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Academic Service-Learning Courses

College of Arts and Sciences AfricanA Studies Program AAS 490: Senior Seminar in Africana Studies: Religion and Civic Engagement Professor: Michelle Maldonado *AAS 390: Special Topics Professor: Don Spivey AAS 490: Senior Seminar in Africana Studies: Rethinking African American Culture Professor: Donald Spivey

American Studies Program AMS 101: Intro to American Studies: Contemporary Issues in the United States Professor: Patti Rose AMS 301: Intro to American National Government Professor: Casey Klofstad (See Political Science, POL 201/AMS 301) AMS 301: African-American History to 1877 Professor: Don Spivey (See HISTORY, HIS 209/AMS 301) AMS 301: Race and Ethnic Relations Professor: George Wilson or Marvin Dawkins (See Sociology, SOC 387/AMS 301) AMS 301/ENG 395/HIS 367: “The Sixties” Professors: Donald Spivey, Joseph Alkana, and David Wilson • Course Description: This course presents the culture and history of the 1960s in the United States through writings, film, music, and the experiences of faculty members who participated in important events during this era of major conflict and change. The course title appears in quotation marks because we are less concerned about the precise time frame than in evoking the atmosphere of a period associated with the Civil Rights Movement, the Vietnam War, the Antiwar Movement, widespread college campus activism, urban unrest, and the Women’s Movement. We also will address how the sciences played a role in 1960s culture—this was a decade when anxiety about nuclear war was prominent, the Space Race was in full swing, and concerns about ecology became widespread. The course format will be a blend of lecture, discussion, film screenings, and panel presentations of first-hand accounts by eyewitnesses to events of the 1960s. • Service Learning Description: Additionally, as part of our effort to make connections between the ideas and events of the 1960s and contemporary life outside the academy, we will offer students the option to fulfill part of the course requirements through service-learning work in a variety of settings away from the U.M. campus. There will be no effort to exclude anyone of any political persuasion either past or present.

* Course offered Spring 2014


Indeed, opposing points of view are encouraged. We think that something as complex and multifaceted as “The Sixties” requires a range of personal perspectives and interpretations, for even today the era of “The Sixties” provokes passionate responses from those who were there as well as those who were not.

* AMS 350: History and Culture of South Florida: From Swamp to Swamped Professor: Timothy Watson (See HISTORY, HIS 381/AMS 350)

AMS 350/POL 400: The 2012 Elections Professors: Casey Klofstad and Christopher Mann • Course/Service Learning Description: An interdisciplinary approach to the 2012 elections. Topics include voter turnout, campaign strategy, racial politics, and voting laws.

AMS 401: Nature and the Environment in American History Professor: Robin Bachin (See HISTORY, HIS 368/AMS 401/ECS 375)

AMS 401/HIS 565: Civic Activism in Modern Miami: Oral History & Practical Experience Professor: Gregory Bush • Course/Service Learning Description: This course will provide real life experience through interaction with leading local officials and non-profit advocates, examining housing and the culture of resource management and land use in South Florida. Students will examine the Miami area’s environmental and social history, local politics, and organizational effectiveness. Through panel discussions, visiting experts, oral history, completing an internship with a local agency, producing short documentaries and expanding and reorganizing an existing website, www.FloridaCommunityStudies.org, students will gain practical experience in non-profit advocacy, public communications and modes of social change and policy implementation.

AMS 401/HIS 561: Planning the American Metropolis: History of Cities Professor: Robin Bachin • Course Description: This course will examine the rise of cities throughout American history, with an emphasis on growth and development in the 19th and 20th centuries. We will focus on the layout of cities; the role of architectural styles in shaping both national and regional identities; the development of commercial and manufacturing districts, entertainment and vice areas; the rise of urban segregation; the growth of suburbs; the emergence of the global city; and the impact of urban growth on the environment. The course will address a variety of factors that have shaped American cities, including landscape, aesthetics, politics, economics, class, race, gender, and region. Thus we will relate discussions of the built environment with broader concerns about shaping democratic public spheres; providing adequate shelter, transportation, and entertainment for residents; fostering capitalist growth; and establishing a sense of place. • Service Learning Description: In addition to providing students with an introduction to American planning history, a major goal of this course is to help students understand how historical understanding can help inform present-day practice. Students will learn how many of the planning issues we discuss from a national and historical perspective have manifested themselves locally in South Florida. Students will then have the opportunity to work collaboratively with a local community organization that addresses some aspect of planning, urban development, and design in Miami. The final project for the class will be the result of this experiential learning assignment and will take the form of a creative or scholarly project for evaluation. Additional assignments include weekly reading and discussion and two short analytic papers.

AMS 401: Civic Participation and Democracy Professor: Casey Klofstad (See Political Science, POL 548/AMS 401) AMS 501: Senior Research Project Professor: Timothy Watson * Course offered Spring 2014


Course/Service Learning Description: All majors must complete either an individual research project or an internship at a local cultural or civic institution. For the research option, students identify an appropriate faculty member to supervise and grade the project, and then obtain approval from the program director before proceeding with the project. For the internship option, students partner with any number of local institutions and produce a creative and/or scholarly project for evaluation. The internship will be arranged through the program director, in consultation with the Butler Center. The final product will be evaluated by the program director.

Anthropology APY 202: Principals of Cultural Anthropology Professor: Louis Marcelin • Course Description: Cultural anthropology, including such topics as economics, politics, kinship and families, health systems, religion, and personality. APY 398: Conservation in Practice Professor: Dana Krempels (See Biology, BIL 433/APY 498/ECS 433/INS 522)

APY 405: Political Ecology of the Galapagos Professor: Sarah Meltzoff (See Ecosystem science and policy, ECS 405/APY 405/INS 321) APY 418/419: Politics of the Past Professor: Pamela Geller • Course Description: The past is not dead and buried. Rather, it shapes the lives of contemporary peoples in ways that are powerful and politically charged. With that being said, however, the sociopolitics of the present-day often inform reconstructions of the past. Politics of the Past, then, will examine the intersection of archaeology, politics, capitalism, and discrimination to consider the presentation, misconstrual, revision, and reclamation of the past. How, for instance, have governments used (or abused) archaeology to build nations and reinforce their own positions of power? Is cultural heritage as collateral damage ever justifiable? What does material culture communicate about class conflicts and consumerism? Can the integration of feminist and queer perspectives, which are born from political activism, produce a past free of presentist notions about sex, gender, and sexuality? How have the long disenfranchised—indigenes, ethnic and racial minorities—co-opted the past for their own identity politicking? Lecturing will be kept to a minimum, as the bulk of the class will be devoted to discussion and debate. • Service Learning Description: This course invites student to engage with social theories born of political activism and social justice movements (e.g., critical race theory, feminism, queer studies, postcolonial theory, Marxism). In so doing, students’ critical thinking is honed and civic responsibility fostered. Rather than think about archaeology as concerned with the ancient and exotic, students are challenged to query the relevance of the past in the present and future. Doing archaeology is then an effective tool for instigating positive social change. One issue of pertinence to the south Florida community we will consider is the Miami Circle archaeological site in Downtown Miami. We will visit the site, reflect on its discovery and significance, consider complications arising from its investigation and conservation, and examine its presentation to the public. APY 505: Museum Internship Professor: Traci Ardren • Course Description: This course is designed to provide hands on experience in a professional museum setting for students who are considering a career in anthropology or related disciplines. In order to fully appreciate the challenges faced by museums in the 21st century, this course begins with an overview of basic issues facing museums such as funding and collections management. This classroom time is followed by an approximately 10 week internship in one of four Miami museums. Over the course of the semester

* Course offered Spring 2014


students will be expected to engage with current literature on the ethics of collecting, representation of and collaboration with indigenous peoples, and the obligation of museums to serve the public. Service Learning Description: An internship with a trained museum professional is the best way to experience this important arena where scholarship and public education intersect. The University of Miami has long term agreements with a number of Miami museums to place upper level undergraduates in a way that benefits both the students and the museums.

Biology BIL 433/APY 398/ECS 433/INS 522: Conservation in Practice Professor: Dana Krempels • Course/Service Learning Description: Intersection between economic development, science and conservation in one of the world's most pristine and fragile ecosystems. Exploration of how tourism offers an alternative to unsustainable fisheries that once drove the local economy, yet has created a new set of pressures on the people and the environment. Mitigation efforts, science, and international conservation mesh with an understanding of local politics, customs and cultures. Prerequisite: BIL 432 or permission of instructor.

BIL 495: Projects in Biology: Community Outreach Professor: Dana Krempels • Course/Service Learning Description: Throughout the term, students will engage in civic activities identified in consultation with the people, government and public health facilities of the small, rural village of Villamil, the sole habitation on Isla Isabela. This course is part of the UGalapagos semester. Students spend one (Fall) semester in the Galapagos islands, and live with a Galapagos family for the duration of the program. They take sequential courses covering anthropology, ecology, and conservation, and develop a community service project related to any or all of these topics in consultation with the people of the local community. BIL 495/496/497: Research Credits Professor: Faculty • Course Description: Individual, original laboratory or field research supervised by a member of the department faculty and concluded by a formal written report. • Service Learning Description: Students can elect to conduct community-based research involving local conservation issues.

BIL 495/ECS 405: UGalapagos: Civic Engagement in the Galapagos Professor: Sarah Meltzoff and Johann Besserer • Course/Service Learning Description: Throughout the term, you will engage in civic activities identified in consultation with the people, government and public health facilities of the small, rural village of Villamil, the sole habitation on Isla Isabella.

Ecosystem science and policy ECS 112: Field Problems in Ecosystem Science and Policy Professor: Donald Olson • Course/Service Learning Description: Problem solving in ecology and environmental management. Class projects and case studies providing experience in identifying problems, quantifying scientific issues and considering management options and outcomes. Extensive field experience.

ECS 310: Sustainable Living Professor: John Van Leer • Course/Service Learning Description: Sustainable Living explores ways of living that can be sustained for thousands of years, without further damage to earth, ocean and atmosphere. Topics covered include renewable energy, agricultural practices, water issues, green building, low carbon transportation and * Course offered Spring 2014


healthy living/eating. Students advocate for sustainable practices of their choice in writing and in oral/visual presentations. Frequent field trips.

