 Bachelor of Music in Wind Instruments.................................................................................60 Bachelor of Music in Wind Instruments and Percussion with Teacher Certification.....................61

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Bachelor Degree Programs

Degree Program Information Core Curriculum Each student is required by election or demonstrated proficiency a basic core curriculum which consists of the following: Piano 111, 112; minimum of 24 hours or completion of course 440/426 by proficiency examination in Major or Principal instrument (or Voice); four terms of an appropriate Ensemble - String majors must participate for 4 terms in Ensemble 345 (University Orchestra), Wind and Percussion majors must participate for 4 terms in Ensemble 345, 347 (University Band), or Ensemble 348 (Marching Band). Voice majors must participate for 4 terms in Ensemble 349 (University Choir), 350 (University Chamber Choir), or 470 (Orpheus Singers). Music Education majors must participate for 4 terms in Ensemble 345, 347, 348, 349, or 350. All other majors must participate for two of the four terms in Ensemble 345, 347, 348, 349, or 350; the other 2 terms of this requirement may be satisfied by selecting from among any of the large or small Ensembles approved by the major department; Music Theory 139/149, 140/150, 239/249, 240/250, and one 400 level Theory course OR Music Theory 139/149, 140/150, Jazz 220 and 221, and one 400 level Theory course; Musicology 139, 140, 239, and 240; one term of a Music Theory or Musicology elective (400 level or higher), or Jazz 466, 467, or 470; English 124, 125, or equivalent, and English 225 (Academic Argumentation) or an upper level Sweetland Writing Center approved junior/senior writing course. A grade of C- or better is required for completion of writing requirements. This core curriculum is outlined within each specific program description, along with additional requirements to complete each degree. Semester Hours of Credit A minimum of 120 hours of credit must be completed with an average grade of C (honor-point average of 2.0). The requirement of some curricula, however, may be higher than this minimum; for further information, consult the specific curriculum outlines elsewhere in this Handbook. The minimum full-time undergraduate course load is twelve hours, though a normal course load per term is fifteen. Additional hours to a maximum of eighteen may be elected with the approval of the student’s advisor. However, hours elected above eighteen will be subject to additional costs. During the Summer Half-Term, the minimum full-time load is five hours and the maximum is nine hours. A student is generally expected to devote approximately three working hours per week for each hour of credit. One hour is normally spent in class and two in preparation, but the proportion varies considerably depending upon the course. In addition to the 120 hours of credit with a C average, each student must complete courses and any proficiency specified for the department of specialization and, where required, a public recital or deposit of compositions. The right is reserved to withhold the recommendation of a candidate for a degree with a major in performance if, in the judgment of the faculty, the minimum hours of credit earned in performance do not represent adequate maturation and musicianship to merit the distinction of a degree. This provision is necessary because of possible individual differences in proficiency and musicianship at the time of admission. Each student must complete a minimum of 30 credit hours in non-music courses. For Bachelor of Music in Performance students, “non-music” can be defined as including Dance and Theatre. Some departmental curricula require more credit in non-music courses than this 30 hour minimum. Transfer Credit College credits earned for courses taken elsewhere will generally be accepted for transfer credit if they correspond to a University of Michigan course offering and they have been taken for credit with an earned grade of C or better. Students who have reached junior status (55 credit hours) are no longer eligible to transfer in credits from junior colleges; all credits must come from a four year, accredited institution. Courses in music and dance that have been applied to a degree completed elsewhere are not applicable toward the completion of a degree in the School of Music, Theatre & Dance. The final decision on the acceptability of transfer credit is made by the School of Music, Theatre & Dance. Acceptable course credits earned in other institutions are recorded on the student’s academic record at the University of Michigan, but grades earned in those courses are not 18

School of Music, Theatre & Dance


Bachelor Degree Programs

transferred or recorded by the University. This system assumes that a student’s original transcript will carry the previous academic record adequately. Thus, only grades earned at the University of Michigan are used in computing the final grade point average. Consequently, the transcript of each institution that the student attends constitutes the basic record of academic achievement. A maximum of seventy-five hours of transfer credit can be applied toward a bachelor’s degree in the School of Music, Theatre & Dance. A maximum of sixty-two hours may be transferred from an accredited two-year college. Students who have transferred sixty-two credit hours or more may only transfer additional hours from a four-year accredited college. No more than fifteen hours of extension or correspondence credit earned in other fully accredited institutions will be accepted. A student may present work from the Academic Outreach Program of the University, however, to a maximum of thirty hours. Of these thirty, not more than fifteen hours may be taken in correspondence study. A maximum of thirty semester hours may be accepted for correspondence credit earned while in military service. This may include work taken through USAFI in which there was a satisfactory end-of-course test. Each application for transfer credit is considered individually. Adjustment of transfer credit is made at the request of a student after enrollment in the School of Music, Theatre & Dance. Senior Residence At least twenty-four hours of courses required in the senior year must be completed in residence, including all senior courses in the major field. A student must be enrolled in performance when presenting a recital. Please see page 7 for Recital Grace Period information. Choosing a Degree Although certain courses, such as Music Theory, Music History, and English are common to all, much of each curriculum is designed to prepare the student in a specific field. The non-music courses that apply toward completing a degree may be chosen from the rich and varied offerings of the University’s other programs, schools, and colleges, with the exception of Officer Education Programs. Each student will choose one of the curricula given in this Handbook. That choice will be governed by previous training and experience and should be approved by the advisor for the department concerned. Since the requirements of the departmental curricula are similar in the first and second years (except for the major or principal performance area), it is possible for a student to change majors before the third year, with departmental approval, without serious disruptions. The work of the final two years leading to the Bachelor of Music degree is focused more on specialized study. Bachelor of Musical Arts and Bachelor of Theatre Arts These degrees allow students flexibility in developing secondary (cognate) fields of interest through the design of a large part of their programs within stated guidelines and with faculty advisor consultation. Applicants are asked to explain their educational and professional goals in the application or through interviews with the department chair. Outlines of the curriculum requirements are listed in this section, but students will customize the program to fit personal goals. The Artist and Scholar Honors Program The Artist and Scholar Honors Program is designed to cultivate and develop the abilities of gifted students with outstanding artistic or intellectual promise. By allowing a small number of selected undergraduate students (a total of approximately 12-15 at a time) to design their own courses of study in close consultation with faculty advisors, the program makes the resources of the School of Music, Theatre & Dance accessible in ways normally unavailable to degree-pursuing students. A student considered for the Artist and Scholar Honors Program must be nominated by a department chair with the concurrence of the department(s) or program(s) of the intended area(s) of focus. Students will normally be identified for this recognition during the sophomore year and at the time of nomination, must have at least a 3.5 GPA. The nomination procedure requires the following: a letter of nomination from a department Chair; a letter of concurrence of the department (or program) of the intended area of focus; another document from the student indicating the preference

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19


Bachelor Degree Programs

of advisor; a proposal to the Council of Departmental Representatives with recommendations to Executive Committee. Upon the recommendation of the faculty advisor and the Dean, the Executive Committee is authorized to name students to the Artist and Scholar Honors Program. A faculty mentor will be appointed by the Executive Committee to serve as advisor and to work with the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs in responding to unusual curricular or instructional needs of the Honors student. The Executive Committee will appoint four members of the faculty, representing both artists and scholars, to oversee the program as well as student progress. These faculty may also advise students in the program, and the Honors Council will also serve as a cross-departmental liaison for Honors students. An Artist and Scholar Honors Program student must complete the Core Curriculum (pg. 18) by election, exemption, or waiver. Apart from that, the student designs the balance of the curriculum in consultation with his or her advisor. At the end of each term, or immediately after a term’s work is reported on an updated transcript, the faculty advisor of an Honors Program student will submit a statement to the Honors Council concerning the student’s progress. On the basis of these statements, the Honors Council will recommend to the Executive Committee that the Honors Program status of the student be renewed or revoked. Dual Degree in Music and Engineering / Dual Degree in Music and Business These programs are intended for students who seek the professional training in applied or academic musical studies associated with the School of Music, Theatre & Dance in combination with the technical studies associated with the College of Engineering or academic and professional studies associated with the Ross School of Business. These dual degrees are open to students enrolled in both schools. They lead to concurrent bachelors degrees from both units and are intended primarily for students who enroll as freshmen in either unit. For specific course requirements, and to develop the best plan of study, students should consult their advisors, the Assistant Dean for Students in Business or Engineering and the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs in the School of Music, Theate & Dance. It is the student’s responsibility to plan the academic program and maintain contact with advisors in the two fields, as well as become familiar with the academic policies and requirements as described in the Bulletin of the College of Engineering, the Bulletin for the Ross Business School, and the Handbook of the School of Music, Theatre & Dance. Candidates for the combined Bachelor of Science in Engineering, Bachelor of Business Administration, and degrees offered by the School of Music, Theatre & Dance, must complete the degree programs in both the College of Engineering, or the Ross School of Business, and the School of Music, Theatre & Dance, and maintain a minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.0, and good scholastic standing in both units. It is usually possible for students electing 16-18 credits per term to meet all requirements in eleven or twelve terms. Other Dual Degrees Students may apply to a dual degree program with other units of the University at any point in their studies. However, we recommend applying before the beginning of the junior year. Students participating in this program will have an academic advisor in both units and both degrees will be granted simultaneously upon graduation. Minor in Performing Arts Management (PAM) The SMTD offers a minor in Performing Arts Management to eligible UM students. Those interested in this program must take two classes listed from the Required Topics curriculum to become eligible for this program. Once completed successfully, the student would interview with the Performing Arts Management Advisor and apply for admission to the minor. The academic minor in PAM is developed in consultation with an undergraduate advisor. Appointments are scheduled through the School’s Arts Administration area at PAMadvising@umich.edu.

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Bachelor Degree Programs

At least 15 credits with a minimum of five courses to be chosen from the following two categories. Eligible courses taken prior to acceptance to the minor can be used to fulfill the 15 credit hour requirement. Required Topics Courses (complete at least 10 credit hours in the following courses):

Hours

Theatre 385: Performing Arts Management

2

Theatre 426: Fundraising and the Arts

2

Theatre 435: Producing in the American Theatre

3

Theatre 438: Legal Issues in the Arts

3

PAT 472: Business of Music

3

Jazz 480: Career Development for Jazz Musicians

2

Arts Admin 491: Special Projects

1-2

Arts Admin 591: Internship

1-2

Electives (remaining credit hours can be earned in courses chosen from the list below): ACC 271: Priniciples of Accounting I ACC 272: Principles of Accouting II COMM 101: The Mass Media COMM 102: Media Processes and Effects COMM 351: Understanding Media Industries COMM 371: Media, Culture, and Society COMM 454: Media Economics COMM 462: Designing Persuasive Communication COMM 463: Computer Mediated Communication COMM 466: Internet, Society and the Law ECON 101: Introduction to Economics I ECON 102: Introduction to Economics II MKT 300: Marketing Management MKT 301: Marketing Management II MKT 310: Fundamentals of Sale Management ORGSTUDY 215: Organization and Society (with SOC 215) ORGSTUDY 305: Inside Organizations ORGSTUDY 310: Formal Organizations and Environments ORGSTUDY 395: Current Issues in Organizational Studies ORGSTUDY 495: Special Topics PSYCH 260: Introduction to Organizational Psychology RCHUMS 334: Topics in Humanities: Community Empowerment Through the Arts STATS 250: Introduction to Statistical Data Analysis

Conditions: An overall GPA of 2.0 or above within the minor must be achieved; all courses used to fulfill minor requirements must be elected both for credit and for a grade; upon approval, up to six credits earned outside the UM or its sponsored programs may be used to fulfill requirements for the minor. Exclusions: Production practica are not eligible courses for the minor; no more than one course fulfilling a requirement in the PAM minor may simultaneously be counted to cover another degree requirement; AP credits may not be used to satisfy minor requirements.

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Bachelor Degree Programs

Minor in Theatre Design and Production The SMTD Department of Theatre and Drama offers a minor in Design and Production to eligible UM students. Students enrolled in the Theatre Department’s current degree programs; Performance, Directing, and the BTA are not eligible for this minor, nor are the students majoring in the BFA in Interarts Peformance degree program. Students will choose one of the four D&P tracks listed below, and confine their studies to that area. Students interested in this program must take two classes listed in their area of interest to become eligible for this program. At that point the student would interview with the Design and Production faculty. Students must secure written approval from their home school/college to pursue a D&P minor and must develop a plan for the minor in consultation with an advisor in the Design and Production Program. Scenic Design

Hours

Theatre 260: Scene Design I

3

Theatre 360: Scene Design II

3

Theatre 460: Scene Design III

3

Theatre 263: Rendering

3

Theatre 464: Scene Painting

3

Theatre 462: Drafting

3

Costume Design

Hours

Theatre 263: Rendering

3

Theatre 277: History of Dress

3

Theatre 270: Costume Design I

3

Theatre 370: Costume Design II

3

Six additional credits to be chosen from the following: Theatre 470: Costume Design III

3

Theatre 476: Costume Crafts

3

Theatre 452: Constume Construction

3

Theatre 471: Women’s Pattern Drafting

3

Theatre 571: Men’s Pattern Drafting

3

Theatre 172 or 472: Make-up Design

2

Theatre 251, 252: Production Practicum

1

Lighting Design

Hours

Theatre 245: Introduction to Stage Management

3

Theatre 256: Introduction to Stage Lighting

3

Theatre 356: Lighting Design II

3

Theatre 456: Lighting Design III

3

Practicum I: Light Board Operator

1

Practicum II: Focus Crew/Semester

1

Practicum III: Assistant ME

1

Practicum IV: Assistant ME

1

Practicum IV: Assist Lighting Designer

1

Practicum IV: Assist Lighting Designer

1

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Bachelor Degree Programs

Stage Management

Hours

Theatre 245: Introduction to Stage Management

3

Theatre 250: Introduction to Technical Theatre Practices

3

Theatre 321 or 322: Theatre History I or II

3

Theatre 351: Practicum 5 - 1st ASM

3

Six additional credits to be chosen from the following: Theatre 101 Introduction to Acting

3

Theatre 240: Introduction to Design

3

Theatre 345: Stage Managing Plays

3

Theatre 351: Practicum 6 - 1st ASM

3

Theatre 356: Lighting Design I

3

Theatre 385: Performing Arts Management

3

Theatre 435: Producing in American Theatre

3

Theatre 446: Advanced Stage Management

3

Theatre 462: Drafting

3

Non-SMTD Minors Students in the School of Music, Theatre & Dance are given the option of electing one or more academic minors offered by departments within the College of Literature, Science and Arts and Art & Design. Minors are intended to recognize the completion of a coherent sequence of courses in a particular academic area and serve as recognition, via a transcript notation, of the completion of a more in-depth course sequence. In practice, a student will meet with the LSA or Art & Design advisor in the area of discipline and together map out the minor courses. The certification that the appropriate courses have been completed will be communicated to the School of Music, Theatre & Dance from the department offering the minor. Listed below, are approved minors covering a diverse range of academic interests. We suggest each student meet with an LSA or Art & Design advisor to discuss exact requirements. MINOR

DEPARTMENT

African American Theatre

Theatre and Drama

Afro-American and African Studies

Center for Afro-American and African Studies

Anthropology

Anthropology

Applied Statistics

Statistics

Art & Design

Art & Design

Asian Languages and Cultures

Asian Languages and Cultures

Asian Studies

Asian Languages and Cultures

Asian/Pacific Islander American Studies

Program in American Culture

Astronomy and Astrophysics

Astronomy

Biochemistry

Chemistry

Biological Anthropology

Anthropology

Biology

Biology

Biophysics

Program in Biophysics

Central Eurasian Studies

Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies

Chemical Measurement Science

Chemistry

Chemical Physics

Chemistry

Chemistry

Chemistry

Classical Archaeology

Classical Studies School of Music, Theatre & Dance

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Bachelor Degree Programs

Classical Civilization

Classical Studies

Community Action and Social Change

School of Social Work

Complex Systems

Center for the Study of Complex Systems

Computer Science

Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

Creative Writing

English Language and Literature

Crime and Justice

Residential College

Cultures and Literatures of Eastern Europe

Slavic Languages and Literatures

Czech Language, Literature, and Culture

Slavic Languages and Literatures

Drama: Text-to-Performance

Residential College

Early Christian Studies

Near Eastern Studies and Classical Studies

Earth Sciences

Geological Science

East European Studies

Center for Russian and East European Studies

Ecology and Evolutionary Biology

Ecology and Evolutionary Biology

Economics

Economics

Electrical Engineering

Division of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

Environment

Program in Environment

Environmental Geology

Geological Science

Epistemology and Philosophy of Science

Philosophy

French and Francophone Studies

Romance Languages and Literatures

Gender and Health

Women’s Studies Program

Gender, Race, and Nation

Women’s Studies Program

General Philosophy

Philosophy

German Studies

Germanic Languages and Literatures

Global Change

Program in Environment

Global Media Studies

Screen Arts and Cultures

History

History

History of Art

History of Art

History of Philosophy

Philosophy

Interdisciplinary Astronomy

Astronomy

International Studies

Center for International and Comparative Studies

Islamic Studies

Islamic Studies Program

Italian

Romance Languages and Literatures

Judaic Studies

Frankel Center for Judaic Studies

Language, Literature, and Culture of Ancient Greece

Classical Studies

Language, Literature, and Culture of Ancient Rome

Classical Studies

Latin American and Caribbean Studies

Latin American and Caribbean Studies Program

Latina/o Studies

Program in American Culture

Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer (LGBTQ), and Sexuality Studies

Women’s Studies Program

Linguistics

Linguistics

Mathematics

Mathematics

Medical Anthropology

Anthropology

Medieval and Early Modern Studies

Medieval and Early Modern Studies

24

School of Music, Theatre & Dance


Bachelor Degree Programs

Mind and Meaning

Philosophy

Modern Greek Studies

Classical Studies

Modern Middle Eastern and North African Studies

Center for Modern Middle Eastern and North African Studies

Modern European Studies

Center for European Studies - European Union Center

Moral and Political Philosophy

Philosophy

Multidisciplinary Design

Multidisciplinary Design Program, Engineering

Museum Studies

Museum Studies

Native American Studies

Program in American Culture

Near Eastern Languages and Cultures

Near Eastern Studies

Oceanography

Geological Science

Paleontology

Geological Science

Peace and Social Justice

Residential College

Physics

Physics

Plant Biology

Ecology and Evolutionary Biology

Polish Language, Literature, and Cultures

Slavic Languages and Literatures

Political Science

Political Science

Polymer Chemistry

Chemistry

Russian Language, Literature, and Culture

Slavic Languages and Literatures

Russian Studies

Center for Russian and East European Studies

Scandinavian Studies

Germanic Languages and Literatures

Science, Technology, and Society

Residential College

Spanish Language, Literature, and Culture

Romance Languages and Literatures

Statistics

Statistics

Sustainability

Program in the Environment

Ukrainian Language, Literature, and Culture

Slavic Languages and Literatures

Urban Studies

Residential College

Writing

Sweetland Center for Writing

An academic minor will require no less than 15 credits of course work, will show structure and coherence, and will contain some upper-level courses. At least 10 out of the 15 credits must be taken in-residence. Students who declare and complete an approved academic minor will receive a notation on their student transcript but not on their diploma. For further details, students should consult the following websites: www.lsa.umich.edu or www.art-design.umich.edu.

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School of Music, Theatre & Dance


Bachelor Degree Program Curricula

BACHELOR OF MUSICAL ARTS Note: Bachelor of Music Piano Performance students who fail to pass their junior standing hearing will not be considered for the BMA Piano Performance, although the BMA with Piano as a secondary instrument will be considered. SMTD Requirements Music Theory:

Hours Aural I

139

1

Written I

149

2

Aural II

140

1

Written II

150

2

2391

1

1

249

2

Aural IV

2401

1

Written IV

2501

2

Aural III Written III

400 Level Theory Musicology:

3

Intro

139

2

Post WWI

140

2

Middle Ages - Baroque

239

2

Preclassic Era - WWI

240

2

Jazz/Musicology/Theory elective2 Piano

3-4 111

2

112

2

*Piano Performance Concentrators will elect the following: Pianolit: Survey of Keyboard Literature

487

2

Ensemble: Piano Accompanying

481

2

SMTD Concentration

Hours

Performance concentration

30 hours of Performance

OR Theory, Musicology, Composition, or Jazz Studies concentration

10 hours beyond the Core Curriculum in one of these areas

Non-SMTD Requirements

Hours

English 124, 125 (College Writing), or equivalent

4

English 225 (Academic Argumentation) or Upper Level Writing course approved by Sweetland Writing Center

3-4

2 courses within the same department of Social Sciences or Humanities

variable

Cognate - At least 3 courses beyond the intro level in one subject area

minimum 9 hours

Electives

variable

Ensemble - 2 terms of 345 (Univ Orch), 347 (Univ Band), 348 (Marching Band), 349 (Univ Choir), 350 (Chamber Choir), or 470 (Orpheus Singers) 2 additional terms of an approved Ensemble Performance - 24 hours or completion of 426/440

All students in the BMA Performance Concentration are required to prepare a public presentation as a Senior Project. Presentations may include recitals, lecture-recitals, partial recitals, chamber music performances, performances in the Outreach program or other forms of performance. The student’s home department determines all guidelines and must approve all senior projects. Minimum SMTD Hours: 60 - 80 Minimum Non-SMTD Hours: 40 - 60 Minimum Total Hours Required: 120 Jazz 220 (3 credits) can be taken in place of Theory 239 and 249. Jazz 221 (3 credits) can be taken in place of Theory 240 and 250. 2 Select from Jazz 460, 467, 470, 479, or an upper level Musicology or Theory. 1

School of Music, Theatre & Dance

27


Bachelor Degree Program Curricula

BACHELOR OF THEATRE ARTS Theatre Requirements Theatre:

Theatre Elective Requirements

Hours

Hours

Theatre electives

minimum 12 hours

Acting I

101

3

Acting II

102

3

Intro to Drama

211

3

Intro to Design

240

3

Directing I

241

3

245 OR 385

3/2

Intro to Technical Theatre

250

3

Production Practicum I

251

1

Theatre History I

321

Theatre History II American Theatre and Drama

Stage Management OR Performing Arts Management

OR Performing Arts Management Concentration includes the following courses: Theatre:

Performing Arts Management

385

2

Practicum in Performing Arts Management

386

3

3

Topics in Drama

399

1-3

322

3

435

3

323

3

Producing in the American Theatre Uber Practicum in Arts Management

495

3-4

Non-School of Music, Theatre & Dance Requirements

Hours

English 124, 125 (College Writing), or equivalent

4

English 225 (Academic Argumentation) or Upper Level Writing course approved by Sweetland Writing Center

3-4

English 367: Shakespeare’s Plays

4

Screen Arts and Culture (SAC) elective - 300 or 400 level course dealing with history or theory, chosen in consultation with a BTA advisor

variable

2 courses within one department of Social Sciences or Humanities

minimum 6 hours

Cognate* - At least 3 courses beyond the introductory level in one subject area

minimum 9 hours

*Cognate Requirements for Concentration in Performing Arts Management At least 4 courses in Accounting, Marketing, Business Law, Management and Organizations, Economics, or related subjects. Suggested electives include: ACC 271 (Principles of Accounting I); ACC 272 (Principles of Accounting II); ACC 471 (Accounting Principles); MKT 300 (Marketing Management); MKT 311 (Advertising Management); MKT 312 (Retail Marketing Management); MO 300 (Behavioral Theory in Management); LHC 305 (Legal Environment of Business); LHC 512 (Introduction to Business Law); ECON 101 (Introduction to Economics)

Minimum SMTD Hours: 60 - 80 Minimum Non-SMTD Hours: 40 - 60 Minimum Total Hours Required: 120 NOTE: After two terms, a BTA checklist and an outline of total course study must be submitted to the program advisor for approval.

28

School of Music, Theatre & Dance


Bachelor Degree Program Curricula

BACHELOR OF FINE ARTS IN DANCE

For those who wish to work as performers and choreographers with an emphasis in Modern dance. Pre-college dance preparation should include significant involvement in dance performance and choreography. Gifted students without previous training may apply. Dance Requirements

Hours

Dance Techniques1

35

Dance Composition

8

Dance and Related Arts

2

Dance Repertory2

4

Dance History and Ideas

9

Dance Production

2

Anatomy and Kinesiology for Dancers

3

Body Knowledge

2

Music For Dance 1 or 2

2

Teaching Methods

3

Sophomore Seminar

2

Freshman Touring Company

2

Senior Seminar

2

Senior Concert

4

Electives

variable

SMTD Requirements

Hours

Coursework from offerings in the Music and Theatre departments4

minimum 6 hours

Non-SMTD Requirements

Hours

English 124, 125 (College Writing), or equivalent

4

English 225 (Academic Argumentation) or Upper Level Writing course approved by Sweetland Writing Center

3-4

History of Art

1 term

Electives

variable - based on the number of credits required to meet the 30 credit hour minimum

3

Minimum Non-SMTD Electives: 30 Minimum Total Hours Required: 120

1

Dance Technique encompasses Modern Dance, Ballet, Improvisation, World Dance, and all Dance Laboratory courses offered in Fall, Winter, or Spring terms. In order to graduate, students must attain a minimum level of 3rd year study in at least one method or technique. Students must complete a minimum of 2 credits in each of the following: Modern Dance, Ballet, Improvisation, World Dance, and Somatic Practices. 2 Dance Repertory encompasses University Dance Company (in Fall or Winter terms) AADW Repertory, PTSI/ UMICH Repertory, and other faculty or guest artist performance projects with approval of departmental advisor. 3 Students with prior musical experience level may take Music for Dance 2 instead of Music for Dance 1 based on instructor approval. 4 Students must choose a minimum of one course each from both Music and Theatre, and can choose their remaining credits from either Music or Theatre departments. MUSPERF 412 (Yoga for Performers) and Dance classes offered in Musical Theatre are NOT eligible for this requirement. School of Music, Theatre & Dance

29


Bachelor Degree Program Curricula

JAZZ AND IMPROVISATION STUDIES

For students who wish to explore jazz, its related idioms, and more eclectic forms of improvisational music. Pre-college music preparation should include extensive study of a principal instrument and demonstrated improvisational skills.

BACHELOR OF FINE ARTS IN JAZZ AND CONTEMPLATIVE STUDIES SMTD Requirements Music Theory:

Hours Aural I

139

1

Non-SMTD Requirements

Hours

Written I

149

2

140

1

English 124, 125 (College Writing), or equivalent

4

Aural II Written II

150

2

English 225 (Academic Argumentation) or Upper Level Writing course approved by Sweetland Writing Center

3-4

Electives (minimum 5 courses to be chosen from the recommended list below)

variable

OR1 Aural III

239

1

Written III

249

2

Aural IV

240

1

Written IV

250

2

2 terms of Musicology chosen from 139 (Intro), 140 (Post WWI), 239 (Middle Ages - Baroque), and 240 (Preclassic Era - WWI)

variable

At least two classes to be elected from Musicology 458 (Music in Culture), Musicology 466 (Music of Asia), Music Theory 433 (Analysis of Modern Music), or other SMTD offerings as approved in consultation with a departmental advisor

variable

Recommended Non-SMTD Electives Minimum of 5 courses to be selected from: Psychology 418 (Psychology and Spiritual Development), Asian Languages and Culture 230 (Intro to Buddhism), Religion 469 (Jewish Mysticism), History of Art 394 (Special Topics), or other nonSMTD courses in Anthropology, Cultural Studies, Psychology, and Neuroscience, and other areas as approved in consultation with a departmental faculty advisor

4 terms of Ensemble 460 (Jazz Ens) or 462 (Small Jazz Ens) 4 additional terms of Ensemble chosen from 460 (Jazz Ens), 462 (Small Jazz Ens), and 467 (Creative Arts Orch)

Enrollment into Theory 239/249 and 240/250 is dependent upon proficiency exam placement. 1

4 terms of Jazz 450 (Contemplative Practices Seminar) Performance - minimum 24 hours, completion of Jazz 402, and presentation of a recital Piano

Jazz:

111

2

112

2

Improvisation I

466

3

Improvisation II

467

3

Improvisation III

471

3

Improvisation IV

472

3

Composition

468

2

Creativity and Consciousness

455

2

Jazz Piano

113

1

Music Electives 30

School of Music, Theatre & Dance

variable

Minimum SMTD Hours: 90 Minimum Non-SMTD Hours: 30 Minimum Total Hours Required: 120


Bachelor Degree Program Curricula

BACHELOR OF FINE ARTS IN JAZZ AND CONTEMPORARY IMPROVISATION

SMTD Requirements Music Theory:

Musicology:

Hours

Non-SMTD Requirements

Hours

Aural I

139

1

4

Written I

149

2

English 124, 125 (College Writing), or equivalent

Aural II

140

1

3-4

Written II

150

2

English 225 (Academic Argumentation) or Upper Level Writing course approved by Sweetland Writing Center

Intro

139

2

Electives

variable

Post WWI

140

2

Musicology or Theory elective

variable

3 terms of Ensemble 345 (Univ Orch), 347 (Univ Band), 349 (Univ Choir), or 350 (Chamber Choir) 3 terms of Ensemble 460 (Jazz Ens) or 462 (Small Jazz Ens) 3 additional terms of Ensemble 460 (Jazz Ens), 462 (Small Jazz Ens), 467 (Creative Arts Orch), or PAT 412 (Digital Music Ens) Performance - minimum 24 hours, completion of Jazz 426 or 440, and presentation of a recital Piano

Jazz:

111

2

112

2

Improvisation I

466

3

Improvisation II

467

3

Improvisation III

471

3

Improvisation IV

472

3

Composition

468

2

Electives (must include 8-12 hours in PAT or Composition)

variable

Minimum SMTD Hours: 90 Minimum Non-SMTD Hours: 30 Minimum Total Hours Required: 120

School of Music, Theatre & Dance

31


Bachelor Degree Program Curricula

BACHELOR OF FINE ARTS IN JAZZ STUDIES

Students wishing to teach in elementary or secondary schools should elect Jazz Studies with Teacher Certification (Curriculum B).

SMTD Requirements

Hours

Non-SMTD Requirements

Hours

Aural I

139

1

149

2

English 124, 125 (College Writing), or equivalent

4

Written I Aural II

140

1

3-4

Written II

150

2

English 225 (Academic Argumentation) or Upper Level Writing course approved by Sweetland Writing Center

Analytical History of Jazz

436

3

Electives

variable

Music Theory:

2 terms of Musicology chosen from 139 (Intro), 140 (Post WWI), 239 (Middle Ages - Baroque), 240 (Preclassic Era - WWI)

variable

Musicology or Theory elective

variable

Performance - minimum 24 hours, completion of Jazz 402, and presentation of recital 4 terms of Ensemble 460 (Jazz Ens) 4 terms of Ensemble 460 (Jazz Ens) or 462 (Small Jazz Ens) Piano

Jazz:

111

2

112

2

Improvisation I

466

3

Improvisation II

467

3

Improvisation III

471

3

Improvisation IV

472

3

Composition

468

2

Arranging I

469

2

Jazz Piano

113

1

Electives

variable

Minimum SMTD Hours: 90 Minimum Non-SMTD Hours:30 Minimum Total Hours Required: 120

32

School of Music, Theatre & Dance


Bachelor Degree Program Curricula

BACHELOR OF FINE ARTS IN JAZZ STUDIES WITH TEACHER CERTIFICATION (Curriculum B) See page 46 for additional program and certification information. SMTD Requirements Music Theory:

Hours Aural I

139

1

Written I

149

2

Aural II

140

1

Written II

150

2

Intro

139

2

140 or 240

2

History of Jazz

417

3

Music in the United States

450

3

Musicology:

Post WWI or Preclassic Era - WWI

Performance - minimum 24 hours, completion of Jazz 402, and presentation of recital

Non-SMTD Requirements

Hours

English 124, 125 (College Writing), or equivalent

4

English 225 (Academic Argumentation) or Upper Level Writing course approved by Sweetland Writing Center

3-4

Area 1 Electives: Humanities

minimum 8 hours (satisfied through music requirements)

Area 2 Electives: Natural Science

minimum 8 hours from at least 2 depts

Area 3 Electives: Social Science (MUST include Psychology 111: Intro to Psychology)

minimum 8 hours from at least 2 depts

5 terms of Ensemble 460 (Jazz Ens) 4 terms of Ensemble 462 (Small Jazz Ens) 1 term of Ensemble 462 (Small Jazz Ens) or Ensemble 467 (Creative Arts Orchestra)

Music Education Requirements Music Education: Art of Music Teaching

111

2

111

2

Tech for Music Educators

121

1

112

2

Strings

201

1

Conducting: Elementary Conducting I

Strings

202

1

315

2

Winds

203

1

Elementary Conducting II

316

2

Brass

205

1

Jazz Piano

113

1

Percussion

207

1

Integral Basic Musicianship I

220

3

Vocal Methods

320

1

Integral Basic Musicianship II

221

3

Teaching General Music in Elementary Schools OR Teaching General Music in Secondary Schools

341 OR 342

3/2

Teaching String Instruments OR Elementary Band Methods

370 OR 371

2/2

372

2

Music Ed Practicum

3491

1-4

Education: Multicultural Society

3921

3

Psychology and Human Development

391

3

Reading and Writing

402

3

Piano

Jazz:

Improvisation I

466

3

Improvisation II

467

3

Improvisation III

471

3

Improvisation IV

472

3

Composition

468

2

Arranging I

469

2

Improvisation Forms

470

2

Additional SMTD Requirements Minimum 5 hours of electives selected by the student in consultation with an advisor

Minimum Non-SMTD Hours: 32 Minimum Total Hours Required: 159-164

Secondary Instrumental Methods

Student Teaching Music Education

See pg 46 for requirements on 349 and 392.

1

Hours

Hours 375

2-3

376

2-3

377

2-3

378

2-3

School of Music, Theatre & Dance

33


Bachelor Degree Program Curricula

BACHELOR OF FINE ARTS IN MUSICAL THEATRE

For those who wish to work as performers in musical theatre, theatre, television, and film. Musical Theatre Requirements (minimum 20 hours including the following)

Hours

Musical Theatre: Intro to Musical Theatre I

133

2

Intro to Musical Theatre II

134

2

Performance I

235

3

Performance II

236

3

History of Musical Theatre I

441

3

History of Musical Theatre II

442

3

Theatre Requirements (minimum 25 hours including the following) Theatre:

Acting II

182

3

Acting III

281

3

Acting IV

282

3

Acting VI

382

3

Theatre History electives Intro to Stage Management, Performing Arts Management, OR Producing in the American Theatre

minimum 6 hours 245, 385, OR 435

2/2/3

Production Practicum

251

1

Production Practicum II

252

1

Dance Requirements (minimum 12 hours including the following) Ballet

2 terms

Dance Styles

2 terms

Tap 152 (or proficiency)

1 term

Dance Electives1

variable

Non-SMTD Requirements

Hours

English 124, 125 (College Writing), or equivalent

4

English 225 (Academic Argumentation) or Upper Level Writing course approved by Sweetland Writing Center

3-4

Foreign Language

2 terms

American or World History

3-4

Electives

variable

Students who wish to participate in Senior Showcase must enroll in MT 496 (Senior Showcase) during senior year. Students cast in a faculty directed musical or play must enroll in MT 280/480 (Production Performance). All Musical Theatre majors must audition for all mainstage musical productions and accept any role in which they are cast. First year students may not audition in their first term of enrollment. Seniors in their final semester may choose not to audition for mainstage productions, or may audition for certain roles, but must consult with the department chair prior to auditions. Upon completion of Musical Theatre 236 (Performance), all majors must participate in a second year evaluation which qualifies them to enroll in specific upper level performance courses. A grade lower than a C- in the following courses will not fulfill degree requirements: Theatre 182 (Acting II), Theatre 281 (Acting III), Theatre 282 (Acting IV), and Theatre 382 (Acting VI), Musical Theatre 235 (Performance I), Musical Theatre 236 (Performance II), and all Voice and Dance classes. Dance courses may include Theatre 172 (Movement I), 271 (Movement II), 272 (Movement III), any courses in choreography, and a maximum 4 hours in MT 280/480 (Production Performance). 1

SMTD Requirements Piano

111

2

112

2

Music Theory

minimum 6 hours

Voice - minimum 24 hours or completion of 426 by proficiency

34

School of Music, Theatre & Dance

Minimum Minimum Minimum Minimum Minimum

Musical Theatre Hours: 20 Theatre Hours: 25 Dance Hours: 12 Non-SMTD Hours: 30 Total Hours Required: 124


Bachelor Degree Program Curricula

PERFORMING ARTS TECHNOLOGY

Pre-college preparation should include experience in performance (both traditional and technologically enhanced), music theory, composition, mathematics, and computer applications.