ECS 372: Tourism and Conservation (Bocas del Toro, Panama) Professor: Daniel Suman (See Latin American Studies, LAS 302/LAS 504/ECS 372)

ECS 372/572: Environmental Filmmaking & Community Engagement Professor: Ali Habashi (See Motion picture, CMP 549/ECS 352/ECS 572) *ECS 374: Topics in Environmental Policy Professor: David Letson *ECS 375: Topics in Environment and the Humanities Professor: Catherine Newell (See RELIGION, REL 406) ECS 401: Internship Professor: Terri Hood • Course/Service Learning Description: Students selecting the internship will be required to spend a minimum of 120 contact hours working in an outside firm or agency whose mission is to address environmental issues where science and policy intersect. ECS 405: Applied Research in ECS Professor: Gina Maranto • Course/Service Learning Description: Faculty-mentored applied research in environmental topics. Projects in natural ecosystems, sustainable design and business, and communication of environmental issues. ECS 405/APY 405/INS 321: Political Ecology of the Galapagos Professor: Sarah Meltzoff • Course/Service Learning Description: This Field course in the Galapagos National Park offers a rare chance to examine the human interactions in this highly politicized landscape of conservation. Students practice the ecology approach for doing ethnographic fieldwork and explore how this approach can lead to wiser resource management. Semester-in-Residence programs also include home-stay and volunteer components. ECS 405: UGalapagos: Civic Engagement in the Galapagos Professor: Sarah Meltzoff and Johann Besserer (See Biology, BIL 495/ECS 405) ECS 433: Conservation in Practice Professor: Dana Krempels (See Biology, BIL 433/APY 398/ECS 433/INS 522)

English *ENG 106: The Literature of Incarceration Professor: Joshua Schriftman • Course Description: Advanced approaches to written academic argument, with emphasis on textual analysis and incorporation of secondary sources. Not for major or minor. Cannot be taken on credit-only option. ENG 209: Creative Writing Professor: Joshua Schriftman • Course Description: Analysis and writing of short stories and poems.

* Course offered Spring 2014


Service Learning Description: Required community project in partnership with Mays Conservatory of the Arts.

ENG 214: American Literature II Professor: Peter Schmitt • Course/Service Learning Description: Selected American authors from the Civil War to the present. Satisfies writing requirement.

ENG 230: Advanced Business Communication Professor: Danielle Houck • Course Description: Professional writing with critical attention to complex rhetorical situations. Practice in formal and informal written communication styles. • Service Learning Description: In the past, over several semesters, different sections worked with Camillus House to (a) analyze website and make recommendations for changes, (b) create and recommend an e-mail policy for the organization, or (c) propose expansion of services. In Spring 2012 there is a required community project in partnership with Mays Conservatory of the Arts.

ENG 306: Advanced Composition Professor: Joshua Schriftman • Course Description: In this course, we will do literary work with students living in Little Haiti and in Haiti. In addition to our regular class meetings and our online interactions, we will also gather together (in Little Haiti and elsewhere) to hear guest speakers, take a city tour, and--at the course’s end--to enjoy a catered Haitian meal. Together with our community partners, we will increase our literacy and push back the limits of Miami’s status quo. Our readings will come from Roxane Gay, Gloria Anzaldua, Eula Biss, Edwidge Danticat, and other essayists who write about Haiti, Miami, identity, and life. At the same time, we study the art of an ancient literary form that began ages ago and extends well into today’s avant garde: the essay. It thrives in places like Harpers, Granta, and The Believer, and it pushes at every definition you might try to throw around it. John D’Agata called it “an intelligence that inaugurates its own form” and “a mind’s inquisitive ramble through a place wiped clean of answers.” We will study the enduring and new geniuses of the form and learn to inhabit it and make it our own. Through our engagement, we will create a community beyond communities, and we will make art. Through art we will move toward a freedom from forms, and a freedom from the status quo. This course is civic-engagement designated and good for a writing (‘W’) credit. ENG 365: Literature of the Holocaust Professor: Joseph Alkana • Course Description: Literature relating to the Nazi genocide and its aftermath. • Service Learning Description: Offered in conjunction with the Judaic Studies Program Holocaust Survivors Service Internship. Please call (305) 284-8180 for additional information. ENG 395: “The Sixties” Professors: Donald Spivey, Joseph Alkana, and David Wilson (See American studies, AMS 301/ENG 395/HIS 367)

ENG 395: Special Topics – Civil Rights in Miami Professor: Nancy Clasby • Course Description: Content varies by semester. • Service Learning Description: Each student did a final research paper on some aspect of race relations in Miami during the 60s and 70s. Guest speakers who were involved in the civil rights movement in Miami were also filmed, and the tapes donated to the Richter Library.

Geography and Regional Studies *GEG 511: Field topics in GEG Professors: Richard Grant * Course offered Spring 2014


GEG 511/REL 406/INS 411/COM 406: UStellenbosch: Engaging South Africa Professors: Richard Grant and William Green • Course Description: UM is offering a 35-day course in South Africa, team-taught by UM and Stellenbosch faculty. Based on-campus at Stellenbosch University, one of the top universities in Africa, the course includes 11 days of travel to locations across South Africa and a service learning experience in an impoverished community outside Cape Town. Stellenbosch University is located only 50 km from Cape Town in the picturesque foothills of the Drakenstein Mountains. Field visits include the Cape of Good Hope, Johannesburg, Soweto, the Cradle of Humankind, Robben Island, and Kruger National Park. • Service Learning Description: Service learning will provide students with opportunities to demonstrate their global citizenship through community service. Students will engage with Stellenbosch University's community projects, work with community leaders, and develop leadership and group skills in working as a team member in service learning assignments. * GEG 523/GEG 301: Seminar in Urban Management Professor: Juan Miguel Kanai • Course/Service Learning Description: Identification of and responses to urban problems in large cities in European and Latin American metropolitan areas. Emphasis is on demographic, cultural/ethnic, serviceprovision, environmental, transportation, and land-use problems. Approach is via case studies, theory applications, and planning practicalities.

*GEG 535: Internship in Geography Professor: Ira Sheskin • Course/Service Learning Description: Students are assigned to work for a local public or private agency.

Geography and Regional Studies GSC 114: Earth Processes Lab Professors: Donald McNeil • Course Description: Minerals, rocks, sediments, maps, imagery, fossils and paleoenvironmental reconstruction methods. Current frontiers of knowledge and field introduction to marine geology. Corequisite: GSC 110.

History

HIS 209/AMS 301: African-American History to 1877 Professor: Don Spivey • Course Description: The course focuses on the themes of “African retention” and “Black self-assertion” as we examine the history of people of African descent in the United States from African roots through the emergence of the Jim Crow era. • Service Learning Description: A community-based project, such as volunteer work with the Black Archives, Miami Workers Center, Alonzo Mourning Charities or some other community service organization, may be done in lieu of a research paper. A ten-page (10) written summary must be submitted on completion of the project. A supervisor must provide written confirmation that you devoted at least 40 hours to the program. HIS 210: The African-American Experience, 1877-Present Professor: Don Spivey • Course Description: History of people of African descent in the United States from 1877 to present. • Service Learning Description: The course has a community service option to substitute for an essay.

* HIS 271: American Political History Since 1960: Policy, Public History, and Modern Media Professor: Gregory Bush • Course Description: Explores selective elements of modern American politics, policy studies, media, and public history, predominantly since 1960.

* Course offered Spring 2014


*HIS 300: The Media-Politics of Poverty and Wealth in Modern America Professor: Gregory Bush • Course Description: This class will largely focus on the late 19th century to the present in examining how the mass media have been involved with politicians and policy makers in persuading the public and policy makers about their changing attitudes towards wealth and poverty.

HIS 300: The African Diaspora in South Florida Professor: Edmund Abaka • Course Description: This course examines the historical experiences of the African Diaspora in South Florida through a close analysis of three junctures in the history of the Black experience: The slave trade, abolition, and emancipation; the migration of various African-descended peoples from the Caribbean, Latin America, Central America; and the increasing addition of people from the African continent itself. • Service Learning Description: In lieu of a final project, students can volunteer or intern with a community or community organization and submit a 3-5 page report on their community involvement as their final paper. HIS 367: “The Sixties” Professors: Donald Spivey, Joseph Alkana, and David Wilson (See American studies, AMS 301/ENG 395/HIS 367)

HIS 368/AMS 401/ECS 375: Nature and the Environment in American History Professor: Robin Bachin • Course/Service Learning Description: For the term paper (15-20 pages), students conduct original research, using both primary and secondary sources, including readings from class. Students select some aspect of environmental history in South Florida to study. They work closely with Special Collections at Richter Library to identify topics and sources to analyze the role of nature in the growth of South Florida. They also meet with local organizations to identify pressing environmental issues in South Florida. *HIS 373: Conservation, Tourism, and Development, Panama (Spring Break Course) Professor: Donald Spivey

HIS 373: The Civil Rights Movement Professor: Donald Spivey • Course Description: This course explores the modern Civil Rights Movement was one of the profound occurrences in the history of the United States of America. In many respects the movement reshaped the nation, from politics and the economy to social relations and cultural values. • Service Learning Description: Required academic service-learning component.

*HIS 377: Sport in American History Professor: Donald Spivey • Course Description : The role of sport in American culture. Sports relation to urban growth, professionalism, ethnic identity and assimilation, nationalism, and consumption.

*HIS 381/AMS 350: History and Culture of South Florida: From Swamp to Swamped Professor: Timothy Watson • Course/Service Learning Description: Following the "city as school" methodology, the course combines an overview of library and online resources about Florida and Miami with explorations of the "hands-on" learning opportunities in the Miami area. The course will enable students to shape their own research questions within the broad topics of Florida history and South Florida in historical and cultural perspective. Weekly blog posts will provide ample student interaction. The goal of the course is to pose significant questions about the culture, politics, and economics of contemporary Florida and to use this vibrant and unique regional history to shape and further debate about creative answers to contemporary issues. For

* Course offered Spring 2014


example: does the Florida experience provide useful direction for economic revitalization? At the end of the course, each student will have posed a significant question and planned a research project about contemporary Miami or Florida that can be addressed at least in part by reference to historical resources. The course will serve as an introduction to Florida and the Miami metropolitan area for some and provide indigenous Miamians and Floridians with new ways to think about their home and its future.

HIS 397: History Internship Professor: Hugh Thomas • Course/Service Learning Description: Provides history students with the opportunity to obtain credit for an internship with the approval and under the close supervision of a faculty member. HIS 565: Civic Activism in Modern Miami: Oral History & Practical Experience Professor: Gregory Bush (See American Studies, AMS 401/HIS 565)

HIS 561: Consumer Culture & the Erosion of Public Space in American History Professor: Gregory Bush HIS 561: Voices in Transit: Oral History in Modern Miami Professor: Gregory Bush • Course Description: This course will provide opportunities for students to examine the history of modern Miami while experiencing and learning about the range and value of oral history interviews. • Service Learning Description: Students will complete two oral history interviews related to (1) one of five topics and (2) another one related to one of five communities. An ongoing service learning component with paper/reflection will also involve brief internships in a specific local non-profit agency or government department related to the topics and communities. HIS 561: Planning the American Metropolis: History of Cities Professor: Robin Bachin (See American Studies, AMS 401/HIS 561)

HIS 569: Studies in African-American History: Black Protest Thought Professor: Don Spivey • Course Description: Throughout the history of Black folk in America, there has been a wide range of thought about what should be the right course of action or agenda for the race. The thinking has ranged the gamut from the advocacy of freedom “By Any Means Necessary” to accommodation and integration, to the building of a separate Black nation within America, to the Back-to-Africa Movements. This seminar will probe the thinking and formulations of those Black leaders. • Service Learning Description: A community-based project, such as volunteer work with the Black Archives, Miami Workers Center, Alonzo Mourning Charities or some other community service organization, may be done in lieu of the research paper. A ten-page (10) written summary must be submitted on completion of the project. A supervisor must provide written confirmation that you devoted at least 40 hours to the program.

International studies Challenges in Sustainable Development in Haiti: from Theory to Practice (Intersession) Professor: Sasha Kramer • Course Description: The intersession course Sustainable Development Challenges in Haiti will allow students to move from theory to practice through a combination of readings, lectures, meetings, and direct participation in the construction of an ecological sanitation system with the organization SOIL. The readings and lectures will take an interdisciplinary look at the connections between poverty, public health and the environment in Haiti. Students will be encouraged to look holistically at environmental and public

* Course offered Spring 2014


health problems from a human rights perspective, examining the role that inequality has played in creating and maintaining health and environmental crises in Haiti.

INS 321: Political Ecology of the Galapagos Professor: Johann Besserer (See Ecosystem science and policy, ECS 405/APY 405/INS 321)

INS 411: UStellenbosch: Engaging South Africa Professors: Richard Grant and William Green (See Geography and regional studies, GEG 511/REL 406/INS 411/COM 406) *INS 519: Internships and Civic Engagement in International Studies: Harnessing Theory with Practice Professor: Sherri Porcelain • Course Description: A research paper is required for this course. The student works with a selected faculty member who determines the length and scope of the project. The Student is responsible for finding the internship position.

INS 522: Latin American Political Economy (Intersession) Professor: Richard Weisskoff • Course Description: Participants will learn how a rural community suffers and recovers from natural disasters amidst the normal conditions of extreme poverty. Students will learn about economic development in a rural setting and those factors that keep a community poor. This five-week summer the program will expand its Ica work to include the two other communities in the Canyon which have been innovative in drip irrigation techniques for low-income farmers. • Service Learning Description: Students will engage in manual work to contribute to the village recovery. Students will engage in projects such as working on the village's water system, tilling the soil, milking cows, harvesting cotton, and cementing drainage ditches. In earning the villagers' confidence, students will be able then to investigate the economic foundations of the community and the roots of poverty on the fringe of one of the most affluent agro-export valleys of Peru. INS 522: Conservation in Practice Professor: Dana Krempels (See Biology, BIL 433/APY 398/ECS 433/INS 522)

INS 595/599: Global Health & Development: Harnessing the Theoretical with Practical Experience Professor: Sherri Porcelain • Course Description: This course will expose students to the indigenous Kuna health, economic, political, social, cultural and environmental aspects of their life and consider the different perspectives of international development. • Service Learning Description: Island activities will include such things as: Visiting and participating in programs with the heath center, a school, and more.

Judaic Studies Program JUS 205: Icheic Service Corps Internship Professor: Eugene Rothman • Course Description: Interns will gain meaningful experiences that will offer them an opportunity to become involved in service-oriented activities that give them a deep insight and unique understanding of the historical significance of the Holocaust while providing valuable services to the survivors of Nazi atrocities. • Service Learning Description: This course does not meet weekly. A semester schedule will be established by the Instructor at the beginning of the semester. This schedule is designed to provide academic enrichment for participation in the volunteer service-learning program described below. Students enrolled in this program provide valuable services to Jewish survivors of Nazi atrocities while developing their leadership abilities and giving them an appreciation for the historical significance of the Holocaust. Student * Course offered Spring 2014


participants are matched with local survivors, whom they visit for 4 to 5 times each semester for a commitment of 2 semesters. Students also meet as a group 4 to 5 times each semester for academic enrichment activities.

* JUS 206: Holocaust Survivors Support Internship Program (HSSIP) Professor: Eugene Rothman (See Religious Studies, REL 409) JUS 421: Human Rights and Otherness Professor: Henry Green (See Religious Studies, REL 408/JUS 421)

JUS 421: Internship in Judaic Studies Professor: Eugene Rothman • Course Description: Prescribed study and supervised work with practitioners in Judaic services. • Service-Learning Description: This course does not meet weekly. A semester schedule will be established by the Instructor at the beginning of the semester. This schedule is designed to provide academic enrichment for participation in the volunteer service-learning program described below.%Students enrolled in this program provide valuable services to Jewish survivors of Nazi atrocities while developing their leadership abilities and giving them an appreciation for the historical significance of the Holocaust. Student participants are matched with local survivors, whom they visit for 4 to 5 times each semester for a commitment of 2 semesters. Students also meet as a group 4 to 5 times each semester for academic enrichment activities.

Latin American Studies Program LAS 302/503: The Environment & Culture of the Galapagos: Writing, Research, & Critical Thinking Professor: Joseph Treaster • Course/ Service Learning Description: This is a course of total immersion in the environment and culture of the Galapagos Islands. It is a course in writing, research and analytical thinking that capitalizes on the distinctive characteristics of the Galapagos. It is designed to benefit students across a wide range of disciplines. This course delivers both the key concepts in understanding and engaging the environment and the instruction and practice to make every participant a better writer. Tweeting and blogging are integral parts of this course. Students will have opportunities to write for several internet operations including the University of Miami’s environmental magazine on the internet, OneWater.org, which Professor Treaster edits. Other opportunities for writing for publication may develop. Summer-in-Residence programs also include home-stay and volunteer components.

*LAS 302/LAS 504/ECS 372/MAF504: Tourism and Conservation (Bocas del Toro, Panama) Professor: Daniel Suman • Course Description: The theme of this course will focus on environmental planning in a relatively pristine coastal region of Panama that is experiencing rapid growth due to tourism development. Participants meet weekly during the spring semester to prepare for the course and then after the spring intercession to present research results. This travel course provides a truly unique opportunity for our students to develop practical field experience in a region that is an ideal laboratory for studying the conflict and tensions between coastal conservation and development. • Service Learning Description: During the week in Bocas del Toro, students will learn from local experts in municipal land use, environmentalism, coastal conservation, and commercial fishing. They will also be given the chance to work within the community to develop a small research and/or community engagement project. LAS 302/503: Field Methods for Socio-Environmental Research – Galapagos, Ecuador Professor: Juan Miguel Kanai • Course/ Service Learning Description: This field methods course takes place in the Galapagos and engages students with the local socio-environmental issues of Puerto Villamil and other small, host communities.

* Course offered Spring 2014


Course participants will acquire the rudiments of fieldwork research through exposure to widely used methods and actual generation of primary data attuned to local issues. Students will be introduced to the socio-economic, cultural, political, and institutional realities of Latin America and particularly environmentally sensitive sites in the region. A Semester-in-Residence program also includes home-stay and volunteer/community engagement components.

LAS 302/REL 409: Guatemala – Its Land, Culture, and Religion Professor: Daniel Suman; Michelle Maldonado • Course Description: This course introduces the contemporary context of Guatemalan culture and identity through the lens of Religious Studies. Special attention is given to the role of culture, class, social location, and historical context in Christianity and Mayan religion in Guatemala. The course content will draw heavily from the local context in San Lucas Tolimán and the contemporary and historical religious landscape of Guatemala. •

Service Learning Description: This is a service-learning course that integrates course material with student service placements. Students will learn about and have an opportunity to research and work in: coffee collectives, a women’s center, a school, construction sites, and ecological reforestation projects.

LAS 505: Internship in Latin American and Caribbean Studies Professor: Marten Brienen • Course/ Service Learning Description: Course credit for on-site experience in a business, government, or non-profit organization dealing with Latin America and the Caribbean.

*LAS 506: Civic Engagement in Peru Professor: Belkys Torres • Course/ Service Learning Description: On site experience in a civic engagement project in Latin America or the Caribbean.

Political Science POL 201/AMS 301: Intro to American National Government Professor: Casey Klofstad • Course Description: Examination of the principles, structures, and processes of the national government of the United States. Frequent comparisons made with other countries. POL 300: The Politics of Growth Management Professor: Richard Brumback • Course Description: An analysis of growth management policies and techniques. Topics include urban environmental issues, development of growth management policies, and growth management planning techniques.

POL 334: Campaigns Professor: Christopher Mann • Course Description: This course is intended to provide an overview of campaigns and elections in the United States for political science majors and non-majors with an interest in understanding elections, campaigns, and voting in the United States. We will cover the institutions governing voting, political communication, public opinion, political participation, and political behavior. The primary course objective is for you to gain a greater understanding of campaigns and elections, American style. This necessarily includes an in-depth understanding of the when, where, why, how and to what effect candidates, media, and voters shape strategies and outcomes. Specifically, by the end of this course, you should: Understand the reasons why individuals choose to participate or not to participate in the American political process. Understand the basic set up of the United States electoral system and how it influences outcomes. Understand the interactions among candidates, media and voters in the context of political campaigns. Become knowledgeable consumers of political information generally and campaign information specifically.

* Course offered Spring 2014


Service Learning Description: With Election Day occurring in the middle of the semester, you have the opportunity to experience the campaign and election first-hand – and as more than a voter. Your assignment is to participate in Election Day as a campaign volunteer or county poll-worker for a minimum of 5 hours – although my hope is that you will embrace a full day experience. This hands-on experience is in lieu of class on Tuesday and any assigned reading that week (except campaign tracking and reading general political news), so it should not be onerous. You may work for any candidate, party, ballot measure committee, or civic organization engaged in campaign or voter mobilization work, or you may sign up to work for the Miami-Dade Elections Department at www.miamidade.gov/elections//employment_pollworker-info.asp or you may sign-up in another county.

POL 400: The 2012 Elections Professors: Casey Klofstad and Christopher Mann (See American Studies, AMS 350/POL 400)

POL 501: Budget and Financial Management and Administration Professor: Richard Brumback • Course Description: Role of the budget in shaping public policy; managing public revenues; budgetary theory, politics, and fiscal management. Examples from state, municipal and federal governments.

POL 520: Internship Professor: Faculty • Course Description: Provides advanced political science majors with an opportunity to participate in a structured, supervised internship. 25-35 page research paper required. • Service Learning Description: Students may opt to intern with campaigns. POL 531: Global Environmental Politics Professor: George Gonzalez • Course/Service Learning Description: Examination of the environment within the context of economic globalization. Contrasts the international trading regime and those regimes designed to protect the environment, with specific attention to the issues of global warming and bio-diversity.