BACHELOR OF MUSIC IN MUSIC AND TECHNOLOGY (Curriculum A)

For students who are performers in voice or on an acoustic instrument and possess demonstrated interest in producing music with computer technology. SMTD Requirements Music Theory:

PAT Requirements PAT: Seminar in the Media Arts

Aural I

139

1

Written I

149

2

Aural II

140

Written II

101

3

1

Acoustics and Psychoacoustics

102

3

150

2

Intro to Computer Music

201

3

2391

1

202

3

Written III

2491

2

Computer Music Programming and Arranging

Aural IV

2401

1

331

3

250

2

Sound Recording and Production I

3

Sound Recording and Production II

332

3

Digital Music Ensemble or Electronic Chamber Music

412 or 413

2

Written IV

1

Intro

139

2

Post WWI

140

2

Middle Ages - Baroque

239

2

Preclassic Era - WWI

240

2

Jazz/Musicology/Theory elective2 Piano

variable 111

2

112

2

2 terms of Ensemble 345 (Univ Orch), 347 (Univ Band), 349 (Univ Choir), 350 (Chamber Choir), or 470 (Orpheus Singers) 2 additional terms of an approved Ensemble Performance - 16 hours or completion of 426 Composition: Creative Composition I

421

3

Creative Composition II

422

3

Minimum Non-SMTD Hours: 30

Minimum Total Hours Required: 120 Jazz 220 (3 credits) can be taken in place of Theory 239 and 249. Jazz 221 (3 credits) can be taken in place of Theory 240 and 250, or substitute the accelerated sequence. 2 Select from Jazz 460, 467, 470, 479, or an upper level Musicology or Theory. 1

Hours

Aural III

400 level Theory Musicology:

Hours

Four courses selected from the following: Technical Ear Training and Critical Listening Adv Sound Recording and Production I Adv Sound Recording and Production II Image, Sound, and Story Interactive Media Adv Computer Composition Intermedia Composition Performance Systems Digital Sound Synthesis Contemporary Practices in Research and Scholarship Business of Music Senior Thesis

422

minimum 12 hours

431 432 441 442 451 452 461 462 471 472 490

3

Non-SMTD Requirements

Hours

English 124, 125 (College Writing), or equivalent

4

English 225 (Academic Argumentation) or Upper Level Writing course approved by Sweetland Writing Center

3-4

Math 105 (Data, Functions, and Graphs) or proficiency

4

1 course in Computer Programming to be chosen in consultation with PAT advisor

4

Electives

variable

School of Music, Theatre & Dance

35


Bachelor Degree Program Curricula

BACHELOR OF FINE ARTS IN PERFORMING ARTS TECHNOLOGY MUSIC CONCENTRATION (Curriculum B)

For students who possess demonstrated interest in producing art forms that integrate images, sound, and music using computer technology. Pre-college preparation should include experience in performance (both traditional and technologically enhanced), music theory, composition, mathematics, and computer applications, as well as some experience manipulating still and moving images using technology. SMTD Requirements

Hours

Music Theory:

PAT Requirements

Hours

Aural I

139

1

Written I

149

2

Seminar in the Media Arts

101

3

Aural II

140

1

Acoustics & Psychoacoustics

102

3

Written II

150

2

Intro to Computer Music

201

3

Aural III

2391

1

202

3

Written III

2491

2

Computer Music Composition & Arranging

Aural IV

2401

1

331

3

Written IV

2501

2

Sound Recording and Production I Sound Recording and Production II

332

3

Digital Music Ensemble

412

2

Electronic Chamber Music

413

2

2 courses in Musicology Piano

PAT:

4-6 111

2

112

2

Composition: Intro to Composition/ Creative Composition I

221 or 421

Composition/ Creative Composition II

222 or 422

Five courses selected from the following: Technical Ear Training and Critical Listening Adv Sound Recording and Production I Adv Sound Recording and Production II Image, Sound, and Story Interactive Media Adv Computer Composition Intermedia Composition Performance Systems Digital Sound Synthesis Contemporary Practices in Research and Scholarship Business of Music

3

3

Dance elective

2

Non-SMTD Requirements

Hours

English 124, 125 (College Writing), or equivalent

4

English 225 (Academic Argumentation) or Upper Level Writing course approved by Sweetland Writing Center

3-4

Screen Arts and Culture (SAC): Aesthetics

3

2 additional courses in SAC: Production

6

Senior Thesis

Math 105 (Data, Functions, and Graphs) or proficiency

422

minimum 15 hours

431 432 441 442 451 452 461 462 471 472 490

3

Minimum Total Hours Required: 120

Additional Non-SMTD Requirements 1 course in Computer Programming to be chosen in consultation with PAT advisor 1 course in Computer Aided Design, Modeling, or Animation 1 course in Visual Arts & Culture 1 course in Still Imagery & Technology Electives chosen in consultation with a PAT advisor

36

School of Music, Theatre & Dance

Jazz 220 (3 credits) can be taken in place of Theory 239 and 249. Jazz 221 (3 credits) can be taken in place of Theory 240 and 250, or substitute the accelerated sequence. 1


Bachelor Degree Program Curricula

BACHELOR OF FINE ARTS IN PERFORMING ARTS TECHNOLOGY MEDIA CONCENTRATION (Curriculum C)

For students who possess demonstrated interest in using technology to create multimedia art forms. Pre-college preparation should include experience in producing integrated art forms using computer technology, as well as some experience in music theory, composition, mathematics, and still and moving images. NOTE: Students will elect one of three areas of concentration: Sonic Arts, Visual Arts, or Engineering. In addition to completing the basic media arts requirements and non-music requirements shared by all three areas, students will follow the program requirements listed under their particular area of interest. SMTD Requirements Music Theory:

Hours

Aural I

139

1

Written I

149

2

Aural II

140

1

Written II

150

2

Aural III

2391

1

Written III

2491

2

1

240

1

2501

2

Minimum 25 hours of Sonic Arts electives beyond those specified in the interdisciplinary core

4-6

Visual Arts Concentration

Aural IV Written IV 2 courses in Musicology Piano

Composition: Intro to Composition/ Creative Composition I

111

2

112

2

221/ 421

3

Dance elective

2

PAT Requirements

Hours

Seminar in the Media Arts

101

3

Acoustics & Psychoacoustics

102

3

Intro to Computer Music

201

3

Computer Music Composition & Arranging

202

3

Sound Recording & Production I Digital Music Ensemble or Electronic Chamber Music Four courses selected from the following: Technical Ear Training and Critical Listening Adv Sound Recording and Production I Adv Sound Recording and Production II Image, Sound, and Story Interactive Media Adv Computer Composition Intermedia Composition Performance Systems Digital Sound Synthesis Contemporary Practices in Research and Scholarship Business of Music Senior Thesis

Students must select one of the following areas of concentration: Engineering Concentration Minimum 25 hours of Math/Engineering electives beyond those specified in the interdisciplinary core Sonic Arts Concentration

Minimum 25 hours beyond those specified in the listed requirements, including a minimum of 2 courses in Screen Arts and Culture (SAC) and the remaining coursework in Art Non-SMTD Requirements

Hours

English 124, 125 (College Writing), or equivalent

4

English 225 (Academic Argumentation) or Upper Level Writing course approved by Sweetland Writing Center

3-4

Screen Arts and Culture (SAC): Aesthetics

3

2 courses in SAC: Production

6

1 course in Visual Arts & Culture

4 3

331

3

1 course in Still Imagery & Technology

412 or 413

2

Sonic and Visual Arts Concentration: Math 105 (Data, Functions, and Graphs) or proficiency

minimum 12 hours

1 course in Computer Programming to be chosen in consultation with PAT advisor

422

1 course in Computer Aided Design, Modeling, or Animation

431

Electives chosen in consultation with a PAT advisor

432 441 442 451 452 461 462 471

Minimum Total Hours Required: 120 Jazz 220 (3 credits) can be taken in place of Theory 239 and 249. Jazz 221 (3 credits) can be taken in place of Theory 240 and 250, or substitute the accelerated sequence. 1

472 490

3

School of Music, Theatre & Dance

37


Bachelor Degree Program Curricula

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN SOUND ENGINEERING (Curriculum D)

For students with a demonstrated proficiency in music as well as a strong aptitude for mathematics and physics. Pre-college preparation should include prior experience with sound recording and/or sound reinforcement. SMTD Requirements Music Theory:

Hours

Aural I

139

1

Written I

149

2

Aural II

140

1

Non-SMTD Requirements

Hours

Written II

150

2

4

Aural III

2391

1

English 124, 125 (College Writing), or equivalent

Written III

2491

2

240

1

English 225 (Academic Argumentation) or Upper Level Writing course approved by Sweetland Writing Center

3-4

1

2501

2 Engineering Requirements

Hours

Aural IV Written IV 2 courses in Musicology Piano

4-6

Math:

Calculus I

115

4

111

2

Calculus II

116

4

112

2

Calculus III

215

4

Intro to Differential Equations

216

4

PAT: Seminar in the Media Arts

101

3

Physics I

140

4

Acoustics & Psychoacoustics

102

3

Elementary Lab I

141

1

Intro to Computer Music

201

3

202

3

240/ 260

4

Computer Music Composition & Arranging

General Physics/ Honors Physics

1

Sound Reinforcement

280

1

Sound Recording & Production I

331

3

Sound Recording & Production II

332

3

Sound for Theatre

380

2

Technical Ear Training and Critical Listening

422

3

Contemporary Practices in Studio Production I

431

3

Contemporary Practices in Studio Production II

432

3

Physics:

Elementary Lab II

241

EECS: Intro to Electronic Circuits

215

Intro to Signals and Systems

216

4

Electromagnetics I

230

4

Digital Signal Processing

451

4

4

Engineering 101 or 1 Computer Programming course to be chosen in consultation with PAT or EECS advisor

Senior Thesis (PAT 490) or EECS 452

Minimum Total Hours Required: 120

Jazz 220 (3 credits) can be taken in place of Theory 239 and 249. Jazz 221 (3 credits) can be taken in place of Theory 240 and 250, or substitute the accelerated sequence. 1

38

School of Music, Theatre & Dance


Bachelor Degree Program Curricula

BACHELOR OF FINE ARTS IN THEATRE

For students interested in pursuing a career in any facet of theatre arts. Pre-college preparation should include significant involvement in theatre productions. Students without previous experience may apply.

BACHELOR OF FINE ARTS IN THEATRE DESIGN AND PRODUCTION D&P Fundamental Requirements (minimum 50 hours) Theatre:

Hours

Intro to Acting

101

3

Intro to Design

240

3

Directing I

241

3

Intro to Stage Management

245

3

Intro to Tech Theatre

250

3

Lighting Design I

256

3

Scene Design I

260

3

Rendering

263

3

Costume Design I

270

3

History of Dress

277

3

Theatre History I

321

3

Theatre History II

322

3

323, 325, OR 324

3

403/404

8 hours

466

3

American Theatre & Drama, Contemporary American Drama, OR Contemporary Black Theatre Design and Production Seminar History of Decor

Minimum Non-SMTD Hours: 39 Minimum Total Hours Required: 120

Production Practicum Requirements Minimum 8 hours chosen from: Theatre 251 (Production Practicum I), Theatre 252 (Production Practicum II), Theatre 261 (Production Practicum III), Theatre 262 (Production Practicum IV), Theatre 351 (Production Practicum V), Theatre 352 (Production Practicum VI), Theatre 451 (Production Practicum VII), Theatre 461 (Production Practicum VIII) D&P Specialization Minimum 17 Theatre hours chosen from advanced Design and Production classes Cognate Requirements Minimum 6 hours of courses which support the field of specialization

Non-SMTD Requirements

Hours

English 124, 125 (College Writing), or equivalent

4

English 225 (Academic Argumentation) or Upper Level Writing course approved by Sweetland Writing Center

3-4

English 367 (Shakespeare’s Plays) or equivalent

4

Foreign Language - 2 terms or demonstrated proficiency History of Art - 6 hours Additional Studies in Social Science, Physical Science, and/or Natural Science - minimum 8 hours Non-SMTD electives - minimum 6 hours

NOTE: All D&P majors must participate in a portfolio review in the Winter term of sophomore, junior, and senior year. This review measures the progress of the student and serves as a prerequisite for upper level Theatre courses, as well as assessing the student’s potential to graduate and enter the job market. A grade lower than a C- in any D&P course is NOT acceptable and will not fulfill degree requirements.

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Bachelor Degree Program Curricula

BACHELOR OF FINE ARTS IN THEATRE PERFORMANCE: ACTING CONCENTRATION Theatre Requirements Theatre:

Hours

SMTD Elective Requirements Minimum 9 hours – possible courses can include Musical Theatre 133 (Intro to Musical Theatre), Musical Theatre 235 (Musical Theatre Perf), Musical Theatre 465/466 (Cabaret), Dance 100 (Intro to Dance), Musical Theatre 151/152 (Tap Dance I), Musical Theatre 153/154 (Dance Styles I), Theatre 162 (Intro to Stage Make-up), Theatre 211 (Intro to Drama), Theatre 212 (Intro to World Perf), Theatre 222 (Intro to Black Theatre), Theatre 227/327 (Playwriting), Theatre 385 (Theatre Arts Mgmt), Theatre 427 (Advanced Playwriting), Theatre 429 (Playwriting Towards Prod), Theatre 464 (Scene Painting), Theatre 472 (Stage Make-up), Theatre 277 (History of Dress), Musicology 121 (Intro to the Art of Music), Ensemble 349 (Univ. Choir), Voice 220

Movement I

172

2

Acting I

181

3

Acting II

182

3

Voice I

192

3

Intro to Tech Theatre

250

3

Production Practicum

251

1

Movement II

271

2

Movement III

272

2

Stage Combat

274

2

Acting III

281

3

Acting IV

282

3

Voice II

291

3

Voice III

292

3

Non-SMTD Requirements

Hours

History of Theatre I

321

3

4

History of Theatre II

322

3

English 124, 125 (College Writing), or equivalent

American Theatre & Drama

323

3

English 225 (Academic Argumentation) or Upper Level Writing course approved by Sweetland Writing Center

3-4

English 367 (Shakespeare’s Plays) or equivalent

4

Physical Theatre

371

1

Stage Combat II

374

2

Acting V

381

3

Acting VI

382

3

Studio I

387

2

Foreign Language - 2 terms or demonstrated proficiency Electives

Studio II

388

2

Stage Dialects

395

3

Acting VII

481

3

Acting VIII

483

3

Acting IX

484

3

variable

Minimum Theatre Hours: 67 Minimum Non-SMTD Hours: 45 Required SMTD Electives: 9 Minimum Total Hours Required: 122

SMTD Requirements Minimum 1 hour of Voice 111, 112, or 219 NOTE: All BFA Theatre Performance majors must audition for all mainstage University Production plays and are required to accept any role in which they are cast. Failure to comply with this program requirement may result in dismissal from the program. First semester freshmen are not required to audition for the Fall semester productions, but may opt to do so. All freshmen must audition for Winter semester productions. All students in the acting concentration must participate in a second year evaluation. Successful completion qualifies the student to enroll in specific upper level performance courses. This evaluation is mandatory, and normally takes place in the Winter term of the sophomore year, or for transfer students, during the term following one full semester completed in good standing in the School of Music, Theatre & Dance. This evaluation serves as an effective means of assessing the student’s potential to graduate, as well as to enter the job market or graduate school. A grade lower than a C- in any Performance course is NOT acceptable and will not fulfill degree requirements.

40

School of Music, Theatre & Dance


Bachelor Degree Program Curricula

BACHELOR OF FINE ARTS IN THEATRE PERFORMANCE: DIRECTING CONCENTRATION Theatre Requirements Theatre:

Hours

Movement I

172

2

Acting I

181

3

Acting II

182

3

Voice I

192

3

Intro to Drama

211

3

Intro to Design

240

3

Directing I

241

3

Directing II

242

3

Intro to Stage Management

245

3

Intro to Tech Theatre

250

3

Production Practicum

251

1

Production Practicum II

252

1

Lighting I

256

3

Scene Design I

260

3

Stage Combat

274

2

Acting IV

282

3

Theatre History I

321

3

Theatre History II

322

3

American Theatre & Drama

323

3

Directing III

341

3

Directing IV

342

3

Studio I

387

2

Playwriting Toward Production

429

3

Directing Project

442

3

277/478

3/3

History of Dress/History of 20th Century Dress

SMTD Electives Minimum 7 hours – possible courses can include Theatre 212 (Intro to World Theatre), Theatre 222 (Intro to Black Theatre), Theatre 227 (Intro to Playwriting), Theatre 233 (Acting and Black Experience), Theatre 385 (Performing Arts Mgmt), Theatre 427 (Advanced Playwriting), Musical Theatre 133 (Intro to Musical Theatre), Musical Theatre 235 (Musical Theatre Performance), Musical Theatre 465/466 (Cabaret) Screen Arts and Culture Requirement Minimum 3 hours of 200 level Screen Arts and Culture (SAC) elective Non-SMTD Requirements

Hours

English 124, 125 (College Writing), or equivalent

4

English 225 (Academic Argumentation) or Upper Level Writing course approved by Sweetland Writing Center

3-4

English 367 (Shakespeare’s Plays) or equivalent

4

Foreign Language - 2 terms or demonstrated proficiency Electives

variable

Minimum Theatre Hours: 67 Minimum Non-SMTD Hours: 45 Minimum Total Hours Required: 122

SMTD Requirements Musicology 121: Intro to the Art of Music

NOTE: All students in the directing concentration must participate in a third year evaluation which takes place in the Winter term of the junior year. This evaluation also serves as an effective means of assessing the student’s potential to graduate, as well as to enter the job market. A grade lower than a C- in any Directing course is NOT acceptable and will not fulfill degree requirements.

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41


Bachelor Degree Program Curricula

BACHELOR OF MUSIC IN COMPOSITION

Intended for students who wish to become composers and college teachers. Students with a desire to teach in elementary or secondary schools should elect a curriculum in Music Education. Pre-college music preparation should include an extensive background in piano or other instruments, and evidence of a musically creative capacity.

SMTD Requirements Music Theory:

Non-SMTD Requirements

Hours

English 124, 125 (College Writing), or equivalent

4 3-4

variable

Aural I

139

1

Written I

149

2

Aural II

140

1

Written II

150

2

English 225 (Academic Argumentation) or Upper Level Writing course approved by Sweetland Writing Center

Aural III

2391

1

Electives

Written III

2491

2

Aural IV

2401

1

Recommended SMTD Electives

Written IV

2501

2

Music Theory 212 (Basic Keyboard), Theory 442 (18th Century Counterpoint), Conducting 315 (Elementary Conducting), Composition 415 (Intro to Electronic Music), Composition 416 (Seminar in Electronic Music)

400 level Theory Musicology:

Hours

3

Intro

139

2

Post WWI

140

2

Middle Ages - Baroque

239

2

Preclassic Era - WWI

240

2

Jazz/Musicology/Theory elective2 Piano

3-4 111

2

112

2

Ensemble - 2 terms of 345 (Univ Orch), 347 (Univ Band), 349 (Univ Choir), 350 (Chamber Choir), or 470 (Orpheus Singers) 2 additional terms of an approved Ensemble

Minimum Non-SMTD Hours: 30 Minimum Total Hours Required: 120

Performance - 24 hours or completion of 426/402 Theory:

Basic Keyboard

211

3

Analysis of 20th Century Music

433

3

440 or 442

3

Orchestration I

454

3

Orchestration II

455

3

Species Counterpoint or 18th Century Counterpoint

Composition - 8 terms of study and completion of 440 Composition 450 elected each term offered Electives (see recommended list)

42

School of Music, Theatre & Dance

variable

Jazz 220 (3 credits) can be taken in place of Theory 239 and 249. Jazz 221 (3 credits) can be taken in place of Theory 240 and 250, or substitute the accelerated sequence. 2 Select from Jazz 460, 467, 470, 479, or an upper level Musicology or Theory. 1


Bachelor Degree Program Curricula

BACHELOR OF MUSIC IN HARP

For those who wish to work in solo and ensemble performance and teaching. Students desiring to teach in elementary or secondary schools should elect a curriculum in Music Education. Pre-college music preparation should include several years of study. Experience in orchestral and chamber music is desirable. Piano study is recommended. SMTD Requirements Music Theory:

Hours

Non-SMTD Requirements

Hours

Aural I

139

1

4

Written I

149

2

English 124, 125 (College Writing), or equivalent

Aural II

140

1

3-4

Written II

150

2

English 225 (Academic Argumentation) or Upper Level Writing course approved by Sweetland Writing Center

2391

1

Electives

variable

1

249

2

Aural IV

2401

1

Written IV

2501

2

Aural III Written III

400 level Theory Musicology:

3

Intro

139

2

Post WWI

140

2

Middle Ages - Baroque

239

2

Preclassic Era - WWI

240

2

Jazz/Musicology/Theory elective2 Piano

3-4

111

2

112

2

8 terms of an approved Ensemble Performance - 24 hours and completion of 440; presentation of recital Performance 450 elected each term

Minimum Non-SMTD Hours: 30 Minimum Total Hours Required: 120

Jazz 220 (3 credits) can be taken in place of Theory 239 and 249. Jazz 221 (3 credits) can be taken in place of Theory 240 and 250, or substitute the accelerated sequence. 2 Select from Jazz 460, 467, 470, 479, or an upper level Musicology or Theory. 1

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Bachelor Degree Program Curricula

BACHELOR OF MUSIC IN MUSIC EDUCATION

Two undergraduate curricula, Choral Music and Instrumental Music, are offered to prepare students for the field of teaching most compatible with their backgrounds and career goals. Performance degrees that also include teacher certification: Organ, Piano, Strings, Voice, and Winds Performance. Please see page 46 for additional important program information.

BACHELOR OF MUSIC IN CHORAL MUSIC EDUCATION SMTD Requirements Music Theory:

Hours Aural I

139

1

Written I

149

2

Aural II

140

1

Written II

150

2

2391

1

1

249

2

Aural IV

2401

1

Written IV

2501

2

Aural III Written III

400 level Theory Musicology:

Non-SMTD Requirements

Hours

English 124, 125 (College Writing), or equivalent

4

English 225 (Academic Argumentation) or Upper Level Writing course approved by Sweetland Writing Center

3-4

Area 1 Electives: Humanities

minimum 8 hours (satisfied through music requirements)

Area 2 Electives: Natural Science

minimum 8 hours from at least 2 depts

Area 3 Electives: Social Science (MUST include Psychology 111: Intro to Psychology)

minimum 8 hours from at least 2 depts

3

Intro

139

2

Post WWI

140

2

Middle Ages - Baroque

239

2

Preclassic Era - WWI

240

2

Jazz/Musicology/Theory elective2

3-4

Piano Principals Elected each term (except when student teaching) with completion of Piano 425 or 426 and presentation of final project (see pg. 46 for details)

Music Education Requirements Music Education: Art of Music Teaching

111

2

Tech for Music Educators

121

1

Voicelit

200

1

Strings

201

1

Completion of Voice 116 Voice Principals Elected each term (except when student teaching) with completion of Voice 425 or 426 and presentation of final project (see pg. 46 for details) Completion of Piano 205 Ensemble - an approved orchestra, band, or choir elected each term except when student teaching Conducting: Elementary Conducting I

315

2

Elementary Conducting II

316

2

Additional SMTD Requirements Minimum 6 hours of electives selected by the student in consultation with an advisor Jazz 220 (3 credits) can be taken in place of Theory 239 and 249. Jazz 221 (3 credits) can be taken in place of Theory 240 and 250, or substitute the accelerated sequence. 2 Select from Jazz 460, 467, 470, 479, or an upper level Musicology or Theory. 3 See pg 46 for requirements on 349 and 392. 1

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School of Music, Theatre & Dance

Hours

Percussion

207

1

Choral Techniques Secondary

340

2

Teaching General Music in Elementary Schools

341

3

Teaching General Music in Secondary Schools

342

2

Music Ed Practicum

3493

1-4

Education: Multicultural Society

3923

3

Psychology and Human Development

391

3

Reading and Writing

402

3

Student Teaching Music Education

Hours 345

2-3

346

2-3

347

2-3

348

2-3

Minimum Performance Hours (Performance/Ensembles/Conducting): 40 Minimum Non-SMTD Hours: 32 Minimum Total Hours Required: 130 - 138


Bachelor Degree Program Curricula

BACHELOR OF MUSIC IN INSTRUMENTAL MUSIC EDUCATION SMTD Requirements Music Theory:

Hours Aural I

139

1

Written I

149

2

Aural II

140

1

Written II

150

2

Aural III

2391

1

Written III

2491

2

Aural IV

2401

1

Written IV

2501

2

400 level Theory Musicology:

3

Intro

139

2

Post WWI

140

2

Middle Ages - Baroque

239

2

Preclassic Era - WWI

240

2

Jazz/Musicology/Theory elective

3-4

2

Performance - principal instrument elected each term (except when student teaching) with completion of 425 or 426 and presentation of final project (see pg. 46 for details) Piano

111

2

112

2

Ensemble - approved orchestra, band, or choir elected each term except when student teaching Conducting: Elementary Conducting I

315

2

Elementary Conducting II

316

2

Additional SMTD Requirements Minimum 6 hours of electives selected by the student in consultation with an advisor

Jazz 220 (3 credits) can be taken in place of Theory 239 and 249. Jazz 221 (3 credits) can be taken in place of Theory 240 and 250, or substitute the accelerated sequence. 2 Select from Jazz 460, 467, 470, 479, or an upper level Musicology or Theory. 3 See pg 46 for requirements on 349 and 392. 1

Minimum Performance Hours (Performance/Ensembles/Conducting): 40 Minimum Non-SMTD Hours: 32 Minimum Total Hours Required: 130 - 138

Non-SMTD Requirements

Hours

English 124, 125 (College Writing), or equivalent

4

English 225 (Academic Argumentation) or Upper Level Writing course approved by Sweetland Writing Center

3-4

Area 1 Electives: Humanities

minimum 8 hours (satisfied through music requirements)

Area 2 Electives: Natural Science

minimum 8 hours from at least 2 depts

Area 3 Electives: Social Science (MUST include Psychology 111: Intro to Psychology)

minimum 8 hours from at least 2 depts

Music Education Requirements

Hours

Music Education: Art of Music Teaching

111

2

Tech for Music Educators

121

1

Strings

201

1

Strings

202

1

Winds

203

1

Brass

205

1

Percussion

207

1

Vocal Methods

320

1

341 or 342

3/2

Teaching String Instruments

370

2

Elementary Band Methods

371

2

Secondary Instrumental Methods

372

2

Music Ed Practicum

3493

1-4

Education: Multicultural Society

3923

3

Psychology and Human Development

391

3

Reading and Writing

402

3

Teaching General Music in Elementary Schools/ Teaching General Music in Secondary Schools

Student Teaching Music Education

Hours 375

2-3

376

2-3

377

2-3

378

2-3

School of Music, Theatre & Dance

45


Bachelor Degree Program Curricula

Final Project: Students in Choral and Instrumental Music Education programs are required to complete a final project as part of their performance series. The project will be part of the final required performance course, 425 or 426. The form and content of the project will be determined by the studio teacher and the individual student, and approved by the studio teacher in consultation with the home department, Music Education. Music Education and Education course requirements: 349 must be elected concurrently with 340, 341, 342, 370, 371, or 372. Education 392 is taken prior to 391. Core Curriculum, Music Education, and Education requirements must be completed before student teaching. Certification Requirements: Requirements for Bachelor degrees with Teacher Certification fall into two categories: those related to music degree course work and those related to Teacher Certification. The requirements related to Teacher Certification depend on acceptance into the Teacher Education Program in the School of Education. For students who wish to apply for the Bachelor of Music with Teacher Certification program and the Teacher Certification program, the deadline for application in the 2012-2013 academic year is in January 2013. Application materials will be available from the Music Education Department in November 2012. All students seeking Teacher Certification must complete a number of audits in the School of Education in order to ensure all state requirements for the Michigan Teacher’s Certificate (coursework, student teaching, tests) are fulfilled. Students should contact the Music Education Department for specific details of requirements. If a student plans to teach in another state, the student is responsible for investigating the requirements for certification in that state. Requirements in some states vary from those in Michigan. Non-SMTD Area Distribution: Area Distribution requirements necessary for degrees containing teacher certification will follow the policies set forth by the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts and are indicated in the following manner: HU - Humanities, SS - Social Science, NS - Natural Science. For verification on courses counting as fulfilling these categories, students should check the LSA website.

46

School of Music, Theatre & Dance


Bachelor Degree Program Curricula

BACHELOR OF MUSIC IN MUSIC THEORY

For those who wish to balance theoretical and applied approaches to the study of music. Elected courses range from developing musical craft such as counterpoint, improvisation, and music composition, to aesthetics, music cognition, and music technologies. Pre-college preparation should include an extensive background in performance or composition, work in basic theory, and background in a keyboard instrument, and/or computer technology. SMTD Requirements Music Theory:

Hours Hours

English 124, 125 (College Writing), or equivalent

4 3-4

1

English 225 (Academic Argumentation) or Upper Level Writing course approved by Sweetland Writing Center

2

Foreign Language

2 terms in one language

Electives - at least 2 sequences of 2 courses each in a department area

variable

139

1

Written I

149

2

Aural II

140

1

Written II

150

2

Aural III

2391

Written III

2491

Aural IV

2401

1

250

2

Written IV

1

400 level Theory Musicology:

Non-SMTD Requirements

Aural I

3

Intro

139

2

Post WWI

140

2

Middle Ages - Baroque

239

2

Preclassic Era - WWI

240

2

Jazz/Musicology/Theory elective2 Piano

3-4

111

2

112

2

Ensemble - 2 terms of 345 (Univ Orch), 347 (Univ Band), 349 (Univ Choir), 350 (Chamber Choir), or 470 (Orpheus Singers)

Minimum Non-SMTD Hours: 32 Minimum Total Hours Required: 120

2 additional terms of an approved Ensemble Performance - 24 hours or completion of 426 Music Theory: Basic Keyboard

211

2

Basic Keyboard

212

2

Analysis of 20th Century Music

433

3

18th Century Counterpoint

442

3

Orchestration I

454

3

440 or 443

3

Species Counterpoint or 18th Century Counterpoint II

Jazz 220 (3 credits) can be taken in place of Theory 239 and 249. Jazz 221 (3 credits) can be taken in place of Theory 240 and 250, or substitute the accelerated sequence. 2 Select from Jazz 460, 467, 470, 479, or an upper level Musicology or Theory. 1

Completion of Piano 116 when piano is not the principal Composition: Creative Composition

421

3

Electives - minimum 8 hours taken in Music Theory, Jazz, Musicology, Composition, or PAT

School of Music, Theatre & Dance

47


Bachelor Degree Program Curricula

BACHELOR OF MUSIC IN MUSICOLOGY

For those who wish to teach music history, to work in radio, television, or journalism, or to pursue a degree in library science at a later time. The study of musicology is also recommended for those who plan to pursue graduate study and professional scholarship. Pre-college music preparation should include an extensive background in piano, voice, or other instruments.

MUSIC HISTORY MAJOR (Curriculum A)

SMTD Requirements Music Theory:

Hours

Non-SMTD Requirements

Hours

Aural I

139

1

4

Written I

149

2

English 124, 125 (College Writing), or equivalent

Aural II

140

1

3-4

Written II

150

2

English 225 (Academic Argumentation) or Upper Level Writing course approved by Sweetland Writing Center

Aural III

239

1

French or German3

2 terms

Written III

1

249

2

History

2 terms

2401

1

Electives

variable

250

2

Aural IV Written IV

1

1

400 level Theory Musicology:

3

Intro

139

2

Post WWI

140

2

Middle Ages - Baroque

239

2

Preclassic Era - WWI

240

2

Jazz/Musicology/Theory elective2 Piano

3-4

111

2

112

2

Ensemble - 2 terms of 345 (Univ Orch), 347 (Univ Band), 349 (Univ Choir), 350 (Chamber Choir), or 470 (Orpheus Singers) 2 additional terms of an approved Ensemble Performance - 24 hours or completion of 426 Completion of Piano 114 Musicology electives - minimum 17 hours beyond 240

48

School of Music, Theatre & Dance

Minimum Non-SMTD Hours: 30 Minimum Total Hours Required: 120

Jazz 220 (3 credits) can be taken in place of Theory 239 and 249. Jazz 221 (3 credits) can be taken in place of Theory 240 and 250, or substitute the accelerated sequence. 2 Select from Jazz 460, 467, 470, 479, or an upper level Musicology or Theory. 3 Another language may be substituted by petition. 1


Bachelor Degree Program Curricula

ETHNOMUSICOLOGY MAJOR (Curriculum B) SMTD Requirements Music Theory:

Hours

Non-SMTD Requirements

Hours

Aural I

139

1

4

Written I

149

2

English 124, 125 (College Writing), or equivalent

Aural II

140

1

3-4

Written II

150

2

English 225 (Academic Argumentation) or Upper Level Writing course approved by Sweetland Writing Center

2391

1

French or German3

2 terms

1

249

2

Aural IV

2401

1

Cognate - chosen from Social Sciences or Humanities

minimum 9 hours

Written IV

2501

2

Electives4

variable

Aural III Written III

400 level Theory Musicology:

3

Intro

139

2

Post WWI

140

2

Middle Ages - Baroque

239

2

Preclassic Era - WWI

240

2

Jazz/Musicology/Theory elective2

3-4

Piano

111

2

112

2

Ensemble - 2 terms of 345 (Univ Orch), 347 (Univ Band), 349 (Univ Choir), 350 (Chamber Choir), or 470 (Orpheus Singers) 2 additional terms of an approved Ensemble Performance - 24 hours or completion of 426 Musicology electives - minimum 17 hours beyond 240

Minimum Non-SMTD Hours: 30 Minimum Total Hours Required: 120

Jazz 220 (3 credits) can be taken in place of Theory 239 and 249. Jazz 221 (3 credits) can be taken in place of Theory 240 and 250, or substitute the accelerated sequence. 2 Select from Jazz 460, 467, 470, 479, or an upper level Musicology or Theory. 3 Another language may be substituted by petition. 4 Students are urged to select courses in a foreign language or in their cognate field. 1

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49


Bachelor Degree Program Curricula

EARLY MUSIC MAJOR (Curriculum C) SMTD Requirements Music Theory:

Hours

Aural I

139

1

Non-SMTD Requirements

Hours

Written I

149

2

140

1

English 124, 125 (College Writing), or equivalent

4

Aural II Written II

150

2

3-4

2391

1

English 225 (Academic Argumentation) or Upper Level Writing course approved by Sweetland Writing Center

Written III

249

2

French, German, or Latin3

2 terms

Aural IV

1

240

1

History

2 terms

2501

2

Electives

variable

Aural III

Written IV

1

400 level Theory Musicology:

3

Intro

139

2

Post WWI

140

2

Middle Ages - Baroque

239

2

Preclassic Era - WWI

240

2

Jazz/Musicology/Theory elective2 Piano

3-4

111

2

112

2

Ensemble - 2 terms of 345 (Univ Orch), 347 (Univ Band), 349 (Univ Choir), 350 (Chamber Choir), or 470 (Orpheus Singers)

Minimum Non-SMTD Hours: 30 Minimum Total Hours Required: 120

2 additional terms of an approved Ensemble Ensemble - 12 hours; 8 of which must be Ensemble 400 (Early Music Ens) Performance - 24 hours or completion of 426 Completion of Piano 114 Musicology electives - minimum 17 hours beyond 240, including Musicology 481 which will consist of a research project and recital presented during senior year Music Theory - total of 5 hours selected from 440 (Species Counterpoint I), 442 (18th Century Counterpoint), and 444 (Ornamentation and Elaboration)

50

School of Music, Theatre & Dance

Jazz 220 (3 credits) can be taken in place of Theory 239 and 249. Jazz 221 (3 credits) can be taken in place of Theory 240 and 250, or substitute the accelerated sequence. 2 Select from Jazz 460, 467, 470, 479, or an upper level Musicology or Theory. 3 Another language may be substituted by petition. 1


Bachelor Degree Program Curricula

BACHELOR OF MUSIC IN ORGAN PERFORMANCE AND CHURCH MUSIC

For those who wish to work or teach in performance and/or church music. Organists desiring to teach in elementary or secondary schools should elect Performance with Teacher Certification (Curriculum B). Pre-college music preparation should include a secure grasp of technique and musicianship from piano study. A student planning to major in organ should be able to play such repertory as Bach’s preludes and fugues from The Well Tempered Clavier, classical sonatas, selected etudes by Chopin, and a significant modern work.

PERFORMANCE MAJOR (Curriculum A) SMTD Requirements Music Theory:

Hours

Aural I

139

1

Non-SMTD Requirements

Hours

Written I

149

2

4

Aural II

140

1

English 124, 125 (College Writing), or equivalent

Written II

150

2

Aural III

239

1

English 225 (Academic Argumentation) or Upper Level Writing course approved by Sweetland Writing Center

3-4

1

2491

2

French or German

2 terms

1

240

1

Electives

variable

2501

2

Written III Aural IV Written IV 400 level Theory Musicology:

3

Intro

139

2

Post WWI

140

2

Middle Ages - Baroque

239

2

Preclassic Era - WWI

240

2

Jazz/Musicology/Theory elective2

3-4

Ensemble - 2 terms of 345 (Univ Orch), 347 (Univ Band), 349 (Univ Choir), 350 (Chamber Choir), or 470 (Orpheus Singers) 2 additional terms of an approved Ensemble

Minimum repertory requirements should include at least 3 large and 4 smaller works from such composers as Sweelinck, Frescobaldi, Pachelbel, Buxtehude, Couperin, and de Grigny; 6 large and 2 smaller chorale preludes of Bach; at least 4 major free works and 2 trio sonatas of Bach; 1 work by a composer of the 18th century after Bach; 6 or more works by composers of the 19th century such as Franck, Brahms, and Reger; 6 or more works by 20th-century or American composers. Selected compositions are to be memorized. A detailed listing of repertory requirements is available from the Chair of the Organ Department.

Performance - minimum 24 hours - 8 terms of

Organ with completion of 440, and presentation of memorized recital Piano - as recommended by the department Conducting: Elementary Conducting I

315

2

Elementary Conducting II

316

2

Music Theory: Basic Keyboard

211

2

Basic Keyboard

212

2

Minimum Non-SMTD Hours: 30 Minimum Total Hours Required: 120

Jazz 220 (3 credits) can be taken in place of Theory 239 and 249. Jazz 221 (3 credits) can be taken in place of Theory 240 and 250, or substitute the accelerated sequence. 2 Select from Jazz 460, 467, 470, 479, or an upper level Musicology or Theory. 1

Music Theory electives - 9 hours of 400 level courses in addition to those required above Organ Lit:

Pre-1750

481

2

1750 - Present

482

2

Teaching of Organ

486

2

Church Music: Hymn Improvisations

483

2

484

2

Console Conducting and Repertoire

School of Music, Theatre & Dance

51


Bachelor Degree Program Curricula

ORGAN PERFORMANCE WITH TEACHER CERTIFICATION (Curriculum B)

Please see page 46 for additional program and certification information, and page 51 for repertory requirements. SMTD Requirements Music Theory:

Hours

Non-SMTD Requirements

Hours

Aural I

139

1

149

2

English 124, 125 (College Writing), or equivalent

4

Written I Aural II

140

1

3-4

Written II

English 225 (Academic Argumentation) or Upper Level Writing course approved by Sweetland Writing Center

150

2

Aural III

2391

1

Written III

2491

2

Aural IV

2401

1

Written IV

2501

2

400 level Theory Musicology:

3

Intro

139

2

Post WWI

140

2

Middle Ages - Baroque

239

2

Preclassic Era - WWI

240

2

Jazz/Musicology/Theory elective2

Area 1 Electives: Humanities

minimum 8 hours (satisfied through music requirements)

Area 2 Electives: Natural Science

minimum 8 hours from at least 2 depts

Area 3 Electives: Social Science (MUST include Psychology 111: Intro to Psychology)

minimum 8 hours from at least 2 depts

Music Education Requirements

3-4

Ensemble - 6 terms of Choral Ensemble Performance - minimum 24 hours with completion of 440, and presentation of memorized recital Completion of Piano 205 Completion of Voice 116

Hours

Music Education: Art of Music Teaching

111

2

Tech for Music Educators

121

1

Choral Techniques Secondary

340

2

Teaching General Music in Elementary Schools

341

3

342

2

Conducting: Elementary Conducting I

315

2

Teaching General Music in Secondary Schools

Elementary Conducting II

316

2

Music Ed Practicum

3494

1-4

Education: Multicultural Society

3924

3

Psychology and Human Development

391

3

Reading and Writing

402

3

Music Theory: 20th Century Music

433

3

18th Century Counterpoint I

442

3

18th Century Counterpoint II

4433

3

Organ Lit:

Pre-1750

481

2

1750-Present

482

2

Church Music: Hymn Improvisations Console Conducting and Repertoire

483

2

484

2

Additional SMTD Requirements Minimum 6 hours of electives selected by the student in consultation with an advisor

Minimum Non-SMTD Hours: 32 Minimum Total Hours Required: 151 - 160

52

School of Music, Theatre & Dance

Student Teaching Music Education

Hours 345

2-3

346

2-3

347

2-3

348

2-3

Jazz 220 (3 credits) can be taken in place of Theory 239 and 249. Jazz 221 (3 credits) can be taken in place of Theory 240 and 250, or substitute the accelerated sequence. 2 Select from Jazz 460, 467, 470, 479, or an upper level Musicology or Theory. 3 Fulfills junior/senior elective in Musicology/Theory. 4 See pg 46 for requirements on 349 and 392 1


Bachelor Degree Program Curricula

BACHELOR OF MUSIC IN PIANO PERFORMANCE

For those who wish to work in performance or teaching. Pre-college preparation should include 8 - 12 years of piano study. Repertory should include compositions representative of the Baroque, Classical and Romantic periods, and the 20th Century. Memorization is expected. Students wishing to teach in elementary or secondary schools should elect Piano Performance with Teacher Certification (Curriculum B).

PERFORMANCE MAJOR (Curriculum A) SMTD Requirements Music Theory:

Non-SMTD Requirements

Hours

English 124, 125 (College Writing), or equivalent

4 3-4

Aural I

139

1

Written I

149

2

Aural II

140

1

Written II

150

2

English 225 (Academic Argumentation) or Upper Level Writing course approved by Sweetland Writing Center

Aural III

2391

1

French, German, or Italian

2 terms

Written III

2491

2

Electives

variable

Aural IV

2401

1

Written IV

2501

2

400 level Theory Musicology:

Hours

3

Intro

139

2

Post WWI

140

2

Middle Ages - Baroque

239

2

Preclassic Era - WWI

240

2

Jazz/Musicology/Theory elective2

3-4

2 terms of Ensemble 345 (Univ Orch), 347 (Univ Band), 350 (Univ Choir), 350 (Chamber Choir), or 470 (Orpheus Singers) 2 additional terms of an approved large or small ensemble 2 terms of Ensemble 181 (or proficiency). Students who receive proficiency must still elect 2 terms of an approved large or small ensemble

Minimum repertory for graduation should include such works as suites, partitas, preludes, and fugues of J. S. Bach; sonatas of Scarlatti, Haydn, Mozart, and Beethoven; small and large form compositions of Schubert, Chopin, Schumann, Mendelssohn, Brahms, and Liszt; music of Debussy and Ravel; music of Scriabin, Rachmaninoff, Stravinsky, Schoenberg, Prokofiev, Bartok, Copland, etc. This should total at least three full recital programs and two concertos, preferably one by Mozart or Beethoven.

Minimum Non-SMTD Hours: 30 Minimum Total Hours Required: 125 - 128

4 terms (minimum 8 hours) of Ensemble 481 Performance - minimum 24 hours - 8 terms of piano (including weekly studio class), completion of 440, and presentation of recital Piano 460 (Piano Forum) elected each term Conducting: Elementary Conducting I

315

2

Music Theory: Basic Keyboard

211

2

20th Century Music

433

3

4423

3

Piano Lit: Elizabethan - Mozart

487

2

Beethoven - present

488

2

18th Century Counterpoint

Jazz 220 (3 credits) can be taken in place of Theory 239 and 249. Jazz 221 (3 credits) can be taken in place of Theory 240 and 250, or substitute the accelerated sequence. 2 Select from Jazz 460, 467, 470, 479, or an upper level Musicology or Theory. 3 May fulfill either 400 level Theory elective or junior/ senior elective in Jazz/Musicology/Theory, provided the student has enough credits to satisfy the minimum credit hours required for graduation. 1

School of Music, Theatre & Dance

53


Bachelor Degree Program Curricula

PIANO PERFORMANCE WITH TEACHER CERTIFICATION (Curriculum B)

See page 46 for additional program and certification information, and page 53 for repertory requirements. SMTD Requirements Music Theory:

Hours

Non-SMTD Requirements

Hours

Aural I

139

1

4

Written I

149

2

English 124, 125 (College Writing), or equivalent

Aural II

140

1

3-4

Written II

150

2

English 225 (Academic Argumentation) or Upper Level Writing course approved by Sweetland Writing Center

2391

1

1

249

2

Aural IV

2401

1

Written IV

2501

2

Aural III Written III

400 level Theory Musicology:

3

Intro

139

2

Post WWI

140

2

Middle Ages - Baroque

239

2

Preclassic Era - WWI

240

2

Jazz/Musicology/Theory elective

minimum 8 hours (satisfied through music requirements)

Area 2 Electives: Natural Science

minimum 8 hours from at least 2 depts

Area 3 Electives: Social Science (MUST include Psychology 111: Intro to Psychology)

minimum 8 hours from at least 2 depts

Music Education Requirements

3-4

2

Area 1 Electives: Humanities

Performance - minimum 24 hours - 8 terms of piano; completion of 440 and presentation of recital Piano 460 (Piano Forum) elected each term Ensemble - 4 terms of Choral Ensemble and 4 terms of Piano Ensemble

Hours

Music Education: Art of Music Teaching

111

2

Tech for Music Educators

121

1

Choral Techniques Secondary

340

2

Teaching General Music in Elementary Schools

341

3

Teaching General Music in Secondary Schools

342

2

Piano Lit: Elizabethan - Mozart

487

2

Music Ed Practicum

3494

1-4

3924

3

Beethoven - present

488

2

Conducting: Elementary Conducting I

Education: Multicultural Society

315

2

Psychology and Human Development

391

3

Reading and Writing

402

3

Elementary Conducting II

316

2

Music Theory: Basic Keyboard

211

3

20th Century Music

433

3

18th Century Counterpoint

442

3

Student Teaching Music Education

3

Additional SMTD Requirements Minimum 6 hours of electives selected by the student in consultation with an advisor

54

School of Music, Theatre & Dance

2-3

346

2-3

347

2-3

348

2-3

Jazz 220 (3 credits) can be taken in place of Theory 239 and 249. Jazz 221 (3 credits) can be taken in place of Theory 240 and 250, or substitute the accelerated sequence. 2 Select from Jazz 460, 467, 470, 479, or an upper level Musicology or Theory. 3 Fulfills junior/senior elective in Musicology/Theory. 4 See pg 46 for requirements on 349 and 392 1

Minimum Non-SMTD Hours: 32 Minimum Total Hours Required: 148 - 153

Hours 345


Bachelor Degree Program Curricula

BACHELOR OF MUSIC IN PERFORMANCE: STRING INSTRUMENTS

For those who desire a career in performance and/or teaching violin, viola, cello, or double bass. Pre-college preparation should include several years of study and some experience in orchestral and chamber music. Piano study is recommended. Students wishing to teach in elementary or secondary schools should elect Performance with Teacher Certification (Curriculum B).

PERFORMANCE MAJOR (Curriculum A) SMTD Requirements Music Theory:

Hours

English 124, 125 (College Writing), or equivalent

4 3-4

variable

Aural I

139

1

149

2

Aural II

140

1

Written II

150

2

English 225 (Academic Argumentation) or Upper Level Writing course approved by Sweetland Writing Center

Aural III

2391

1

Electives

Written III

2491

2

Aural IV

2401

1

Written IV

2501

2 3

Intro

139

2

Post WWI

140

2

Middle Ages - Baroque

239

2

Preclassic Era - WWI

240

2

Jazz/Musicology/Theory elective2 Piano

Non-SMTD Requirements

Written I

400 level Theory Musicology:

Hours

3-4

111

2

112

2

Ensemble 345 - elected 8 terms Ensemble 335 (String Quartet) elected 3 terms by Violinists, Violists, and Cellists. Double Bassists elect 325 (Orchestral Repertory) for 2 terms and 335 or 480 (Mixed Chamber Music) for 1 term

Minimum Non-SMTD Hours: 30 Minimum Total Hours Required: 120

Jazz 220 (3 credits) can be taken in place of Theory 239 and 249. Jazz 221 (3 credits) can be taken in place of Theory 240 and 250, or substitute the accelerated sequence. 2 Select from Jazz 460, 467, 470, 479, or an upper level Musicology or Theory. 1

Performance - minimum 24 hours, completion of 440, and presentation of recital Performance 450 elected each term Violinists are required to include 1 term on Violin 460 (Viola for Violin) in their junior year or in consultation with their advisor

School of Music, Theatre & Dance

55


Bachelor Degree Program Curricula

PERFORMANCE WITH TEACHER CERTIFICATION: STRINGS (Curriculum B)

For those who wish to teach in elementary or secondary schools. The bachelor’s degree and teaching certificate are awarded at the completion of all required course work. Students interested in applying for graduate standing on completion of bachelor’s degree requirements are encouraged to do so. See page 46 for additional program and certification information. Non-SMTD Requirements Hours SMTD Requirements Hours English 124, 125 (College Writing), or 4 Music Theory: Aural I 139 1 equivalent Written I 149 2 English 225 (Academic Argumentation) 3-4 Aural II 140 1 or Upper Level Writing course approved by Sweetland Writing Center Written II 150 2 Aural III

2391

1

Written III

2491

2

Aural IV

2401

1

Written IV

2501

2

400 level Theory

3

Area 1 Electives: Humanities

minimum 8 hours (satisfied through music requirements)

Area 2 Electives: Natural Science

minimum 8 hours from at least 2 depts minimum 8 hours from at least 2 depts

Intro

139

2

Post WWI

140

2

Area 3 Electives: Social Science (MUST include Psychology 111: Intro to Psychology)

Middle Ages - Baroque

239

2

Music Education Requirements

Preclassic Era - WWI

240

2

Musicology:

Jazz/Musicology/Theory elective Piano

3-4

2

Music Education: Art of Music Teaching

111

2

Tech for Music Educators

121

1

111

2

Strings

201

1

112

2

Strings

202

1

Winds

203

1

Brass

205

1

Percussion

207

1

Ensemble 345 - elected 8 terms Ensemble - 2 terms of 335 (String Quartet) elected by Violinists, Violists, and Cellists; Double Bassists will elect 325 (Orchestral Repertory) or 400 (Early Music Ensemble) Performance - elected each term (except when student teaching) with completion of 440; presentation of recital Performance 450 elected each term (except when student teaching) Violinists are required to include 1 term on Violin 460 (Viola for Violin) in their junior year or in consultation with their advisor

Vocal Methods

320

1

Teaching General Music in Elementary Schools/ Teaching General Music in Secondary Schools

341 or 342

3/2

Teaching String Instruments

370

2

Elementary Band Methods

371

2

Secondary Instrumental Methods Education:

Conducting: Elementary Conducting I

315

2

Elementary Conducting II

316

2

Additional SMTD Requirements Minimum 6 hours of electives selected by the student in consultation with an advisor Jazz 220 (3 credits) can be taken in place of Theory 239 and 249. Jazz 221 (3 credits) can be taken in place of Theory 240 and 250, or substitute the accelerated sequence. 2 Select from Jazz 460, 467, 470, 479, or an upper level Musicology or Theory. 3 See pg 46 for requirements on 349 and 392 1

56

Hours

School of Music, Theatre & Dance

372

2

Music Ed Practicum

3493

1-4

Multicultural Society

3923

3

Psychology and Human Development

391

3

Reading and Writing

402

3

Student Teaching Music Education

Hours 375

2-3

376

2-3

377

2-3

378

2-3

Minimum Non-SMTD Hours: 32 Minimum Total Hours Required: 133


Bachelor Degree Program Curricula

BACHELOR OF MUSIC VOICE PERFORMANCE

For students who desire a career on the concert stage, in church solo work, radio, television, and/or teaching. Singers who wish to teach in elementary and secondary schools should elect the curriculum in Voice Performance with Teacher Certification (Curriculum B) or Choral Music Education. Pre-college preparation should include participation in choral ensembles and some instrumental study.

PERFORMANCE MAJOR (Curriculum A) SMTD Requirements Music Theory:

Non-SMTD Requirements

Hours

English 124, 125 (College Writing), or equivalent

4

English 225 (Academic Argumentation) or Upper Level Writing course approved by Sweetland Writing Center

3-4

Aural I

139

1

Written I

149

2

Aural II

140

1

Written II

150

2

Aural III

2391

1

Written III

2491

2

Aural IV

2401

1

1 term of French, German, and Italian with a C- or better or 2 terms of any language in which a lower grade is earned

Written IV

2501

2

Dance:

400 level Theory Musicology:

Hours

Intro

3 139

2

Theatre:

Ballet

100

1

Modern or Jazz

100

1

Intro to Acting I

101

3

102

3

251

1

Post WWI

140

2

Intro to Acting II

Middle Ages - Baroque

239

2

Production Practicum

Preclassic Era - WWI

240

2

Jazz/Musicology/Theory elective2 Piano

111

2

112

2

Ensemble 352 (Opera Chorus) elected 1 term in the sophomore or junior year Performance - 8 terms of Voice with completion of 440 and presentation of recital Conducting: Elementary Conducting I

315

2

Elementary Conducting II

316

2

I

340

2

II

341

2

Voice Literature - 3 terms of Diction (French, German, and Italian) Opera Production 455 (if cast)

variable

3-4

Ensemble - 8 terms of 349 (Univ Choir), 350 (Chamber Choir), or 470 (Orpheus Singers)

Opera Workshop:

Electives

2-4

Minimum vocal repertory requirements: Early Italian – 6 songs; Early English – 4 songs; 10 songs or arias by Bach, Handel, Hadyn, and Mozart; German – 14 songs including representation of Schubert, Brahms, Wolf, and Schumann; French – 6 songs; American – 10 songs; Miscellaneous – 10 songs or arias. At least 25 of these must be completed to qualify for junior standing.

NOTE: Participation by Voice students in School of Music, Theatre & Dance performance organizations and courses shall be subject to the approval of the Voice instructor, and individual solo assignments within these activities are subject to specific approval. Participation in extracurricular vocal activities requires consultation with the instructor.

Minimum Non-SMTD Hours: 30 Minimum Total Hours Required: 124

Jazz 220 (3 credits) can be taken in place of Theory 239 and 249. Jazz 221 (3 credits) can be taken in place of Theory 240 and 250, or substitute the accelerated sequence. 2 Select from Jazz 460, 467, 470, 479, or an upper level Musicology or Theory. 1

School of Music, Theatre & Dance

57


Bachelor Degree Program Curricula

VOICE PERFORMANCE WITH TEACHER CERTIFICATION (Curriculum B)

See page 46 for additional program and certification information, and page 57 for repertory requirements. SMTD Requirements Music Theory:

Non-SMTD Requirements

Hours

English 124, 125 (College Writing), or equivalent

4

English 225 (Academic Argumentation) or Upper Level Writing course approved by Sweetland Writing Center

3-4

Aural I

139

1

Written I

149

2

Aural II

140

1

Written II

150

2

Aural III

2391

1

Written III

2491

2

Aural IV

2401

1

Written IV

2501

2

400 level Theory Musicology:

Hours

3

Intro

139

2

Post WWI

140

2

Middle Ages - Baroque

239

2

Preclassic Era - WWI

240

2

Area 2 Electives: Natural Science

minimum 8 hours from at least 2 depts

Area 3 Electives: Social Science (MUST include Psychology 111: Intro to Psychology)

minimum 8 hours from at least 2 depts

Music Education Requirements 111

2

111

2

Tech for Music Educators

121

1

112

2

Choral Techniques Secondary

340

2

Teaching General Music in Elementary Schools

341

3

Teaching General Music in Secondary Schools

342

2

Music Ed Practicum

3493

1-4

Education: Multicultural Society

3923

3

Psychology and Human Development

391

3

Reading and Writing

402

3

Ensemble 349 (Univ Choir), 350 (Chamber Choir), or 470 (Orpheus Singers) elected each term except when student teaching Ensemble 352 (Opera Chorus) elected 1 term in the sophomore or junior year Performance - 8 terms of Voice with completion of 440 and presentation of recital Basic Lyric Diction

200

1

Conducting: Elementary Conducting I

315

2

Student Teaching

Elementary Conducting II

316

2

Music Education

I

340

II

Opera Workshop: Opera Production (if cast)

Hours

Music Education: Art of Music Teaching

Completion of Piano 205 or demonstrated proficiency

Voicelit:

minimum 8 hours (satisfied through music requirements)

3-4

Jazz/Musicology/Theory elective2 Piano

Area 1 Electives: Humanities

Hours 345

2-3

2

346

2-3

341

2

347

2-3

455

2-4

348

2-3

Additional SMTD Requirements Minimum 6 hours of electives selected by the student in consultation with an advisor

Minimum Non-SMTD Hours: 32 Minimum Total Hours Required: 156 - 160

58

School of Music, Theatre & Dance

Jazz 220 (3 credits) can be taken in place of Theory 239 and 249. Jazz 221 (3 credits) can be taken in place of Theory 240 and 250, or substitute the accelerated sequence. 2 Select from Jazz 460, 467, 470, 479, or an upper level Musicology or Theory. 3 See pg 46 for requirements on 349 and 392 1


Bachelor Degree Program Curricula

BACHELOR OF MUSIC IN PERFORMANCE: WIND INSTRUMENTS AND PERCUSSION

For students who wish to pursue a career in performance and/or teaching. Those interested in pursuing a career on their principal instrument and related instruments should elect Wind and Percussion Performance (Curriculum B). Those wishing to teach in elementary and secondary schools should elect Wind and Percussion Performance with Teacher Certification (Curriculum C). Pre-college preparation should include strong ability, training, and repertoire. Piano study is recommended.

PERFORMANCE MAJOR (Curriculum A) SMTD Requirements Music Theory:

Hours

Aural I

139

1

Non-SMTD Requirements

Hours

Written I

149

2

4

Aural II

140

1

English 124, 125 (College Writing), or equivalent

Written II

150

2

Aural III

239

1

English 225 (Academic Argumentation) or Upper Level Writing course approved by Sweetland Writing Center

3-4

1

2491

2

Electives

variable

1

240

1

2501

2

Written III Aural IV Written IV 400 level Theory Musicology:

3

Intro

139

2

Post WWI

140

2

Middle Ages - Baroque

239

2

Preclassic Era - WWI

240

2

Jazz/Musicology/Theory elective2 Piano

3-4

111

2

112

2

Minimum Non-SMTD Hours: 30 Minimum Total Hours Required: 121

Ensemble - 345 (Univ Orch), 347 (Univ Band), or 348 (Marching Band) elected each term. 460 (Jazz Ens) may be substituted with department approval 4 terms of Ensemble 461 (Small Woodwind Ens), 463 (Small Brass Ens), 465 (Percussion Ens), 466 (Piano Chamber Music), or 400 (Early Music Ensemble), or with department approval, 2 terms of 475 (Contemporary Directions Ens) or 469 (Orch Rep) by audition only Performance - minimum 24 hours - 8 terms of major instrument, selected each term; completion of 440; presentation of recital

Jazz 220 (3 credits) can be taken in place of Theory 239 and 249. Jazz 221 (3 credits) can be taken in place of Theory 240 and 250, or substitute the accelerated sequence. 2 Select from Jazz 460, 467, 470, 479, or an upper level Musicology or Theory. 1

School of Music, Theatre & Dance

59


Bachelor Degree Program Curricula

PERFORMANCE MAJOR: WIND INSTRUMENTS (Curriculum B) SMTD Requirements Music Theory:

Hours

Aural I

139

1

Non-SMTD Requirements

Hours

Written I

149

2

4

Aural II

140

1

English 124, 125 (College Writing), or equivalent

Written II

150

2

2391

1

English 225 (Academic Argumentation) or Upper Level Writing course approved by Sweetland Writing Center

3-4

Aural III Written III

2491

2

Electives

variable

Aural IV

2401

1

Written IV

2501

2

400 level Theory Musicology:

3

Intro

139

2

Post WWI

140

2

Middle Ages - Baroque

239

2

Preclassic Era - WWI

240

2

Jazz/Musicology/Theory elective2 Piano

3-4

111

2

112

2

Minimum Non-SMTD Hours: 30 Minimum Total Hours Required: 131

Ensemble - 345 (Univ Orch), 347 (Univ Band), or 348 (Marching Band) elected each term in residence. 460 (Jazz Ens) may be substituted with department approval 4 terms of Ensemble 461 (Small Woodwind Ens), 463 (Small Brass Ens), 465 (Percussion Ens), 466 (Piano Chamber Music), or 400 (Early Music Ens), or with department approval, 2 terms of 475 (Contemporary Directions Ens) or 469 (Orch Rep) by audition only Performance - minimum 24 hours - 8 terms of major instrument, selected each term; completion of 440; presentation of recital Conducting: Elementary Conducting I

315

2

Elementary Conducting II

316

2

Secondary Instruments - Proficiency equal to or average of 114 must be demonstrated on each related instrument

60

Jazz 220 (3 credits) can be taken in place of Theory 239 and 249. Jazz 221 (3 credits) can be taken in place of Theory 240 and 250, or substitute the accelerated sequence. 2 Select from Jazz 460, 467, 470, 479, or an upper level Musicology or Theory. 1

School of Music, Theatre & Dance


Bachelor Degree Program Curricula

WIND INSTRUMENTS AND PERCUSSION PERFORMANCE WITH TEACHER CERTIFICATION: (Curriculum C) See page 46 for additional program and certification information. Hours

Non-SMTD Requirements

Hours

Aural I

139

1

4

Written I

149

2

English 124, 125 (College Writing), or equivalent

Aural II

140

1

3-4

Written II

150

2

2391

1

English 225 (Academic Argumentation) or Upper Level Writing course approved by Sweetland Writing Center

1

249

2

Aural IV

2401

1

Written IV

2501

2

SMTD Requirements Music Theory:

Aural III Written III

400 level Theory Musicology:

3

Intro

139

2

Post WWI

140

2

Middle Ages - Baroque

239

2

Preclassic Era - WWI

240

2

Jazz/Musicology/Theory elective Piano

2

3-4

111

2

112

2

Area 1 Electives: Humanities

minimum 8 hours (satisfied through music requirements)

Area 2 Electives: Natural Science

minimum 8 hours from at least 2 depts

Area 3 Electives: Social Science (MUST include Psychology 111: Intro to Psychology)

minimum 8 hours from at least 2 depts

Music Education Requirements Music Education: Art of Music Teaching

111

2

Tech for Music Educators

121

1

Strings

201

1

Strings

202

1

Winds

203

1

Brass

205

1

Percussion

207

1

Vocal Methods

320

1

341 or 342

3/2

Teaching String Instruments

370

2

Elementary Band Methods

371

2

372

2

Ensemble - 345 (Univ Orch), 347 (Univ Band), or 348 (Marching Band) elected each term in residence except when student teaching. 460 (Jazz Ens) may be substituted with department approval 2 terms of Ensemble 461 (Small Woodwind Ens), 463 (Small Brass Ens), 465 (Percussion Ens), 466 (Piano Chamber Music), or 400 (Early Music Ensemble), or with department approval, 2 terms of 475 (Contemporary Directions Ens) or 469 (Orch Rep) by audition only Performance - minimum 24 hours - 8 terms of major instrument, selected each term; completion of 440; presentation of recital

Hours

Teaching General Music in Elementary Schools/ Teaching General Music in Secondary Schools

Conducting: Elementary Conducting I

315

2

Secondary Instrumental Methods

Elementary Conducting II

316

2

Music Ed Practicum

3493

1-4

Education: Multicultural Society

3923

3

Psychology and Human Development

391

3

Reading and Writing

402

3

Additional SMTD Requirements Minimum 6 hours of electives selected by the student in consultation with an advisor Jazz 220 (3 credits) can be taken in place of Theory 239 and 249. Jazz 221 (3 credits) can be taken in place of Theory 240 and 250, or substitute the accelerated sequence. 2 Select from Jazz 460, 467, 470, 479, or an upper level Musicology or Theory. 3 See pg 46 for requirements on 349 and 392 1

Minimum Non-SMTD Hours: 32 Minimum Total Hours Required: 141

Student Teaching Music Education

Hours 375

2-3

376

2-3

377

2-3

378

2-3

School of Music, Theatre & Dance

61


COLOR PAGE 62

62

School of Music, Theatre & Dance


Bachelor Degree Course Descriptions

Courses numbered from 100 to 299 are intended for freshmen and sophomores and those from 300 to 499 are intended for juniors and seniors. Courses numbered 500 and above are designed for graduate students, but may be elected by undergraduates with special permission. Courses numbered above 800 are intended for doctoral students only. Credit hours are given in parentheses and prerequisites are indicated in italics. Courses marked with an asterisk (*) may be elected for graduate credit in School of Music, Theatre & Dance programs but not in Rackham programs.

ARTS ADMINISTRATION 491 Special Projects (1-2 credit hours) Permission of instructor.

CHURCH MUSIC 483 Hymn Improvisation (2 credit hours) A practicum in service music with emphasis on keyboard improvisation and hymn-playing as these skills relate to service-playing in churches with diverse cultural approaches to worship music. Handbells and other instruments are included as needed. 484 Console Conducting and Repertoire (2 credit hours) A continuation of 483. Includes a study of anthem literature for graded choirs plus training in conducting from the console. Also study and performance of repertoire for organ and other instruments.

COMPOSITION

Major Courses: The following courses are structured as a combination of individual lessons and scheduled required lectures. 139, 140 Introductory Composition (3 credit hours each) Freshman Composition majors; 139 is prerequisite to 140. An introduction to the basic craft of musical composition. 239, 240 Intermediate Composition (3 credit hours each) Sophomore Composition majors; 239 is prerequisite to 240. Requires concurrent election of 450 when offered ; department to determine course election. Continuation of the study of the basic craft of musical composition with emphasis on contrapuntal writing, harmonic structure, instrumentation and notational techniques. 339, 340 Advanced Composition (4 credit hours each) Junior Composition majors; 339 is prerequisite to 340. Requires concurrent election of 450 when offered; department to determine course election. The study and writing of larger musical forms. 439, 440 Advanced Composition (4 credit hours each) Senior Composition majors; 439 is prerequisite to 440. Requires concurrent election of 450 when offered; department to determine course election. Focuses on multilinear, extended-form writing for the mixed consort. 450 Undergraduate Seminar (1 credit hour) To be elected concurrently with 239, 240, 339, 340, 439, 440, 423, 424, 425, and 426. Study of music and examination of issues of particular interest to composers; 20th-century art music is a primary focus. Secondary Courses: 221 Introduction to Elementary Composition (3 credit hours) For non-SMTD majors. For students with limited musical background who wish to gain understanding of the creative process and contemporary art music by composing. The course investigates traditional compositional crafts, as well as more current or experimental tendencies, including pop,

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ethnic, and jazz idioms. Student creative projects receive individual attention. No prerequisites, but the ability to read music is strongly recommended. 222 Composition (3 credit hours) For non-SMTD majors. Prerequisite: 221. A continuation of 221, this course serves as an introduction to instrumental music and a study of musical structure through individual creative effort. 233 Special Topics in Composition (2-3 credit hours) Periodic offerings on topics of special interest in Composition. 415 Introduction to Electronic Music (2 credit hours) An elementary study of the scientific and technological basis for the electronic music medium, with emphasis on studio procedures and techniques, including recording and tape manipulation, “classic� and voltage-controlled synthesis. 416 Seminar in Electronic Music (2 credit hours) Prerequisite: 415. A continuation of Composition 415 with an introduction to computer technology and its electronic music applications 421, 422 Creative Composition (3 credit hours each) 421 is prerequisite to 422. An introduction to composition for students interested in concentrating on original creative work in contemporary idioms. Individual instruction is provided for student projects. Also includes biweekly lectures on appropriate aspects of musical language and composition craft. 423, 424 Advanced Composition (2 or 4 credit hours each) Prerequisite: 422; 423 is prerequisite to 424. Requires concurrent election of 450 when offered. For students capable of original creative work. Consists of individual instruction and participation in a weekly seminar devoted to a broad range of 20th-century literature. 425, 426 Advanced Composition (2 or 4 credit hours each) Prerequisite: 424; 425 is prerequisite to 426. Requires concurrent election of 450 when offered. Focuses on composing for the mixed consort and examines differing approaches to musical notation. 433 Special Topics in Composition (2-3 credit hours) Periodic offerings on topics of special interest in Composition.

CONDUCTING 315 Elementary Conducting I (2 credit hours) Beginning baton technique, development of appropriate non-verbal communication skills. Students may elect instrumental or choral sections. 316 Elementary Conducting II (2 credit hours) Prerequisite: 315. Includes an introduction to score study and analysis. Students may elect instrumental or choral sections. 407 Special Projects (1-3 credit hours) 415, 416 Intermediate Instrumental Conducting (2 credit hours each) Prerequisite: 316 or permission of instructor. Instrumental students only. 415 is a prerequisite for 416. Intermediate baton technique, including analysis of appropriate rehearsal procedures. 442 Choral Conducting Techniques and Repertory (3 credit hours) Prerequisite: 315 or one semester at an alternate institution. Develops conducting techniques with particular emphasis on choral/orchestral works. Fall Term only.

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443 Intermediate Choral Conducting (3 credit hours) Prerequisite: 442 and permission of instructor. Continuation of 442 for students seeking more advanced training. Winter Term as needed. 455 Band Conducting (2 credit hours) Prerequisite: Ensemble 347. 456 Band Conductor’s Art (2 credit hours; Summer Half-Term, 1 credit hour)

DANCE 100 Introduction to Dance (1 credit hour) For non-Dance majors only. Introductory course provides continued instruction in technical and creative aspects of contemporary modern dance as an art form. Principles of placement and rhythmic sequences of movement, providing flexibility and strength as a foundation for freedom of expression through a variety of dance forms. 101, 102 Modern Dance I (1 credit hour each) For Dance majors; non-majors by permission of instructor. Dance techniques from mid-20th century American modern dance, with particular focus on one or two particular styles of training. 103, 104 Modern Dance I (1 credit hour each) For Dance majors; non-majors by permission of instructor. First-year studio course in principles of contemporary modern dance technique for dance majors, building upon principles of alignment, training, movement dynamics, rhythmic phrasing, and its potential for expression as an art form. 111, 112 Ballet I (1 credit hour each) For Dance majors; non-majors by permission of instructor. An intermediate ballet course which focuses on the basic placement concepts of transfer of weight, core-strength, a solid standing leg, and the positions of the body. Proper alignment will be stressed in all of the exercises at the barre and in the centre. Centre work is designed to impart solid turning and jumping skills including en dehors and en dedans pirouettes, traveling turns, basic petit allegro and grand allegro vocabulary. Emphasis will be placed on musicality and transitions. 113, 114 Ballet I (1 credit hour each) For Dance majors; non-majors by permission of instructor. Survey of principles of basic ballet placement, barre and centre work to prepare for allegro, jumps and sequences across the floor. 121, 122 Freshman Repertory (1 credit hour each) By audition. Cast by audition, repertory groups rehearse works by faculty and guest choreographers for the annual production of the University Dance Company at the Power Center and other venues. 126 Freshman Touring Company (1 credit hour) In the model of a repertory dance company, students learn, rehearse, produce, and tour new and existing repertory works by faculty and guest choreographers for performances, master classes, and lecture demonstrations in various locations throughout the region. 127, 128 Freshman Dance Lab (1 credit hour each) For Dance majors; non-majors by permission of instructor. Course content to compliment core technique classes in the curriculum. May include Pilates, Yoga, Partnering, Cross-Training, in addition to Ballet and Modern Technique courses. 129 Freshman University Dancers (1 credit hour) By audition. Rehearsal and performance of student works by invitation of choreographer for senior or graduate productions.

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131 Dance Composition I (2 credit hours) For Dance majors; non-majors by permission of instructor. Students are introduced to basic elements of the craft of choreography: space, time, force, and motivation; concepts that can be applied to any genre of dance. Topics will be approached through improvisation, movement studies, readings, performance and video viewings, and written assignments. Concepts will be explored both as soloists and in small groups, and will conclude in a final composition showing. 132 Dance Composition II (2 credit hours) For Dance majors; non-majors by permission of instructor; Prerequisite: Dance 131. Study of dance forms and their relationship to the other arts, exploring motivations and source materials. 141 Music For Dance 1 (2 credit hours) For Dance majors; non-majors by permission of instructor. An introduction to western music through elementary theory, an introduction to form, aesthetics, and technology. 201, 202 Modern Dance II (1 credit hour each) For Dance majors; non-majors by permission of instructor. Prerequisite: successful completion of Freshman technique. Dance techniques from mid-20th century American modern dance, with particular focus on placement, phrasing, and dynamics. 203, 204 Modern II (1 credit hour each) For Dance majors; non-majors by permission of instructor. Prerequisite: successful completion of Freshman technique. Second-year studio course in principles of contemporary modern dance technique for dance majors, building upon principles of alignment, training, movement dynamics, rhythmic phrasing, and its potential for expression as an art form. 211, 212 Ballet II (1 credit hour each) For Dance majors; non-majors by permission of instructor. Prerequisite: successful completion of Freshman technique. An intermediate ballet course which focuses on placement concepts such as transfer of weight, core-strength, a solid standing leg, and the positions of the body. Proper alignment will be stressed in all of the exercises at the barre and in the centre. Centre work is designed to impart solid turning and jumping skills including en dehors and en dedans pirouettes, traveling turns, basic petit allegro and grand allegro vocabulary. Emphasis will be placed on more difficult combinations of movements. 213, 214 Ballet II (1 credit hour each) For Dance majors; non-majors by permission of instructor. Prerequisite: successful completion of Freshman technique. Sophomore-level continuation of barre, centre and sequences across the floor, stressing phrasing and range, from adagio to petit allegro. 221, 222 Sophomore Repertory (1 credit hour each) By audition. Cast by audition, repertory groups rehearse works by faculty and guest choreographers for the annual production of the University Dance Company at the Power Center and other venues. 227, 228 Sophomore Dance Lab (1 credit hour each) For Dance majors; non-majors by permission of instructor. Course content to compliment core technique classes in the curriculum. May include Pilates, Yoga, Partnering, Cross-Training, in addition to Ballet and Modern Technique courses. 229 Sophomore University Dancers (1 credit hour) By audition. Rehearsal and performance of student works by invitation of choreographer for senior or graduate productions. 231 Dance Composition III (2 credit hours) For Dance majors; non-majors by permission of instructor. Prerequisite: Dance 132. Sophomore-level survey of uses of rhythm, design, dynamics and motivation, leading to the creation and performance of solo and group works with emphasis on the relationship of music to choreography. 66

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232 Dance Composition IV (2 credit hours) For Dance majors; non-majors by permission of instructor. Prerequisite: Dance 231. This course examines a series of way to map movement and sound with the goal of cultivating an awareness of how the impact of movement can be deepened and extended through the informed choice of sound/ music/silence. Other topics addressed include chance structures, aural backdrop, and collaboration between composer and choreographer. 241 Art of Dance (3 credit hours) By permission of instructor. An introduction to the history of theatrical dance in Europe, Russia and America focusing on major choreographers and styles as well as the cultural and political contexts in which they develop. 242 Music For Dance 2 (2 credit hours) For Dance majors; non-majors by permission of instructor. Following an introduction to the dance manuals of Negri, Arbeau, Playford, and Louis Horst’s Pre-Classic Dance Forms, students will study the following: The Bartered Bride, Coppelia and Eugene Onegin (for character and social dance forms); selected works of Frederic Chopin and Johann and Josef Strauss; an overview of the three Tchaikovsky ballets (focusing on source libretti and collaborative process); selected Ballets Russes repertoire from 1909-29; and developments in 20th century dance through the influence and collaborative participation of Louis Horst, Constant Lambert, Igor Stravinsky, John Cage, and others. 251 Anatomy & Kinesiology for Dancers (3 credit hours) For Dance majors; non-majors by permission of instructor. This course is a detailed study of the structure and function of musculoskeletal anatomy from the deep supporting layers of bone, fascia and intrinsic muscle, to the joints and large superficial muscles that do the moving, how these layers work together to create movement and to use this information to explore bio-mechanics. 261, 262 Congolese Dance I (1 credit hour) Study of traditional dances of the African Congo. 265 Introduction to Afro-Caribbean Dance (1 credit hour) Study of the various folkloric dance forms of the Caribbean, particularly those of Cuba, Haiti, and Brazil. 291 Sophomore Seminar (2 credit hours) For Dance majors; non-majors by permission of instructor. Students review their dance training, articulate new goals and begin to develop individual portfolios to support both artistic and career goals. This will include sessions on writing resumes/CVs, cover letter, professional applications, and sessions on archiving of creative materials and the current technology/media used in supporting these aims. 301, 302 Modern III (1 credit hour each) For Dance majors; non-majors by permission of instructor. Dance techniques from mid-20th century American modern dance, with particular focus on choreographic intent, musicality, and phrasing. 303, 304 Modern III (1 credit hour each) For Dance majors; non-majors by permission of instructor. Prerequisite: successful completion of Sophomore technique. Dance techniques from mid-20th century American modern dance, with a particular focus integrating technical ability with musicality, phrasing and performance projection. 311, 312 Ballet III (1 credit hour each) For Dance majors; non-majors by permission of instructor. Prerequisite: successful completion of Sophomore technique. This course is a continuation of working on alignment and proper execution of technique that encompasses the following: advanced barre work, en dehors and en dedans pirouettes, fine tuning execution of basic material, self-discovery and self-correction of mistakes, awareness of other dancers, discovering value of plie and brush in petit allegro, piecing together more complicated/ advanced petit allegro, and the use of imagery to enhance the thought process and the physical execution. School of Music, Theatre & Dance

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313, 314 Ballet III (1 credit hour each) For Dance majors; non-majors by permission of instructor. Prerequisite: successful completion of Sophomore technique. An intermediate ballet course which focuses on placement concepts such as transfer of weight, core-strength, a solid standing leg, and positions of the body. Proper alignment will be stressed in all of the exercises at the barre and in the centre. Centre work is designed to impart solid turning and jumping skills including en dehors and en dedans pirouettes, traveling turns, basic petit allegro and grand allegro vocabulary. 321, 322 Junior Repertory (1 credit hour each) By audition. Cast by audition, repertory groups rehearse works by faculty and guest choreographers for the annual production of the University Dance Company at the Power Center and other venues. 327, 328 Junior Dance Lab (1 credit hour each) For Dance majors; non-majors by permission of instructor. Course content to compliment core technique classes in the curriculum. May include Pilates, Yoga, Partnering, Cross-Training, in addition to Ballet and Modern Technique courses. 329 Junior University Dancers (1 credit hour) By audition. Rehearsal and performance of student works by invitation of choreographer for senior or graduate productions. 332 Movement Improvisation (2 credit hours) For Dance majors; non-majors by permission of instructor. The in-depth study and practice of improvisation as a performing art. Recognizing three strands of improvisational practice: bodily exploration, honing and cultivating aesthetic values and observational skill to compose dances in the moment will influence and shape process. 335 Dance and Related Arts (2 credit hours) Prerequisite: Dance 131, 132, 231, 232. Participating student choreographers, composers, visual artists, video artists, etc, collaborate on experiments to develop an evening length happening/collage/performance that is held at the end of the semester. 342 Topics in World Dance (3 credit hours) By permission of instructor. This course offers an opportunity to gain insight into the functions, aesthetics, history, and cultural context of dances within specific societies. Theatrical, religious, popular, and social dance traditions will be examined in widely varied cultures. 348 Africanist Traditions (3 credit hours) This course examines the history and influence of African American vernacular dance and performance traditions upon American popular, concert, and commercial dance performance, beginning with black-faced minstrelsy and ending with 20th century traditions such as hip hop. It will bring forward the clear retention of Africanist culture rooted deeply in the American aesthetic, as evidenced in the work of such major choreographers as George Balanchine, Alvin Ailey, and others. 352 Body Knowledge (2 credit hours) For Dance majors; non-majors by permission of instructor. This course will offer a broad overview of areas which compliment and support dance and movement training. These include: Labanotation, Laban Movement Analysis, Release Ball Work, Pilates, Alexander Technique, Ideokinesis, Bartenieff Fundamentals, and massage. 372 Dance Production (2 credit hours) Technical and stagecraft information with hands-on experience producing dance performances. 401, 402 Modern Dance IV (1 credit hour each) For Dance majors; non-majors by permission of instructor. Prerequisite: successful completion of Junior technique. Dance techniques from mid-20th century American modern dance, with particular focus on choreographic intent, musicality, and phrasing. 68

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403, 404 Modern Dance IV (1 credit hour each) For Dance majors; non-majors by permission of instructor. Prerequisite: successful completion of Junior technique. Dance techniques from mid-20th century American modern dance, with a particular focus integrating technical ability with musicality, phrasing, and performance projection. 405 Ann Arbor Dance Works Technique (AADW) (1 credit hour) For Dance majors; non-majors by permission of instructor. An intermediate/advanced modern dance technique course, taught by dance faculty and guest artists, offers a variety of styles and trends in the field. 406 Paul Taylor Summer Intensive/UM Technique (PTSI/UMTech) (1-2 credit hours) For Dance majors; required enrollment in PTSI/UMTech and permission of instructor. In this intensive course, dancers will learn both Ballet and the Paul Taylor Technique taught by guest faculty from the Paul Taylor Dance Company in residence at the Paul Taylor Summer Intensive/UM Technique and resident UM faculty. 411, 412 Ballet IV (1 credit hour each) For Dance majors; non-majors by permission of instructor. Prerequisite: successful completion of Junior technique. This course is a continuation of working on alignment and proper execution of technique that encompasses the following: advanced barre work, en dehors and en dedans pirouettes, fine tuning execution of basic material, self-discovery and self-correction of mistakes, awareness of other dancers, discovering value of plie and brush in petit allegro, piecing together more complicated/advanced petit allegro, and the use of imagery to enhance the thought process and the physical execution. 413, 414 Ballet IV (1 credit hour each) For Dance majors; non-majors by permission of instructor. Prerequisite: successful completion of Junior technique. An intermediate ballet course which focuses on placement concepts such as transfer of weight, core-strength, a solid standing leg, and positions of the body. Proper alignment will be stressed in all of the exercises at the barre and in the centre. Centre work is designed to impart solid turning and jumping skills including en dehors and en dedans pirouettes, traveling turns, basic petit allegro and grand allegro vocabulary. 421, 422 Senior Repertory (1 credit hour each) By audition. Cast by audition, repertory groups rehearse works by faculty and guest choreographers for the annual production of the University Dance Company at the Power Center and other venues. 423 Ann Arbor Dance Works Repertory (AADW Rep) (1 credit hour) For Dance majors; non-majors by permission of instructor. Dancers will learn repertory by faculty and guest artists, to be performed at the end of the course. Dancers will also design and conduct a residency in a public school setting. Dancers may be cast, by audition, in one work for one credit or two works for two credits. 424 Paul Taylor Summer Intensive - Repertory (1 credit hour) This course introduces students to Taylor repertory, as taught by guest faculty from the Paul Taylor Dance Company in residence at UM. Students will learn 2-3 repertory excerpts to be presented in public performance, supported by theory classes in Taylor history and style. Enrollment for the intensive is required through the Paul Taylor school. 427, 428 Senior Dance Lab (1 credit hour each) For Dance majors; non-majors by permission of instructor. Course content to compliment core technique classes in the curriculum. May include Pilates, Yoga, Partnering, Cross-Training, in addition to Ballet and Modern Technique courses. 429 Senior University Dancers (1 credit hour) By audition. Rehearsal and performance of student works by invitation of choreographer for senior or graduate productions.