POL 548/AMS 401: Civic Participation and Democracy Professor: Casey Klofstad • Course/Service Learning Description: In this course we examine these various mechanisms of "civic participation", and discuss the meaning and consequences of participatory democracy. The course focuses on the contemporary United States, but we will devote some time to discuss civic participation in other countries as well. Students will perform an in-depth study of how a specific group of citizens expresses their civic voice.

POL 656: Public Service Internship Professor: Faculty • Course/Service Learning Description: Individual on-the-job work experience; arranged and monitored by a faculty member.

Psychology PSY 120: Autism Spectrum Disorders Professor: Michael Alessandri • Course/Service Learning Description: Freshman Forum. Students conduct a classroom observation of a child within an early childhood classroom or school in the community.

PSY 203: Child and Adolescent Development Professor: Rebecca Shearer * Course offered Spring 2014


Course Description: Survey of significant aspects of growth and development throughout the lifespan. Emphasis placed on childhood and adolescence.

PSY 203: Child and Adolescent Psychology Professor: Christine Delgado • Course/Service Learning Description: Students conduct a classroom observation of a child within an early childhood classroom or school in the community.

*PSY 230: Child and Adolescent Development Professor: Elyse Hurtado Course Description: Survey of significant aspects of growth and development throughout the lifespan. Emphasis placed on childhood and adolescence.

PSY 340: The Psychology of Thinking and Learning in Children Professor: Elyse Hurtado • Course Description: Development of perception, thought, and language processes throughout the lifespan with an emphasis on early and middle childhood.

PSY 367/368: Introduction to Research Projects Professor: Sean Kilpatrick • Course/Service Learning Description: Students assist on a research project in psychology under supervision of a faculty member. Activities include library research, data collection and management, and attendance at research team meetings. *PSY 474: Genetic and Developmental Disorders Professor: Michael Alessandri

Religious Studies REL 406: UStellenbosch: Engaging South Africa Professors: Richard Grant and William Green (See Geography and regional studies, GEG 511/REL 406/INS 411/COM 406) *REL 406: Topics in Environment and Humanities Professor: Catherine Newell (See Ecosystem science aND Policy, ECS 375) REL 408/JUS 421: Human Rights and Otherness Professor: Henry Green • Course Description: Special projects in religious or historical traditions. • Service Learning Description: Students did oral histories as part of the course last fall as a part of the Sephardi Voices project. REL 409: Human Rights, Religion, & Refugees Arab World Professor: Henry Green

* REL 409/JUS 206: Holocaust Survivors Support Internship Program (HSSIP) Professor: Eugene Rothman • Course/Service Learning Description: Holocaust Survivors Service Internship. Students enrolled in this program provide valuable services to Jewish survivors of Nazi atrocities while developing their leadership abilities and giving them an appreciation for the historical significance of the Holocaust. Student participants are matched with local survivors, whom they visit for 4 to 5 times each semester for a commitment of 2 semesters. Students also meet as a group 4 to 5 times each semester for academic enrichment activities. Students receive 3 JUS or REL credits for their participation, and are eligible, depending on the number of visits, for a stipend of up to $250 per semester towards travel expenses.

* Course offered Spring 2014


Outstanding interns may be eligible for a Sue Miller Scholarship subject to the availability of funds. Open to all students across campus.

REL 409: Religion and Civic Engagement Professor: Michelle Maldonado • Course/Service Learning Description: This course will explore the manner in which religion is a driving force behind civic engagement in the United States. Issues that will be covered include immigration, gender, law, youth, religious pluralism, and racism. This is a service-learning course that will integrate course material with student service placements. Students will be required to do service learning throughout the semester. If you have any questions about REL 409, please contact Dr. Maldonado at mmaldonado@miami.edu. REL 409: Guatemala – Its Land, Culture, and Religion Professor: Michelle Maldonado (See Latin American Studies, LAS 302/REL 409)

Sociology SOC 303: Social Inequalities Professor: George Wilson • Course/Service Learning Description: Social ranking by class, status, and power. Stratification by age, sex or minority group membership. This course has a substantial Miami focus. The course content will address how socioeconomic inequality has altered in the context of deindustrialization and rising poverty rates in areas such as Overtown and Liberty City within the Miami city limits.

*SOC 365: Internship Professor: Jan Sokol-Katz • Course/Service Learning Description: The Department of Sociology’s Internship Program provides valuable exposure to and insight into the operations of community non-profit or government based social service agencies. More specifically, this "field education" program enables students to: integrate classroom knowledge and theories with work experience in the community; critically analyze the limitations of sociological practice; and build working relationships to enhance their ability to obtain employment in their chosen profession upon graduation. Spring 2011 participating internship agencies: CHARLEE; Department of Juvenile Justice; Empowered; Youth Program; His House; Miami Dade County Police Department; Miami Dade County State; Attorney's Office; Miami-Dade County Medical Examiner’s Office; Ronald McDonald House; Kristee House

SOC 387/AMS 301: Race and Ethnic Relations Professor: Marvin Dawkins Course/Service Learning Description: The influence of racial distinctions on individual and social behavior. This course has a substantial Miami focus. The course content will address how race relations have altered in the context of deindustrialization and rising poverty rates in areas such as Overtown and Liberty City within the Miami city limits. SOC 388: “The Black Ghetto” Professor: Marvin Dawkins • Course/Service Learning Description: This course examines the origin and evolution of the "ghetto" as a concept and the social and historical significance of the ghetto in understanding the development of black community life in urban America.

Spanish SPA 322: Archives and Cuban Cultural Studies * Course offered Spring 2014


Professor: Lillian Manzor • Course/Service Learning Description: Students work at the Cuban Heritage Collection and with different community theaters in the city in order to create archives of their performance work and develop their pages in the Cuban Theater Digital Archive. Students do oral histories of artists as well and they have served as assistant directors for productions.

* SPA 322: Cultural Topics: Images of (I)legal Immigration Professor: Bridget Arce • Course Description: Issues related to the cultures in the Spanish-speaking world. Topics may include film, journalism, religion, language in society, popular and mass culture, visual arts, immigration, slavery, mestizaje.

Urban studies Program URB 301: Cities in Time and Space Professor: Richard Grant • Course Description: This course provides interdisciplinary perspectives on the city, urbanity, and urbanization through a series of wide-ranging historical-geographical contexts.

School of Education & Human Development Educational and Psychological Studies EPS 201: Psychosocial Change and Well-being Professor: Margaret Crosbie-Burnett and Kent Burnett • Course Description: Explores the integration of individual, organizational, and community approaches to the promotion of health and well-being. Emphasis will be placed on real-life applications in multiple settings such as schools, workplaces, government, and non-government institutions.

EPS 304: Mentored Research Studies Professor: Laura Kohn Wood • Course/Service Learning Description: Under the guidance of EPS faculty and graduate students, undergraduate students will have an opportunity to get involved in various components of research study; gain valuable knowledge and research experience; and expand their academic experience. * EPS 321: Understanding Human Service Organizations Professor: Scot Evans • Course Description: Focus on unique role of community-based human service organizations in society with an overview and history of community organizations, which provide services, support, advocacy, and organizing in today's communities. Review of the systems, cultures, structures, and processes of community organizations with a special emphasis on promoting well-being in communities. This course has a 10 hour field research experience requirement. • Service Learning Description: Students work in groups with a community-based human service organization to learn as much as they can about the organization and identify current strengths and challenges. Students work with the organization to identify a specific challenge that the organization is facing and conduct research on the issue and offer research and theory-based solutions for consideration. Students have an opportunity to see course concepts in action in organizations and to merge theory and practice while offering practical solutions to community partners. *EPS 361: Community Psychology & Development Professor: Laura Kohn Wood or Scot Evans * Course offered Spring 2014


Course Description: Community psychology is about the prevention of psychosocial problems and the promotion of mental health and well-being through the creation of equitable and just social settings, neighborhoods, communities, and societies. Course topics include: stress & social support; oppression and human diversity; primary prevention, social intervention and health promotion; self-help; mediating structures; community mental health; alternative settings; community development and social change.

EPS 462: Community Consultation and Leadership Professor: Dina Elias Rodas • Course/Service Learning Description: This course will cover strength based, preventive, empowering approaches to institutional and community change, and will address related skills, stages, processes and outcomes; Conflict resolution, facilitation, strategic planning, visioning, advocacy, change management, and community mobilization will be studied and practiced in class.

EPS 471: Human and Social Development Practicum Professor: Dina Elias Rodas • Course/Service Learning Description: The practicum serves an integrative function: it allows students to apply their academic training, to further develop their career goals, and to hone their skills while gaining experience in real-world settings. Practica are unpaid, supervised experiences. Students choose from a menu of settings that have been approved as HSD practicum sites and spend a minimum of 100 hours (3 credits) or 200 hours (6 credits) at their chose setting over the course of the semester. Must be taken concurrently with EPS 481.

* EPS 558: Understanding Human Service Organizations Professor: Scot Evans • Course Description: This course in community youth development (CYD) will focus on the philosophical, sociological, and educational foundations of a youth development perspective that highlights youth as powerful catalysts for change and positive forces in shaping communities. We reflect on how youth development is inextricably linked with family and community development. After reviewing and critiquing traditional adolescent development theories, students will engage with theories and practices of CYD, youth empowerment, youth civic engagement, youth organizing, social justice youth development, youth activism, and critical youth engagement EPS 606: Community Well-Being and Change: Theory and Practice Professor: Laura Kohn Wood • Course/Service Learning Description: This course is designed to promote an understanding of the factors associated with healthy communities. It provides a comprehensive overview of the relevant skills and theories including: ecological/systems theory/ models; community theories (sense of community, social capital, environmental psychology); and critical social theory, social justice, and social determinants of well-being. EPS 648: Multicultural Communities in a Globalized Society Professor: Marie Guerda Nicolas • Course/Service Learning Description: This course examines the relationship between multiculturalism and globalization and how these concepts impact education and the world at large. Topics include dimensions of human diversity, identities and acculturation; race and class; gender and power; children and youth; social inclusion and social justice; health disparities; poverty and work; racism and inequality.

Exercise and Sports Sciences

KIN 150: General Nutrition for Health and Performance Professor: Lisa Dorfman • Course/Service Learning Description: Fundamentals and theories of nutrition with a specific focus on nutrition for both sports and fitness. Students are required to develop a weight loss program for a family member or member of the community and include dietary analysis and body composition measures. KIN 202: Applied Nutrition for Health and Performance * Course offered Spring 2014


Professor: Wesley Smith • Course Description: The study of nutrition, diet analysis, biochemical processes in energy metabolism, nutrition and health problems, and nutrition as it relates to physical performance. The class will have 3 sections: 1) nutritional links to chronic disease; 2) nutrition before, during and after exercise bout; and 3) nutritional supplements for health and performance.