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442 Screendance (3 credit hours) Collaborations in Media introduces the hybrid fusion (also called Videodance or Dance for the Camera) of movement, camera work and editing on Final Cut Pro. A highly interdisciplinary course that attracts students from Dance, Performing Arts Technology, Art & Design, and Screen Arts & Culture, it challenges students from diverse disciplines to compose short works for the screen in a series of 5-6 assignments. The course hosts an Annual UM Dance on Camera Festival of works curated from that year’s New York Dance on Camera Festival at Lincoln Center. 481, 482 Teaching Methods (3 credit hours each) For Dance majors; non-majors by permission of instructor. Students will gain skills for teaching an Introduction to Modern Dance class, articulate goals as teachers, and develop the means to guide students in experiential, analytical, and creative exercises. Through readings, practice, and discussion, students gain information about issues involved in teaching dance to beginning adult students. 491 Senior Seminar (2 credit hours) Prerequisite: Dance 291. Students review their dance training, articulate new goals and begin to develop portfolios to support both artistic and career goals. This will include sessions on grant writing, program planning, marketing, auditioning, and sessions on archiving of materials and current technology/media used in supporting these aims. 493, 494 Senior Dance Concert (4 credit hours each) Senior Dance majors only. Prerequisite: Dance 372. Choreography and production of one solo and one group work for presentation in a thesis concert. 496 Special Topics (1-3 credit hours) Survey of dance related topics such as Labanotation, massage therapy, Alexander and Feldenkries techniques, yoga, and dance science; guest speakers. 497 Directed Independent Study (1-3 credit hours) Dance majors only. Special projects designed by students under faculty supervision. 498 Field Experience (1-3 credit hours) Dance majors only. Performance, teaching, and directing of projects for the local community (nonUniversity related).

DOUBLE BASS 460 Bass for Cello (1 credit hour) By permission of instructor in consultation with advisor. A practicum for cello majors on the basics of double bass playing to be taken in conjunction with playing one semester of double bass in an ensemble. Six, half hour lessons every two weeks and three performances in Double Bass Studio Class are required.

ENSEMBLE

PLEASE NOTE: Ensemble courses may be repeated for credit. 181 Sight-Reading Skills for the Piano (2 credit hours) Freshman Piano majors and others by permission of instructor. Development of sight-reading skills at the piano using solo, ensemble, chamber, and vocal literature. 325 Orchestral Repertory for Strings (1, 2 credit hours) Permission of instructor. Reading major works of the orchestra repertory from 1700 to the present. 326 Orchestral Repertory for Harp (2 credit hours) Permission of instructor. Covers standard orchestral literature in small ensemble settings.

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335 String Quartet (1, 2 credit hours) Involves weekly coaching with Strings faculty and coaching and master classes with a specialist in chamber music. 344 University Campus Orchestra (1 credit hour) For non-SMTD majors. 345 University Orchestras (1, 2 credit hours) By audition. Rehearsals and regular concerts on the campus and elsewhere of major works from the entire range of symphonic literature. Some participation in opera, musical theatre, choral, and concerto repertories is included. 346 Campus Band (1 credit hour) For non-SMTD majors. 347 University Bands (1, 2 credit hours) By audition. Involves rehearsals and performance of the major repertoire for wind ensembles and concert bands. 348 Marching Band (1, 2 credit hours) By audition. Involves rehearsals and performance at major athletic events through marching and playing. 349 University Choirs (1, 2 credit hours) By audition. Rehearsals and concerts of sacred and secular repertories of works from the Renaissance to the present. 350 University Chamber Choir (1, 2 credit hours) By audition. Rehearsals and concerts of works from the Renaissance to the present. Membership is highly selective. 351 Arts Chorale (1 credit hour) By audition. 352 Opera Chorus (1 credit hour) By audition. Rehearsal and public performance of a staged opera. 353 Men’s Glee Club (1 credit hour) By audition. Rehearsals and concerts of works specifically written for male chorus. Repertoire ranges from the Renaissance to the present; includes folk music and college songs. 354 University Choral Union (1 credit hour) By audition. 356 Women’s Glee Club (1 credit hour) By audition. Rehearsals and concerts of works specifically written for women’s chorus. Repertoire ranges from the Renaissance to the present; includes folk music and college songs. 357 Gospel Chorale (1 credit hour) Provides opportunities to rehearse and perform African-American gospel music while focusing on authentic performance practices, cultural perspectives, and vocal techniques. The chorale meets twice weekly, with special rehearsals prior to concerts. 360 Campus Jazz Ensemble (1 credit hour) Jazz Ensemble for non-SMTD majors.

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400 Early Music Ensemble (1, 2 credit hours) By audition. Specializing in music of the Medieval through Classical periods, this ensemble provides students a chance to perform on modern instruments or original ones, in chorus, mixed ensembles, and continuo classes. 402 Japanese Music Study Group (1, 2 credit hours) Rehearsal and public performance of traditional Japanese music. 405, 406 Beginning Javanese Gamelan (1 credit hour each) Open to SMTD and non-SMTD students. No audition required. 407 Javanese Gamelan Ensemble (2 credit hours) Prerequisite: one semester of gamelan. Advanced Gamelan training. 441 Jazz Harp Performance and Improvisation (2 credit hours) Prerequisite: MT 147, 150, and Permission of instructor. Jazz performance skills and improvisation for the performing harpist. 460 Jazz Ensemble (1, 2 credit hours) By audition. Performs big-band jazz ranging from classic works of Duke Ellington and Fletcher Henderson to contemporary compositions by students and faculty. The group performs publicly, including national and international tours. 461 Small Woodwind Ensembles (1 credit hour) Weekly coaching, emphasizing intonation, blend, stylistic awareness, and ensemble precision. Repertoire, primarily for woodwind quintet, ranges from the 18th through 20th centuries. 462 Small Jazz Ensembles (1, 2 credit hours) By audition. Six to eight groups (five or six members each) perform standard and contemporary jazz repertory. The groups perform regularly in public. 463 Small Brass Ensembles (1 credit hour) Purpose is to heighten awareness of intonation, balance, style, and ensemble when playing in a small group. Brass quintet and other instrumentations will be formed, depending on enrollment. 465 Percussion Ensemble (1 credit hour) Repertory surveys works of historical significance and performs works offering aesthetic and notational diversity. Usually presents two concerts each term. 466 Piano Chamber Music (1, 2 credit hours) Permission of instructor. Coaching of chamber music ensembles (generally 3 or more players) that include piano; open to pianists, instrumentalists, and voice students. 467 Creative Arts Orchestra (1, 2 credit hours) Prerequisite: Jazz 470 or permission of instructor. A largely improvisation-based group that invites interaction with other performance fields such as dance, theatre, and music technology. 469 Orchestral Repertory for Winds and Percussion (1 credit hour) By audition; permission of instructor. Provides a practical approach to orchestral routine covering 18th- through 20th-century repertory. Emphasizes intonation, blend, stylistic awareness, ensemble precision, and knowledge of repertory. 470 Orpheus Singers (1-2 credit hours) By audition. Small, select choir specializing in music before 1750 and after 1900. 471 Latin Jazz Ensemble (1-2 credit hours)

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474 University Chamber Orchestra (1,2 credit hours) 475 Contemporary Directions Ensemble (1, 2 credit hours) By audition. SMTD students only. Rehearses and performs contemporary music. 480 Mixed Chamber Music (1, 2 credit hours) Permission of instructor. Coaching of chamber music ensembles with mixed instrumentation (no piano); open to instrumentalists and voice students only. 481 Piano Accompanying/Duo Sonatas (2 credit hours) Weekly private instruction in collaborative skills. Piano majors work with singers and instrumentalists.

JAZZ AND IMPROVISATIONAL STUDIES 101, 102 Freshman Jazz and Improvisation Performance (2, 4 credit hours) 113 Jazz Piano (1 credit hour) Designed for non-pianists in the Jazz program to increase their ability to build jazz chords and to be able to negotiate jazz chord progressions with good voice leading. 201, 202 Sophomore Jazz and Improvisation Performance (2, 4 credit hours) 220, 221 Integral Basic Musicianship I & II (3 credit hours) Prerequisite: Music Theory 139/149 and 140/150. Improvisation-based approach to music theory aural skills. 301, 302 Junior Jazz and Improvisation Performance (2, 4 credit hours) 401, 402 Senior Jazz and Improvisation Performance (2, 4 credit hours) 450 Contemplative Practices Seminar (2 credit hours) Explores contemplative disciplines through historical and theoretical perspectives, and through direct experience. 454 Special Topics (2–4 credit hours) 455 Creativity and Consciousness (2 credit hours) Permission of instructor. This course explores the idea that heightened consciousness may be a central aspect to creative activity in diverse fields. 456 Improvisation Across Fields (3 credit hours) Permission of instructor. Explores improvisation from a cross-disciplinary standpoint. 460 Introduction to Jazz Improvisation (3 credit hours) SMTD majors only. Prerequisite: Theory 149 and 150. Course material covered includes basic jazz theory, chord/scale relationships, melody construction, blues progressions, voice leading, basic jazz piano, voicings, transcription and pattern practice. In addition, the course will address beginning jazz pedagogy and will be helpful to Music Education students. 464 Jazz Guitar Ensemble (1 credit hour) To give more experience to the Jazz guitarists, playing individual lines in a polyphonic setting, following a conductor, reading written out voicings, etc. 465 Independent Study (1–3 credit hours) Permission of instructor.

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466, 467 Jazz Improvisation I, II (3 credit hours each) Jazz majors only; Permission of instructor; 466 is a prerequisite to 467. Experiential approach to the study of jazz improvisation. 468 Jazz Composition I (2 credit hours) Prerequisite: 466, 467, or permission of instructor. Composing for small jazz groups. Topics covered include form, style, chord progressions, and melodic construction. 469 Jazz Arranging I (2 credit hours) 470 Improvisation Forms (2 credit hours) Permission of instructor. Improvisation in an eclectic style. 471, 472 Jazz Improvisation III, IV (3 credit hours each) By audition. 478 Jazz Composition II (2 credit hours) 479 Jazz Arranging II (2 credit hours) 480 Career Development for Jazz Musicians (2 credit hours)

MUSIC EDUCATION 111 The Art of Music Teaching (2 credit hours) An introduction to the theoretical foundations of effective music teaching. Includes observation component. 112 Philosophy of Music Education (2 credit hours) Prerequisite: 111. In-depth study of the traditions and trends of thought underpinning contemporary music education practices. Includes observation component. 121 Technology for Music Educators (1 credit hour) For Music Education majors only. An overview of modern technology that can be used to enhance teacing and learning in school-based music programs. 201 Teaching String Instruments I (1 credit hour) Presents pedagogy and techniques for teaching string instruments in an ensemble setting for certification degree programs. 202 Teaching String Instruments II (1 credit hour) Presents pedagogy and techniques for teaching woodwind instruments in an ensemble setting for certification degree programs. 203 Teaching Woodwind Instruments (1 credit hour) Presents pedagogy and teaching techniques for teaching flute, oboe, bassoon, clarinet, and saxophone in an ensemble setting for certification degree program. 205 Teaching Brass Instruments (1 credit hour) Presents pedagogy and teaching techniques for teaching brass instruments in an ensemble setting for certification degree program. 207 Teaching Percussion Instruments (1 credit hour) Presents pedagogy and teaching techniques for teaching percussion instruments in an ensemble setting for certification degree program.

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Bachelor Degree Course Descriptions

320 Vocal Methods (1 credit hour) Provides prospective music educators with the skills to model and work effectively with students of all ages in a band/choral setting. Includes vocal instruction and topics related to vocal pedagogy. 340 Choral Techniques and Methods for Secondary Schools (2 credit hours) Permission of instructor. Prerequisite: Voicelit 200; Conducting 315; admission to the Teacher Certification Program and concurrent election of Music Ed 349. Introduces vocal techniques suitable for adolescent voices and effective rehearsal procedures. Examine music currently being used in secondary schools and criteria for selecting appropriate materials. Observation of school choirs is included. 341 Teaching General Music in Elementary Schools (3 credit hours) Permission of instructor. Prerequisite: Piano 112; admission to the Teacher Certification Program and concurrent election of Music Ed 349. Presents materials and techniques for teaching general music to elementary students. Utilizes lectures, group discussion, peer teaching, readings, and demonstrations. 342 Teaching General Music in Secondary Schools (2 credit hours) Permission of instructor. Prerequisite: 341; Piano 112; admission to the Teacher Certification Program and concurrent election of Music Ed. 349. Introduces philosophies, objectives, materials, and organization of secondary general music classes. Utilizes lecture-demonstrations, peer teaching, readings, group discussion, and films. 345, 346 Student Teaching of Vocal Music/Elementary Schools (2-3 credit hours each) Permission of instructor. Requires a daily uninterrupted block of 4-6 hours. Open to seniors and graduate students approved for the teacher certification program and whose application for student teaching has been accepted. For additional requirements, consult the Music Education Department. Total elections during directed teaching are limited to 14 credits. Designed to provide practical experience and to develop teaching skills through observation and teaching in elementary schools under joint supervision of University and public school personnel. 347, 348 Student Teaching of Vocal Music/Secondary Schools (2-3 credit hours each) Permission of instructor. Follows structure of 345, 346. 349 Practicum in Music Education (1–4 credit hours) Permission of instructor. Student must be admitted to the Teacher Certification Program. Provides the opportunity to integrate teaching theory and practice by working with learners in classrooms or other field settings. 370 Fundamentals of Teaching String Instruments (2 credit hours) Permission of instructor. Prerequisite: Music Ed 201, 202; admission to the Teacher Certification program. Introduces philosophies, objectives, materials, and group methods for teaching string instruments in elementary and secondary schools. 371 Elementary Band Methods (2 credit hours) Permission of instructor. Prerequisite: Music Ed 203, 205, 207, 320; admission to the Teacher Certification program. Assists the student in developing the necessary skills for a position as an elementary or middle school band director. Topics include: recruitment, program organization and scheduling, building musicianship, materials for instruction, national standards and state frameworks in instrumental music and classroom management. 372 Secondary Instrumental Methods (2 credit hours) Permission of instructor. Prerequisite: Music Ed 203, 205, 207, 320; Conducting 315; admission to the Teacher Certification Program and concurrent election of Music Ed 349. Study and discussion of the role of the secondary instrumental music educator and the purpose of instrumental music in schools. Assists the student in developing the necessary skills for a position as an instrumental music teacher in the high school. 375, 376 Student Teaching of Instrumental Music in Elementary Schools (2-3 credit hours each) Permission of instructor. Requires a daily uninterrupted block of 4-6 hours. Open to seniors and School of Music, Theatre & Dance

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Bachelor Degree Course Descriptions

graduate students approved for the teacher certification program and whose application for student teaching has been accepted. For additional requirements, consult the Music Education Department. Total elections during directed teaching are limited to 14 credits. Designed to provide practical experience and to develop teaching skills through observation and teaching in elementary schools under joint supervision of University and public school personnel. 377, 378 Student Teaching of Instrumental Music in Secondary Schools (2-3 credit hours each) Permission of instructor. Follows structure of 375, 376. 407 Special Courses (1-4 credit hours) 408 Teaching of Music by Elementary School Teachers (3 credit hours) Designed to help elementary teachers learn the fundamentals of music and to provide practical suggestions for teaching music skills to children. Students perform and learn to teach music. For general elementary teachers. 442 Choral Conducting Technique and Repertoire (2-3 credit hours) 443 Intermediate Choral Conducting (2-3 credit hours) 449 Music in Early Childhood (2 credit hours) Provides practical suggestions for teaching music to children from nursery school through second grade. Students perform and learn to teach music. 475 Special Problems in String Pedagogy (2 credit hours) An analysis of the sequential skills, strategies, and diagnostic skills necessary to implement effective teaching in a private studio. Lists of materials, historical survey, and a review of academic literature are included. 481 Marching Band Techniques (2 credit hours) Introduction to music, techniques, and teaching methods for developing the secondary school marching band. 490 Special Projects and Readings (1–4 credit hours) Permission of instructor.

MUSIC HONORS 295, 296 Honors in Music History (3 credit hours each) Prerequisite: permission of chair of the Honors Council; 295 is a prerequisite to 296. 395 Music Honors (1–4 credit hours) Prerequisite: admission to the Music Artist and Scholar Honors Program and permission of the chair of the Music Honors Council. May be elected concurrently in more than one department and may be repeated for credit. Students planning special studies under tutorial guidance elect the special course Music Honors 395. The number of credit hours depends on the nature of the studies planned by the student, his or her tutor, and the chair of the Music Honors Council. 396, 397 Honors Seminar (2 credit hours each) Required of honors students and open to juniors and seniors with 3.5 GPA or higher. Juniors and seniors with a GPA of 3.0 or above may enroll with permission of advisor and Chair of the Music Honors Council. The seminar is devoted to assigned readings and discussion covering a broad range of topics and will from time to time engage the participation of faculty members from other units of the University. May be elected for one or two terms.

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Bachelor Degree Course Descriptions

MUSIC PERFORMANCE 101/401 Outreach in the Performing Arts (1 credit hour) Permission of faculty coordinator and staff. The purpose of this course is to grant academic credit to students who use their performance abilities in socially constructive outreach activities. 412 Yoga for Performers (1 credit hour) Not repeatable for credit. Balancing body, mind and spirit for optimal performance. Provides a balance of physical and mental conditioning that best suits the special needs of performers.

MUSICAL THEATRE 122 Introduction to Jazz Dance (1 credit hour) 123, 124 Ballet for the Musical Theatre (2 credit hours each) Permission of instructor. 133, 134 Introduction to Musical Theatre (2 credit hours each) Freshman Musical Theatre majors. Overview of the field of Musical Theatre, including career opportunities, historic trends, resource books, vocabulary terms, the creative process, analysis of song form, techniques used in reading musicals, and the philosophy of the audition process. 150 Musical Theatre Ensemble Techniques (1 credit hour) Musical Theatre majors only. A practical exploration of various tecniques and methods as practiced in stage production ensemble work. 151, 152 Tap Dance I, II (1 credit hour each) Permission of instructor. 207 Independent Study (1–3 credit hours) For lower-division Musical Theatre students with permission of instructor. May be repeated for credit. 235, 236 Performance I, II (3 credit hours each) Musical Theatre majors or permission of instructor. A practical application of rudimentary acting techniques to musical theatre performance, including song analysis, vocal improvisation, physical improvisation with music, and beginning scene work. 253, 254 Dance Styles I, II (1 credit hour each) Prerequisites: 124 or equivalent for 253; 253 for 254. These courses are designed to teach Musical Theatre styles of dance, focusing mainly on jazz style; ballet and tap skills are required; emphasis is placed on developing technique and auditioning skills. 280 Production Performance (1–3 credit hours) For lower-division students with permission of instructor or by audition. Designed to allow students to receive credit for performance in music theatre productions. 323, 324 Ballet for the Musical Theatre III, IV (1 credit hour each) Prerequisite: 124 or permission of instructor; 323 is a prerequisite to 324. A continuation of 123 and 124, emphasizing ballet technique and its application to the musical theatre stage. 335, 336 Performance III and IV (3 credit hours each) Prerequisite: 235, 236, or permission of instructor. A practical study of audition techniques, cabaret performance, vocal coaching, recording analysis, and role research. 345, 346 Jazz Dance I, II (1 credit hour each) Prerequisite: 154 or permission of instructor; 345 is a prerequisite to 346. A junior/senior class in contemporary jazz dance. School of Music, Theatre & Dance

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Bachelor Degree Course Descriptions

351, 352 Tap Dance III, IV (1 credit hour each) Permission of instructor. A continuation of 151, 152. 353, 354 Dance Styles III, IV (1 credit hour each) Permission of instructor. A continuation of 253, 254. 357 Musical Theatre Seminar (2, 3 credit hours) Musical Theatre majors or permission of instructor. 360 Musical Theatre Song Repertoire (2 credit hours) Musical Theatre majors only. Prerequisite: 133, 134, 235, 236. An exploration of the various music styles found in musical theatre, including traditional, contemporary, comedic, folk, rock, pop, and country. Emphasis is on music skills, methods of preparation, phrasing, song form analysis, interpretive choices and stylistic traits. 407 Independent Study (1–3 credit hours) For upper-division Musical Theatre students. May be repeated for credit. 423, 424 Ballet for Musical Theatre V, VI (1 credit hour) Prerequisite: 323 or permission of instructor. A continuation of 323 and 324, emphasizing ballet technique and its application to the musical theatre stage. 435, 436 Performance IV, VI (3 credit hours each) Prerequisite: 336 or permission of instructor. An advanced musical theatre scene study class, exploring various techniques for each. Also includes focus on career performance work. 441 History of American Musical Theatre I (3 credit hours) A survey of the American musical theatre from about 1890 to 1940. An overview of theatrical forms, including vaudeville, revues, operettas, and book musicals, from the turn of the century to 1940, with particular attention to the composers and lyricists of the period. Major works to be examined include Showboat, Of Thee I Sing and Porgy and Bess. Lecture and discussion. 442 History of American Musical Theatre II (3 credit hours) A continuation of 441, from 1940 to the present, with particular emphasis on theatrical criticism; analysis of book, music, and lyrics in shows of various genres; and the compilation of a bibliography. 443 Choreography for the Musical Theatre (2 credit hours) Prerequisite: 123, 124, 253, 254. 445, 446 Jazz Dance III, IV (1 credit hour) Permission of instructor. 450 Dance Workshop (1 credit hour) Permission of instructor; by audition. Combines musical theatre dance, dialogue/text, movement improvisation, and various styles of theatre music for the purpose of exploring their inter-relationship. It will study the dichotomy and merging of physical and verbal communication. A public performance may be presented as the culmination of the course. 453, 454 Dance Styles V, VI (1 credit hour) A continuation of 353, 354 465, 466 Cabaret Performance I, II (2 credit hours each) Permission of instructor; by audition. An overview of song styling, improvisation, and acting technique is used to develop a personal singing style for cabaret, musical theatre, and concert performances. 475 Writing Musical Theatre (2-3 credit hours) Permission of instructor. The course will bring together composers, librettists, singers, and actors 78

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Bachelor Degree Course Descriptions

who want to collaborate on writing new material for the musical stage. Using techniques such as improvisation and theatre games to stimulate ideas, it will involve every member of the class in creating first a popular song, then a short scene, and finally, the reading of a one-act musical piece. 480 Production Performance (1–3 credit hours) For upper-division students with permission of instructor or by audition. This course is designed to allow students to receive credit for performance in musical theatre productions. 496 Senior Showcase (1 credit hour) Studio course for graduating musical theatre seniors. Class-work involves extensive repertoire exploration, vocal and dramatic coaching in solo literature, and participation in two group musical numbers, culminating in several public presentations, including one in New York City for agents and casting directors.

MUSICOLOGY 111 The Foundations of Rock (3 credit hours) This course will explore the historical background, musical foundations, and styles of rock music. 121 Introduction to the Art of Music (4 credit hours) For non-SMTD majors. Introduces Western music for the listener in overview from the Baroque era to the present. 122 Introduction to World Music (3 credit hours) For non-SMTD majors. Introduces the musical cultures of a few select areas of the world (such as the Caribbean, West Africa, India, China and Japan). 123 Introduction to Popular Music (4 credit hours) Offers a broad survey of 20th century popular music, exploring a diverse set of genres and musical artists from the Tin Pan Alley era to the present. The course places the musical conventions, key performers and aesthetic shifts that mark the history of popular music in social, cultural, technological, and musical context. Designed to develop listening and analytical skills, the course aims to help students to understand, describe, interpret, and write about popular music. 130 Opera! (3 credit hours) This is an introductory level course in music and theatre, open to everyone; opera fans as well as those for whom opera is a completely new experience. Although our primary focus is the music of opera, the course does not require musical literacy or the ability to read music. Students are taught to look at a vocal score of opera without fear, but no training in music theory is presumed. 131 Special Course (2-3 credit hours) For non-SMTD majors. An introductory level course on particular aspects of Western music history. Offerings focus on such topics as music and culture, music and languages, as well as select repertoires and periods of then Western musical tradition. 139 Introduction to the Literature of Music (2 credit hours) A survey of musical concepts and repertories of the Western and non-Western world. 140 History of Music (2 credit hours) Music of the United States and American and European music since World War I. Includes both vernacular and art-music traditions. 239 History of Music (2 credit hours) History of music from the Middle Ages through the Baroque. 240 History of Music (2 credit hours) History of music from the Preclassic era to World War I.

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Bachelor Degree Course Descriptions

305, 306, 307, 308 Special Courses (3 credit hours each) For non-SMTD majors. 343 Music and Islam (3 credit hours) For non-SMTD majors. No musical background is required. This course focuses on the unity and diversity of musical customs from the Muslim cultures of the Middle East, Central Asia, north India and Indonesia. We will investigate musical systems in terms of instruments, repertoire, modal and rhythmic structures and the effects of religious constraints, cultural policy and social history on musical life. 345 History of Music (3 credit hours) For non-SMTD majors. History of European music from the Middle Ages through the Baroque. 346 History of Music (3 credit hours) For non-SMTD majors. 347 Opera of the Past and Present (3 credit hours) Non-SMTD majors only. A survey from the beginnings of opera around 1600 to the present, stressing mainstream works that are likely to be staged today. 369 Hawaiian Music in the American Colonial Context (3 credit hours) Exploration of cultural identity, ethnicity, and stereotyping through an examination of representative genres of Hawaiian music and dance and their performance. 405, 406, 408 Special Courses (1–3 credit hours; 406 for 2–4 credit hours) Special courses on topics that vary from term to term. 411 History of the Symphony (3 credit hours) This course surveys the symphony from its earliest inception through the 20th century. 413 Topics in the Early History of Opera (3 credit hours) Topics in the history of opera of the 17th and 18th centuries, from its beginnings through the operas of Mozart; opera is studied as music, theater, performance medium and cultural expression. 414 History of Opera, 19th-20th Centuries (3 credit hours) An historical survey of opera (as music, as theater, and as cultural expression) from the 19th century through the present. 416 History of Musical Instruments (3 credit hours) The historical development of musical instruments, emphasizing those of the Western world. 417 History of Jazz (3 credit hours) Surveys jazz in the United States from its beginnings in African-American aural traditions to the present. 420 Topics in 17th and 18th Century Music (3 credit hours) A survey of European music of the 17th and early 18th centuries. 421 Music of the Classic Era (3 credit hours) A survey of European music from the mid-18th century to about 1810. 422 Music of the 19th Century (3 credit hours) A survey, lecture, and discussion of music from the early 19th century to about 1900. 423 Music of the 20th Century (3 credit hours) Prerequisite: 240 or equivalent; SMTD students only. A survey of Western music since about 1900.

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Bachelor Degree Course Descriptions

424 The Art Song (3 credit hours) A survey of European and American art song of the 19th and 20th centuries. 426 Music and Language (3 credit hours) Examines the relationship between music and words. 436 Women and Music: Exploring Issues of Gender, Ideology, and Characterization (3 credit hours) Undergraduates only. An exploration of issues surrounding women as composers, performers, and subjects (how they are portrayed musically). 437 Philosophy of Music (3 credit hours) A philosophical investigation of the nature and significance of music. What is music, and does music have “meaning�? 446 Performance Practices of the 17th and 18th Centuries (3 credit hours) A study of Baroque musical performance practice. 450 Music in the United States (3 credit hours) A lecture survey of American music from the 18th century to the present, including both formal and informal traditions. 456 Asian American Music (3 credit hours) Examines music of Asian Americans as case studies of musical, personal and communal identities in multi ethnic, multiracial and transnational contexts in the United States. 457 The Musics of African Americans (3 credit hours) For non-SMTD majors with permission of instructor. A survey of black American music, including both formal and informal traditions. 458 Music in Culture (3 credit hours) An examination of the role of music in selected rituals of Western and non-Western cultures. 460 Euro-American Folk and Popular Music (3 credit hours) A survey of indigenous musical practices of these regions, including commercial vernaculars. 462 Japanese Music (2 credit hours) A survey of the history, instruments, forms, and compositional methods of Japanese music from ancient times to the present. 463 Southeast Asian Music (2 credit hours) A survey of the indigenous musical practices of the region. 464 Music of Latin America and the Caribbean (3 credit hours) Introduces the Caribbean as an area comprising many distinct musical cultures, with special focus on Trinidad. 465 Music of Africa (3 credit hours) Undergraduate only. An introduction to African musical traditions through an investigation of the sound materials, creative processes and social contexts of music making. 466 Music of Asia I (3 credit hours) Examines the music of East Asia (China, Japan and Korea) as sonic and cultural expressions. 467 Music of Asia II (3 credit hours) Examines some of the better known musical traditions from West Asia (Egypt, Lebanon, Syria, Turkey, Iran, Iraq), South Asia (Pakistan, India, Sri Lanka), and Southeast Asia (Myanmar, Thailand, Cambodia, Laos, Malaysia, Vietnam, Indonesia, Philippines).

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Bachelor Degree Course Descriptions

468 Jazz Scenes in Historical Perspective (3 credit hours) Examines the constitution of the jazz scenes in New York City, Chicago, Philadelphia and other American cities throughout the 20th century. 469 Music of the Pacific Islands (3 credit hours) An introduction to music and dance traditions in the Pacific Islands, with emphasis on ways of understanding cultural resilience in light of historical experiences of colonization. 470 Music and Dance (3 credit hours) An exploration of ways in which musical sound and dance movements structure each other in the process of performance as well as creation. Case studies are drawn from world traditions. 477 Medieval Music (3 credit hours) A survey of European music from the Middle Ages to about 1420. 478 Renaissance Music (3 credit hours) A survey of European music from about 1420 to 1600. 481 Special Projects (1–4 credit hours) Permission of instructor. Independent study. 484 Mensural Notation and Tablature (3 credit hours) Permission of instructor. Exercises in the sight-singing and transcription of mensural notation and instrumental tablatures. Focuses on repertories from 1400 to 1670.

OPERA 340, 341 Opera Workshop I (2 credit hours each) Prerequisite: Junior standing; 340 is a prerequisite to 341. Permission of instructor. An introductory course including coaching in arias and scenes, and training in the basics of dramatic aspects of opera. 450, 451 Opera Workshop II (2 credit hours each) Prerequisite: Opera 341 and permission of instructor. Topics such as basic stagecraft, audition technique, movement, sense memory, and emotional recall are developed, and then applied to full-scale opera productions. 455 Opera Repertory and Production (2–4 credit hours) Normally open to seniors. Permission of voice instructor and opera directors. A full-scale series of double-cast performances. Casting by audition only.

ORGAN LITERATURE 481 Organ Literature: Antiquity to 1750 (2 credit hours) A survey of major schools of organ composition from antiquity through J. S. Bach. Documentary sources, concepts of organ design, and performance practices are related to each major period and are used by students in preparing works performed in class. 482 Organ Literature: 1750 to Present (2 credit hours) A survey of organ literature, performance practices, and organ design after J. S. Bach, concentrating on major works. A portion of each class is devoted to organ design and construction. Includes study of documentary sources and historic sound recordings. 486 The Teaching of Organ (2 credit hours) An introductory course that includes coaching and training in the basic principles of teaching organ. Studies various pedagogical methods.

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Bachelor Degree Course Descriptions

PERCUSSION 446 Percussion Pedagogy (2-4 credit hours) Permission of instructor. Prerequisite: Juniors or Seniors. Qualitative critical analysis and creative thinking to create independent healthful physiological and psychological methods necessary to tutor students. 488 Percussion Literature (2-4 credit hours) Prerequisite: Juniors or Seniors; permission of instructor. Explores the history and composition of percussion, solo percussion, ensemble, and mixed chamber ensemble.

PERFORMING ARTS TECHNOLOGY 100 Research and Scholarship I (1-3 credit hours) Permission of instructor. The course is for freshman and sophomore PAT majors. Students will learn the fundamentals of dissemination and pursuit of critical review of research and scholarship through work such as performance, audio and video production and post-production, website design, computer programming, library research, and work with mixed media. 101 Freshman Seminar in Media Arts (3 credit hours) This seminar presents perspectives in the performing and media arts from the early twentieth century to the present. Students develop critical analytical skills contextualized by the historical, cultural and technological underpinnings that have influenced the media arts. Students complete readings, writings, viewings and listening assignments as well as participate in group discussions. 102 Acoustics and Psychoacoustics (3 credit hours) An introduction to the principles of acoustics and psychoacoustics that are relevant to the recording engineer, music technologist, and composer. Topics include introduction to sound, human hearing, perception and measurement of sound, room acoustics, and the acoustics of musical instruments and the human voice. 201/401 Introduction to Computer Music (3 credit hours) This course is an introduction to electronic musical instruments, MIDI, and digital audio systems. Students create several original compositions for presentation and discussion. The aesthetics of electroacoustic composition are discussed through study of selected repertoire. 202 Computer Music Composition and Arranging (3 credit hours) This course is a continuation of PAT 201 with an emphasis on composition and arranging using MIDI, software samplers, and digital audio systems. Compositional issues are explored by classroom discussion, critiques, and lectures. 280 Sound Reinforcement (1 credit hour) Prerequisite: PAT 331. Students will assist with live sound reinforcement and production for music, opera, and musical theatre productions. 300 Research and Scholarship II (1-3 credit hours) This course is for junior and senior PAT majors. Students will learn the fundamentals of dissemination and pursuit of critical review of research and scholarship through work such as performance, audio and video production and post-production, website design, computer programming, library research, and work with mixed media. Electing this course at the 300 level requires more leadership and responsibility from the student. 313 Special Topics in Performing Arts Technology (1 - 3 credit hours) Periodic offerings on topics of special interest in Performing Arts Technology. 331 Sound Recording and Production I (3 credit hours) Prerequisites: PAT 101, PAT 102, PAT 201, PAT 202, and introductory Calculus. Students receive School of Music, Theatre & Dance

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Bachelor Degree Course Descriptions

instruction on the theory and practice of sound recording. Topics include microphones, microphone techniques, equalization, preparing for a recording session, recording consoles, digital audio workstations, loudspeakers, and critical listening. The course includes a required lab section for hands-on experience in a recording studio. 332 Sound Recording and Production II (3 credit hours) Prerequisite: PAT 331. This course is a continuation of PAT 331. The course explores philosophies and techniques in sound recording theory and practice, including microphone techniques, dynamics processing, equalization, reverberation, mixing in stereo and surround, critical listening, and selected topics in audio electronics. The course includes a required lab section for hands-on experience in a recording studio. 380 Sound for Theatre (2 credit hours) Prerequisite: PAT 280. Students work as a member of a theatre production team with emphasis on sound effects and sound design for theatre. 407 Directed Individual Studies (1–3 credit hours) Permission of instructor. Students receive individual instruction, consultation, and guidance from the instructor. Course emphasis is on developing individual research skills that culminates in a final project or paper. 412 Digital Music Ensemble (1-2 credit hours) Digital Music Ensemble (DME) is a technology-based interdisciplinary performance troupe that collaborates in the creation and performance of new works of art or performs historically innovative works. DME uses methods of open-ended critical inquiry to challenge meaning in the creation, realization and performance of art. The fall semester is usually focused on readings concerning the Labyrinth tradition in many cultures, culminating in the recurring work “Gypsy Pond Music,” a sonic, site-specific installation involving sculpture and algorithmic computer music. 413 Electronic Chamber Music (1-2 credit hours) Prerequisites: PAT 202. Small ensembles of musicians are formed to create and perform contemporary chamber music. Various approaches to composition and group collaboration are explored through the integration of various categories of instruments including acoustic, electronic, electroacoustic hybrids, performance controllers, and computers. 422 Technical Ear Training and Critical Listening (3 credit hours) Prerequisite: PAT 331, PAT 332. This course is an introduction to the concept of translating between timbres and frequency resonances produced by parametric equalization. Students learn to aurally identify different timbres through their corresponding spectral envelopes. Critical listening exercises will also be explored with a focus on dynamics processing, spatial characteristics, spectral balance, and recording, mixing, and production techniques. 431 Contemporary Practices in Studio Production I (3 credit hours) Prerequisites: PAT 331 and 332. The advanced study of theory and practice of recording techniques, mixing, and production for multi-channel audio systems through guided projects. 432 Contemporary Practices in Studio Production II (3 credit hours) Prerequisite: PAT 431. This course focuses on the development of the producer’s role as techno-artistic interpreter and creative collaborator. Critical listening and discussion investigate the evolution from the “illusion of reality” aesthetic to the “reality of illusion” point of view. Producers studied include Gaisberg, Spector, Martin, Eno, Reznor and Dr. Dre. Students sharpen their creative, technical, and production skills through the realization of complex recordings. 441 Image, Sound, and Story (3 credit hours) Prerequisites: Screen Arts & Cultures 200, music composition. This course investigates the relationship among music, sound design, moving image and narrative. Students create original audio-visual compositions using digital video, animation techniques, and digital audio tools. A range of aesthetic 84

School of Music, Theatre & Dance


Bachelor Degree Course Descriptions

and technical approaches to combining music, sound, and the moving image are considered. Readings, screenings, and critiques accompany studio work. 442 Practicum in Music and Sound for Film (3 credit hours) Prerequisites: PAT 331, SAC 290, SAC 400, music composition, or permission of instructor. Students work in original film and animation projects, in roles such as composers, sound designers, dialog editors, mix engineers, or production audio crew on advanced student productions. Class sessions include script analysis, screenings, discussion of readings, and in-class critiques of works-in-progress. The emphasis is on developing an awareness of the multiple ways that music and sound can interact with the moving image to create meaning. While this is an advanced course that assumes a familiarity with computers and audio production tools, it does include some direct instruction in relevant techniques such as syncing to picture, spotting music, dialog editing, and onset recording. 451 Interactive Media Design I (3 credit hours) Prerequisites: PAT 202, computer programming and music composition. This course introduces the tecnological and theoretical foundations of designing physically interactive media experiences. Students develop interactive sensing systems and program embedded computing devices as well as real-time auditory, visual and tangible displays. Through exercises that draw on theory and techniques of interaction design, students create technological sketches and prototypes for novel devices and artworks. 452 Interactive Media Design II (3 credit hours) Prerequisites: PAT 451 or permission of instructor. The course focuses on the application of skills and techniques developed in Interactive Media Design I to design and implement physically interactive performance systems and media installations. Incorporating advanced sensing and interaction tecniques, students create fully realized works that are exhibited before a public audience. Seminal works of interactive art and interactive performance are discussed and critiqued. 461 Performance Systems (3 credit hours) Prerequisites: PAT 202 and computer programming. This course explores contemporary technologies that support musical performance. Topics include the goals of technology-enhanced performance, instrument interfacing, system design, programmable systems, and sound reinforcement design for playback of electronic and acoustic ensembles. Students create original compositions using performance systems that they have designed and built and direct performances that use these systems. 462 Digital Sound Synthesis (3 credit hours) Prerequisites: PAT 202, computer programming, introductory calculus, music composition. An introduction to digital sound synthesis and signal processing theory with an emphasis on sound design and compositional applications. Topics include additive synthesis, amplitude modulation, ring modulation, frequency modulation, subtractive synthesis, granular synthesis, physical modeling synthesis, heterodyne filter analysis/resynthesis, linear predictive coding, and phase vocoding. 471 Contemporary Practices in Research & Scholarship (3 credit hours) This course presents contemporary practices in research and scholarship including aesthetics, pedagogy, system design and development, and media encoding and delivery. 472 Business of Music (3 credit hours) This course discusses the essential aspects of the music business including performing rights agencies, copyright, licensing, music publishing, contracts, royalties, and distribution. Selected readings will include case studies from a variety of musical genres. 481 Independent Study (1–4 credit hours) Permission of instructor. Students receive individual instruction, consultation and guidance from the instructor. Course emphasis is on developing individual research skills that culminates in a final project or paper.

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490 Senior Thesis Seminar (1-3 credit hours) This capstone course introduces students the fundamentals of creative and/or scholarly research. Students will formulate a thesis topic accompanied by objectives and methodologies, requires resources, and a timeline and/or production schedule. Weekly seminars promote sharing among students. Each student is required to complete a thesis that may be a research paper, recordings, website, or DVD. 498 Special Topics in Performing Arts Technology (1-3 credit hours) Periodic offerings on topics of special interest in Performing Arts Technology.

PIANO 460 Piano Forum (1 credit hour) Weekly performance class elected each term in residence by all bachelors and masters Piano majors (Performance and Pedagogy and Performance).

PIANO LITERATURE AND PEDAGOGY 401 Piano Technology (2 credit hours) An overview of theories of piano construction, maintenance and tuning, including an application of those theories to piano performance. 402 Practicum in Piano Technology (3 credit hours) Prerequisite: 401. Participants will learn the rudiments of piano tuning and maintenance through hands-on work. Lab hours are required for completion of individual and group projects. 465 Individual Study in Piano Technology (2 credit hours) Permission of instructor. Designed for the student with interest in developing tuning and maintenance skills. Directed study will consist of readings from technological sources, rebuilding projects, and tuning of upright and grand pianos. 487 Literature of Piano Music for the Advanced Student (2 credit hours) Prerequisite: Junior standing or permission of instructor. A survey of keyboard literature from Elizabethan music through Mozart. Each student performs at least one work and writes a term paper. Selections from appropriate treatises on performance practices are discussed. 488 Literature of Piano Music for the Advanced Student (2 credit hours) Prerequisite: Junior standing or permission of instructor. A continuation of 487, covering music from Beethoven to the present. Music is analyzed and performed; students give oral presentations and submit final papers.

THEATRE AND DRAMA 101 Introduction to Acting I (3 credit hours) Permission of instructor. Prerequisite: primarily for non-majors. Basic principles of acting for nonperformance majors. The class introduces the fundamentals of acting to help the student “discover� him/herself through improvisation and other exercises. Grounds the student in basic acting theory. 102 Introduction to Acting II (3 credit hours) Permission of instructor. Prerequisite: primarily for non-majors. Continuation of 101 with attention to scene study. Instructs how to analyze and approach the written text and embody character. 110 Introduction to Acting for the Camera (3 credit hours) Introduces students to the basic techniques of acting for the camera through the use of video. Sound foundation acting principles will be presented with an emphasis on exercise, scene and monologue work, and closing with scene orchestration via a basic two-camera with switcher recording, utilizing 86

School of Music, Theatre & Dance


Bachelor Degree Course Descriptions

a mix of selected dramatic material and/or existing film scripts. 162 Introduction to Stage Make-up (1 credit hour) Permission of instructor. Covers the foundations of stage make-up; basic corrective, manipulating the features with the highlight and shadows and old age make-up applications, script analysis for make-up and an introduction to prosthetics and wig care. 172 Movement I (2 credit hours) Permission of instructor. Aims to provide performers with a working knowledge of their bodies. Exercises, improvisation, and other techniques will aid in developing awareness of the body as an expressive medium. 181 Acting I (3 credit hours) Permission of instructor. Emphasizes exploration and definition of the total physical life of an actor, freeing and expanding the imagination, self-awareness and personal discovery, and developing a character through individual experience and creativity, sense memory, and imagery. 182 Acting II (3 credit hours) Permission of instructor. Scene-specific improvisation to text analysis and scene study; structured improvisation, script and scene analysis, text interpretation and realization, identification and implementation of action and objectives. 192 Voice I (3 credit hours) Permission of instructor. Establishes a working philosophy and vocabulary for voice study. Exercises develop students’ understanding and awareness of vocal production necessary for continued study. Uses Linklater system of vocal production, with vocal improvisation and physical/vocal awareness. 211 Introduction to Drama (3 credit hours) Introduces the student to as many basic elements of the theatre, practical and theoretical, as time allows. It also presents a number of key plays from various periods, and examines them from the point of view of their dramatic qualities, theatrical strengths, social and political contexts, their performance history, and their relevance today. 212 Introduction to World Performance (3 credit hours) Introduction to world performance traditions based on non-Western societies. Main issues examined include: nature of performance and conditions of occurrences in social and political contexts; modes of performance; rituals and ritualistic drama; non-Western dramaturgy and performance perspective; relationship between the performer and the audience. 222 Introduction to Black Theatre (3 credit hours) A beginning course in black theatre, acquainting students with origins, developments, trends, and significant contributions of African Americans to theatre. Focuses on the basic concepts, creations, methods of operation, artistic contributions of Black Americans to theatre of western civilization and theatre of Black America. 227 Introductory Playwriting I (3 credit hours) A creative writing course in the rudiments of playwriting, with special attention to writing for performance in a 10 minute play format. This course will function as a workshop in which students will be expected to perform as well as write. 233 Acting and the Black Experience (3 credit hours) Permission of instructor. An introductory acting course concentrating on the development of fundamental acting skills and techniques related to the presentation of drama from a Black perspective. Discussion and practical improvisation, character development through monologue and scene work. Dramatic text comes from the works of Black playwrights.

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Bachelor Degree Course Descriptions

240 Introduction to Design (3 credit hours) Prerequisite: Theatre 250. Introduction to theory and practice of theatrical design, text analysis and the ways a production concept and visual metaphor can be communicated in the design of scenery, costumes and lighting. 241 Directing I (3 credit hours) Permission of instructor. The history of directors, function and responsibilities of a director, relationships with designers, playwrights, stage managers, technical/artisan staff, actors, dramaturgs. Identifying styles of theatre, stage types, floor plans. Also covers script interpretation/analysis, director’s research, resources, directorial concepts, conceptualization of a play, interpretation. 242 Directing II (3 credit hours) Prerequisite: Theatre 250 or permission of instructor. Stage composition, blocking, effective stage pictures, principles of focus. Also stage movement with actors, establishing variety, clarity, use of levels, enhancement if inner action of the play, entrances/exits, crowd scenes, rhythm, pace, tempo. Also working with actors, approach to motivation/characterization, rehearsal techniques, study/use of status technique. 245 Introduction to Stage Management (2 credit hours) Prerequisite: Theatre 250 or permission of instructor. Principles and practices of stage management, including rehearsal coordination, prompt book preparation, and director/cast/crew relationships during rehearsal for theatre, opera, and musical theatre. Combines classroom instruction with practicum experience. Students assistant-stage-manage a University Productions show during the semester; participate in rehearsals and performances. 250 Introduction to Technical Theatre Practices (3 credit hours) Introduction to the basic principles and practices of stagecraft: scenic materials, construction, painting, stage lighting, and costuming. Lectures and lab (shop assignment for a mainstage production). 251 Production Practicum I (1 credit hour) Laboratory in theatre production. Students work in stagecraft, scenic painting, lighting, props, costuming for mainstage productions. 252 Production Practicum II (1 credit hour) Prerequisite: Theatre 251 and permission of instructor. Second-level laboratory in theatre production. 256 Lighting Design I (3 credit hours) Prerequisite: Theatre 250. Introduction to the components of stage lighting, including an in-depth exploration of the functions and controllable properties of stage lighting. Topics include color theory, optics, electricity, distribution, and equipment. Industry standards will be covered. 260 Scene Design I (3 credit hours) Prerequisite: Theatre 250. Beginning course in scenic design with an emphasis on text analysis. Expression of the production concept, style and period studied through visual research and development of a model. 261 Production Practicum III (1 credit hour) Prerequisite: Theatre 251 and 252 or permission of instructor. Exploration of principles of theatre crafts and practices under faculty supervision. 262 Production Practicum IV (1 credit hour) Prerequisite: Theatre 261 or permission of instructor. Exploration of principles of theatre crafts and practices under faculty supervision. 263 Design Rendering (3 credit hours) Permission of instructor. Study in the techniques, materials and theory of communicating the costume and scenic design idea. 88

School of Music, Theatre & Dance


Bachelor Degree Course Descriptions

270 Costume Design I (3 credit hours) Prerequisite: Theatre 240 and 277 or permission of instructor. Familiarizes students with art and process of costume design, with strong emphasis on text and character analysis and methods of research. Introduction to basic drawing skills and other visual options in presenting design ideas. 271 Movement II (2 credit hours) Permission of instructor. Prerequisite: Theatre 172. This class expands the understanding and awareness of movement philosophy and vocabulary while developing a clearer connection to the actor’s body in relation to performance/text. 272 Movement III (2 credit hours) Permission of instructor. Prerequisite: Theatre 172 and 271. Expands the student’s individual flexibility, range, sensitivity to experiencing movement while stimulating movement imagination. Fundamentals of performance enhancement, Alexander Technique, Tai Chi are used as reference. 274 Stage Combat I (2 credit hours) Permission of instructor. Prerequisite: Theatre 172 and 181. Focuses on enabling the actor to extend range of truth and responsibility; imparts a philosophical and historical overview relative to three areas of concentration: unarmed combat, quarterstaff, and single rapier and rapier-and-dagger. 277 History of Dress (3 credit hours) Prerequisite: Theatre 351. Slide survey course which traces the history of dress from ancient times through the present day, with an emphasis on the societies which produced particular manners and styles of dress. 281 Acting III: Acting for The Camera I (3 credit hours) Permission of instructor. Prerequisite: Theatre 182. Exploration of the fundamentals of acting techniques as they relate to the medium; concentration of purposeful relaxation, image work, subtext and re-emphasis of basic action playing. Methods include improvisation, storytelling, monologues, and scenes. Subject matter explored will be of a contemporary nature and will utilize in-class critique. 282 Acting IV (3 credit hours) Permission of instructor. Prerequisite: Theatre 281. Basic scene study: action/objective text scoring and technique review; includes early to mid-20th century American and European playwrights. 291 Voice II (3 credit hours) Permission of instructor. Prerequisite: Theatre 192. Expands the understanding and awareness of the basic vocal philosophy and vocabulary established in Voice I, while developing a clearer connection to the demands of text. Continuation of Linklater work, Lessac and Berry study, Skinner speech work, including IPA. Includes poetic text, sonnets and monologues. 292 Voice III (3 credit hours) Permission of instructor. Prerequisite: Theatre 291. Expands and refines the student’s individual flexibility, range, and sensitivity to experiencing voice while stimulating vocal imagination. Improvisation and Roy Hart techniques are explored. 321 History of Theatre I (3 credit hours) The history of theatre from Greeks to Shakespeare, reading selected plays and tracing the history of theatre into dramatic texts generated at particular times and places. 322 History of Theatre II (3 credit hours) The history of theatre from Western Europe and the U.S. from the end of the 17th century to present, focusing on the production of theatre in its historical, social and ideological contexts. Class studies representative plays. 323 American Theatre and Drama (3 credit hours) The study of the American heritage as theatre artists and what has influenced us; principal Ameri-

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Bachelor Degree Course Descriptions

can dramatists and principal events and issues in the American theatre, mainly in the 20th century. 324 Contemporary Black Theatre (3 credit hours) Prerequisite: Theatre 222. Explores the evolving aesthetic of current African-American Theatre, and examines the relationship between that aesthetic and the African American community. 325 Contemporary American Theatre and Drama (3 credit hours) Works and developments in American Theatre and drama from 1975 to the present; American dramatic or theatrical avant-garde; work of drama collectives; the rise or auteur, as well as of performance artists; the particular elements in the American experience that shape drama and theatre. 326 Script Analysis for Black Writers and Directors (3 credit hours) Permission of instructor. Prerequisite: Theatre 222. Analyzes the way African American characters and dramatic stories are constructed by reading plays and viewing films from the vantage point of the actor, director, writer or designer; enhances the student’s ability to imagine and create. 327 Playwriting II (3 credit hours) Permission of instructor. Prerequisites: Theatre 222. Students write the first act of a full-length play. They read from their plays in class and the work is discussed. They also read plays, see performances, keep a journal. At the end of the semester, students give a staged reading of their work for an informal audience. 332 Performing Gender: Dramatization from Oral Sources (3 credit hours) Permission of instructor. Prerequisite: Theatre 233. Course acquaints students with a style of African American folk drama which lends itself to dramatizing real-life stories. Course is a research/ performance class entailing reading, discussion, in-class and out-of-class exercises, and a final performance piece built from independent research. 340 Black Theatre Workshop (3 credit hours) Permission of instructor. Prerequisite: Theatre 233. A performance-oriented class designed to develop acting, movement and vocal skills in conjunction with an exploration of basic theory and technique as it relates to the African-American experience. Uses classroom exercises, and the study of journals, plays, music and various performance traditions created by African-Americans. 341 Directing III (3 credit hours) Permission of instructor. Prerequisites: Theatre 242. Covers period styles from Greek to avant garde, styles of performance (realism, naturalism, expressionism, absurdist, farce, experimental). Explore contemporizing of a play. 342 Directing IV (3 credit hours) Permission of instructor. Prerequisite: Theatre 341. The realization of a play from choice of script to opening night; the complete process of direction/concept, research process, collaborating with designers, casting, rehearsal technique, play opening and review. Students direct a short play. 345 Stage Management Practicum: Plays (2–6 credit hours) Permission of instructor. Prerequisite: Theatre 245 and 351. Methods of stage management, including rehearsal coordination, prompt book preparation, and director/cast/crew relationships during rehearsal period, for plays. Students are assigned as stage managers for Theatre productions. 350 Scenic Construction I (3 credit hours) Permission of instructor. Prerequisite: Theatre 250 and 362. For the beginning design and technical student, focusing on in-depth study of scenic construction and materials used in construction. Topics: drafting of construction drawings; developing of working drawings; basic electricity; working with wood, foams, fabric, plastics, and metals; hardware used in construction/rigging. Requires working in shop, load-in and strike of a production.

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Bachelor Degree Course Descriptions

351 Production Practicum V (2–3 credit hours) Prerequisite: Theatre 261 and 262 or permission of instructor. Exploration of principles of theatre crafts and practices under faculty supervision. 352 Production Practicum VI (2–3 credit hours) Prerequisite: Theatre 351 or permission of instructor. Exploration of principles of theatre crafts and practices under faculty supervision. 353 Sound for the Theatre (2 credit hours) Permission of instructor. Prerequisite: Theatre 250. Principles and practices of sound for the theatre; potential which sound can bring to a theatre production; actual sound projects. 356 Lighting Design II (3 credit hours) Permission of instructor. Prerequisite: Theatre 256. An in-depth exploration into the development and execution of a lighting design, and the lighting potentials of a wide variety of facilities, production styles, and lighting equipment. Includes work on the development of communication skills with directors and shops via value sketches and lighting plots. 360 Scene Design II (3 credit hours) Permission of instructor. Prerequisite: Theatre 260. Some advanced model-making and drawing skills; the process of conceptualizing and articulating design ideas. Exploration of the unique characteristics of proscenium, arean, and thrust staging. 362 Drafting and Model Making (2 credit hours) Permission of instructor. Prerequisite: Theatre 250. Developing the essential skills of drafting as a means of communication for the stage designer. Explore issues of clarity and expressiveness through use of drafting tools. Develop skill with line weight, accuracy and speed in drawing. 370 Costume Design II (3 credit hours) Permission of instructor. Prerequisite: Theatre 270. This is an advanced course in which students will explore and practice the process of costume design. Course work will consist of a series of projects using specific texts further developing skills in text analysis, research, drawing and painting as related to the art of costume design. 371 Physical Theatre (1 credit hour) Permission of instructor. Prerequisite: Theatre 172, 271, 272. Exposes the actor to the dynamics of gesture, the physical foundations of character and interaction, the architecture of stage space and the creation of original work. Based on work of Jacques Lecoq, techniques include commedia, chorus, dance, mime, neutralist, and clown. 374 Stage Combat II (2 credit hours) Permission of instructor. Prerequisite: Theatre 192, 274, 282. Continuation of Stage Combat I, leading to SAFD certification. 381 Advanced Scene Study (3 credit hours) Permission of instructor. Prerequisite: Theatre 282. European Classics of the 18th and 19th century. In depth scene study identifying author’s period and style, understanding the physical and social traits inherent in scenes. 382 Shakespeare/Restoration (3 credit hours) Permission of instructor. Emphasis on Shakespeare and Restoration period text. Language through verse is explored; getting advance classical text and action of the page. Monologue and scene work and some play reading is required. 385 Performing Arts Management (2 credit hours) Permission of instructor. Prerequisite: Theatre 250. An overall look at the administrative aspects of the performing arts, using a Theatre company as the standard model, but with a look at orchestras, School of Music, Theatre & Dance

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Bachelor Degree Course Descriptions

dance, and opera. Exploration of theatre development, profit vs. non-profit companies, role of board of directors, unions, budgeting, marketing, public relations, and fundraising. 386 Practicum in Performing Arts Management (3 credit hours) Permission of instructor. Practical work in the management of the performing arts, principally theatre, through assisting in the creation of live performing arts presentations. 387, 388 Studio I, II (2 credit hours each) Permission of instructor. 387 is a prerequisite to 388. Prerequisite: Theatre 282. The ongoing work each semester includes scene work, monologues, auditions, readings, and occasional short plays; provides opportunity to expand roles and styles of performance. 395 Stage Dialects (3 credit hours) Permission of instructor. Prerequisite: Theatre 292. Introduces students to specific methods for acquiring stage dialects. Work includes International Phonetic alphabet and Standard American Speech/Dialect. Students listen to and perform scenes and monologues in each dialect, which may include Standard American, Standard British, Cockney, Irish, American Southern, French, South African, and Spanish. 399 Topics in Drama (1–4 credit hours) Covers specialized topics in theatre and drama, which vary from semester to semester. The purpose is to explore in depth aspects of theatre that cannot be covered in existing courses, such as a play or special subject. 400 Directed Reading (1-3 credit hours) Permission of instructor. Special reading project under faculty supervision. 401 Independent Study (1–3 credit hours) Permission of instructor. Allows special work in directing, design, theatre studies, or other specialized areas. 402 Ideas of Theatre (3 credit hours) An introduction to various types of dramatic literature, to different ideas of theatre-naturalistic, expressionist, tragicomic, farcicaland, to the reading of plays themselves. Class discussion concentrate on dramatic structure, how a playwright creates meaning through the arrangement of action, language, and character; also examines our assumptions about the nature and purposes of theatre and drama. 403, 404 Design & Production Seminar I, II (1 credit hour each) Permission of instructor. Active discussion courses which explore issues of contemporary theatre, particularly in relation to design and production. These courses broaden the student’s knowledge of contemporary theatre artists and practices, and sharpens esthetic judgment of productions. 426 Fundraising and the Arts (2 credit hours) A review and analysis of philanthropy and development in America’s cultural life, and the role of both the public and private sectors. 427 Advanced Playwriting (3 credit hours) Permission of instructor. Students write a dramatic text, complete a series of assigned technique exercises and material reading, participate in class discussions and live readings. 429 Playwriting Toward Production (3 credit hours) Permission of instructor; students must have written a script. Student must have written an original play. Class is a collaboration between student designers, actors, producers, and playwrights; analyzes the evolution of a script from its writing to its production. Students rewrite and workshop their plays and present them before an audience at the end of the semester. 434 Writing Musical Theatre (2-3 credit hours) Permission of instructor. Course will bring together composers, librettists, singers, and actors who want to collaborate on writing new material for the musical stage. Using techniques such as impro92

School of Music, Theatre & Dance


Bachelor Degree Course Descriptions

visation and theatre games to stimulate ideas, it will involve every member of the class in creating first a popular song, then a short scene, and finally, the reading of a one-act musical piece. 435 Producing in the American Theatre (3 credit hours) Prerequisite: Theatre 385, 386, and Junior or Senior standing. A history of American theatre emphasizing the development of producing techniques coupled with significant productions in the American theatre of the 20th Century. 438 Legal Issues in the Theatre (3 credit hours) Prerequisite: Theatre 435. Theatre’s collective bargaining fundaments/issues. 440 Special Topics in African American Theatre (3 credit hours) Permission of instructor. Topics may include: comparing Black aesthetics; Caribbean, African, American and African drama; African-American dramatic literature, traditions in modernity in African drama. 441 Design for Directors (3 credit hours) Permission of instructor. Prerequisite: Theatre 342. Course examines the role of design in a director’s concept and what is particular to the director-designer relationship. Various areas of design, how to analyze from a design perspective, how to communicate with designers. 442 Directing Project (3 credit hours) Permission of instructor. Prerequisite: Theatre 441. Students continue their preparation for a professional career or graduate studies in directing by directing a studio play. 443, 444 Directing Colloquium I, II (1 credit hour each) Permission of instructor. Prerequisite: Theatre 442. Senior directing students meet to discuss final projects, do presentations of concept of their play, design and casting choices, practical realization of the play, choice of script, and post-production discussions/reviews. 445 Stage Management for Operas and Musicals (2-6 credit hours) Permission of instructor. Prerequisite: Theatre 245 and 351. Seminar portion covers methods of stage management; students are also assigned as stage managers for School of Music, Theatre & Dance opera or musical theatre productions. 446 Advanced Stage Management (3 credit hours) Permission of instructor. Prerequisite: Theatre 245. Further study of the principles and practices of stage management including personnel management, problem solving, range of work environments and contracts, union rules, and touring. 450 Scenic Construction II (3 credit hours) Prerequisite: Theatre 350. For advanced technical students. Topics include scenic tracking and automation, pneumatics/hydraulics, metal working, rigging, basic mechanics for scenery construction, budgeting, and business of the technical director. 451 Production Practicum VII (2-3 credit hours) Permission of instructor. Prerequisite: Theatre 352. An introduction to production and management skills needed by the technical director: drafting of construction drawings, cost analysis of materials, metal and wood fabrication, environmental/structural safety, scenery rigging, movement, mechanization. Students work on studio projects and department productions. 452 Costume Construction (3 credit hours) Permission of instructor. Basic hand and machine sewing techniques and fundamental skills used in construction of theatrical costumes. Introduction to costume shop equipment. Some work on University Production’s projects. 456 Lighting Design III (3 credit hours) Prerequisite: Theatre 356. Advanced study of lighting design, incorporating increasingly difficult

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Bachelor Degree Course Descriptions

texts, facilities, and production styles; alternative venues and production styles. Includes several major projects. 457 Lighting Design IV (3 credit hours) Permission of instructor. Prerequisite: Theatre 456. Course incorporates increasingly difficult texts, facilities, and production styles; alternative venues and production styles, such as concert, television, and landscape lighting. Includes several major projects. 460 Scene Design III (3 credit hours) Prerequisite: Theatre 360. For students whose main interest is scenic design. Hones the conceptual process and develops deeper awareness of style as related to text. 461 Production Practicum VIII (2-3 credit hours) Permission of instructor. Prerequisite: Theatre 451. Advanced level production practicum under faculty supervision. 462 Drafting (2 credit hours) Prerequisite: Theatre 250. A study of the principles of scenery drafting; basic skills of geometric construction; steps for making production drawings. 464 Scene Painting for the Theatre (3 credit hours) Prerequisite: Theatre 250. A study of the methods and materials of painting scenery for stage productions; characteristics of various scene painting materials; lab work devoted to color, perspective, utilization of various materials. 466 History of Decor (3 credit hours) Permission of instructor. A chronological study of the decorative styles of interiors and exteriors in Western architecture and their application to the stage. 468 History of Theatre Architecture and Stage Design (3 credit hours) Permission of instructor. This course covers the origins and evolution of the theatre building and theatrical design and technology with the corresponding political, social, and artistic context. 470 Costume Design III (3 credit hours) Permission of instructor. Prerequisite: Theatre 370. Further exploration of the process of costume design for theatre. Projects are more intensely focused on text, research, the conceptual process, and sense of style. 471 Women’s Pattern Drafting (3 credit hours) Permission of instructor. Prerequisite: Theatre 452. Course covers the techniques used for drafting and draping women’s slopers based on standard measurements. Using basic bodice, sleeve, and skirt slopers, students will develop patterns for contemporary and historical garments. Includes a final project. 472 Stage Make-Up (2 credit hours) Permission of instructor. Fundamentals of make-up for theatre; study of facial structure, physiology of age, character, and psychology of color. 476 Costume Crafts (3 credit hours) Permission of instructor. An introduction to the materials and techniques used in the design and construction of craft work associated with theatrical costumes, including millinery, mask making, and dyeing and painting of fabric. 478 History of 20th Century Dress & Costume Design (3 credit hours) Prerequisite: Theatre 477 or permission of instructor. The continuing evolution of the fashion silhouette; growth of theatrical costume design during the 20th century; influences of economic and political situations, art styles, popular culture. 94

School of Music, Theatre & Dance


Bachelor Degree Course Descriptions

481 Acting VII (3 credit hours) Permission of instructor. Prerequisite: Theatre 382. Professional seminar; particular attention to individual rehearsal and audition technique; preparation for graduate, conservatory and professional work. Seminars with guest lecturers and visiting directors focusing on professional career preparation. 483 Acting VIII (3 credit hours) Permission of instructor. Prerequisite: Theatre 481. Styles II: Playwrights may include Shaw, Checkhov, Coward, Wilde, Strindberg. Advanced scene work incorporates style texts and Romance language authors. 484 Acting IX: Acting for The Camera II (3 credit hours) Prerequisite: Theatre 483 or permission of instructor. Concentration on practical techniques to use in selected on-camera situations. Utilization of adjustments needed for compelling, truthful work using various audition and recording formats. Single and multiple camera studio work will be employed. 487, 488 Studio III, IV (2 credit hours each) Permission of instructor; 487 is a prerequisite to 488. Prerequisite: 382, 388. Ongoing work each semester includes scene work, monologues, auditions, readings, and occasional short plays; provides opportunity to expand roles and styles of performance. 495 Ăœber Practicum (2–6 credit hours) Permission of instructor. This advanced theatre practicum requires a significant production contribution from the student, such as a major design assignment, stage management, or technical direction.

THEORY 111 The Foundations of Rock (3 credit hours) This course will explore the historical background, musical foundations, and styles of rock music. 129 Introduction to Aural Skills (1 credit hour) Permission of instructor. Emphasis on rudiments and their application in simpler exercises of types to be featured in 139. 135 Introduction to Music Theory (3 credit hours) Musical Theatre majors only. Prerequisite: Music reading ability; Course leads to 236. 137 Introduction to the Theory of Music (3 credit hours) For non-SMTD majors. Prerequisite: Music reading ability. Course leads to 238. 138 Introduction to College Theory (3 credit hours) Emphasizes aural and writing skills to support entrance into the basic musicianship core requirement of the School of Music, Theatre & Dance. 139, 140 Basic Musicianship: Aural Skills I, II (1 credit hour each) 139 is a prerequisite to 140. (Parallels 149, 150) Sight-singing, vocal chord arpeggiation, keyboard and dictation exercises, major and minor keys including diatonic sequences, most frequent patterns of modulation, and special techniques associated with 5-3 and 6-3 chords. 149, 150 Basic Musicianship: Writing Skills I, II (2 credit hours each) 149 is a prerequisite to 150. (Parallels 139, 140) Review of rudiments; introduction to harmony and voice-leading involving triads, seventh chords, figured bass, and procedures for four-voice writing; writing activities with diatonic harmony including cadential 6-4, analyses of harmony, phrasestructure, texture, elements of figuration in shorter pieces, basic conducting skills, and rehearsal techniques. 150 (section 004) Accelerated Basic Musicianship: Writing Skills II (3 credit hours) Prerequisite: 139, 149. By invitation only. Encompasses all of 150 and part of 249 in one term. School of Music, Theatre & Dance

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211, 212 Basic Theory at the Keyboard: Realization, Improvisation and Score Reading (2 credit hours each) 211 is a prerequisite to 212. Prerequisite: Theory 140, 150, and piano proficiency at least at level of 112. 236 Introduction to Musical Analysis (3 credit hours) Musical Theatre majors only. Prerequisite: Theory 135. Emphasizes conceptual aspects of theory with some rigorous practice of aural and writing skills. 238 Introduction to Musical Analysis (3 credit hours) For non-SMTD majors. Prerequisite: Theory 137. Emphasizes conceptual aspects of theory with some rigorous practice of aural and writing skills. 239, 240 Basic Musicianship: Aural Skills III, IV (1 credit hour each) 239 is a prerequisite to 240. (Parallels 249, 250). Prerequisite: Theory 140, 150. Deals with modulation to wider range of keys, harmony involving mixture, tonicization in major and minor and Neapolitan and augmented sixth chords. Last half of 240 introduces 20th-century materials. 249, 250 Basic Musicianship: Writing Skills III, IV (2 credit hours each) 249 is a prerequisite to 250. (Parallels 239, 240). Prerequisite: Theory 140, 150. Writing activities involving melodic and rhythmic figuration, leading-tone seventh chords, diatonic modulation, and chromatic voice-leading techniques; analysis of period structure, binary form, ternary forms. Last half of 250 introduces 20th-century materials such as atonality, exotic scales, pitch-class sets, and 12-tone serialism. 250 (section 004) Accelerated Basic Musicianship: Writing Skills III (3 credit hours) Permission of instructor. Prerequisite: Theory 140, 160. Combines part of 249 and all of 250 in one term. 334 Survey of Sophomore Theory: Writing Skills (2 credit hours) Enrollment for graduate students placed into 334 by Theory Placement Exam. Fall Term only. 405 Special Courses (3 credit hours) Prerequisite: Theory 240. Offerings relating to such topics as analysis and performance practice of Mozart; analysis of ethnic, pop, and jazz music; music cognition, etc. 407 Directed Individual Studies (2–4 credit hours) Permission of instructor. Prerequisite: Theory 240 and 250 or 259. Special topics that vary from term to term. 408 Senior Project (2 credit hours) Senior Music Theory majors only. 430 Advanced Analysis of Tonal Music (3 credit hours) Prerequisite: Theory 240 and 250 . In depth analysis emphasizing elements of structures evident in various important examples, offering a variety of analytical problems; readings on tonal forms. 433 Analysis of 20th-Century Modernist Music (3 credit hours) Prerequisite: Theory 240 and one of the following three: Theory 250, 259, or Jazz 221. Primary emphasis is on the development of analytical and aural skills in significant 20th-century music. Varied repertoire; varied aural and analytical approaches. 435 Pop/Rock Music Theory (3 credit hours) Prerequisite: Theory 240 and one of the following three: Theory 250, 259, or Jazz 221. Explores tonal analysis of American and British pop/rock music from early rock-n-roll to the present. 436 Analytical History of Jazz (3 credit hours) Prerequisite: Theory 240 and one of the following three: Theory 250, 259, or Jazz 221. Treats the 96

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evolution of jazz in the United States through the 1940s; involves aural transcription of music and the creation of musical scores for works available only on record; analyzes sheet music, autographed scores, first editions, etc., to induce theory of the evolution of musical styles in jazz. 440, 441 Species Counterpoint I (3 credit hours) Prerequisite: Theory 250 or permission of instructor. A study and practice of fundamental principles of counterpoint during the 16th century. 442 18th-Century Counterpoint I (3 credit hours) Prerequisite: Theory 240 and 250. Involves analysis and practice of the craft of counterpoint based upon 18th-century repertoire of Western music and scholarly treatises of both that period and the present. A diet of species counterpoint is emphasized in the first half, then varieties of contrapuntal craft of the difficulty of two- and three-part inventions of J. S. Bach. 443 18th-Century Counterpoint II (3 credit hours) Prerequisite: Theory 442. Sequel to 442, moving ahead in analysis and practice of craft to sophisticated settings of 18th-century contrapuntal forms, especially with the creation of fugues in the styles of representative composers. Pedagogical treaties of that era as well as contemporary scholarship are dealt with in analytical and creative tasks. 444 Practical Ornamentation and Elaboration (3 credit hours) Prerequisite: Theory 250 or permission of instructor. Analysis of scores and treatises of the 17th and 18th centuries undergirds creative invention of ornamentation and elaboration in the specific style of major composers of these eras. 454 Orchestration I (3 credit hours) Prerequisite: Theory 240 and one of the following three: Theory 250, 259, or Jazz 221. Emphasis on original compositions or arrangements for various instruments in string, wind, brass, and percussion families. Also reading and listening assignments. Final project is selecting and orchestrating a short piano composition for chamber orchestra. Undergraduate credit only. 455 Orchestration II (3 credit hours) Prerequisite: Theory 454. Techniques used by composers of the 18th, 19th, and 20th centuries will be compared and analyzed. Reading and listening assignments as well as attendance at School of Music, Theatre & Dance ensemble rehearsals. Final project involves composing or arranging an extended work for wind ensemble or orchestra. 458 Practicum in Arranging (2 credit hours) Prerequisite: Theory 250 or permission of instructor. 460 Special Courses (3 credit hours) Prerequisite: Theory 240 and 250. Offerings relating to such topics as analysis and performance practice of Mozart; analysis of ethnic, pop, and jazz music; music cognition, etc. May be repeated for credit. 461 Analysis of Tonal Music (2 credit hours) Enrollment only for graduate students placed into 461 by Theory Placement Exam. Remedial review course for graduate students.

VIOLIN 460 Viola for Violin (1 credit hour) Permission of instructor in consultation with advisor. A practicum for violin majors on the basics of viola playing to be taken in conjunction with playing one semester of viola in Quartet 335. Six, half hour lessons every two weeks and three performances in Viola Studio Class are required.