KIN 464: Therapeutic Rehabilitation Laboratory Professor: Luis Feigenbaum • Course Description: This laboratory will place emphasis on the techniques and clinical skills relating to the rehabilitation of athletic injuries. Clinical education hours in a therapeutic rehabilitation facility will give the students the opportunity to use the knowledge, skills, and techniques learned in this course. The student must complete 100 hours of documented clinical education hours, which apply toward the clinical education requirement for graduation. Students must be additionally enrolled in KIN 463 (Formally ESS 463).

Teaching and Learning

TAL 101: Introduction to Education Professor: Eugene Provenzo • Course Description: Interdisciplinary overview of the historical development of education in the United States. Topics include history of education, schooling as a social institution, school funding, ethics, legal issues, racism, social class, sexism, homophobia and heterosexism, language-based discrimination and religion. This course emphasizes the interdependent nature of school and culture; it critically analyzes issues facing children, parents, and educators using this larger cultural framework. • Service Learning Description: This course includes an extensive Social Advocacy Project, as well lectures and discussion on Social Advocacy.

TAL 203: Children’s Literature Professor: Staff • Course Description: History, trends, and genres of children's literature with emphasis on children's literature as a curriculum resource.

TAL 305: Classroom and Behavior Management Professor: Anita Meinbach • Course Description: The principles of behavior analysis and classroom management strategies, both preventative and problem solving. Special emphasis includes effective communication with students, parents and other stakeholders; meeting the needs of all learners based on individual differences, cultural and linguistic diversity; knowledge of research-based strategies that support intellectual, personal and social well-being and development of all students; planning and conducting lessons in a safe, efficient and supportive learning environment. Field experience required. TAL 420: Introduction to Literacy Assessment & Instruction in Elementary School Professor: Maria Carlo • Course Description: Multidisciplinary survey of reading and writing acquisition in the elementary school. Assessment and instruction in the major components of reading: phonological awareness, word identification and phonics, fluency, vocabulary, and comprehension • Service Learning Description: Involves 1 hour per week of tutoring of 3rd grade students at West Lab elementary School

TAL 421: Language Arts in the Elementary School Professor: Anita Meinbach • Course/Service Learning Description: This course focuses on competencies in reading, writing, listening, speaking, viewing and visual representation. Children's literature is infused. Emphasis on research-based practices and multicultural awareness. Field experience required.

* Course offered Spring 2014


TAL 470: Student Teaching in the Elementary School (Semester-Long) Professor: Gloria Pelaez/Robert Moore • Course/Service Learning Description: A comprehensive semester-long program in observation and supervised teaching in the elementary school. The student spends full time in an elementary school participating in all activities of the teacher under the guidance of school and university personnel.

TAL 480/580: Seminar on Teaching Professor: Gloria Pelaez • Course/Service Learning Description: The seminar is designed to support teacher candidates during the associate teaching experience. Students receive support and assistance in completing Florida Educator Accomplished Practices (FEAP) electronic portfolios. Students share, reflect, and discuss their daily experiences in class during culminating experience in the field.

College of Engineering Civil and architectural engineering CAE 403: Senior Design Project I Professor: Wangda Zuo • Course/Service Learning Description: Two-semester comprehensive design project based on the knowledge and skills acquired in earlier coursework and incorporating engineering standards and realist ic constraints. The faculty coordinator and several practicing engineers/architects provide consultation, guidance, and recommendations on aspects such as problem definition, evaluation of design approaches, design development, and the preparation of construction documents. CAE 530: Water Resources Engineering II Professor: David Chin Course/Service Learning Description: Runoff models, routing models, water-quality models, and evapotranspiration models. Design of storm water management systems. Principles of groundwater flow. Design of wells and wellfields for public water supply. Legal regulatory, and economic components of water-resources management systems. Comprehensive design project.

CAE 533: Water-Quality Control in Natural Systems Professor: David Chin Course/Service Learning Description: Water quality regulations, fate and transport processes, water-quality control in rivers, lakes, wetlands, oceans, and ground water.

CAE 560: Sustainable Construction Professor: Wangda Zuo • Course/Service Learning Description: Drivers and foundations of sustainable construction. Principles of sustainable construction: integrated planning and design, life-cycle view of projects, resource selection and optimization, protection of the natural environment, toxics and pollutants elimination, durability and quality. Green building assessment initiatives, green building policies, and code impacts. Evaluation of the environmental impacts of construction operations. Innovative design and construction practices. Economic viability. Subtropical and coastal issue and opportunities. Case studies.

Frost School of Music Music Education and Therapy * Course offered Spring 2014


MED 359/360/361/362/363/364/657/658/659: Music Therapy Practicum Professors: Shannon de l’Etoile, Teresa Lesiuk, and Carolyn Dachinger • Course/Service Learning Description: While enrolled, students provide music therapy services on a weekly basis to various clinical sites in the community, such as the Debbie Institute in the Mailman Center for Child Development, Ryder Trauma Center, the Mental Health Hospital Center at Jackson Memorial Health Systems, the Pediatric Transplant Surgical Unit at the Holtz Hospital, the Veterans Affairs Medical Center, United Cerebral Palsy, Creative Children Therapy, Miami Jewish Health Systems and Kendall Speech and Language Ctr., Inc. MED 473: Associate Teaching in secondary School Music Professor: Carlos Abril • Course Description: A comprehensive program in observation and supervised teaching in secondary school music. The student spends full time for one half a semester in a secondary school, participating in all activities of the music teacher under the guidance of school and university personnel.

MED 559: Internship in Music Therapy Professor: Shannon de l’Etoile/Teresa Lesiuk • Course Description: Course provides students with a six month opportunity as a music therapy intern in an approved training facility. MED 560: Internship in Music Therapy II Professor: Shannon de l’Etoile/Teresa Lesiuk • Course Description:

MED 657: Music Therapy Graduate Practicum 1 Professor: Shannon de l’Etoile/Teresa Lesiuk • Course Description: In a clinical setting, gain skill in observation and co-leading under the super vision of a music therapist.

MED 658: Music Therapy Graduate Practicum 2 Professor: Shannon de l’Etoile/Carolyn Dachinger/Teresa Lesiuk • Course Description:

MED 659: Music Therapy Graduate Practicum 3 Professor: Shannon de l’Etoile/Teresa Lesiuk • Course Description: In a clinical setting, independently design and apply therapeutic techniques ba sed on scientific evidence.

MED 471: Associate Teaching in Elementary School Music Professor: Carlos Abril • Course Description: A comprehensive program in observation and supervised teaching in elementary school music. The student spends full time for one half a semester in an elementary school, participating in all activities of the music teacher under the guidance of school and university personnel. MED 475: Student Teaching in Music Professor: Carlos Abril • Course Description: A comprehensive program in observation and supervised teaching in elementary, middle, or secondary school music settings for a full semester under the guidance of school and university personnel.

MED 675: Practium in Music Education Professor: Stephen Zdzinski • Course Description: Students enrolled in the Master of Music with Certification Option Degree may complete the required internship with this course. * Course offered Spring 2014


Miller school of medicine epidemiology EPH 647: Community-based Participatory Research Professor: Erin Kobetz-Kerman • Course/Service Learning Description: Community-based participatory research (CBPR) is methodology, increasingly popular in public health and other disciplines, which invites community collaboration throughout the research process from conceptualization of study focus to dissemination of findings. This course will provide an opportunity for medical and graduate students to better understand the process by which community members and academic researchers work collectively to address health disparities and influence social change. EPH 682: Advanced Individual Study Professor: David Lee • Course/Service Learning Description: Individual work on a special project under faculty guidance.

EPH 647: Public Health Projects Professor: Erin Kobetz-Kerman • Course/Service Learning Description: Community-based participatory research (CBPR) is methodology, increasingly popular in public health and other disciplines, which invites community collaboration throughout the research process from conceptualization of study focus to dissemination of findings. This course will provide an opportunity for medical and graduate students to better understand the process by which community members and academic researchers work collectively to address health disparities and influence social change.

Physical Therapy

PTS 610: Clinical Internship I Professor: Helen Masin/Lori Gusman • Course Description: First of four eight-week internships. This course follows the fourth semester of didactic work and is performed in an outpatient setting. During this experience the student concentrates on the clinical application of the basic assessment, evaluation and treatment procedures that they have learned thus far in the academic setting. Good documentation skills, communication skills and early professionalization to the field of physical therapy are additional goals of this experience. Prerequisite: Open to Physical Therapy majors only.

PTS 611: Clinical Internship II Professor: Elsa Castro/Helen Masin/Lori Gusman • Course Description: Second of four eight-week internships. This course follows the completion of didactic work and can be performed in an acute, rehabilitation, outpatient, or specialty setting. During this experience the student concentrates on the clinical application of the assessment, evaluation and treatment procedures that they have learned in the academic setting. Good documentation skills, communication skills and professionalization to the field of physical therapy are additional objectives of this experience. Prerequisite: Open to Physical Therapy majors only.

RSMAS * Course offered Spring 2014


Marine Affairs & Policy MAF 505/506: Fieldwork in Coastal Cultures / Advanced Fieldwork in Political Ecology Professor: Sarah Meltzoff • Course Description: MAF505: Field course in which the student participates in a social and economic analysis of a coastal culture (i.e., stone crab fishermen in Everglades City, spiny lobster fishermen in Key West, boat builders and commercial divers in the Abacos, Bahamas). Preliminary lectures and reading introduce the theory and method which the student then practices during a week-long field trip. MAF506: Advanced field course in which the students participate in the social and economic analysis of a coastal culture (e.g. Louisiana bayou fishermen, Abacos boat builders, Tarpon Spring spongers). Students utilize field research techniques learned in MAF 505 and develop skills in framing a research problem. Students examine a coastal issue from an anthropological perspective, structuring a field research paper. • Service Learning Description: We will examine the rival stakeholder groups involved in fisheries and the Exuma park, exploring various interests from conservation to tourism and development. Little Farmers Cay locals will join in teaching us about their life, including the women who plat baskets and make shell jewelry; the men who fish through hand lining and the use of compressors; students from the all-age school; the clinic nurse; and governmental leaders. Each student team combining Bahamian and UM students will carry out detailed, open-ended, life and work histories on a select research topic in the field. Students write up rough interview notes each night into a coherent, fleshed out field journal. Note that daily notes while interviewing people are just the raw material that you share in nightly class seminars. Students also create a social network file.

School of architecture Architecture ARC 407-609: Architectural Design: Havana Preservation Studio Professor: Sonia Chao • Course/Service Learning Description: This studio project will concentrate on the opportunities and challenges of designing a building within a historic fabric. Students will become aware of international canons and tools used to guide preservation initiatives and they will better understand how preservation catalyzes economic development, particularly in an impoverished country. The class will also learn about the Integral Management Model employed by the preservation Office of Havana (OHC) on interventions within the World Heritage Site.