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VOICE LITERATURE 200 Basic Lyric Diction (1 credit hour) An introduction to the international Phonetic Alphabet and a survey or English, German, Italian, and French diction. Basic rules of stage pronounciation for singers are introduced. Individual sung performances in each language serve as monthly class projects. Class is a blend of a cutting edge, interactive keynote presentation with an emphasis on listening to native speakers, coupled with individual and group transcription practicum exercises. 201 Basic Italian Diction (1, 2 credit hours) Introduction to singing in Italian according to the principles of the Italian lyric stage. Singing in Latin and Spanish is briefly introduced. 202 Basic German Diction (1, 2 credit hours) German diction according to codified rules of German stage pronunciation. Coaching of repertoire takes place throughout the course. Also includes introduction to singing in English according to common practice, as well as the International Phonetic Alphabet. 203 Basic French Diction (1, 2 credit hours) Introduction to singing in French according to common practice. Coaching of repertoire (art songs and operas) takes place throughout the course. 357 Musical Theatre Seminar (2, 3 credit hours) Prerequisite: Musical Theatre majors or permission of instructor. 410 Vocal Literature of Black American Composers (2 credit hours) Junior standing or higher. Surveys the art songs of African Americans from the beginning of the 20th century to the present. The course includes numerous unpublished works and the analysis of the texts as well as rhythmic, harmonic, and melodic features. 450 Chamber Music for Voice and Instrumentalists (2 credit hours) Permission of instructor. Designed for singers and instrumentalists to explore chamber music involving voice(s) from the Renaissance to the 21st Century. Ensembles can include all voice types, orchestral instrumentalists, Harpsichord, Piano, Organ, Guitar, and Percussion. 465, 466 Cabaret Performance I, II (2 credit hours each) An overview of song styling, improvisation, and acting technique is used to develop a personal singing style for cabaret, musical theatre, and concert performances. 467 Recitative and Arias of Oratorios (2 credit hours) Focuses on solos, duets, trios, quartets, etc., from standard as well as sometimes lesser-known works. Written reviews of recordings and live concerts are required, and there is a final recital. 469 Interpretation of Opera Arias (2 credit hours) 489, 490 Interpretation of German Lieder (2 credit hours each) 491 Interpretation of Songs (3 credit hours) Deals with generic and specific problems in art song interpretation for both singers and pianists. Each term, the bulk of the repertory is synchronized with the studies in diction classes. 504 Master Class in Vocal Literature (1–4 credit hours) 519 Teaching Voice I (2 credit hours) 520 Teaching Voice II (2 credit hours) Prerequisite: Voicelit 519 98

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Performance Course Information

PERFORMANCE COURSE SEQUENCE

Performance courses consist of individual lessons, small group lessons, or a combination of individual and group lessons. The time per lesson is dependent on the program. Performance election upon initial enrollment is course 139 (Performance), 219 (Principal), 100 (Transfers), 150 (non-SMTD students), and 111 (Secondary). The following provides a description of each area. Students should follow the appropriate sequence for their degree program unless otherwise directed by the department. Failure to pass juries may affect elected course sequence TRANSFER STUDENTS: All incoming transfer students will elect 100 until placed into the appropriate course number by the department. Per instructor recommendation, the course may be elected for 2, 4, or 6 credit hours. NON-SMTD STUDENTS: All non-SMTD students will be placed in 150 regardless of term or level. UNDERGRADUATE PERFORMANCE SEQUENCE BY DEGREE PROGRAM: BM COMPOSITION (Composition Studio) BM HARP PERFORMANCE BM ORGAN PERFORMANCE / BM ORGAN PERFORMANCE WITH CERTIFICATION BM PIANO PERFORMANCE / BM PIANO PERFORMANCE WITH CERTIFICATION BM STRINGS PERFORMANCE / BM STRINGS PERFORMANCE WITH CERTIFICATION BM VOICE PERFORMANCE / BM VOICE PERFORMANCE WITH CERTIFICATION BM WINDS & PERCUSSION / BM WINDS & PERCUSSION WITH CERTIFICATION BMA (Performance Concentration) Performance Course Sequence

FALL TERM

WINTER TERM

FRESHMAN

139

140

SOPHOMORE

239

240

JUNIOR

339

340

SENIOR

439

440

All major courses yield between 3 and 6 hours of credit each during the academic year depending on the degree program. Instruction in major courses includes an individual lesson each week typically of one hour, the equivalent in small groups, or the combination of individual or group lessons. Courses 240 and 440 in any undergraduate performance department may be repeated upon recommendation of the department faculty. UNDERGRADUATE PRINCIPAL COURSE SEQUENCE BY DEGREE PROGRAM: BMA (Theory, Musicology, OR Composition Concentration) BM MUSIC AND TECHNOLOGY (PAT A) BM COMPOSITION (Principal Instrument) BM MUSIC EDUCATION (Choral or Instrumental) BM MUSIC THEORY BM MUSICOLOGY BFA MUSICAL THEATRE Performance Course Sequence

FALL TERM

WINTER TERM

FRESHMAN

219

220

SOPHOMORE

221

222

JUNIOR

423

424

SENIOR

425

426

Principal courses are offered for either two or four hours of credit each during the academic year. Four hour elections in principal courses includes an individual lesson of one hour per week or its equivalent in small groups. Two-hour elections during the academic year equate to a half hour per week of individual instruction or its equivalent in small groups. Either individual or group instruction 100

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Performance Course Information

or a combination of the two plans may be used. Credit-hour accumulation in major and principal course sequences should reflect approximately the same degree of student effort. For example, a four-hour election implies that one hour of weekly instruction and at least two hours of daily practice each week are required. UNDERGRADUATE PERFORMANCE SEQUENCE FOR JAZZ MAJORS: BFA JAZZ AND CONTEMPLATIVE STUDIES BFA JAZZ AND CONTEMPORARY IMPROVISATION BFA JAZZ STUDIES / BFA JAZZ STUDIES WITH CERTIFICATION Performance Course Sequence

FALL TERM

WINTER TERM

FRESHMAN

101

102

SOPHOMORE

201

202

JUNIOR

301

302

SENIOR

401

402

This sequence of courses deals with theoretical, syntactic, and aural issues. The issues of basic technique and musicianship are addressed in the major or principal studio instruction. UNDERGRADUATE SECONDARY LESSONS: All SMTD students wishing to take lessons on an instrument on which they have NOT auditioned. Secondary Course Sequence

FALL TERM

WINTER TERM

FRESHMAN

111

112

SOPHOMORE

113

114

JUNIOR

115

116

SENIOR

217

218

Secondary courses normally yield two hours of credit each and include an individual lesson of a half hour each week, the equivalent in small groups, or a combination of the two plans.

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Performance Course Information

MASTERS PERFORMANCE SEQUENCE BY DEGREE PROGRAM: MM ARTS ADMINISTRATION MM CHAMBER MUSIC MM CHURCH MUSIC MM COLLABORATIVE PIANO MM COMPOSITION (Composition Studio) MM KEYBOARD INSTRUMENTS MM PERFORMANCE MM WIND INSTRUMENTS Performance Course Sequence

FALL TERM

WINTER TERM

FIRST YEAR

539

539 or 540

SECOND YEAR

540

540

Performance Course Sequence

FALL TERM

WINTER TERM

FIRST YEAR

501

501 or 502

SECOND YEAR

502

502

MM IMPROVISATION

MASTERS PRINCIPAL COURSE SEQUENCE BY DEGREE PROGRAM: MM COMPOSITION (Principal Instrument) MM CONDUCTING MM MUSIC EDUCATION Performance Course Sequence

FALL TERM

WINTER TERM

FIRST YEAR

527

527

SECOND YEAR

528

528

Principal courses are offered for either two or four hours of credit each during the academic year. Four hour elections in principal courses includes an individual lesson of one hour per week or its equivalent in small groups. Two-hour elections during the academic year equate to a half hour per week of individual instruction or its equivalent in small groups. Either individual or group instruction MASTERS SECONDARY COURSE SEQUENCE Performance Course Sequence

FALL TERM

WINTER TERM

FIRST YEAR

500

500

SECOND YEAR

600

600

SPECIALIST PERFORMANCE SEQUENCE BY DEGREE PROGRAM: SM CHURCH MUSIC SM PERFORMANCE Performance Course Sequence

FALL TERM

WINTER TERM

FIRST YEAR

639

639 or 640

SECOND YEAR

640

640

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Performance Course Credit Hour Sequence: Students in performance majors should follow the sequence of numbers listed in the performance course table below unless otherwise stipulated by the studio instructor. All principal courses are offered for 2 or 4 credit hours depending upon recommendation of the department. Catalog Course

139

140

239

240

339

340

439/539/639

440/540/640

Bassoon Cello Clarinet Double Bass Euphonium Flute French Horn Guitar Harp Oboe Percussion Saxophone Trombone Trumpet Tuba Viola Violin

4

4

4

4

4/6

4/6

4/6

4/6

Composition

3

3

3

3

4

4

4

4

Organ

4

4

4

4

4

4

6

6

Piano

4

4

4

4

4

4

5

5

Voice

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

Secondary Course Credit Hour Sequence: Catalog Course

111

112

113

114

115

116

217

218

500/600

Bassoon Cello Clarinet Double Bass Flute French Horn Oboe Percussion Trombone

1

2

2

2

2/4

2/4

2/4

2/4

2/4

Guitar Violin Voice

1

1

2

2

2/4

2/4

2/4

2/4

2/4

Harp Saxophone Trumpet Tuba Viola

1/2

2

2

2

2/4

2/4

2/4

2/4

2/4

Euphonium Organ Piano

2

2

2

2

2/4

2/4

2/4

2/4

2/4

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Information for Masters Students

Admission Admission to any graduate program in music at the University of Michigan is predicated upon completion of a bachelor’s or master’s degree in the same field at the University of Michigan or an equivalent program at another institution. Work elected in making up deficiencies will not count as credit toward the degree. School of Music, Theatre & Dance Graduate Programs At least one-third of the credits for a Master’s degree must be taken in the student’s major field. Another third must be taken in other studies in music. At least half the credit required for the master’s or specialist degrees must be in courses numbered 500 or above. No course numbered below 400 may be counted for a master’s or specialist degree. Credit toward a graduate degree cannot be granted for any course elected to satisfy a deficiency, nor for any course required as a prerequisite to the student’s graduate program. The remainder will comprise elective studies in supportive music or non-music fields. Work in the major field, which should encompass intensive and extensive coverage of the subject matter, should culminate in tangible evidence of the capacity of the student to organize and present the specific materials of the subject matter and to demonstrate independence of thought, critical powers, interpretive abilities, and potential as a scholar and a musician. This tangible evidence may take the form of a thesis, composition, project, comprehensive examination, or public recital. The School of Music, Theatre & Dance reserves the right to withhold the recommendation of a candidate for a degree with a major in performance if, in the judgment of the faculty, the minimum of credits earned in performance do not represent adequate maturation and musicianship to merit the distinction of a degree without additional study. This provision is necessary because of possible individual differences in proficiency and musicianship at the time of admission. Multiple Degrees A student pursuing two master’s degrees in the School of Music, Theatre & Dance simultaneously must satisfy all requirements for both degrees, as if each program were being pursued independently. Up to 10 credit hours may be double-counted. To request double-counting, submit the School of Music, Theatre & Dance form “Double-Counting of Courses for Dual Graduate Degrees.” Approval of both departments involved and of the Associate Dean is required. Time Limit All work toward a master’s or specialist degree must be completed within six years from the date of first enrollment in the degree program. No work completed more than six years prior to the awarding of a degree may be counted. The Associate Dean may approve extensions of up to two years beyond the six-year limit for completing the master’s degree or specialist degree, and may approve the counting of work completed up to eight years earlier toward a master’s or specialist degree. If an extension is granted, the student must meet the degree requirements in force at the time the degree is awarded. Students Anticipating Doctoral Study In addition to two terms of a foreign language, any master’s student anticipating doctoral study at the University of Michigan should complete at least two graduate courses in music history and/or theory, including, when possible, Musicology 503, plus a course to satisfy the pedagogy requirement, as part of her or his master’s program. A student pursuing the master’s degree elsewhere should elect a music bibliography course equivalent to Musicology 503. Residence Requirements All graduate students are expected to enroll full-time. Part-time enrollment is permitted only with the approval of the Associate Dean for Graduate Studies. Master of Music in Music Education may be earned entirely from summer enrollment with the written permission of the chair of the Music Education department. All other degrees must be earned by enrollment in Fall and Winter terms. The minimum residence requirement for School of Music, Theatre & Dance programs is the equivalent of two full terms of work, or twenty-four hours. When a student begins degree work with deficiencies,

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the length of time required to complete the degree will be increased proportionately. Every graduate and specialist student is required to enroll for and complete a full load of at least three courses relevant to his or her degree program. These should comprise a total of at least nine credit hours (full-time enrollment). Permission to elect a lesser load may be sought by submitting the form “Request for Permission to Enroll Part-Time.” Credit Hour Requirements All Master of Music, Master of Arts, and Specialist in Music programs require a minimum of thirty hours of graduate credit with an average grade of B. The normal course load is at least twelve hours per term or six hours per half-term. A master’s or specialist student may transfer up to six hours of graduate credit from accredited institutions with the approval of the student’s advisor and the Associate Dean for Graduate Studies. Credit hour requirements for doctoral programs are described in the Handbook for Rackham Students in Music, Dance, or Theatre from the office of the Associate Dean. A graduate or specialist student must have a cumulative grade point average (GPA) of at least B (5.0) to receive a degree. A student whose cumulative GPA falls below B (5.0) in a given term or halfterm will either be placed on probation for the following term or half-term or be denied permission to re-enroll. A student whose cumulative GPA falls below B for two successive terms or half-terms will either be granted a final opportunity to raise his or her average or will be denied permission to reenroll. A student whose cumulative GPA falls below B for three successive terms or half-terms will not be permitted to enroll again in a School of Music, Theatre & Dance program. Transferring Credit From Other Institutions With the permission of the Associate Dean, up to six hours of credit earned at another institution may be transferred to a student’s graduate record, provided: 1. The courses were not used to meet the requirements of another degree. 2. The courses were approved for graduate credit at the institution offering them, and that institution is accredited to offer graduate degrees. 3. A grade of B or higher was received. 4. The courses were completed not more than five years prior to the term of initial enrollment in the graduate division of the School of Music, Theatre & Dance and not more than six years prior to the awarding of the graduate degree sought in the School of Music, Theatre & Dance. 5. Written approval of the student’s major department is provided. 6. The student has completed at least eight hours of work in the graduate division of the School of Music, Theatre & Dance with an average grade of B or higher. Extension credit from other institutions will not be transferred. Transferring Credit From the University of Michigan With the permission of the Associate Dean, up to nine hours of credit earned as an undergraduate in the School of Music, Theatre & Dance may be transferred to a student’s graduate record, provided: 1. The courses were not used to meet the requirements for the undergraduate degree. 2. The courses were approved for graduate credit in the School of Music, Theatre & Dance. 3. A grade of B or higher was received. 4. The courses were not completed more than one year prior to the term of initial enrollment in the graduate division of the School of Music, Theatre & Dance and not more than six years prior to the awarding of the master’s degree. 5. Written approval of the student’s major department is provided. 6. The student has completed at least eight hours of work in the graduate division of the School of Music, Theatre & Dance with an average grade of B or higher. With the permission of the Associate Dean, up to six hours of credit earned as a master’s student in the School of Music, Theatre & Dance may be applied toward the Specialist in Music degree, provided: 1. The courses were not used to meet the requirements for the master’s degree. 2. The courses were approved for graduate credit in the School of Music, Theatre & Dance. 3. A grade of B or higher was received. 4. The courses were completed not more than one year prior to the term of initial enrollment in the Specialist in Music program and not more than six years prior to the awarding of the specialist degree. 106

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5. Written approval of the student’s major department is provided. 6. The student has completed at least eight hours of work toward the specialist degree with an average grade of B or higher. No more than six hours of extension credit from the University of Michigan may be transferred for any degree. Credit as Non-Candidate for Degree With the permission of the Associate Dean, up to 15 hours of credit earned in the NCFD (Not Candidate for Degree) status may be applied to either the master’s or the specialist degree, provided: 1. The courses were not used to meet the requirements of another degree. 2. The courses are approved for graduate credit in the School of Music, Theatre & Dance. 3. A grade of B or higher was received. 4. The courses were completed not more than one year prior to the effective term of admission to the master’s or specialist program, and not more than six years prior to the awarding of the degree. 5. Written approval of the student’s major department is provided. 6. The student has completed at least eight hours of work toward the master’s or specialist degree with an average grade of B or higher. Grading Criteria The faculty of the School of Music, Theatre & Dance have established the following descriptions and criteria for grading at the graduate level: Excellent: A+ (9 honor points) A (8 honor points) A- (7 honor points)

Markedly above average for graduate student The highest conceivable standard of work Genuinely outstanding A very high standard in which strengths far exceed weaknesses

Good: B+ (6 honor points) B (5 honor points) B- (4 honor points)

Standard normally expected of graduate students Above average Average Revealing certain weaknesses

Fair: C+ (3 honor points) C (2 honor points) C- (1 honor point)

Below average for graduate students Lacking essential qualities Marginally acceptable Need for marked improvement to remain in program

Poor: D (0 honor points) E (0 honor points)

Not acceptable at graduate level

Pass/Fail Grades Graduate students in the School of Music, Theatre & Dance are not permitted to elect any courses in the School of Music, Theatre & Dance on a pass/fail basis, including courses taken to make up undergraduate deficiencies. Similarly, courses outside the School of Music, Theatre & Dance elected to satisfy a student’s degree requirement may not be elected pass/fail. Students in music may, however, elect courses pass/fail in theatre and dance when they are not being elected to satisfy requirements. No more than one course may be elected on a pass/fail basis per term, or half-term. If a course is elected on a pass/fail basis, the Office of the Registrar will translate grades of C or above as pass, and C- or below as fail. Incomplete Grades An incomplete grade may be assigned to a student only if the unfinished part of the student’s work is small, the work is unfinished for reasons acceptable to the instructor, and the student’s standing

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in the course is a B grade or higher. The student and the instructor should discuss the incomplete prior to its conferral. A grade of “I” can be changed to a letter grade only if the incomplete work is made up within the first fours weeks of the second full term following the term from which the “I” is given, counting the spring-summer term, regardless of whether the student is enrolled. If the grade of “I” has stood for two full terms, credit can be earned only by re-electing the course, attending classes, and completing all course work and examinations. The grade-point average will be based on hour or work completed. The grade of “I” is permanently retained on the student’s record. An incomplete which has been made up according to the above procedure will appear on the student’s transcript as a crossed-out “I” with the letter grade next to it. A grade of “X” (Absent from Examination) will be recorded as “I.” An “I” grade cannot be used to extend the grace period for presentation of a recital without enrolling. Dropping a Course A student may drop a course, change status from credit to visit, or decrease the hours for a course within the range offered through the third week of classes in a full term or the second week of a half-term. Approval of the advisor, the instructor, and the Associate Dean is required. After the sixth week (fourth week of a half term) no change will be permitted. However, a drop may be permitted for medical reasons provided that an incomplete is not acceptable to the instructor in the course, and continued enrollment in the course is not feasible. Unsatisfactory progress or a failing grade in a course are not considered acceptable reasons for dropping the course after the sixth week (fourth week of a half-term). Similarly, being too busy is not an acceptable reason for dropping a course after the sixth week (fourth week) unless there are compelling circumstances. Curriculum and Examination Requirements Each new graduate student in music entering at the Fall or Winter term is required to take a placement examination in music theory during the first term of residence. A student who has taken Music Theory 430 or another 400/500 level course in theory at the University of Michigan during the preceding four years is not required to take the examination. It is possible to gain more time for graduate study by avoiding the need to make up undergraduate deficiencies. In order to do so, it is important that each new graduate student arrive prepared to take this placement examination. The following tests are given to those who have completed appropriate courses. Recommended preparation is indicated. 1. Freshman-level writing skills: Edward Aldwell and Carl Schachter, Harmony and Voice Leading, 2nd ed., Chapters 1–19 (Harcourt Brace Jovanovich). 2. Freshman-level aural skills: sight singing and two-part dictation of a level comparable to Unit 1 (Parts 1–11) of Thomas Benjamin, Michael Horvit and Robert Nelson, Music for Sight Singing, 2nd ed. (Wadsworth). Harmonic dictation paralleling the conceptual material in the Aldwell and Schachter text, Chapters 1–19. 3. Sophomore-level writing skills: Edward Aldwell and Carl Schachter, Chapters 20–30, analytical skills in simpler 20th-century pitch-centered music (e.g., Debussy, Bartók, Stravinsky) and in basics of 12-tone serialism (e.g., Schoenberg, Webern). 4. Sophomore-level aural skills: sight singing and two-part dictation of difficulty comparable to that of Benjamin, Horvit and Nelson, Unit 2 (Parts 12–17) and Unit 3 (Parts 19–22). Harmonic dictation paralleling the conceptual material in the Aldwell and Schachter text, Chapters 20–29, with particular emphasis on simple mixture, applied harmony modulation, and the Neapolitan and augmented-sixth chords. 5. Junior-level analysis: prototypical tonal forms from Bach to Brahms. See, for example, books on form by Wallace Berry, Douglass Green, Donald Tovey, Charles Rosen, and others. Skills include stylistic, formal, structural, motivic, and reductive analysis of representative works from the tonal repertoire. 6. Junior-level 20th-century analysis: representative works from pitch-centered, atonal, 108

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12-tone, and experimental styles and systems. See, for example, Kostka, Materials and Techniques of Twentieth-Century Music (Prentice Hall); Lester, Analytic Approaches to Twentieth-Century Music (Norton); Perle, Serial Composition and Atonality (University of California Press); Simms, Music in the Twentieth Century: Styles and Structure (Schirmer) and Straus, Introduction to Post-Tonal Theory (Prentice Hall). The following anthologies of works are relevant to tests 5 and 6: Arlin et al., Music Sources (Prentice Hall); Burkhart, Anthology for Musical Analysis (Holt, Rhinehart and Winston); Wennerstrom, Anthology of Musical Structure and Style (Prentice Hall); Wennerstrom, Anthology of Twentieth-Century Music (Prentice Hall); Simms, Music of the Twentieth Century: An Anthology (Schirmer). Tests 1–4 are approximately 45, 50, 60, and 40 minutes long, respectively. Test 5 lasts approximately 90 minutes and is intended for those students who have taken at least two and a half years of college theory. Test 6 lasts approximately two hours and is intended for those students whose programs require 20th-century analysis and who have completed a college-level third-year theory course in the subject. Language Requirements Certain master’s programs have language proficiency entrance requirements. Consult the descriptions of individual curricula for details. For information about the language requirements for doctoral programs see the Handbook for Rackham Students.

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Masters Degree Programs

School of Music, Theatre & Dance Programs Certain graduate programs are administered through the School of Music, Theatre & Dance and others are administered though the Horace H. Rackham School of Graduate Studies. The following programs are administered through the School of Music, Theatre & Dance. Master of Music (M.M.) in Chamber Music Bassoon, Cello, Clarinet, Double Bass, Euphonium, Flute, French Horn, Oboe, Percussion, Piano, Saxophone, Trombone, Trumpet, Tuba, Viola, Violin Master of Music (M.M.) in Church Music Master of Music (M.M.) in Collaborative Piano Master of Music (M.M.) in Composition Master of Music (M.M.) in Conducting Master of Music (M.M.) in Early Keyboard Instruments Master of Music (M.M.) in Improvisation Master of Music (M.M.) in Keyboard Instruments Master of Music (M.M.) in Music Education Master of Music (M.M.) in Music Education (Summers Only) Master of Music (M.M.) in Music Education with Teacher Certification Master of Music (M.M.) in Performance Bassoon, Carillon, Cello, Clarinet, Double Bass, Euphonium, Flute, Fortepiano, French Horn, Harpsichord, Harp, Oboe, Organ, Percussion, Piano, Saxophone, Trombone, Trumpet, Tuba, Viola, Violin, Voice Master of Music (M.M.) in Piano Pedagogy and Performance Master of Music (M.M.) in Wind Instruments Bassoon, Clarinet, Euphonium, Flute, French Horn, Oboe, Percussion, Saxophone, Trombone, Trumpet, Tuba Specialist in Music (S.M.) in Collaborative Piano Specialist in Music (S.M.) in Ethnomusicology Specialist in Music (S.M.) in Performance Bassoon, Cello, Clarinet, Double Bass, Euphonium, Flute, French Horn, Harp, Oboe, Percussion, Saxophone, Trombone, Tuba, Viola, Violin, Voice Inquiries concerning School of Music, Theatre & Dance programs should be directed to the Admissions Office, Room 2290, School of Music, Theatre & Dance.

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Masters Degree Programs

Rackham Programs The following programs are administered by the Horace H. Rackham School of Graduate Studies and are referred to as Rackham programs: Master of Arts (M.A.) in Composition Master of Arts (M.A.) in Media Arts Master of Arts (M.A.) in Musicology Historical Musicology or Ethnomusicology Master of Arts (M.A.) in Theory Master of Fine Arts (M.F.A.) in Dance Information concerning programs in Dance is not included in this booklet. Request materials from the Department of Dance, 3501 Dance Building, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 481092217, Phone: 734/763-5460. Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) in Composition and Music Theory Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) in Music Education Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) in Musicology Historical Musicology or Ethnomusicology Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) in Music Theory Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) in Theatre Doctor of Musical Arts (D.M.A. or A.Mus.D.) Composition Doctor of Musical Arts (D.M.A. or A.Mus.D.) in Conducting Band and Wind Ensemble, Choral, or Orchestral Doctor of Musical Arts (D.M.A. or A.Mus.D.) in Performance Bassoon, Cello, Clarinet, Double Bass, Euphonium, Flute, French Horn, Harp, Harpsichord, Oboe, Organ Program I: Organ Performance, Organ Program II: Liturgical, Church and Synagogue Music, Percussion, Piano Program I: Piano Performance, Piano Program II: Collaborative Piano, Program III: Piano Pedagogy and Performance, Saxophone, Trumpet, Trombone, Tuba, Violin, Viola, Voice Inquiries concerning Rackham programs in music should be directed to the Associate Dean’s Office, Room 2277, School of Music, Theatre & Dance.

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MASTER OF MUSIC DEGREE

Each master’s curriculum is based on an appropriate undergraduate curriculum at the University of Michigan or another accredited institution offering a comparable curriculum. Work elected in making up deficiencies will not count toward the master’s degree. The requirements of the various programs are as follows:

CARILLON

Prerequisites for Admission: BM or BMA degree from the University of Michigan or equivalent; a strong keyboard background and ability to play the Carillon as demonstrated by an audition. Work elected in making up deficiencies will not count as credit toward the degree. Performance Requirements

SMTD Requirements

Carillon - 12 hours to include completion of 540

8 hours of Music Theory, Musicology, and or Composition beyond the undergraduate requirements

Organ - 8 hours Final Project - Recital

Minimum Total Hours Required: 32

CHURCH MUSIC

Work elected in making up deficiencies will not count as credit toward the degree. Hours

Organ Requirements

Hymn Improvisation

583

2

Organ Performance - 8 hours

Console Conducting and Repertoire

584

2

Organ Literature - 4 hours

Blended Worship Styles

585

2

Additional SMTD Requirements

Church Music Repertoire

586

2

6 hours of Musicology, Music Theory, and/or Composition

Church Music Requirements

Final Project - Recital

Minimum Total Hours Required: 32

COLLABORATIVE PIANO

Prerequisites for Admission: Bachelor’s degree in Piano or its equivalent; substantial solo and ensemble repertoire; elementary proficiency in two languages (French, German, or Italian). Work elected in making up deficiencies will not count as credit toward the degree. Performance Requirements

Hours

Piano Accompanying and/or Chamber Music

minimum 12 hours

Piano Chamber Music Literature

minimum 3 hours

Piano Performance

as required

Final Project - Three recitals of vocal and instrumental repertoire; departmental examination to include advanced proficiency in pronunciation and intermediate proficiency in reading French, German, and Italian

Additional SMTD Requirements

Hours

Voice Literature: Interpretation of Songs

592

3

Piano Literature: Techniques of Vocal Coaching

587

minimum 3 hours

Musicology and/or Music Theory beyond the undergraduate requirements

minimum 6 hours

Minimum Total Hours Required: 35

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COMPOSITION

Work elected in making up deficiencies will not count as credit toward the degree. SMTD Requirements

Hours

Composition

8 hours

Music Theory, Musicology, Electronic Music, and/or Music Technology

8 hours

Electives other than Composition (Performance is recommended)

8 hours

Final Project - A short orchestral work composed while in residence, a bound copy of which must be deposited with the department, or another large project approved by an advisor

Minimum Total Hours Required: 30

CONDUCTING

Work elected in making up deficiencies will not count as credit toward the degree. Orchestral Conductors 10 hours to include the following:

Hours

Conducting: Seminar in Orchestral Conducting

501

2-4

Directed Performance in Orchestral Conducting

502

2

Seminar in Choral Conducting

505

2-4

Aural Skills for Conductors

510

minimum 4 hours

Choral Conductors

Hours

Conducting: Seminar in Orchestral Conducting

501

2-4

Seminar in Choral Conducting

505

2-4

Directed Performance in Choral Conducting

506

2

Aural Skills for Conductors

510

minimum 4 hours

Band/Wind Conductors 10 hours to include the following Conducting:

114

Hours

Seminar in Band and Wind Ensemble Conducting

503

2-4

Directed Performance in Band and Wind Ensemble Conducting

504

2

Seminar in Choral Conducting

505

2-4

Aural Skills for Conductors

510

minimum 4 hours

School of Music, Theatre & Dance

Additional SMTD Requirements Music Theory (above 500) - 3 hours Musicology (above 500) - 3 hours Music Theory OR Musicology (above 500) - 3 hours Performance (426 or above) - 4 hours

Ensemble - 545 (Univ Orchestra), 547 (Univ Band), 549 (Univ Choir) 550 (Chamber Choir), or 470 (Orpheus Singers) elected each term Final Project - Conducting project consisting of two or more conducting appearances, one of which must be with a School of Music, Theatre & Dance major ensemble. Other appearances may be with non-major ensembles or ad hoc ensembles

Minimum Total Hours Required: 32


Masters Degree Programs

EARLY KEYBOARD INSTRUMENTS

Work elected in making up deficiencies will not count as credit toward the degree. Additional SMTD Requirements

Performance Requirements 16 hours of two instruments selected from Harpsichord, Tracker organ, or Fortepiano with completion of 540 in both 4 hours of the third keyboard instrument to include completion of 528

Minimum Total Hours Required: 32

8 hours of Musicology, Music Theory, and/or Composition beyond the undergraduate requirements 2 terms Ensemble 400 (Early Music Ensemble)

Final Project - Either one full recital on each of two instruments elected from Harpsichord, Organ, or Fortepiano, or one and one-half recitals on one instrument and one-half recital on another

FORTEPIANO

Prerequisites for Admission: Bachelor’s degree in Piano of Fortepiano, or a Bachelor’s degree in Harpsichord or Organ with extensive work in Piano or Fortepiano. Work elected in making up deficiencies will not count as credit toward the degree. Performance Requirements 16 hours of performance, including one term of Ensemble 400 (Early Music Ens) and one term of Chamber Music Completion of Fortepiano 540 Additional SMTD Requirements 8 hours of Composition, Musicology, and/or Music Theory beyond the undergraduate requirements

Final Project - Recital

Minimum Total Hours Required: 30

HARP

Work elected in making up deficiencies will not count as credit toward the degree. Performance Requirements Minimum 12 hours of Harp to include 540 Performance 550 elected each term Additional SMTD Requirements 10 hours, including 8 hours of non-performance music electives

Final Project - Recital

Minimum Total Hours Required: 30

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Masters Degree Programs

HARPSICHORD

Prerequisites for Admission: Bachelor’s degree in Harpsichord or a Bachelor’s degree in Piano or Organ with extensive work in Harpsichord. Work elected in making up deficiencies will not count as credit toward the degree. Performance Requirements

Additional SMTD Requirements

Minimum 16 hours of Harpsichord with completion of 540

Minimum 10 hours of Composition, Musicology, and/or Music Theory beyond the undergraduate requirements

At least 2 terms of Ensemble 400 (Early Music Ensemble)

Final Project - Recital

Minimum Total Hours Required: 32

IMPROVISATION

Prerequisites for Admission: A high level of skill in performance as demonstrated by an audition to include both standard repertoire and improvisation styles; well developed aural skills Jazz and Improvisation Requirements Jazz:

Hours

Ensemble Requirements Minimum 6 hours: one term each of three of the following: 460 (Jazz Ensemble), 462 (Small Jazz Ensemble), 467 (Creative Arts Orchestra), 471 (Latin Jazz Ensemble), PAT 412 (Digital Music Ensemble)

Contemporary Improv

566

4

Advanced Jazz Improv

567

2

Performance Requirements

Additional SMTD Requirements 6 hours Composition, Conducting, Musicology, Music Theory, Music Education, and/or Performance Dance 583 (Dance and Related Arts) or Jazz (excluding ensembles)

Minimum 12 hours to include completion of Graduate Jazz and Improvisation Performance 503 Final Project - Recital and Studio Recording

Minimum Total Hours Required: 32

KEYBOARD INSTRUMENTS

Work elected in making up deficiencies will not count as credit toward the degree. Performance Requirements 12 hours of Organ, Piano, or Harpsichord to include completion of 540 10 hours of two keyboard instruments other than the major (completion of course 528 on the first secondary instrument; two terms of study and completion of course 528 on the second secondary instrument) Final Project - Memorized recital

116

School of Music, Theatre & Dance

Additional SMTD Requirements 10 hours of Music Theory, Musicology, Composition, Conducting, Ensemble, and/or Organ Literature

Minimum Total Hours Required: 32


Masters Degree Programs

MUSIC EDUCATION: ACADEMIC YEAR

Students completing the Summer MM program or the MM with Teacher Certification should see requirements listed below. Scheduling of the Final Presentation, or Thesis Proposal/Defense - Final Thesis Proposal meetings and Final Presentation must be completed on campus. The Thesis Proposal meeting may be held via teleconference. All Presentation and Thesis meetings must be scheduled during the regular Fall or Winter term (September - May). Work elected in making up deficiencies will not count as credit toward the degree. Music Education Requirements minimum 12 hours which must include the following courses:

Hours

Music Education: Research Design in Music Education

500

3

Psychology of Music Teaching and Learning

501

3

History and Philosophy of Music Education

502

3

Seminar in Music Curriculum and Assessment

503

3

Thesis for Master’s Degree in Music Education OR Music Education Final Presentation

508 OR 516

3/2

Additional SMTD Requirements 6 hours of Music Theory, Musicology, Ethnomusicology, Jazz, and/or Composition Electives Additional electives include graduate courses offering both performance study opportunities and practical application of theoretical principles in the various specialty areas such as choral, instrumental, and general music

Minimum Total Hours Required: 30

MUSIC EDUCATION: SUMMER TERM MASTERS DEGREE Music Education Requirements minimum 12 hours which must include the following courses:

Hours

Music Education Theory Review (does not count toward degree requirements)

407

1

Research Design in Music Education

500

3

Psychology of Music Teaching and Learning

501

3

History and Philosophy of Music Education

502

3

Seminar in Music Curriculum and Assessment

503

3

Thesis for Master’s Degree in Music Education OR Music Education Final Presentation

508 OR 516

3/2

Additional SMTD Requirements 6 hours of Music History, Ethnomusicology, Jazz, Music Theory, or Composition Electives Additional electives include graduate courses offering both performance study opportunities and practical application of theoretical principles in the various specialty areas such as choral, instrumental, and general music

Minimum Total Hours Required: 30

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Masters Degree Programs

MUSIC EDUCATION: MASTERS DEGREE WITH CERTIFICATION

The Masters Degree with Certification curriculum enables a student holding a Bachelor of Music degree in another field, typically performance, to earn a Master of Music with certification to teach music in the public schools. The degree program consists of certification requirements and master’s degree requirements. It is recommended the student complete the certification requirements in the first year. Some certification requirements may be met with previous courses from the undergraduate degree if approved by the Director of Graduate Studies.

40 semester hours in Performance, Ensemble, and Conducting (Conducting 315 and 316) is required 25 semester hours of Musicology and Music Theory

32 semester hours of non-music courses which must be distributed among Humanities, Natural Sciences, and Social Sciences, with a minimum of 8 hours in each category, and with at least two departments represented in each category Education 391 (Psychology and Human Development), 392 (Multicultural Society), and 402 (Reading and Writing)

Completion or proficiency of Piano 112 or Piano 205 (for Choral Music Education, Voice principal) Instrumental Music Ed - Strings 201 and 202, Winds 203, Brass 205, Percussion 207, Voice 320 Choral Music Ed Voice Principal - Strings 201, Percussion 207, Voicelit 200 Choral Music Ed Piano Principal - Strings 201, Percussion 207, Voicelit 200, Voice 320 Music Ed 121 (Tech for Music Educators)

Masters Degree Requirements are same as those listed for MM in Music Education.

Instrumental Music Ed - Music Ed 370 (Fundamentals of Teaching String Instruments), 371 (Beginning Band Methods), 372 (Secondary Instruments Methods), 341 or 342 (Teaching General Music), 349 (Practicum), and 375-378 (Student Teaching) Choral Music Ed - Music Ed 340 (Choral Techniques and Materials for Secondary Schools), 341 (Teaching General Music in Elementary Schools), 342 (Teaching General Music in Secondary Schools), 349 (Practicum), and 345-348 (Student Teaching)

ORGAN

Work elected in making up deficiencies will not count as credit toward the degree.

Performance Requirements 15 hours of Organ and Organ Literature to include completion of Organ 540

Additional SMTD Requirements 8 hours of Music Theory, Musicology, Composition, Conducting, and/or ensemble

Minimum Total Hours Required: 30

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Final Project - Memorized recital


Masters Degree Programs

PIANO PERFORMANCE

Prerequisites for Admission: A bachelor’s degree in piano or its equivalent; Piano Literature 487– 488. Work elected in making up deficiencies will not count as credit toward the degree. Program I: Concentration in Performance

Program II: Concentration in Chamber Music

Performance Requirements

Performance Requirements

16 hours of Piano, Fortepiano, and/or Harpsichord, including weekly studio class; a minimum of 12 hours of Piano Performance to include completion of 540

Ensemble 566 (Piano Chamber Music) - minimum 4 terms (4-8 hours)

Piano 460 (Piano Forum) elected each term 2 terms Ensemble 181 (Sight Reading Skills for Piano) or demonstrated proficiency

Ensemble 581 (Piano Accompanying and Duo Repertoire) - minimum 2 terms (4 hours) Piano Performance - minimum 8 hours (2 terms); completion of 540

Ensemble 581 (Piano Accompanying and Duo Repertoire) - 2 terms

Additional SMTD Requirements

Additional SMTD Requirements

8 hours of Music courses besides performance to include Piano Literature 588 (Survey of Piano Chamber Music Literature)

9 hours of Musicology, Music Theory, and/or Composition beyond the undergraduate requirements. (Piano Literature must be elected if not taken previously.) 3 hours of additional non-performance Final Project - Recital

Minimum Total Hours Required: 32

Final Project - Two full-length recitals, one to consist of duo works for piano and another instrument; the other to consist of major works for piano and chamber ensemble (trios, quartets, quintets, etc.)

Minimum Total Hours Required: 30

PIANO PEDAGOGY AND PERFORMANCE Prerequisites for Admission: A bachelor’s degree in piano or its equivalent; Piano Literature 487– 488. Work elected in making up deficiencies will not count as credit toward the degree. Performance Requirements 13 - 16 hours of Piano Pedagogy 12 hours of Piano and Piano Ensemble, to include completion of Piano 540; election of Piano 460 each term Additional SMTD Requirements 6 hours of Musicology, Music Theory, and/or Composition beyond the undergraduate requirements. Piano Literature must be elected if not taken previously

Final Project - Recital

Minimum Total Hours Required: 31

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Masters Degree Programs

STRING INSTRUMENTS

Prerequisites for Admission: A Bachelor’s degree in performance or its equivalent; substantial solo and ensemble repertoire. Work elected in making up deficiencies will not count as credit toward the degree. Program I: Concentration in Major Instrument (Violin, Viola, Cello, Double Bass)

Program II: Concentration in Chamber Music (Violin, Viola, Cello)

Performance Requirements

Performance Requirements

10-15 hours to include completion of course 540

Minimum 8 hours of major instrument to include completion of course 540

Performance 550 elected each term

Performance 550 elected each term

Ensemble Requirements

Ensemble Requirements

2 terms (or 1/2 terms) Ensemble 545 (Univ Orch) 2 terms (or 1/2 terms) Ensemble 535 (String Quartet) - for Violinists, Violists, and Cellists; one term of 525 (Orch Repertory for Double Bass) and one term of 535 or Mixed Ensemble - for Bassists

4 hours of Ensemble 535 (String Quartet) 4 hours Ensemble 580 (Mixed Chamber Music) Additional SMTD Requirements

Additional SMTD Requirements

8 hours of non-performance

8 hours of non-performance

Final Project - Recital to include 2 major chamber works, including at least one string quartet, as well as one concerted sonata for the major instrument and piano

Final Project - Recital

Minimum Total Hours Required: 30 (No more than 15 hours of performance on the major instrument may be counted toward the 30 hours.)

Minimum Total Hours Required: 30

VOICE

Each master’s student in voice performance is required to audition for a role in the School of Music, Theatre & Dance opera production during at least two terms and, if cast, is required to perform the role, subject to the approval of his or her studio teacher. Prerequisites for Admission: One term each of German, French and Italian (101). Work elected in making up deficiencies will not count as credit toward the degree. Performance Requirements 8 hours of Voice to include completion of 540

1 term of German diction, French diction, and Italian diction 1 term of Choral Conducting (students must have prerequisite of one term of Conducting at an undergraduate institution, or completion of Conducting 315)

2 terms of Choral Ensemble 2 hours of Opera or Opera Workshop

1 term of Musicology, Music Theory, or Composition Additional SMTD Requirements Voicelit:

120

Hours

Teaching of Voice I

519

2

Teaching of Voice II

520

2

Oratorio

567

2

Interpretation of Songs

592

3

School of Music, Theatre & Dance

1 additional course selected from the following: Musicology, Music Theory, Composition, Conducting, Music Education, or Theatre Final Project - Recital

Minimum Total Hours Required: 35


Masters Degree Programs

WIND AND PERCUSSION INSTRUMENTS

(Flute, Oboe, Clarinet, Bassoon, Saxophone, Trumpet, Horn, Trombone, Euphonium, Tuba, Percussion). Work elected in making up deficiencies will not count as credit toward the degree. Program I: Concentration in Major Instrument 12 hours of major instrument to include completion of course 540 (must be elected each term) Ensemble 545 (Univ Orch), 547 (Univ Band), or 548 (Marching Band) elected each term 1 term of Ensemble 400 (early Music Ens), 461 (Small Woodwind), 463 (Small Brass), 465 (Percussion Ens), 566, (Piano Chamber Music), 580 (Mixed Chamber Music), or 475 (Contemporary Directions Ens). 460 (Jazz Ens or Jazz Lab Ens), or 462 (Small Jazz Ens) may be substituted with department approval 8 hours of non-performance Final Project - Recital

Minimum Total Hours Required: 31

Program II Concentration in Wind Instruments 10 hours of major instrument to include completion of 540 (must be elected each term) 10 hours of related instruments with an average proficiency equivalent to 426 in all Ensemble 545 (Univ Orch), 547 (Univ Band), or 548 (Marching Band) elected each term 1 term of Ensemble 400 (early Music Ens), 461 (Small Woodwind), 463 (Small Brass), 465 (Percussion Ens), 566, (Piano Chamber Music), 580 (Mixed Chamber Music), or 475 (Contemporary Directions Ens). 460 (Jazz Ens or Jazz Lab Ens), or 462 (Small Jazz Ens) may be substituted with department approval 6 hours of non-performance Final Project - Recital

Minimum Total Hours Required: 31

Program III: Concentration in Chamber Music 8 hours of major instrument to include completion of 540 (must be elected each term) 4 hours of Ensemble 545 (Univ Orch), 547 (Univ Band) 4 hours of Ensemble 461 (Small Woodwind), 463 (Small Brass), 465 (Percussion Ens), or 566 (Piano Chamber Music) 4 hours of Ensemble 400 (Early Music Ens), 464 (Wind Chamber Music), 475 (Contemporary Directions Ens), 580 (Mixed Chamber Music). Ensemble 462 (Small Jazz Ens) may be substituted with departmental approval 8 hours of non-performance Final Project - Recital to include 2 major chamber works and at least one significant collaborative work for the student’s major instrument and piano

Minimum Total Hours Required: 31

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Masters Degree Programs

SPECIALIST IN MUSIC DEGREE

The Specialist in Music degree (SM) deserves special mention because of its unique nature. This degree was inaugurated in 1981 by the University of Michigan School of Music, Theatre & Dance as an alternative to the PhD or DMA degrees for the person who seeks additional work at the post-master’s level. The specialist programs have been designed in response to inquiries and requests from persons who hold master’s degrees and who recognize the need for further study in music but do not wish to pursue a doctoral program because of its length, its emphasis on research and scholarship, and its language and dissertation requirements. Post-master’s study with non-degree status is often insufficient for such persons because it does not result in a credential. Although the specific objectives differ among departments, in general the Specialist in Music program is intended to serve the following purposes: 1. The program provides opportunities and appropriate recognition for the individual whose present employment or career goals require a high level of technical skill. 2. The program is useful for the individual who wishes to combine concentrated study in his or her field of specialization with a secondary emphasis in another field of music, such as music history, music theory, conducting, composition, performance, or music education. 3. The program provides high-quality preparation for the person seeking a career teaching in a conservatory of music or a two or four year college. 4. The program enables persons who are on sabbatical leave, or who for other reasons have available only one year, to complete (with one or perhaps two additional summers) a well integrated program of study and receive an appropriate credential. Currently, the Specialist in Music degree is offered in the fields of Church Music, Ethnomusicology, Music Education, Piano Accompanying, String Instrument Performance, Voice Performance, and Wind and Percussion Instrument Performance. The School of Music, Theatre & Dance application, rather than the Rackham School application, is used to apply for Specialist in Music programs. The degree requires at least two terms of full-time enrollment on campus beyond the master’s degree. The applicant should realize that the Specialist in Music degree is not widely known. Although several universities offer the degree Specialist in Education, with an emphasis in music, and a few offer the degree Specialist in Music Education, no other institution is known to offer a Specialist in Music degree. The Specialist in Music degree is a terminal degree. Doctoral applications from persons holding Specialist in Music degrees from the University of Michigan will not be considered. Any person contemplating doctoral study should apply for the PhD or DMA program and not for the specialist program. The Specialist in Music is a post-master’s degree based upon an appropriate master’s curriculum at the University of Michigan or another accredited institution offering a comparable curriculum. The Specialist in Music degree requires a minimum of 30 hours beyond the master’s degree. The requirements of the various programs are as follows:

ETHNOMUSICOLOGY

Work elected in making up deficiencies will not count as credit toward the degree. Musicology Requirements

Hours

Musicology: Intro to World Music

542

3

Intro to Ethnomusicology

547

3

4 courses selected from Musicology 550 (Music in the U.S.), 557 (Musics of African Americans), 559 (Music Cultures of Africa and South America), 561 (Music of Asia), 562 (Japanese Music), 564 (Music of the Caribbean), or Music Education 505 (Special Topics)

Additional SMTD Requirements 2 terms selected from Ensemble 402 (Japanese Music Study), 405 (Javanese Gamelan I), 406 (Javanese Gamelan II), 407 (Javanese Ensemble), Dance 541 (Congolese Dance I), or 542 (Congolese Dance II) Electives selected in consultation with an advisor from the Ethnomusicology faculty to reflect the needs and interests of the student and to comprise a coherent and defensible program of study

Minimum Total Hours Required: 30

HARP PERFORMANCE

Work elected in making up deficiencies will not count as credit toward the degree. Performance Requirements

Additional SMTD Requirements

Minimum 12 hours; completion of course 640; presentation of recital

Chamber Music - minimum 4 hours

Performance 550 elected each term 2 terms of Ensemble 545 (Univ Orch) 122

School of Music, Theatre & Dance

Minimum Total Hours Required: 30


Masters Degree Programs

COLLABORATIVE PIANO

Prerequisites for Admission: Substantial ensemble repertoire and experience; proficiency in diction and translation of one standard foreign language. Work elected in making up deficiencies will not count as credit toward the degree. Program I: Collaborative Piano 8 - 12 hours of Piano to include completion of Ensemble 640 (Piano Accompanying); 2 recitals prepared totally by the student 2 - 4 hours of Chamber Music Studies

Program II: Concentration in Vocal Accompanying and Coaching 8 - 12 hours of Piano to include completion of Ensemble 640 (Piano Accompanying); 2 recitals, including one prepared and coached totally by the student 2 - 4 hours of Opera or Opera Workshop

2 - 4 hours of Music Performance 781 Piano Literature 588 (Survey of Piano Music Literature) Electives selected from other music or non-music courses, subject to the advisor’s approval

Minimum Total Hours Required: 30

2 - 4 hours of Music Performance 781 Voice Literature 592 (Interpretation of Songs) Proficiency in diction and translation of a third standard foreign language Electives selected from other music or non-music courses, subject to the advisor’s approval

Minimum Total Hours Required: 30

STRING INSTRUMENT PERFORMANCE

Work elected in making up deficiencies will not count as credit toward the degree. Major Instrument - minimum 12 hours; completion of course 640; presentation of recital

2 terms of Ensemble 545 (Univ Orch)

Performance 550 elected each term

Minimum 4 hours of Chamber Music

Minimum Total Hours Required: 30

VOICE PERFORMANCE

The degree requires at least three terms of full-time enrollment, or two terms and two half-terms. Each specialist student in voice performance is required to audition for a role in the School of Music, Theatre & Dance opera production during at least two terms and, if cast, is required to perform the role, subject to the approval of his or her studio teacher. Prerequisites for Admission: Two terms each of German, French and Italian (101 and 102). Work elected in making up deficiencies will not count as credit toward the degree. Performance Requirements

Additional SMTD Requirements

Minimum 12 hours of Voice - election each term during Specialist program residence; completion of Voice 640; presentation of recital consisting of 45 minutes of memorized music

Voice Literature - at least 2 terms of Art Song, German Lieder, Music of Black Composers, Oratorio, Pedagogy, or other Voice Literature courses

At least 2 terms (4 - 8 hours) of Opera Production or Opera Workshop

Minimum Total Hours Required: 30

Courses in Musicology, Music Theory, Music Education, Conducting, Composition, Ensemble, Musical Theatre, Acting, Languages, or other fields related to singing (excluding Voice Performance)

WIND AND PERCUSSION INSTRUMENT PERFORMANCE

(Flute, Oboe, Clarinet, Bassoon, Saxophone, French Horn, Trumpet, Trombone, Euphonium, Tuba, Percussion). The following requirements include work applied to the master’s degree. Work elected in making up deficiencies will not count as credit toward the degree. Performance Requirements

Additional SMTD Requirements

Major Instrument - Minimum 24 hours; election each term during Specialist program residence; completion of course 640; presentation of recital during Specialist program residence

Music Education, Musicology, Music Theory, Conducting, and/or Composition - minimum 12 hours

Ensemble - minimum 9 hours, including at least 4 hours elected during Specialist program residence

Electives selected to reflect the needs and interests of the student and to make up a coherent and defensible program of study

Minimum Total Hours Required: 30 School of Music, Theatre & Dance

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Masters Degree Course Descriptions

Graduate Course Offerings Not all of the courses listed are offered regularly. The specific courses to be offered in a given term will be posted online at the University Registrar’s website (www.umich.edu/~regoff) and on Wolverine Access. Course descriptions are presented in alphabetical order by subject area. Performance Credit Performance credit is available in Bassoon, Carillon, Cello, Clarinet, Double Bass, Euphonium/ Baritone, Flute, Fortepiano, French Horn, Harp, Harpsichord, Oboe, Organ, Percussion, Piano, Saxophone, Trombone, Trumpet/Cornet, Tuba, Viola, Violin, and Voice. Master of Music students in performance elect courses 500, 539, or 540 (four or six hours each) on their major instruments. Master’s students electing performance on secondary instruments and master’s students in programs other than performance elect courses 500, 527, or 528 (two or four hours each). Specialist students in performance elect courses 600, 639, or 640 (four or six hours each) on their major instruments. Specialist students electing performance on secondary instruments and specialist students in programs other than performance elect course 600 (two or four hours). Courses 500, 540, 528, 600, and 640 may be repeated for credit. Rackham students elect courses listed under Music Performance. A student enrolled for two or three hours of credit receives a half-hour lesson (or, during the Summer Half-Term, an hour lesson). A student enrolled for more than three hours of credit receives an hour lesson. For further information, see a faculty advisor. Courses numbered below 500 are assumed to be primarily for undergraduates, those numbered 500 and above are designed for graduate students, and courses numbered above 800 are intended only for doctoral students. Credit hours are given in parentheses; for example, (4) denotes four hours of credit. Prerequisites are indicated in italics. Courses marked with an asterisk (*) may be elected for graduate credit in School of Music, Theatre & Dance programs but not in Rackham programs.

ARTS ADMINISTRATION 591* Internship (1–6 credit hours) Permission of instructor.

CHURCH MUSIC 583 Hymn Improvisation (2 credit hours) A practicum in service music with emphasis on keyboard improvisation and hymn-playing as these skills relate to service playing in churches with diverse cultural approaches to worship music. Handbells and other instruments are included as needed. 584 Console Conducting and Repertoire (2 credit hours) A continuation of 483/583. Includes a study of anthem literature for graded choirs plus training in conducting from the console. Also study and performance of repertoire for organ and other instruments. 585 Blended Worship Styles (2 credit hours) An in-depth study of the many varied liturgies currently in practice in today’s Christian churches. Emphasis on practical and philosophical aspects of blended worship in contemporary society. 586 Contemporary Church Music (2 credit hours) Focuses on the aesthetics of contemporary church music and the methodology of successful church music administration. To yield principles and guidelines for effective presentation of church music, students deeply explore the major issues of hymn text revision regarding contemporary and inclusive language, current methods and materials for organizational effectiveness in administration, and the dissemination of high-quality music to the congregation and the community at large. 588 Church Music Administration (2 credit hours) This course provides graduate students the opportunity to examine issues relating to music programs for today’s worshipping communities. Topics covered include preparation of budgets, setting salaries, working conditions, staff relations, publicity, recruitment of volunteers, and musical programming.

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Masters Degree Course Descriptions

COMPOSITION 504 Words and Music (3 credit hours) Permission of instructor. 506 Special Courses (1–3 credit hours) May be repeated for credit. 515 Introduction to Electronic Music (2 credit hours) An elementary study of the scientific and technological basis for the electronic music medium, with emphasis on studio procedures and techniques, including recording and tape manipulation, “classic” and voltage-controlled synthesis. 516 Seminar in Electronic Music (2 credit hours) Prerequisite: 515. Continuation of 515 with an introduction to computer technology and its electronic music applications. 521, 522 Graduate Composition (2–4 credit hours each) Prerequisite: 426. 521 is a prerequisite to 522. Requires concurrent election of 550. Addresses the problems of composing for large instrumental forces, including orchestra. Special attention is given to craft, instrumentation techniques, and personal statement. Stresses score preparation and performance material extraction, manuscript reproduction methods and presentation. Participation in a seminar concerned with the detailed study of recent compositions, techniques, and aesthetics is required. 526 Advanced Studies in Electronic Music (2–4 credit hours) Prerequisite: 516 or equivalent with permission of instructor. Includes the study of digital synthesis techniques. Special attention is given to the relationship between technology, the creative process, and individual statement. 539, 540 Graduate Studies in Composition (4 credit hours each) Prerequisite: 440. 539 is a prerequisite to 540. Requires concurrent election of 550. May be repeated for credit. 550 Seminar in Composition (2 credit hours) Study of music and examination of issues with particular interest to composers; 20th-century art music is a primary focus. Each term’s overall topic is determined by the instructor of record. In addition to lectures by the instructor, extensive student participation with assigned oral presentations is expected. 601 Independent Study (2–4 credit hours) 850 Advanced Seminar in Composition (2 credit hours) To be elected concurrently with composition 891, 892, 990. Study of music and examination of issues with particular interest to composers; 20th-century art music is a primary focus. Each term’s overall topic is determined by the instructor of record. Students preparing for preliminary oral examinations have an opportunity to discuss their score selections in a setting similar to the actual examination. 891, 892 Doctoral Studies in Composition (4–6 credit hours each) Prerequisite: 540. For doctoral students. Requires concurrent election of 850. May be repeated for a total of 12 credit hours. 900 Preliminary Examinations (1 credit hour) For students not otherwise enrolled. May be repeated for credit.

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Masters Degree Course Descriptions

990 Dissertation/Precandidate Fall, Winter, Spring-Summer Term (1–8 credit hours) Spring-Summer Half Term (1–4 credit hours) Requires concurrent election of 850. Election for dissertation work by a doctoral student not yet admitted to status as a candidate. 995 Dissertation/Candidate Fall, Winter, Spring-Summer Term (8 credit hours only) Spring-Half, Summer-Half Term (4 credit hours only) Prerequisite: Graduate school authorization for admission as a doctoral candidate. Only full-term enrollment is permitted for the term(s) in which the candidate takes a final examination on his or her dissertation.

COMPOSITION LITERATURE 503 Special Course (2 credit hours)

CONDUCTING 501 Seminar in Orchestral Conducting (2–4 credit hours) Permission of instructor. Addresses advanced conducting technique and score study, especially as it applies to the orchestral and operatic repertoire. May be repeated for credit. 502 Directed Performance in Orchestral Conducting (2 credit hours) Prerequisite: 501 and permission of instructor. Synthesizes conducting study at the master’s level and is usually taken during the final term of residence. Encompasses the mentoring of the student’s public performances by the principal instructors of orchestral conducting. 503 Seminar in Band and Wind Ensemble Conducting (2–4 credit hours) Addresses advanced conducting technique and score study, especially as it applies to the band and wind ensemble repertoire. May be repeated for credit. 504 Directed Performance in Band and Wind Ensemble Conducting (2 credit hours) Synthesizes conducting study at the master’s level and is usually taken during the final term of residence. Encompasses the mentoring of the student’s public performances by the principal instructors of band and wind ensemble conducting. 505 Seminar in Choral Conducting (2–4 credit hours) Addresses advanced conducting technique and score study, especially as it applies to the choral repertoire. May be repeated for credit. 506 Directed Performance in Choral Conducting (2 credit hours) Synthesizes conducting study at the master’s level and is usually taken during the final term of residence. Encompasses the mentoring of the student’s public performances by the principal instructors of choral conducting. 507 Special Projects (1-3 credit hours) 510 Aural Skills for Conductors (1-3 credit hours) 595 Practicum in Teaching (1 credit hour) This course is designed to satisfy the training/orientation requirement for graduate student teaching assistants. 601 Orch-Opera Repetoire (2 credit hours) Permission of instructor. 602 Studies in Wind Ensemble/Band Repertory (2 credit hours) Permission of instructor.

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Masters Degree Course Descriptions

603 Studies in Choral Repertory (2 credit hours) Permission of instructor. 801 Advanced Studies and Directed Performance in Conducting (2–6 credit hours) Permission of Instructor. 900 Preliminary Examination (1 credit hour) For students not otherwise enrolled. May be repeated for credit. 990 Dissertation/Precandidate Fall, Winter, Spring-Summer Term (1–8 credit hours) Spring-Half, Summer-Half Term (1–4 credit hours) Election for dissertation work by a doctoral student not yet admitted to status as a candidate. 995 Dissertation/Candidate Fall, Winter, Spring-Summer Term (8 credit hours only) Spring-Half, Summer-Half Term (4 credit hours only) Prerequisite: Graduate school authorization for admission as a doctoral candidate. Only full-term enrollment is permitted for the term(s) in which the candidate takes a final examination on his or her dissertation.

DOUBLE BASS 560 Bass for Cello (1 credit hour) By permission of instructor in consultation with advisor. A practicum for cello majors on the basics of double bass playing to be taken in conjunction with playing one semester of double bass in an ensemble. Six, half hour lessons every two weeks and three performances in Double Bass Studio Class are required.

ENSEMBLE

PLEASE NOTE: Ensemble classes may be repeated for credit. 348* Marching Band (1, 2 credit hours) By audition. Involves rehearsals and performance at major athletic events through marching and playing. 400 Early Music Ensemble (1, 2 credit hours) By audition. Specializing in music of the Medieval through Classical periods, this ensemble provides students a chance to perform, on modern instruments or original ones, in chorus, mixed ensembles, and continuo classes. 402 Japanese Music Study Group (1, 2 credit hours) Rehearsal and public performance of traditional Japanese music. 405, 406 Beginning Javanese Gamelan (1 credit hour each) Open to music and non-music students. No audition required. 407 Javanese Gamelan Ensemble (2 credit hours) Prerequisite: 405, 406. Rehearsal, using Javanese teaching techniques, and public performance of traditional Javanese music and dance. 441* Jazz Harp and Improvisation (2 credit hours) Permission of instructor. 460 Jazz Ensemble (1 credit hour) By audition. Performs big-band jazz ranging from classic works of Duke Ellington and Fletcher Henderson to contemporary compositions by students and faculty. The group performs publicly, including national and international tours.

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461* Small Woodwind Ensembles (1 credit hour) Weekly coaching, emphasizing intonation, blend, stylistic awareness, and ensemble precision. Repertoire, primarily for woodwind quintet, ranges from the 18th through 20th centuries. 462 Small Jazz Ensembles (1, 2 credit hours) By audition. Six to eight groups (five or six members each) perform standard and contemporary jazz repertory. The groups perform regularly in public. 463* Small Brass Ensembles (1 credit hour) Purpose is to heighten awareness of intonation, balance, style, and ensemble when playing in a small group. Brass quintet and other instrumentation will be formed, depending on enrollment. 464* Wind Chamber Music (1 credit hour) Permission of instructor. Requires concurrent election of 347. The study, rehearsal, and performance of music for small or chamber wind ensemble. 465* Percussion Ensemble (1 credit hour) Repertory surveys works of historical significance and performs works offering aesthetic and notational diversity. Usually presents two concerts each term. 467* Creative Arts Orchestra (1, 2 credit hours) Prerequisite: permission of instructor or Jazz 470. A largely improvisation-based group that invites interaction with other performance fields such as dance, theatre, and music technology. 475* Contemporary Directions Ensemble (1, 2 credit hours) By audition. School of Music, Theatre & Dance students only. Rehearses and performs contemporary music. 525 Orchestral Repertory for Double Bass (1, 2 credit hours) Permission of instructor. 526 Orchestral Repertory for Harp (1, 2 credit hours) Permission of instructor. 535* String Quartet (1, 2 credit hours) 539* Piano Accompanying and Chamber Music (4 credit hours) M.M. students in accompanying. 540* Piano Accompanying (4–6 credit hours) M.M. students in accompanying. 545* University Orchestras (1, 2 credit hours) By audition. Rehearsals and regular concerts on the campus and elsewhere of major works from the entire range of symphonic literature. Some participation in opera, musical theatre, choral, and concerto repertories is included. 547* University Bands (1, 2 credit hours) By audition. Rehearsals and performances of the major repertoire for wind ensembles and concert bands. 549 University Choirs (1, 2 credit hours) By audition. Rehearsals and concerts of sacred and secular repertories of works from the Renaissance to the present. 550 University Chamber Choir (1, 2 credit hours) By audition. Rehearsals and concerts of works from the Renaissance to the present. Membership is highly selective. School of Music, Theatre & Dance

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554 University Choral Union (1 credit hour) By audition. 566 Piano Chamber Music (1, 2 credit hours) Permission of instructor. Coaching of chamber music ensembles (generally 3 or more players) that include piano; open to pianists, instrumentalists, voice students. 569 Orchestral Repertory for Winds and Percussion (1 credit hour) Provides a practical approach to orchestral routine covering 18th through 20th century repertory. Emphasis is on intonation, blend, stylistic awareness, ensemble precision, and knowledge of repertory. 574 University Chamber Orchestra (1, 2 credit hours) Permission of instructor. 580* Mixed Chamber Music (1, 2 credit hours) Permission of instructor. M.M. instrumentalists and singers. Coaching of chamber music ensembles with mixed instrumentation (no piano); open to instrumentalists and voice students only. 581 Piano Accompanying & Duo Repertoire (2–4 credit hours) MM Piano majors. Coaching in collaborative skills. MM piano majors work with singers and with instrumentalists. Literature ranges from instrumental accompaniments, art songs, to substantial duo instrumental repertoire. 582* Supervised Studio Accompanying (2 credit hours) Permission of instructor. 639* Piano Accompanying and Chamber Music (4 credit hours) Specialist students in Accompanying. 640* Piano Accompanying (4, 6 credit hours) Specialist students in Accompanying.

JAZZ AND IMPROVISATION STUDIES 501, 502 Graduate Jazz and improvisation Performance (2, 4 credit hours) 566 Contemporary Improvisation (4 credit hours) Permission of instructor. Eclectic approach to improvisation in modern styles. The course will include multi-media and music technology collaboration. 567 Advanced Jazz Improvisation (2 credit hours) Permission of instructor. Explores advanced aspects of the harmonic language of jazz through analysis and applied experience in improvisation.

MUSIC EDUCATION 407 Music Education Theory Review (1 credit hour) This course is designed to help students review and renew their knowledge in the area of music theory. Each week, students will review a given topic: counterpoint, diatonic harmony, chromatic harmony, form, and atonality. As student abilities vary, each student will have the opportunity to meet with the instructor personally in order to reach the necessary standards required by the department. 500 Research Design in Music Education (3 credit hours) Study of the music education research literature with an emphasis on framing research problems and evaluating research studies from a wide range or research traditions.

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501 The Psychology of Music Teaching and Learning (3 credit hours) Study of the psychological foundations of music teaching and learning, including perception, motivation, creative and critical thinking, and musical development. 502 History and Philosophy of Music Education (3 credit hours) Critical analysis of the history and philosophy of music education in North America. 503 Seminar in Music Curriculum and Assessment (3 credit hours) Draws upon related foundational disciplines - e.g., history, philosophy, psychology, sociology, and educational policy studies - to examine what is taught and learned in music classrooms. This course consists of topics related to contemporary teaching and learning models, curricular innovations, and strategies for assessment within the field of music education. 504, 505, 506 Special Topics in Music Education (1-3 credit hours) 507 Field Studies in Music Education (1-3 credit hours) 508 Thesis for Master’s Degree in Music Education (1-3 credit hours) Prerequisite: 500. May be repeated for a total of three hours credit. 509 Special Projects and Readings (1-4 credit hours) Permission of instructor 516 Music Education and Final Presentation (1-2 credit hours) May be repeated for a total of two credit hours. The student works with a faculty advisor to examine three different areas of scholarship. The student creates an oral presentation based on the areas of study. The presentation serves as the Music Education Final Presentation. 595 Teaching Music in Higher Education (2 credit hours) Includes an examination of theories of music teaching and learning, adult learning styles, developmental stages experienced by undergraduate students, and discussion of issues in the teaching of music in higher education. This course is designed to satisfy the training/orientation requirement for graduate student teaching assistants. 800 Research Design in Music Education I (3 credit hours) Study of the Music Education research literature with an emphasis on framing research problems and evaluating research studies from a wide range or research traditions. 807 Graduate Seminar in Music Education (1 credit hour) Required for all doctoral students during the first four semesters. Bi-weekly seminar involving faculty, students, and invited guests in presentations of their research work at various stages of completion. 809 Research in Music Education II (3 credit hours) Continued study of music education research literature with emphasis on the creation of original, defensible proposals for doctoral dissertation. 810 Seminar in Music Teacher Education (3 credit hours) Examination of research and models of instruction in music teacher education with an emphasis on the teaching of undergraduate methods courses in instrumental, choral, and/or general music. 881 Special Readings (1–6 credit hours) Permission of instructor. 900 Preliminary Examination (1 credit hour) For students not otherwise enrolled. May be repeated for credit.

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990 Dissertation/Precandidate Fall, Winter, Spring-Summer (1–8 credit hours) Spring-Half, Summer-Half Term (1–4 credit hours) Election for dissertation work by a doctoral student not yet admitted to status as a candidate. 995 Dissertation/Candidate Fall, Winter, Spring-Summer Term (8 credit hours only) Spring-Half, Summer-Half Term (4 credit hours only) Prerequisite: Graduate school authorization for admission as a doctoral candidate. Only a full-term enrollment is permitted for the period in which the candidate takes a final examination on his or her dissertation.

MUSIC PERFORMANCE Rackham students only 550 Performance Seminar (1 credit hour) A practicum in string and harp performance issues to include special topics in the performance idiom. 581 Organ Music Institute (1, 2 credit hours) One week workshop. 582 Church Music Institute (1, 2 credit hours) One week workshop. 591 Directed Performance (2–4 credit hours) Open only to Rackham School students in music. 592 Chamber Music and Accompanying (2–4 credit hours) For doctoral students in Piano; not open to Accompanying students. 781 Seminar in Performance Problems (1–4 credit hours) Prerequisite: admission to departmental curriculum in performance or permission of instructor. 800 Chamber Music (1–4 credit hours) Prerequisite: permission of instructor. May be repeated for credit. 881 Large Ensemble (1–4 credit hours) Prerequisite: permission of instructor and doctoral advisor. 882 Contemporary Directions Ensemble (1, 2 credit hours) Prerequisite: permission of instructor. 883 Piano Chamber Music and/or Accompanying (2–6 credit hours) For students in Accompanying; permission of instructor and doctoral advisor required. 891 Directed Performance (2–6 credit hours) Prerequisite: admission to departmental curriculum in performance or permission of instructor. 900 Preliminary Examinations (1 credit hour) For students not otherwise enrolled. May be repeated. 990 Dissertation/Precandidate Fall, Winter, Spring-Summer Term (4–8 credit hours) Spring-Half, Summer-Half (2–4 credit hours) 995 Dissertation/Candidate Fall, Winter, Spring-Summer Term (8 credit hours only) Spring-Half, Summer-Half Term (4 credit hours only) Prerequisite: Graduate school authorization for admission as a doctoral candidate. Only a full-term enrollment is permitted for the term in which the candidate takes a final examination on his or her dissertation.

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MUSICOLOGY 501 Introduction to Graduate Study (3 credit hours) 502 Practical Bibliographical and Research Techniques (3 credit hours) Prerequisite: 503. Primarily for M.A. students in Musicology. 503 Bibliography of Music (3 credit hours) 505, 506, 507, 508 Special Courses (1–3 credit hours each; 506 for 1–4 credit hours) Topics vary. 509 Teaching an Introduction to Music (3 credit hours) A course in designing and teaching an Introduction to Music course for non-majors. In-class teaching practice is included. 510 Teaching of Music History (2 credit hours) 511 History of Symphony (2 credit hours) Survey of symphonic repertory from the 18th century to the present. 513 Topics in the Early History of Opera (3 credit hours) Topics in the history of opera of the 17th and 18th centuries, from its beginnings through the operas of Mozart; opera is studied as music, theater, performance medium and cultural expression. 514 History of Opera, 19th - 20th Centuries (3 credit hours) An historical survey of opera (as music, as theatre, and as cultural expression) from the 19th century through the present. 516 History of Musical Instruments (3 credit hours) The historical development of musical instruments, emphasizing those of the Western world. 517 History of Jazz (3 credit hours) Surveys jazz in the United States from its beginnings in African-American aural traditions to the present. 520 Topics in 17th and 18th Century Music (3 credit hours) Survey of European music of the 17th and early 18th centuries. 521 Music of the Classic Era (3 credit hours) Survey of European music from the mid-18th century to about 1810. 522 Music of the 19th Century (3 credit hours) Survey, lecture, and discussion of music from the early 19th century to about 1900. 523 Music of the 20th Century (3 credit hours) Survey of Western music since about 1900. 524 The Art Song (3 credit hours) Survey of European and American art song of the 19th and 20th centuries. 530 History of Music Printing and Publishing (School of Information 558) (3 credit hours) 542 Studies in World Music (3 credit hours) This course examines the music, the instruments, the supporting ideologies of class and gender, the cultural meanings and the performing contexts of a few “canonic” world music genres such as Javanese and Balinese gamelan traditions, Hindustani music, Carnatic music, and Persian classical music. School of Music, Theatre & Dance

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547 Introduction to Ethnomusicology (3 credit hours) Readings and discussion of current issues and methodology in the field. 550 Music in the United States (3 credit hours) Lecture survey of American music from the 18th century to the present, including both formal and informal traditions. 556 Asian American Music (3 credit hours) Examines music of Asian Americans as case studies of musical, personal and communal identities in multi-ethnic, multiracial and transnational contexts in the United States. 557 The Musics of African Americans (3 credit hours) Survey of black American music, including both formal and informal traditions. 558 Music in Culture (3 credit hours) Examines the role of music in selected rituals of Western and non-Western cultures. 559 Music Cultures of Africa and South America (3 credit hours) Survey of indigenous musical practices of these regions. 561 Music of Asia (3 credit hours) Survey of indigenous musical practices of the Asian continent. 562 Japanese Music (2 credit hours) Survey of the history, instruments, forms, and compositional methods of Japanese music from ancient times to the present. 563 Southeast Asian Music (2 credit hours) Survey of the indigenous musical practices of the region. 564 Music of Latin America and the Caribbean (3 credit hours) Introduces the Caribbean as an area comprising many distinct musical cultures, with special focus on Trinidad. 566 Music of Asia I (3 credit hours) Examines the music of East Asia (China, Japan and Korea) as sonic and cultural expressions. 567 Music of Asia II (3 credit hours) Examines some of the better known musical traditions from West Asia (Egypt, Lebanon, Syria, Turkey, Iran, Iraq), South Asia (Pakistan, India, Sri Lanka), and Southeast Asia (Myanmar, Thailand, Cambodia, Laos, Malaysia, Vietnam, Indonesia, Philippines). 568 Jazz Scenes in Historical Perspective (3 credit hours) Examines the constitution of the jazz scenes in New York City, Chicago, Philadelphia, and other American cities throughout the 20th century. 569 Music of the Pacific Islands (3 credit hours) This course introduces students to music and dance traditions in the Pacific Islands (excluding insular Southeast Asia). This area covers numerous diverse societies in three broad cultural and linguistic regions: Melanesia, Micronesia, and Polynesia. This course will cover six themes: contemporary performance contexts; interpretation of available evidence for historical understanding; musical impacts of colonialization; traditionality; diasporic communities; and local/global tensions in contemporary popular culture. 571 Discourses on the Singing Voice (3 credit hours) Seminar on cultural constructions and disciplinary methods of vocal technique, historically and cross-culturally. 134

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577 Medieval Music (3 credit hours) Survey of European music from the Middle Ages to about 1420. 578 Renaissance Music (3 credit hours) Survey of European music from about 1420 to 1600. 581 Special Projects (1–4 credit hours) Independent study. 584 Mensural Notation and Tablature (3 credit hours) Exercises in the sight-singing and transcription of mensural notation and instrumental tablatures. Focuses on repertories from 1400 to 1670. 585 Ethnomusicological Transcription (3 credit hours) This course combines bi-weekly exercises in ethnomusicological transcription and presentation, readings of significant scholarly contributions, critique of existing notational systems, and discussion related to the visual representation of performed musical sound. 591 Musicology Thesis (2–6 credit hours) For Music History/Musicology students only. 592 Musicology Paper (2-6 credit hours) Prerequisite: 501 and 502. 605, 606 Special Course (1–4 credit hours each) Permission of instructor. 621 History of Music Theory I (3 credit hours) Covers the period to 1600. 622 History of Music Theory II (3 credit hours) Covers the period since 1600. 625 Studies in Notation and Editing (3 credit hours) Permission of instructor. 628 Music as Creative and Cultural Practices (3 credit hours) 631 Studies in the History and Application of Performance Practice (3 credit hours) 639, 640 Studies in Medieval Music (3 credit hours each) Permission of instructor. Seminar; topics vary. 641 Studies in Early Renaissance Music (3 credit hours) Permission of instructor. Seminar; topics vary. 642 Studies in Late Renaissance Music (3 credit hours) Permission of instructor. Seminar; topics vary. 643 Studies in Music of the Baroque (3 credit hours) Permission of instructor. Seminar; topics vary. 644 Studies in Music of the Pre-Classic Era (3 credit hours) Permission of instructor. Seminar; topics vary. 645 Studies in Late Classic and Early 19th-Century Styles (3 credit hours) Permission of instructor. Seminar; topics vary.