ARC 509/510: Elective Studio: Overtown Redevelopment Studio Professor: Faculty • Course/Service Learning Description: This is a capstone project that offers master planning and services for communities all over the country. This year we will be working in the City of Hollywood, FL.

ARC 584: Off the Map: Learning from Informal Cities in Latin America Professor: Adib Cure • Course/Service Learning Description: While undeniably precarious in construction, unplanned cities exhibit underlying urban and architectural patterns of remarkable resilience, and that moreover reflect their inhabitants’ enduring cultural values. Built without the assistance of architects and/or planners, they are folkloric expressions of a given people worthy of study. Given this framework, the seminar will initially focus on the study and analysis of informal settlements throughout Latin America. The ultimate objective of the course is to develop a new understanding of these communities, in order to formulate effective modes of engagement with the informal. In addition, the relationship between the formal and the informal will be the basic platform of our investigations throughout the semester. Each participant in the course is expected to complete readings, participate in discussions, and complete a research proposal. ARC 621: Seminar on Housing, Transportation and Infrastructure Professor: Eric Firley

* Course offered Spring 2014


Course/Service Learning Description: Part I: Survey of housing theories and projects with emphasis on morphological context, typology and composition - focus on topics of modernity. Part II: Introduction to thoroughfare design and walkability principles; description of urban, suburban, rural and regional infrastructure.

ARC 623: Public Participation Methods – Charrette with MRED+U Program Professors: Chuck Bohl, Jaime Correa, and Armando Montero • Course Description: The CDD Workshop assists communities with visioning, planning, design and development challenges through the combined resources of faculty and graduate students in real estate, urban design and architecture. • Service Learning Description: We will define the scope of the work in conjunction with the needs of the community, but it can encompass any of the areas of expertise and training they have received at UM, including: evaluating sites and properties by looking for opportunities and constraints for development (physical as well as land use, real estate, policy, management and other topics), conducting market analyses by examining the potential for redevelopment or repositioning of properties, performing financial studies and preparing pro formas, evaluating existing codes, plans and regulations, advising on preservationoriented development, and providing planning, architecture and urban design services.

Real estate development

RED 601: Introduction to Real Estate Development and Urbanism Professor: Chuck Bohl • Course/Service Learning Description: Fundamentals of real estate development of urban places, including the many challenges of the development process such as analyzing market sectors and development opportunities, comprehending the development context of regulation, public policy and politics, raising investment capital, assembling land, program formulation, building types, construction management, marketing, and sales.

RED 660: Urban Infill, Preservation and Redevelopment Professors: Chuck Bohl and Stephen Nostrand • Course/Service Learning Description: Urban infill and redevelopment practice introduces complexities and opportunities that differ significantly from edge city and greenfield development practice. This course will build students competencies for infill and redevelopment practice focusing on: barriers and solutions for urban infill development; urban site analysis; mixed-use development; repositioning of urban land, vacant and underutilized properties (including greyfield and brownfield opportunities); long-term land leases; tax incentives, historic preservation, public-private partnerships, business improvement districts, tax increment financing, community (re)development districts, parking strategies, urban housing types and mixed-use infill strategies. Some of the team projects will also engage RED660 students with design studios in the School of Architecture who will collaborate on team projects.

RED 680: Entrepreneurship: Building a Real Estate Development Company Professor: Muayad Abbas • Course/Service Learning Description: In today’s challenging economic conditions, being an entrepreneur is an imperative. And in the business of real estate, it is the norm. The Entrepreneurship in Real Estate course is focused on examining methods and approaches to building a successful real estate business and the different forms it takes. The objective of the course is to prepare the students for determining efficient organizational forms for their business, appropriate partnership structures for their ventures, and innovative ways at approaching their developments. The course is structured as regular lectures integrated with several visits by guest speakers that will include developers, attorneys, bankers, and brokers in an effort to get a real-life prospective on the issues discussed in class. RED 699: Capstone Real Estate Development and Urbanism Professors: Chuck Bohl, Jaime Correa, and Armando Montero

* Course offered Spring 2014


• •

Course Description: The CDD Workshop assists communities with visioning, planning, design and development challenges through the combined resources of faculty and graduate students in real estate, urban design and architecture. Service Learning Description: We will define the scope of the work in conjunction with the needs of the community, but it can encompass any of the areas of expertise and training they have received at UM, including: evaluating sites and properties by looking for opportunities and constraints for development (physical as well as land use, real estate, policy, management and other topics), conducting market analyses by examining the potential for redevelopment or repositioning of properties, performing financial studies and preparing pro formas, evaluating existing codes, plans and regulations, advising on preservation-oriented development, and providing planning, architecture and urban design services.

School of Business Administration Business BUS 604: MBA Career Development and Enrichment Professor: Mary Young • Course/Service Learning Description: This course will expose students to a variety of academic and industry career l ectures, events, and workshops to enhance their MBA experience. The focus is to establish addedvalue to an MBA student through real world and relevant access to information and resources beyond the traditional curriculum. BUS 622: Global Business Project (GBP)-CIBER Professor: Anuj Mehrotra • Course/Service Learning Description: The Global Business Project (GBP) is a collaborative course offered by particip ating CIBER schools to their MBAs and other interested graduate students. Stud ents in related disciplines work in teams both virtually and in person on real business issues with multinational and local businesses and not-for-profits. P roject supervision and final grade provided by Country Lead Professor CIBER.

Business Law BSL 694: Real Estate Law Professor: John Dellagloria • Course/Service Learning Description: Real Estate Law focuses on the U.S. legal system as it relates to the buying, selling, and financing of real property. In addition to traditional text material, the analysis of U.S. court cases is used to detail the legal factors of ownership rights and liabilities, specific interests in real property, contracting issues related to the purchase and sale of real property, as well as financing and closing the real estate transaction. The course provides a problem-solving experience, which is intended to develop graduate students' critical thinking process as well as their skills in oral and written communication.

Management MGT 100: FIRST STEP (Freshman Integrity, Responsibility, and Success through Teamwork) Professors: Sheryl Alonso and Madelyn Sierra • Course/Service Learning Description: This course is designed to provide entering freshman business majors an enriched curriculum that examines key issues in the global business environment and emphasizes the importance of ethical business practices. The course culminates with a team project that encourages students to address real world problems and encourages a lifelong commitment to civic engagement. * Course offered Spring 2014


MGT 401: Strategic Management Professor: Marianna Makri • Course Description: An integrative approach to strategy formulation and implementation from a domestic and international perspective is the focus of this core capstone course. All the primary areas of business are emphasized using cases and readings. Course is required of all graduating seniors in Business. • Service Learning Description: Project: Teams of 4-6 executives each visit an organization (private or nonprofit) in the Americas, analyze its opportunities & challenges, identify strategic options, formulate strategic plan, and submit it to organization & to class. For example, in 2010, one team visited the Red Cross of Saltillo, Mexico

School of Communication Communication COM 406: UStellenbosch: Engaging South Africa Professors: Richard Grant and William Green (See Geography and regional studies, GEG 511/REL 406/INS 411/COM 406) COM 598: Using Communication to Change Health and Environmental Behavior: Theory and Practice Professor: Jyotika Ramaprasad • Course Description: With an international focus, the course covers the theory and practice in using communication to make social change, particularly in health and the environment. Communication includes the dialogic/participatory, the “diffusionist,” and the hybrid theoretical models, as well as how these models are put into practice in actual projects in the world using strategic communication and journalism as well as activist creative work. The course essentially gives you an overview of all the different forms of communication practice to address world health and environmental issues. • Service Learning Description: Students will implement a social justice project

COM 609: Communication for Social Change Professor: Jyotika Ramaprasad • Course/Service Learning Description: The course teaches theory and practice in using communication to address social issues. Most interventions that address social problems (disasters, environment, health) do not pay enough attention to communication.

Electronic Media

CEM 345: Intermediate Electronic Media Production Professor: Edward Julbe • Course/Service Learning Description: The class produces a 30 minute television show with a group on a subject related to the community. In the past, we have worked with disabled people at the Center for Independent Living, with elementary school kids at West Lab Elementary and with the business owners and women's shelter in the Wynwood district.

Motion pictures

*CMP 544: Media Activism Professor: Michelle Seelig • Course/Service: In this course, students will examine the role of media in shaping social reform to document social issues such as poverty, human rights, social inequities, the environment, and powerless groups. We will review the philosophy and history of media as activism ranging from photography, documentary, cinema, the Internet, social media and newer forms of media. Emphasis is

* Course offered Spring 2014


placed on developing a critical understanding of current media advocacy practices with a conscious goal; awareness, change minds, to affect policy, and action. At the end of the semester, students will have a fully developed project concept.

*CMP 594: Essentials of Documentary Film Professor: James Virga

CMP 694/ECS 352/ECS 572: Environmental Filmmaking & Community Engagement Professor: Ali Habashi • Course/Service Learning Description: Students will develop the skills necessary to create short, nonfiction pieces that actively explore, critique, and expand on what makes an environmental documentary film. Students will also learn how the inhabitants of a community, including its residents, educators, leaders, activists, farmers, and others can use their films to engage and empower elected officials, parents, students, youth and others in addressing the environmental and social challenges facing diverse groups.

Multimedia Journalism (graduate)

CVJ 221: Introduction to Photojournalism Professor: Margaret Steber • Course Description: Introduction to documentary photography is a course designed to help you develop the skills needed to produce successful images and recognize what makes good photographs in terms of content, composition, and technical quality. The course will help you acquire and develop the intellectual, analytical, and technical skills needed to become strong visual storytellers. CVJ 435: Video Journalism Professor: James Virga • Course Description: An advanced visual journalism course to develop skills in video pre-production, production, and post-production with special emphasis on documentary approaches for on-line media.

CVJ 519: Interactive Storytelling Professor: Rich Beckman and/or Kim Grinfeder • Course Description: This course is intended as an exploration of how storytelling is evolving utilizing the digital communication tools available to us today. This course will cover linear and non-linear storytelling techniques and production processes. We will plan, produce and publish a major multimedia documentary project and continue to build on elements of your multimedia skill set. • Service Learning Description: Students produce documentary video stories for community organizations including Special Olympics and Shake-A-Leg Miami. These stories highlight participants from these organizations, including intellectually, physically and demographically handicapped citizens of South Florida and their coaches and mentors, as well as volunteers from the community. We also work nationally and internationally with Special Olympics.