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646 Studies in Later 19th-Century Styles (3 credit hours) Permission of instructor. Seminar; topics vary. 647 Studies in 20th-Century Music (3 credit hours) Permission of instructor. Seminar; topics vary. 648 Studies in Asian Music (3 credit hours) Permission of instructor. Seminar; topics vary. 649 Studies in Asian Music: Chinese Music (3 credit hours) 650 Studies in Music of the U.S. (3 credit hours) Permission of instructor. Seminar; topics vary. 705, 706, 707, 708 Special Courses (3 credit hours each) Topics vary from term to term. 715 Studies in Organology (3 credit hours) 730 Ethnomusicology Field Methods (3 credit hours) 748 Seminar in Ethnomusicology (3 credit hours) Permission of instructor. Seminar; topics vary. 750 Comparative Aesthetics (3 credit hours) 760 Colloquium in Ethnomusicology (1 credit hour) 881 Special Readings (2–6 credit hours) For Ph.D. students only. May be repeated for credit. 900 Preliminary Examinations (1 credit hour) For students not otherwise enrolled. May be repeated. 990 Dissertation/Precandidate Fall, Winter, Spring-Summer Term (1–8 credit hours) Spring-Half, Summer-Half term (1–4 credit hours) Election for dissertation work by a doctoral student not yet admitted to status as a candidate. 995 Dissertation/Candidate Fall, Winter, Spring-Summer (8 credit hours only) Spring-Half, Summer-Half Term (4 credit hours only) Prerequisite: Graduate school authorization for admission as a doctoral candidate. Only a full-term enrollment is permitted for the period in which the candidate takes a final examination on his or her dissertation.

OPERA 540, 541 Opera Workshop I (2 credit hours each) 540 is a prerequisite to 541. An introductory course including coaching in arias and scenes and training in the basics of the dramatic aspects of opera. 550, 551 Opera Workshop II (2 credit hours each) Prerequisite: permission of instructor. 550 is a prerequisite to 551. Topics such as basic stagecraft, audition technique, movement, sense memory, and emotional recall are developed and then applied to full-scale opera productions. 555 Opera Repertory and Production (2–4 credit hours) By audition. A full-scale series of double-cast performances. 136

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ORGAN 587 Pedagogy “The Teaching of Organ” (2 credit hours)

ORGAN LITERATURE 581 Organ Literature: Antiquity to 1750 (2 credit hours) Survey of major schools of organ composition from antiquity through J. S. Bach. Documentary sources, concepts of organ design, and performance practices are related to each major period and are used by students in preparing works performed in class. 582 Organ Literature: 1750 to Present (2 credit hours) Survey of organ literature, performance practices, and organ design after J. S. Bach, concentrating on major works. A portion of each class is devoted to organ design and construction. Includes study of documentary sources and historic sound recordings. 587 Organ Pedagogy (2 credit hours) 595 Practicum in Teaching (1 credit hour) This course is designed to satisfy the training/orientation requirement for graduate student teaching assistants. 782 Early Music for Keyboard (2–4 credit hours) A study of selected pre-Bach composers from the schools of North and South Germany, the Netherlands, France, Italy, Spain, and England. Attention is given to performance practices with particular emphasis on rhythm, phrasing and articulation, ornamentation, and concepts of registration. Content varies; may be repeated for credit. 783 Baroque Organ Music (2–4 credit hours) Concentrates on the music of North German composers with particular emphasis on the music of J. S. Bach. Specific collections of his organ music such as the Orgelbuchlein, Trio Sonatas, “Leipzig” chorales, and Clavier-Übung, as well as the major preludes and fugues, are studied; focuses on differences and similarities among organs found in the northern and central regions of Germany. Content varies; may be repeated for credit. 784 Romantic Organ Literature (2–4 credit hours) A study of aspects of 19th-century musical style as found in the organ works of Liszt, Mendelssohn, Brahms, Franck, and the French symphonists. Consideration is given to the relationship between specific compositions and 19th-century organ design. Content varies; may be repeated for credit. 785 Organ Music of the 20th Century (2–4 credit hours) A seminar devoted to organ works of one or more major composers of the 20th century. Each class member researches and presents a specific topic; students also prepare representative works to be coached in class and performed on a group recital. Content varies; may be repeated for credit. 786 Music of the French Baroque (2–4 credit hours)

PERCUSSION 519 Percussion Pedagogy I (2-3 credit hours) Prerequisite: WPID Percussion majors or principals; permission of instructor. Class members will develop a holistic approach encompassing qualitative critical analysis and creative thinking. The course offers healthful physiological and psychological methodologies needed to tutor percussion students at all levels (including the primary and secondary grades pre-professional, and college) in a sequential approach toward musical and technical development.

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520 Percussion Pedagogy II (2-3 credit hours) Prerequisite: 519; WPID Percussion majors or principals; permission of instructor. Class members will put into practice the knowledge assimilated in Percussion Pedagogy I. During laboratory sessions, class members will teach each other as well as guests who will include non-percussion music majors, non-musician university students, primary school students, and senior citizens. 588 Percussion Literature I (3 credit hours) Prerequisite: WPID Percussion majors and principals; permission of instructor. Class members will study seminal repertory, which has had a significant influence on the development of percussion music. The historical time frame of works, the performance practice of the period including instrument selection, and the compositional form will be discussed in the context of comparing multiple recordings of some works. 589 Percussion Literature II (3 credit hours) Prerequisite: WPID Percussion majors and principals; permission of instructor. Class members will study current directions in the development of the percussion repertory. Comparative study of recordings of significant works will aid in developing an aesthetic by which class members will be able to evaluate new works.

PERFORMING ARTS TECHNOLOGY 501 Introduction to Computer Music (3 credit hours) This course is an introduction to electronic musical instruments, MIDI, and digital audio systems. Students create several original compositions for presentation and discussion. The aesthetics of electroacoustic composition are discussed through study of selected repertoire. 502 Summer Workshop (1, 2 credit hours) Music Education Summer Masters only. Introduction to music technology for music educators. 507 Directed Individual Study (1-3 credit hours) Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Students receive individual instruction, consultation and guidance from the instructor. Course emphasis is on developing individual research skills that culminates in a final project or paper. 510 Media Arts: Immersion and Enculturation (3 credit hours) Prerequisite: Media Arts graduate student or permission of instructor. The course details the theory and practice of music technology, interactive art forms that use technology, models of human computer interaction, and digital video and animation. Students will perform analyses of contemporary works in the media arts from aesthetic, production, technological, and artistic points of view. Students will examine the roles in the collaborative process. 511 Engineering Applications of Media Technology (3 credit hours) Prerequisite: Media Arts graduate student or permission of instructor. Algorithm design and analysis with applications in the sonic and visual arts; fundamental knowledge representation, formal reasoning, and search algorithms. An emphasis on fundamental computational problems in the media arts and a discussion of the introductory issues in encoding and processing style. 512 Interdisciplinary Collaboration I (3 credit hours) Prerequisite: Media Arts graduate student or permission of instructor. Students form teams to realize computer-based multimedia works that integrate technology, music, sound, art, and moving image. Students analyze the work as an individual, as well as a member of a group. The analysis details aspects of the design, role development, collaboration, aesthetic goal, artistic statement, production values, and the role of technology in the creative process. 513 Interdisciplinary Collaboration II (3 credit hours) Prerequisite: Media Arts graduate student or permission of instructor. A continuation of Interdisciplinary Collaboration I with an emphasis on large-scale multimedia interactive installations. 138

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521 Computer Music Composition and Arranging (3 credit hours) Prerequisite: PAT 501. This course is a continuation of PAT 501 with an emphasis on composition and arranging using MIDI, software samplers, and digital audio systems. Compositional issues are explored by classroom discussion, critiques, and lectures. 522 Technical Ear Training and Critical Listening (3 credit hours) Prerequisite: permission of instructor. This course is an introduction to the concept of translating between timbres and frequency resonances produced by parametric equalization. Students learn to aurally identify different timbres through their corresponding spectral envelopes. Critical listening exercises will also be explored with a focus on dynamics processing, spatial characteristics, spectral balance, and recording, mixing, and production techniques. 531 Contemporary Practices in Studio Production I (3 credit hours) Prerequisite: PAT 332. The advanced study of theory and practice of recording techniques, mixing, and production for multi-channel audio systems through guided projects. 532 Contemporary Practices in Studio Production II (3 credit hours) Prerequisite: PAT 531. This course focuses on the development of the producer’s role as techno-artistic interpreter and creative collaborator. Critical listening and discussion investigate the evolution from the “illusion of reality” aesthetic to the “reality of illusion” point of view. Producers studied include Gaisberg, Spector, Martin, Eno, Reznor, and Dr. Dre. Students sharpen their creative, technical, and production skills through the realization of complex recordings. 541 Image, Sound, and Story (3 credit hours) Prerequisite: PAT 501, 521, 561 (concurrent). This course investigates the relationship among music, sound design, moving image and narrative. Students create original audio-visual compositions using digital video, animation techniques, and digital audio tools. A range of aesthetic and technical approaches to combining music, sound, and the moving image are considered. Readings, screenings, and critiques accompany studio work. 542 Interactive Media (3 credit hours) Prerequisite: PAT 541. Students work on film and animation projects, in roles such as composers, sound designers, dialog editors, mix engineers, or production audio crew. The emphasis is on developing an awareness of the multiple ways that music and sound can interact with the moving image to create meaning. The course also includes some instruction in relevant techniques of syncing to picture, spotting music, dialog editing, on-set recording. 551 Advanced Computer Composition (3 credit hours) Prerequisite: Math 115 and one semester of computer programming. This course introduces the technological and theoretical foundations of designing physically interactive media experiences. Students develop interactive sensing systems and program embedded computing devices as well as real-time auditory, visual and tangible displays. Through exercises that draw on theory and techniques of interaction design, students create technological sketches and prototypes for novel devices and artworks. 552 Intermedia Composition and Performance (3 credit hours) Prerequisite: PAT 551. The course focuses on the application of skills and techniques developed in Interactive Media Design I to design and implement physically interactive performance systems and media installations. Incorporating advanced sensing and interaction techniques, students create fully realized works that are exhibited before a public audience. Seminal works of interactive art and interactive performance are discussed and critiqued. 561 Performance Systems (3 credit hours) Prerequisite: Math 115, PAT 201 and one semester of computer programming. This course explores contemporary technologies that support musical performance. Topics include the goals of technologyenhanced performance, instrument interfacing, system design, programmable systems, and sound reinforcement design for playback of electronic and acoustic ensembles. Students create original 139

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compositions using performance systems that they have designed and built and direct performances that use these systems. 562 Digital Synthesis (3 credit hours) Prerequisite: 561. An introduction to digital sound synthesis and signal processing theory with an emphasis on sound design and compositional applications. Topics include additive synthesis, amplitude modulation, ring modulation, frequency modulation, subtractive synthesis, granular synthesis, physical modeling synthesis, heterodyne filter analysis/resynthesis, linear predictive coding, and phase vocoding. 571 Contemporary Practices in Research and Scholarship (3 credit hours) The course presents contemporary practices in research and scholarship including aesthetics, pedagogy, system design and development, and media encoding and delivery. 572 Business of Music (3 credit hours) Prerequisite: PAT 331 and Music Theory 240. This course discusses the essential aspects of the music business including performing rights agencies, copyright, licensing, music publishing, contracts, royalties, and distribution. Selected readings will include case studies from a variety of musical genres. 581 Independent Study (1-4 credit hours) Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Students receive individual instruction, consultation, and guidance from the instructor. Course emphasis is on developing individual research skills that culminates in a final project or paper. 590 Thesis (1-9 credit hours) Prerequisite: Media Arts graduate students only. Supervised work on a research topic in the Media Arts approved by the student’s thesis committee.

PIANO LITERATURE AND PEDAGOGY 500 Piano Skills for MIDI Applications (1 credit hour) Summer workshop. 501 Piano Technology (2 credit hours) 502 Practicum in Piano Technology (3 credit hours) 565 Individual Studies in Piano Technology (2 credit hours) 580 Introduction to Fortepiano (2 credit hours) Permission of instructor. 581, 582 Piano Pedagogy: Beginning, Intermediate and Advanced (3 credit hours each) 581 is prerequisite for 582, or permission of instructor. 583, 584* Piano Pedagogy: Supervised Teaching (2–6 credit hours each) Permission of instructor. 585 College and Adult Group Teaching (3 credit hours) 586 Historical and International Perspectives (3 credit hours) 587 Techniques of Vocal Coaching (3 credit hours) 588 Survey of Piano Chamber Music Literature (3 credit hours) Survey of the chamber music repertoire that includes the piano, from the late 18th century to the present day. A stylistic overview of major works of the genre, from a performer-oriented perspective. 140

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589 Concerti (2 credit hours) Survey of the keyboard concerto from Bach to the present. Representative works are studied in class and through outside listening. Student presentations will be expected of DMA students enrolled in the course. 590 Sonatas (2 credit hours) Survey of the solo piano sonata from Scarlatti to the present. Representative works are studied in class and through outside listening. Student presentations will be expected of DMA students enrolled in the course. 591 Suites and Character Pieces (2 credit hours) Survey of the genre of keyboard suites and character pieces from Bach to the present. Representative works are studied in class and through outside listening. Student presentations will be expected of DMA students enrolled in the course. 592 Fantasies and Variations (2 credit hours) Survey of the genre of keyboard fantasies and variations from Bach to the present. Representative works are studied in class and through outside listening. Student presentations will be expected of DMA students enrolled in the course. 595 Practicum in Teaching (1 credit hour) This course is designed to satisfy the training/orientation requirement for graduate student teaching assistants.

STRING LITERATURE 518 String Pedagogy (1 credit hour) Spring/summer workshop. 542 Seminar in Chamber Music Literature (2 credit hours) 543 Seminar in the String Quartets of Beethoven (2 credit hours) Permission of instructor.

THEORY 461 Analysis of Tonal Music (2 credit hours) Prerequisite: enrollment only for graduate students place into 461 by Theory Placement Exam. Remedial review course for graduate students 507 Directed Individual Studies (1–4 credit hours) Permission of department chair. May be repeated for credit. 531 Schenkerian Theory and Analysis I (3 credit hours) Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Teaches the basic techniques of Schenkerian analysis; emphasizes basic concepts of linear, contrapuntal, and harmonic structure in tonal music; analyzes excerpts and short compositions. Students learn to express their analytical insights through the preparation of voice-leading graphs. 532 Schenkerian Theory and Analysis II (3 credit hours) Prerequisite: permission of instructor. A continuation of 531, emphasizing analysis of complete compositions or movements from multi-movement works. Compositions chosen reflect a variety of formal types and a variety of styles, ranging from Bach to Chopin and Brahms. 533 Analysis of 20th Century Modernist Music (3 credit hours) Prerequisite: 250 or equivalent. Primary emphasis is on the development of analytical and aural skills in significant 20th-century music. Varied repertoire; varied aural and analytical approaches.

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Masters Degree Course Descriptions

534 20th-Century Music: Theory and Analysis I (3 credit hours) Prerequisites: 433 or permission of instructor. A systematic and critical study of theoretical systems treating music of the 20th century. Practice in applying these systems in analyses of significant repertoire. 535 Pop/Rock Music Theory (3 credit hours) Prerequisite: 250. Explores tonal analysis or American and British pop/rock music from early rockn-roll to the present. 536 Analytical History of Jazz (3 credit hours) Prerequisite: 250 or equivalent. Treats the evolution of jazz in the United States through the 1940s. Aural transcription of music and the creation of musical scores for works available only on record; analysis of sheet music, autographed scores, first editions, etc., in order to induce theory of the evolution of musical styles in jazz. 537 Proseminar in the Analysis of Music (3 credit hours) Prerequisites: 430 or permission of instructor. Each proseminar treats varied repertoire presenting different approaches for analysis. Each may be repeated for credit. 540 Species Counterpoint I 1450-1600 (3 credit hours) 540 is a prerequisite to 541. 541 Species Counterpoint II (3 credit hours) Prerequisite: 540. Continuation of 540. 542 18th-Century Counterpoint I (3 credit hours) Prerequisite: 250 or equivalent. Involves analysis and practice of the craft of counterpoint based on 18th-century repertoire of Western music and scholarly treatises of both that period and the present. A diet of species counterpoint is emphasized in the first half, then varieties of contrapuntal craft of the difficulty of two- and three-part inventions of J. S. Bach. 543 18th-Century Counterpoint II (3 credit hours) Prerequisite: 542. Moving ahead in analysis and practice of craft to sophisticated settings of 18thcentury contrapuntal forms, especially with the creation of fugues in the styles of representative composers. Pedagogical treaties of that era as well as contemporary scholarship are dealt with in analytical and creative tasks. 544 Practical Ornamentation and Elaboration (3 credit hours) Prerequisite: 250 or equivalent. Analysis of scores and treatises of the 17th and 18th century undergirds creative invention of ornamentation and elaboration in the specific style of major composers of these eras. 551 Advanced Aural Skills (3 credit hours) Graduate students only; permission of instructor. 552 Project in Tonal Composition (2 credit hours) Theory majors only. Creative work to model traditional composition forms, with careful attention to development processes attendant to the common practice period. 560 Special Studies (3 credit hours) Prerequisite: 250 with permission of instructor. See Time Schedule for description in any particular term. May be repeated for credit. 590 Teaching Tonal Theory (2 credit hours) Permission of instructor. Integration of practical teaching techniques with evaluation of texts and anthologies. Coverage includes fundamentals, harmony, ear training, sight-singing, keyboard harmony, counterpoint, tonal analysis, and various integrated approaches; introduction to some computer-assisted materials. 142

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595 Practicum in Teaching (1 credit hour) This course is designed to satisfy the training/orientation requirement for graduate student teaching assistants. 621 History of Music Theory I (3 credit hours) Also listed as MHM 621. Survey of the intellectual history of music theory, from antiquity to 1600. 622 History of Music Theory II (3 credit hours) Also listed as MHM 622. Continuation of 621. Survey of the intellectual history of music theory from 1600 to 1900. 631 Canon and Fugue (3 credit hours) Prerequisite: 473, 474. Study and practice of advanced principles of counterpoint as evident in canon and fugue in repertoire of the 18th and 19th centuries. 651 Topics in Analysis (3 credit hours) Prerequisite: 511 or equivalent with permission of instructor. Illustrative offerings: Chromatic Harmony, Compositional Systems. May be repeated for credit. 721 20th-Century Theories of Tonal Music (3 credit hours) Prerequisite: 511 or permission of instructor. A comparative, critical exploration of different analytical systems that treat music of the common practice period. 723 20th-Century Music Theory and Analysis II (3 credit hours) Prerequisite: 722 or permission of instructor. 805, 806 Seminar in Music Theory (3 credit hours each) Permission of instructor. Recent offerings: Theory of Rhythm in Tonal Music; Generative Theory of Music. May be repeated for credit. 807 Research Project (2–4 credit hours) Permission of department chair. Collaborative or directed research project other than dissertation. May be repeated for credit. 900 Preliminary Examination (1 credit hour) For students not otherwise enrolled. May be repeated. 990 Dissertation/Precandidate Fall, Winter, Spring-Summer Terms (1-8 credit hours); Spring-Half, Summer Half Term (1-4 credit hours) Election for dissertation work by a doctoral student not yet admitted to status as a candidate. 995 Dissertation/Candidate Fall, Winter, Spring-Summer Term (8 credit hours only); Spring-Half, Summer-Half Term (4 credit hours only) Prerequisite: Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral candidate. Only a full-term enrollment is permitted for the term in which the candidate takes a final examination on his or her dissertation.

VIOLIN 560 Viola for Violin (1 credit hour) Permission of instructor in consultation with advisor. A praticum for violin majors on the basics of viola playing to be taken in conjunction with playing one semester of viola in Quartet 535. Six, half hour lessons every two weeks and three performance in Viola Studio Class are required.

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VOICE LITERATURE 504 Master Class in Vocal Literature (1–4 credit hours) 505 Italian and Latin Diction for Singers (2 credit hours) 506 German and English Diction for Singers (2 credit hours) 507 French Diction for Singers (2 credit hours) 510 Artsongs of African American Composers (2 credit hours) 518 Voice Pedagogy for Teachers and Conductors (1 credit hour) Spring/summer workshop. 519 Teaching of Voice I (2 credit hours) 520 Teaching of Voice II (2 credit hours) 567 Oratorio (2 credit hours) 568 Independent Study (1–3 credit hours) Permission of instructor. 569 Interpretation of Opera Arias (3 credit hours) 592 Interpretation of Songs (3 credit hours) Permission of instructor.

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UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN CALENDAR

The University of Michigan calendar consists of a Fall Term, a Winter Term, and a Spring-Summer Term, which includes a Spring Half-Term of eight weeks, and a Summer Half-Term of eight weeks. These calendars are subject to change. Fall Term 2012 *Registration (for students not pre-registered) .........................................................Friday, August 31 Labor Day (Holiday) ......................................................................................Monday, September 3 Classes Begin.............................................................................................Tuesday, September 4 Fall Study Break..................................................................Monday, October 15 - Tuesday, October 16 Thanksgiving Recess (5:00pm).................................................................Wednesday, November 21 Classes resume from Thanksgiving (8:00am)....................................................Monday, November 26 Classes End...............................................................................................Tuesday, December 11 Study Days...........................................................................................Wednesday, December 12 Saturday, December 15 - Sunday, December 16 Examinations..............................................................Thursday, December 13 - Friday, December 14 Monday, December 17 - Thursday, December 20 Commencement.........................................................................................Sunday, December 16 Winter Term 2013 *Registration (for students not pre-registered).......................................................Tuesday, January 8 Classes Begin.............................................................................................Wednesday, January 9 Martin Luther King, Jr. Day (University Symposia/no regular classes)...........................Monday, January 21 Vacation Begins 12:00 noon.................................................................................Saturday, March 2 Classes Resume...............................................................................................Monday, March 11 University Honors Convocation............................................................................Sunday, March 17 Classes End.......................................................................................................Tuesday, April 23 Study Days...................................................................................................Wednesday, April 24 Saturday, April 27 - Sunday, April 28 Examinations..............................................................................Thursday, April 25 - Friday, April 26 Monday, April 29 - Thursday, May 2 Commencement Activities................................................................Thursday, May 2 - Sunday, May 5 Spring - Summer Term 2013 *Registration (full term and half Spring)......................................................................Monday, May 6 Classes Begin.......................................................................................................Tuesday, May 7 Memorial Day (Holiday).........................................................................................Monday, May 27 Classes End (Spring half) 5:00pm............................................................................Friday, June 21 Study Days................................................................................Saturday, June 22 - Sunday, June 23 Examinations.............................................................................Monday, June 24 - Tuesday, June 25 Spring Half Term Ends..........................................................................................Tuesday, June 25 *Registration (Summer half)............................................................................Wednesday, June 26 Summer Half Term Classes Begin..........................................................................Thursday, June 27 Independence Day (Holiday Observed).....................................................................Thursday, July 4 Classes End 5:00pm........................................................................................Tuesday, August 13 Examinations.....................................................................Thursday, August 15 - Friday, August 16 Full Term and Summer Half Term Ends...................................................................Friday, August 16 Students enrolling in Business Administration, Dentistry, Law, Pharmacy, Social Work, and Medicine should check with their respective schools for academic calendar information, including registration dates. This calendar is subject to change. The University’s policy on religious holidays and academic conflicts can be found the following web address: http://www.provost.umich.edu/calendar/religious_holidays.html

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INFORMATION INDEX/CONTACTS School of Music, Theatre & Dance Offices Academic Affairs Office............................................Martha Snyder: 764-2516 / martysny@umich.edu Admissions .....................................................................764-0593 / smtd.admissions@umich.edu Assistant Dean for Admissions and Enrollment Management.............................Laura Hoffman: 764-0593 lauras@umich.edu Assistant Director of Academic Advising and School Registrar..............................Deedee Ulintz: 764-0592 dianals@umich.edu Associate Dean for Academic Affairs......................................Melody Racine: 764-2516 / red@umich.edu Associate Dean for Administration...........................................John Ellis: 936-2497 / jsellis@umich.edu Associate Dean for Graduate Studies..........................Steven Whiting: 764-0590 / stevenmw@umich.edu Auditions .........................................................Katherine Harkness: 763-6677 / kidavids@umich.edu Block M Records..............................................................Ron Torella: 615-3734 / torrella@umich.edu Dance Department ....................................................................................................763-5460 Dean’s Office ............................................................................................................764-0584 Director of Ensemble Operations .....................................Emily Avers: 936-1915 / eavers@umich.edu Events Hotline (24 hours)..............................................................................................764-0583 Facilities..........................................................Mary-Alice Wiland: 764-6524 / mawiland@umich.edu Fax.........................................................................................................................763-5097 Human Resources......................................................................................................764-6521 Information Office......................................................................................................764-0583 Marketing and Communications...................................Rachel Francisco: 764-0594 / rachaf@umich.edu Michigan League Ticket Office........................................................................................764-2538 Michigan Marching Band...............................................................................................764-6102 MPulse and Interlochen All-State Program........................................................................936-2660 Music Library ............................................................................................................764-2512 Music and Multimedia.............................................Jeremy Edwards: 647-2020 / jredward@umich.edu Musical Theatre................................................................764-0593 / smtd.admissions@umich.edu Outreach Program ................................................Prof. Louis Nagel: 764-2511 / julou@umich.edu Piano Technology Department.......................................................................................764-6207 Rackham Program Information ............................Kelsey Sieverding: 764-0590 / kmsolber@umich.edu Scheduling Office .................................................Brittany Deyoung: 936-2214 / brithart@umich.edu Sound and Video Services................................................Roger Arnett: 764-2505 / rogera@umich.edu Student Services .......................................................................................................764-0593 Theatre Department ...............................................................764-5350 / theatre.info@umich.edu Webmaster...................................................................................music.webmaster@umich.edu

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University Offices and Services Campus Information...................................................764-INFO (764-4636) / www.umich.edu/~info Career Planning and Placement.........................................................764-7460 / www.cpp.umich.edu Cashier’s Office .............................................(Central Campus) 764-8230; (North Campus) 936-4936 Cashiers.Office@umich.edu / www.cashiers.umich.edu Center for the Child and Family .......................................764-9466 / www.sitemaker.umich.edu/uccf Commencement Information.................................................647-6037 / www.umich.edu/~gradinfo Counseling and Psychological Services ........................................764-8312 / www.umich.edu/~caps Dean of Students.................................................................764-7420 / deanofstudents@umich.edu Domestic Violence Crisis Line ...................(non-UM number) 995-5444 / www.umich.edu/~pog/VAWTF Domestic Violence project/SAFE House . ...............................................(non-UM number) 995-5444 Drink Wise ...........................................(non-UM number) 975-4000 / www.med.umich.edu/drinkwise English Language Institute .........................................................764-2413 / www.lsa.umich.edu/eli Evaluations and Examinations ................................................................www.umich.edu/~eande Financial Aid Office ....................................................................763-6600 / www.finaid.umich.edu Hatcher Graduate Library ........................................................764-0400 / www.lib.umich.edu/grad Health Services ............................................764-8320; 662-5674 (after hours) / www.uhs.umich.edu Housing Office .......................................................................647-3048 / www.housing.umich.edu International Center ..............................................................764-9310 / www.umich.edu/~icenter Lesbian Gay Bisexual and Transgender Affairs ........................763-4186 / www.umich.edu/~inqueery MCard Office ..............................................................93-MCARD (6-2273) / www.mcard.umich.edu Michigan Daily (Campus Newspaper)...........................................................www.michigandaily.com Michigan Student Assembly ..........................................................763-3241 / www.msa.umich.edu Multi-Ethnic Student Affairs ................................................763-9044 / www.umich.edu/~mesamss North Campus Family Health Services..............................................................................647-1636 Off Campus Housing Office ....................................763-3164 / www.offcampus.housing.umich.edu/lt Office of New Student Programs ...................................................764-6413 / www.onsp.umich.edu Office of Student Conflict Resolution ............................................936-6308 / www.umich.edu/~oscr Ombuds Office...............................................Ombuds-DSA@umich.edu / www.umich.edu/~ombuds Public Safety and Security ..........................................(non-emergency) 763-1131; (emergency) 911 www.umich.edu/~safety Rackham Graduate School ......................................................764-8129 / www.rackham.umich.edu Rackham Student Government .............................................................www.umich.edu/~rstugov Services for Students with Disabilities ........................................763-3000 / www.umich.edu/~sswd Sexual Assault Prevention and Awareness Center ............................(crisis Line) 936-3333; 998-9368 www.umich.edu/~sapac Shapiro Undergraduate Library ...................................................764-7490 / www.lib.umich.edu/ugl Student Conflict Resolution............................................................................www.oscr.umich.edu Student Directory.................................................................................www.directory.umich.edu Student Employment .............................................763-4128 / www.studentemployment.umich.edu Student Financial Operations............................................................764-7447 / um-sfo@umich.edu Student Legal Services ............................................763-9920 / studentlegalservices.dsa.umich.edu Study Abroad Program ....................................764-9310 / www.umich.edu/~icenter/overseas/study Sweetland Writing Center ........................................................764-0429 / www.lsa.umich.edu/swc Troubleshooting...............................................................M-Answer: www.umich.edu/~manswers Tuition and Fees...........................................................................www.umich.edu/~regoff/tuition Undergraduate Admissions Office .........................................764-7433 / www.admissions.umich.edu University Hospital Information.....................................................................................936-4000 University Police........................................................(non-emergency) 763-1131; (emergency) 911 public.safety@umich.edu / http://police.umich.edu University Registrar’s Office .............................(Central Campus) 647-3507; (North Campus) 763-7650 www.umich.edu/~regoff

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INDEX A Academic Calendar..............................................146 Academic Code of Conduct........................................3 Academic Discipline..............................................14 Academic Minors..................................................23 Adding or Dropping Course.......................................... (bachelors) 15; (masters) 108 Admissions Policy..................................(masters) 105 Advising...............................................................8 Alcohol and Drug Policy.............................................4 Application for Graduation......................................11 Area Distribution Requirements for Certification...........46 Artist and Scholar Honors Program............................19 Arts Administration Course Descriptions........................ (bachelors) 63; (masters) 126 Arts Administration Curriculum................(MBA/MM) 113 Attendance and Absences.........................................8 B Bachelor of Musical Arts Curriculum..............(BMA) 19; 27 Bachelor of Theatre Arts Curriculum..............(BTA) 19; 28 Bachelor’s Degree Course Descriptions.................63-98 Bachelor’s Degree Curricula...............................27-61 Bachelor’s Degree Programs Listing..........................17 Bachelors Student Information...........................13-15 C Carillon Curriculum......................................(MM) 113 Changing or Adding a Degree Program..........................8 Church Music Course Descriptions................................ (bachelors) 63; (masters) 126 Church Music Curriculum...............................(MM) 114 Classroom Use Policy...............................................6 Collaborative Piano Curriculum..........(MM) 114; (SM) 123 Composition Course Descriptions................................ (bachelors) 63; (masters) 127 Composition Curriculum....................(BM) 42; (MM) 115 Conducting Course Descriptions.................................. (bachelors) 64; (masters) 128 Conducting Curriculum.................................(MM) 114 Conflict Resolution..................................................5 Contact Information.....................................147-148 Core Curriculum...................................................18 Course Substitution or Waiver Policy...........................10 Credit by Examination Policy........................................ (bachelors) 15; (masters) 108 Credit Hour Requirements.......................(masters) 106 D Dance Course Descriptions......................(bachelors) 65 Dance Curriculum.........................................(BFA) 29 Degree Program Listing............................................. (bachelors) 17; (masters) 111-112 Directory Information.............................................6 Disenrolling from Courses.........................................9 Double Enrollment.............................................11 Dual Degrees................................(bachelors) 20 E Early Keyboard Instruments Curriculum............(MM) 115

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Early Music Curriculum....................................(BM) 50 Electronic Documentation and Recording.....................6 Ensemble Course Descriptions.................................... (bachelors) 70; (masters) 129 Ethnomusicology Curriculum..............(BM) 49; (SM) 122 Examinations/Juries.............................................11 F Financial Holds.....................................................12 Fortepiano Curriculum..................................(MM) 116 G Grades and Scholastic Standing................................11 Grading Criteria................(bachelors) 14; (masters) 107 Grievance Procedure...............................................5 H Hall Use Policy........................................................6 Harp Curriculum.................(BM) 43; (MM) 116; (SM) 122 Harpsichord Curriculum................................(MM) 116 I Identification Cards................................................6 Improvisation Curriculum.............................(MM) 117 Incomplete Grade Policy............................................. (bachelors) 14; (masters) 107 Independent Study...............................................10 Information Index........................................147-148 J Jazz and Contemplative Studies Curriculum................30 Jazz and Contemporary Improvisation Curriculum........31 Jazz and Improvisation Studies Course Descriptions......... (bachelors) 73; (masters) 131 Jazz Studies Curriculum.....................................32-33 Jazz Studies Performance Course Sequence..............101 Jobs....................................................................7 Juries................................................................11 K Keyboard Instruments Curriculum...................(MM) 117 L Language Requirements for Graduate Students..........109 Leave of Absence Policy.............................................7 M Master’s Degree Course Descriptions................126-145 Master’s Degree Programs Listing...........................111 Masters Student Information..........................105-109 Merit-Based Scholarships.......................................12 Minor in Performing Arts Management........................20 Minor in Theatre Design and Production.......................22 Mission Statement..................................................3 MPlanner ..............................................................4 Multiple Degrees for Graduate Students....................105 Music Education Course Descriptions............................ (bachelors) 74; (masters) 131

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Music Education Curriculum........................................ (BM) 44-46; (MM) 117-118 Music History Curriculum................................. (BM) 48 Music Honors Course Descriptions.............................76 Music Performance Course Descriptions......................... (bachelors) 76; (masters) 133 Music Theory Course Descriptions................................ (bachelors) 94; (masters) 142 Music Theory Curriculum..................................(BM) 47 Musical Theatre Course Descriptions.........................76 Musical Theatre Curriculum.............................(BFA) 34 Musicology Course Descriptions.................................. (bachelors) 78; (masters) 134 Musicology Curriculum...............................(BM) 48-50 N Need-Based Financial Aid........................................12 Non-Academic Conduct...........................................4 Non Candidate for Degree........................................... (bachelors) 7; (masters) 107 Non-SMTD Minors..............................................23 O Opera Course Descriptions......................................... (bachelors) 81; (masters) 137 Organ Curriculum......................................(MM) 119 Organ and Church Music Curriculum...............(BM) 51-52 Organ Literature Course Descriptions............................ (bachelors) 82; (masters) 138 Overrides.............................................................9 P Part-Time or Overload Enrollment...............................9 Pass-Fail Option................(bachelors) 14; (masters) 107 Performance Course Elective Sequence......................... (bachelors) 100; (masters) 102 Performance Course Information.....................100-103 Performance Instruction..........................................9 Performing Arts Management Minor.........................20 Performing Arts Technology Course Descriptions.............. (bachelors) 82; (masters) 139 Performing Arts Technology Curriculum:........................ BM Music and Technology (PAT A)..........................35 BFA Music Concentration (PAT B)..........................36 BFA Media Concentration (PAT C)..........................37 BS Sound Engineering (PAT D).............................38 Piano Curriculum.........................(BM) 53-54; (MM) 119 Piano Literature and Pedagogy Course Descriptions.......... (bachelors) 85; (masters) 141 Piano Pedagogy and Performance Curriculum.....(MM) 119 Practice Room Policy................................................6 Progress Towards a Degree........................................8

Religious Holiday Policy............................................4 Residence Requirements........................(masters) 105 S School of Music, Theatre & Dance Offices Contacts........147 Semester Hours of Credit.........................(bachelors) 18 Senior Residence..................................................19 Signatures...........................................................4 Sound Engineering Curriculum..........................(BM) 38 Specialist in Music Degree......................................122 String Literature Course Descriptions.......................142 String Instruments Curriculum.................................... (BM) 55-56; (MM) 120; (SM) 124 Student Grievance Procedure....................................5 T Theatre Course Descriptions....................(bachelors) 86 Theory Course Descriptions................(BM) 94; (MM) 142 Theatre Design and Production Curriculum..................39 Theatre Design and Production Minor..........................22 Theatre Performance: Acting Curriculum....................40 Theatre Performance: Directing Curriculum................41 Time Limit for Graduate Students............................105 Transfer Credit.................(bachelors) 18; (masters) 106 U University Services Contacts.................................147 V Vocal Accompanying and Coaching Curriculum....(SM) 123 Voice Curriculum...................................................... (BM) 57-58; (MM) 120; (SM) 124 Voice Literature Course Descriptions............................. (bachelors) 98; (masters) 145 W Wind Instruments and Percussion Curriculum................ (BM) 59-61; (MM) 121; (SM) 124 Withdrawal from Courses.........................................9 Wolverine Access...................................................6

R Rackham Music Programs.....................................112 Readmission Policy.................................................7 Recital Policy..........................................................7 Recording Policy.....................................................6 Registration..........................................................8

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University of Michigan Nondiscrimination Policy Statement The University of Michigan, as an equal opportunity/affirmative action employer, complies with all applicable federal and state laws regarding nondiscrimination and affirmative action, including Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973. The University of Michigan is committed to a policy of nondiscrimination and equal opportunity for all persons regardless of race, sex, color, religion, creed, national origin or ancestry, age, marital status, sexual orientation, disability, or Vietnam-era veteran status in employment, educational programs and activities, and admissions. Inquiries or complaints may be addressed to the University’s Director for Affirmative Action and Title IX/Section 504 Coordinator, 4005 Wolverine Tower, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-1281, 734-763-0235, TTY 734-647-1388. For other University of Michigan information call 734-764-1817. Campus Safety Each year, the University of Michigan prepares an Annual Security Report. The report includes information on campus safety and security policies, procedures and programs, including information on emergency services, security telephone numbers, sexual assault policy, stalking laws, handling obscene phone calls, sexual harassment policy, dealing with workplace violence and threats, police agencies, health services, counseling services, safe transportation after dark, safety tips, and alcohol and drug policies and programs. The report also includes statistics concerning crimes on campus. If you would like to receive a complete copy, please write or call the University of Michigan Police, 1239 Kipke Drive, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-2036, 734-763-3434 The University of Michigan School of Music, Theatre & Dance Administrative Officers Christopher Kendall M.M. Dean and Paul Boylan Collegiate Professor of Music, Theatre & Dance Steven Whiting, Ph.D. Associate Dean For Graduate Studies and Professor of Musicology Melody Racine, M.M. Associate Dean for Academic Affairs and Associate Professor of Voice Daniel Washington, M.M. Associate Dean For Faculty and Multi-Cultural Affairs and Professor of Voice John Ellis, D.M.A. Associate Dean for Administration and Associate Professor of Piano and Piano Pedagogy Laura Hoffman, B.A. Assistant Dean for Admissions and Enrollment Management Maureen Schafer, M.M. Director of Development and External Relations The School of Music, Theatre & Dance of the University of Michigan is accredited by the National Association of Schools of Music. Information concerning the accreditation of the School of Music, Theatre & Dance is available in the Office of the Dean. Regents of the University Julia Donovan Darlow, Laurence B. Deitch, Denise Ilitch, Olivia P. Maynard, Andrea Fischer Newman, Andrew C. Richner, S. Martin Taylor, Katherine E. White, Mary Sue Coleman, ex officio

The University of Michigan School of Music, Theatre & Dance E.V. Moore Building 1100 Baits Drive Ann Arbor, MI. 48109-2085 www.music.umich.edu

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University of Michigan School of Music, Theatre & Dance Student Handbook 2012-13  

degree requirements, course descriptions

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