CVJ 521: Seminar in Visual Storytelling Professor: Rich Beckman • Course Description: An advanced seminar class designed to enhance the knowledge and practice of the visual story telling narrative. This seminar stresses the importance of converging, interactive and social media, still images, graphics, video and sound. We will examine multimedia storytelling as it is practiced today by talking with leading multimedia producers in an attempt to establish and publish uniform standards for multimedia storytelling. We will develop all of our findings into an interactive online multimedia project in an attempt to provide some clarity to the maze of judging and evaluation criteria that exist today. We'll be working with multimedia editors and practitioners from a variety of publications. We will also continue to refine your personal multimedia storytelling techniques and learn to create dynamic web sites using Joomla and a blog using WordPress. • Service Learning Description: Students produce documentary video stories for community organizations including Special Olympics and Shake-A-Leg Miami. These stories highlight participants from these * Course offered Spring 2014


organizations, including intellectually, physically and demographically handicapped citizens of South Florida and their coaches and mentors, as well as volunteers from the community. We also work nationally and internationally with Special Olympics.

Public Relations

*CPR 232: Writing for Public Relations Professor: Heidi Carr or Cornelia Splichal • Course Description: Principles and techniques for the development of creative strategies, concepts, and writing of effective public relations messages for all types of media.

*CPR 346: Public Relations Message Development and Execution Professor: Maria Scott • Course Description: Preparation, execution, and production of visual messages for public relations media.

CPR 346: Advanced Public Relations Writing and Design Professor: Maria Scott • Course Description: Preparation, execution, and production of visual messages for public relations media. • Service Learning Description: Each class develops a public relations campaign for a not-for-profit entity in South Florida. CPR 380: Public Relations Internship Professor: Colee Splichal • Course/Service Learning Description: Supervised activities in public relations. Students may choose to intern for a not-for-profit organization.

*CPR 436: Public Relations Campaigns Professor: Donn Tilson or Cornelia Splichal • Course Description: Planning, execution and evaluation of communications designed to influence attitudes of specialized publics. Case studies of public relations programs of business firms and other institutions are included. This course is a capstone required of all undergraduate Public Relations students and comes after all other required PR classes have been taken. You are expected to meet a substantial challenge by applying and building on knowledge and skills already acquired. You will use theories, principles, strategies and target communications to develop and execute a public relations campaign for an actual client. Of special concern is how you acquit yourself as a working communication professional who is committed to the goal and who effectively budgets time, plans, exhibits leadership, adheres to ethical and legal practice, and demonstrates a strong work ethic. • Service Learning Description: Students may work for non-profits.

*CPR 533: Sports, Publicity and Promotions Professor: Maria Scott • Course Description: This course will provide a review, examination and practical application of sports communications, publicity and promotions in strategic communications. *CPR 581: Public Relations Experience Program Professor: Maria Scott • Course Description: Develop skills used by professionals in the public relations/media relations, communications, promotions/marketing and journalism professions through faculty-supervised hands-on experience in the "field" with real organizations. Visual Journalism CVJ 209: Audio Visual Production * Course offered Spring 2014


Professor: James Virga and/or Kim Grinfeder • Course Description: This course is a lab-lecture course that introduces students to the concepts of visual storytelling, and teaches skills needed to gather information in the visual storytelling process. Students work in teams using still photography, video and audio-gathering devices to document community stories. Students learn to use basic computer skills to communicate in a variety of forms, including text, images, sound and video. Students will take on the role of content providers and producers for their own projects. Students will consider how to research, gather and organize their content. This course will organize each project into three phases: pre-production, content gathering, and post-production. The main goal of the class is for each student to develop a creative approach to the visual narrative. • Service Learning Description: Students cultivate local contacts to engrain themselves into the community. Students are required to develop story ideas that have value to the various aspects of our local community. They work on both short-term and long term projects.

CVJ 221: Introduction to Photojournalism Professor: Margaret Steber, James Virga, Michelle Seelig, and adjuncts • Course/Service Learning Description: Introduction to Photojournalism is a course designed to help you develop the skills needed to produce successful images and recognize what makes good photographs in terms of (1) content; (2) composition; and (3) technical quality. The course will help you acquire and develop the intellectual, analytical and technical skills needed to become strong visual storytellers. We will carefully consider the way photographs are labeled and the caption information that is needed with a photograph. Through practice and research you will gain an understanding of the use of visual images in the professional world as well as the local, national, and international community. Ultimately you will gain an understanding of the responsibility and social value of being a photojournalist/visual storyteller. We will pay close attention to the news and communities in South Florida. We will constantly be talking about the ethical considerations of the viewed materials in class, as well as our own ethical considerations as content gatherers for the public. This course will be demanding; we will set the bar high in terms of skill sets and content. TO SUCCEED IN THIS CLASS YOU WILL NEED A STRONG WORK ETHIC. • Service Learning Description: Students cultivate local contacts to engrain themselves into the community. Students are required to develop story ideas that have value to the various aspects of our local community. They work on both short-term and long term projects. CVJ 361: Advanced Photojournalism Professor: Margaret Steber and James Virga • Course/Service Learning Description: Advanced Photojournalism is a class designed to improve the visual storytelling, newsgathering, and photographic technical skills introduced in the Intro to Photojournalism class. Students will be expected to integrate into the community to make contacts and develop story ideas worthy of visual documentation. The class will explore how quality photojournalism has the potential to affect change in a community, a country, and beyond.

CVJ 419: Interactive Storytelling Professor: Margaret Steber • Course/Service Learning Description: This course is intended as an exploration of how storytelling is reinventing itself utilizing the new digital communication tools available to us today. This course covers linear and non-linear storytelling techniques and production processes. Students explore and expand upon the various ways communities are getting their local news. Students examine the sustainability and economic models for small online publications. Students learn to create, execute and present a business plan. In this course, students demonstrate the ability to think out of the box and discover new ways to deliver news stories targeted to a unique community. This course culminates with a team project that entails research and production of an online documentary on an aspect of our community. In the past they produced Grand Ave. News, Fish at Bay (State of Biscayne Bay) and a project on Stiltsville. They learn what it means to provide an information service to a community. Websites of projects: www.grandavenews.com www.fishatbay.com and www.viscom.miami.edu/~stiltsville/ CVJ 435: Video Journalism Professor: James Virga * Course offered Spring 2014


Course/Service Learning Description: This course is designed to develop skills in video pre-production, production and post-production with special emphasis on documentary approaches for online media. Introduction to the aesthetic and technical aspects of digital video recording and non-linear editing using the personal computer equipped with Final Cut Pro. Students will use the still photographic storytelling skills and sound recording skills learned in CVJ introductory courses, and apply those skills to video/audio content gathering. We will compare and contrast the art forms of: moving images, still images, and sound recording; and compare and contrast all the combinations. This course will also develop critical skills through the viewing and discussion of online video journalism as well as documentary films. In class we will watch motion picture sequences, and break them down into layers to give us a better understanding of the content-gathering process. As a class we will study a variety of narrative forms, and discuss what we think can be used to influence our own work. In Video Journalism students will work in teams to author character driven stories about South Florida. Each project will be for publication. In these documentaries students will tell creative, well-researched, carefully crafted, stories about intriguing people, places, and issues. Students should expect to deepen their understanding and appreciation of the South Florida community, improve their storytelling skills, conduct research as a professional, and build pieces substantial for their portfolios.

CVJ 521: Seminar in Visual Storytelling Professor: Richard Beckman • Course/Service Learning Description: An advanced seminar class designed to enhance the knowledge and practice of the visual storytelling narrative. This seminar stresses the importance of converging media, still images, video and sound. Particular emphasis will be placed upon the creation of a multimedia portfolio.

CVJ 541: Advanced Audio Video Narratives Professor: Richard Beckman • Course/Service Learning Description: This course examines uses of audio and video to communicate journalism. Students learn to investigate, gather content, and produce documentary stories primarily for online distribution.

School of Law Law LAW 014: Property Law Professor: Faculty • Course/ Service Learning Description: Focus is on basic principles governing private and public control over tangible and intangible resources, especially land. The course addresses concepts and policies concerning property and special concepts concerning real estate, such as estates in land, future interests, and the rule against perpetuities. The course also studies real estate transactions, recording, methods of title assurance, easements, covenants, and land use controls.

LAW 229: Housing Discrimination Professor: Marc Fajer • Course/ Service Learning Description: This course will explore the scope of discrimination in housing in the United States and the nature and adequacy of the legal remedies created to prevent it. We will focus primarily on federal statutory law, but will also examine some state statutes and some historical and constitutional materials. An important theme of the class will be differences between the kinds of characteristics protected by state and federal statues (e.g. race, sex, disabilities, material status) and whether the legal regime sufficiently considers those differences. The course serves as an introduction to civil rights statues both for students who are considering public interest practice and for students who are interested in representing housing providers (landlords, developers, condo and homeowners' association, etc.). Substantive topics covered are likely to

* Course offered Spring 2014


include the meaning of race under the 1866 Civil Rights Act, proving discrimination, discriminatory advertising, sexual harassment, accommodation of persons with disabilities, discrimination to achieve integration, marital status discrimination, and claims that enforcement of certain fair housing provisions violates the free exercise rights of landlords. In addition, the course will include a number of exercises designed to introduce students to common techniques employed in working with statutes (theories of statutory interpretation, drafting, legislative history, implied ratification, canons of construction, etc.).

LAW 651: Public Interest Law and Leadership Seminar Professor: Anthony Alfieri • Course Description: The seminar will address the theory and practice of public interest law, lawyering, and ethics for nonprofit and for-profit law firms, public policy and faith-based social service organizations, and local, national, and international social movements. We will survey the culture, economics, history, and sociology of the public interest law movement, and, moreover, consider the role of legal education, leadership studies, and professional responsibility in public interest practice. To that end, we will examine both litigation and non-litigation advocacy strategies, including community organizing, direct service, impact and test case litigation, law reform in legislative, administrative/regulatory, and institutional contexts, and "cause" lawyering. • Service Learning Description: we will apply these advocacy strategies through community-based projects in partnership with the Ministerial Alliance of Historic Black Churches and other nonprofit groups in the West Grove and in other low-income communities of color in the City of Miami and Miami-Dade County. The projects will focus on antipoverty research and advocacy as well as rights education and community outreach. *LAW 708: Bankruptcy Clinic I Professor: Patricia Redmond • Course Description: The Bankruptcy Assistance Clinic is a two semester (Fall/Spring) or (Spring/Fall) course for a total of six (6) credits for both semesters. Students will represent clients before the U.S. Bankruptcy Court under the supervision of practicing lawyers who will serve as mentors throughout the representation. The students will be evaluated on a pass/fail basis on the following criteria: 1) Classwork and Class participation 2) A journal or fee application depending on the semester detailing their externship activities 3) The mentor's evaluation of the student in connection with their client representations. • Service Learning Description: Under the supervision of practicing lawyers who serve as mentors throughout the representation, students: Interview, counsel and represent clients in Chapter 7 and 13 bankruptcy cases; assist clients who are dealing with unprecedented financial crisis; appear in court for contested matters when the clinic’s assistance is requested by a judge

LAW 709: Bankruptcy Clinic II Professor: Patricia Redmond • Course Description: The Bankruptcy Assistance Clinic is a two semester (Fall/Spring) or (Spring/Fall) course for a total of six (6) credits for both semesters. Students will represent clients before the U.S. Bankruptcy Court under the supervision of practicing lawyers who will serve as mentors throughout the representation. The students will be evaluated on a pass/fail basis on the following criteria: 1) Classwork and Class participation 2) A journal or fee application depending on the semester detailing their externship activities 3) The mentor's evaluation of the student in connection with their client representations. • Service Learning Description: Under the supervision of practicing lawyers who serve as mentors throughout the representation, students: Interview, counsel and represent clients in Chapter 7 and 13 bankruptcy cases; assist clients who are dealing with unprecedented financial crisis; appear in court for contested matters when the clinic’s assistance is requested by a judge

*LAW 711: Death Penalty Clinic Professor: Sarah Mourer

LAW 711: Capital Defense Project Workshop Professor: Sarah Mourer * Course offered Spring 2014


Service Learning Description: Students will be placed with an attorney in the community currently litigating a capital case. Professor Mourer will act as either co-counsel or a consultant on the students' case. Students will have the opportunity to participate in the capital case through client and witness interviews, deposition skills, plea negotiations, legal research, motion writing, motion hearings, fact finding, pre-trial investigation, mitigation reports, pre-trial negotiations, mental health evaluations, social services workups, motions for new trial, sentencing preparation, and sentencing hearings. Students will also have the opportunity for reflection and case staffing during seminar class time. Students are interviewed and must demonstrate the emotional maturity to cope with exposure to possibly disturbing or gruesome factual situations and depictions. Students will have client contact with clients accused of particularly serious and violent crimes, some of which may involve death or violence to young children.

LAW 735/736: Community Lawyering Clinic Professors: Charles Elsesser • Course/Service Learning Description: In this eight-credit, two semester clinic, students work with the Community Justice Project (CJP) of Florida Legal Services, Inc. to provide legal assistance to community organizations fighting for racial and economic justice in Miami’s low-income communities of color. In this clinic, students specifically: experience using a “community lawyering” model to support the campaigns of local community organizations fighting against poverty, classism, racism, and oppression in Miami; hone practical litigation skills representing organizational and individual clients; sharpen their theoretical understanding of the relationship between social change, organizing and lawyering. Students work on the CJP’s current caseload in the areas of housing justice, workers’ rights, and civil rights. Students in the past have worked closely with CJP to provide representation to the following community organizations: Miami Workers Center: www.miamiworkerscenter.org (including litigation challenging the demolition of 850 units of public housing); POWER U Center for Social Change: www.poweru.org (including tenant union litigation challenging inhabitable housing conditions); Restaurant Opportunities Center of Miami (ROC-Miami): www.rocunited.org (including the development of workers’ rights manual); and South Florida Jobs with Justice: www.sfjwj.org (including land use, zoning and comprehensive planning advocacy involving the preservation, purchase and upgrading of low income mobile home parks).

LAW 737/791: Children & Youth Law Clinic I Professors: Bernard Perlmutter, Kele Stewart and Robert Latham • Course Description: The Children & Youth Law Clinic is an in-house, live-client clinic established in 1995 by the Law School. The Clinic represents children in foster care and former foster youth in dependency, health care, mental health, disability, independent living, education, immigration and other general civil legal matters, ensuring that they have a voice in court proceedings. Under the supervision of three Floridalicensed attorneys, approximately 24 second and third year law students each year assume primary responsibility for all aspects of a client’s case. Students learn fundamental lawyering skills, substantive law and professional ethics. • Service Learning Description: The Clinic seeks to instill in students a sense of professionalism and encourages them to pursue public interest law careers or to devote substantial portions of their legal practices to providing pro bono legal assistance to the poor. LAW 738/791: Children & Youth Law Clinic II Professors: Bernard Perlmutter and Robert Latham • Course Description: The Children & Youth Law Clinic is an in-house, live-client clinic established in 1995 by the Law School. The Clinic represents children in foster care and former foster youth in dependency, health care, mental health, disability, independent living, education, immigration and other general civil legal matters, ensuring that they have a voice in court proceedings. Under the supervision of three Floridalicensed attorneys, approximately 24 second and third year law students each year assume primary responsibility for all aspects of a client’s case. Students learn fundamental lawyering skills, substantive law and professional ethics. • Service Learning Description: The Clinic seeks to instill in students a sense of professionalism and encourages them to pursue public interest law careers or to devote substantial portions of their legal practices to providing pro bono legal assistance to the poor.

* Course offered Spring 2014


*LAW 758/778: Professional Responsibility and Ethics I Workshop Professors: Jan Jacobowitz LAW 760: Human Rights Clinic Professors: Caroline Bettinger-López • Course Description: Through an intensive critical seminar, students examine the actors, subjects, and tools of the human rights movement, as well as critiques coming from left and right. Specifically, the seminar considers the evolution of the human rights movement, how to locate litigation in human rights work, the difficulties in applying 'traditional' human rights methodology beyond the civil and political rights context, the developing human rights movement in the United States, and economic issues that arise in human rights norms and analysis. • Service Learning Description: To bridge theory and practice, the Human Rights Clinic provides students with hands-on experience working on active human rights cases and projects. Students apply and test the skills-training and critical examinations imparted through classroom instruction and simulations in the context of real-world advocacy. Working in partnership with experienced attorneys and institutions engaged in human rights activism, both in the United States and abroad, students contribute to effecting positive change locally and globally as they hone their professional skills.

LAW 773: Tenants’ Rights Clinic Professor: Faculty • Course/Service Learning Description: The clinic is designed to allow students to represent a client from the beginning of a case until its completion and primarily involves clients being evicted from public and subsidized housing, receiving Section 8 terminations, and having their affordable housing applications denied. Each student will be assigned several cases during the semester. In the Tenants’ Rights Clinic students will: represent tenants to help them avoid homelessness and preserve their extremely valuable, subsidized housing; interview clients, investigate cases, research legal issues; negotiate with opposing parties, draft pleadings and discovery; represent clients at mediation, administrative hearings and in court. While most cases will involve some appearance in court or in an administrative forum, the number of appearances will be dependent on the cases assigned. Some cases may go to trial; most will settle.

LAW 779: Federal Appellate Clinic Professor: Ricardo Bascuas • Course/Service Learning Description: The Federal Appellate Clinic is a one-semester, three-credit course that provides upper-level students with the opportunity to plan, research, and draft federal appeals for indigent criminal defendants. The aim of the clinic is to provide advanced instruction in written advocacy, client counseling, and legal analysis. The Federal Appellate Clinic works closely with and accepts cases only from the Federal Public Defender’s Office for the Southern District of Florida. Pairs of students are assigned to a case and required to produce both the appellant’s initial brief and reply brief on strict deadline. Students are also responsible for corresponding with their clients. The entire class discusses all of the clinics’ cases, debates strategies, and shares research and ideas. The clinic thus functions as a small, highly collaborative law firm.

LAW 785: Health Rights Clinic Professors: JoNel Newman

* LAW 786: Health Rights & Elder Law Clinic II Professors: JoNel Newman • Course/Service Learning Description: The Health and Elder Law Clinic is a two-semester, eight-credit course in which students assist low-income elderly and health-impaired clients under the supervision of a professor and clinical instructors. Students function as the client's primary advocate in all aspects of the client's case, including interviewing and counseling, fact investigation, drafting and briefing, negotiations and hearings. Students represent clients in the following fora: in Social Security disability hearings before Federal Administrative Law Judges, in immigration status adjustment proceedings before USCIS Officers and Immigration Judges, and in public benefits and housing hearings before state agency hearing officers. Students also prepare wills, guardianships and advance healthcare directives and represent clients in Probate Court and engage in policy and impact advocacy on such topics as HIV and confidentiality, immigrant benefit eligibility, and healthcare

* Course offered Spring 2014


reform. This population-based clinic uses a "teaching hospital" and social justice model providing student advocates with a dynamic, high-intensity and high-volume practice. The seminar component of this course provides substantive instruction to students in the clinic's primary practice areas and skills training. The seminar also includes clinical "case rounds" designed to reinforce substantive training, emphasize real-world profession responsibility issues.

*LAW 789: Miami Innocence Clinic Professors: Sarah Mourer and Craig Trocino • Course/Service Learning Description: In this hands-on project students will work toward the exoneration of actually innocent prisoners wrongfully convicted. Students will have the opportunity for live client representation of prisoners claiming actual innocence. Students will have the responsibility of investigating innocence claims and litigating post-conviction motions when appropriate. The workshop is committed to exonerating innocent individuals and combating injustice. Students reexamine cases in their entirety and provide post-conviction representation to defendants with compelling claims to innocence. Students contribute to the project through fact investigation, interviewing defendants and witnesses, and legal research and analysis. Students may also have the opportunity to research, draft, and file motions for postconviction relief, and appear in court on behalf of those wrongfully convicted. LAW 797: Immigration Clinic Professor: Rebecca Sharpless • Course/Service Learning Description: The Immigration Clinic provides a challenging opportunity for students to advocate on behalf of immigrants in a wide variety of complex immigration proceedings. In addition to helping individual clients, students collaborate with other immigrant rights groups on projects that reform the law and advance the cause of social justice for immigrants. The clinic is dedicated to being an integral part of the wider immigrant and human rights advocacy community in South Florida and the nation. All of the clinic's clients are in removal proceedings before immigration court, the Board of Immigration Appeals, or federal courts. Students have the primary responsibility for preparing cases from start to finish—from an initial factual investigation through to a final merits hearing in an adversarial setting.

* LAW 798: Immigration Clinic II Professor: Rebecca Sharpless

LAW 820: Public Interest Program Professor: Jan Jacobowitz • Course/Service Learning Description: Summer public interest program in which the students are enrolled in a public interest law seminar and work in the community at a non-profit legal services agency.

LAW 845: Externship: Judicial Professor: Jennifer Zawid

LAW 873: Externship: Transactional Professor: Jennifer Zawid LAW 885: International Corporate/ Transactional Externship Professor: Jennifer Zawid

School of Nursing and Health Studies Nursing *NUR 304: Adult Health I: Fundamentals of Nursing Practice Professor: Doris Ugarriza * Course offered Spring 2014


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Course Description: This clinical experience has a focus on the development and practice of basic communication, assessment, and psycho-motor skills which are utilized in the nursing care of clients. Students provide basic nursing care for clients in a long term care setting. Service Learning Description: This clinical course is carried out in local area healthcare settings, hospitals, and long-term care facilities where the students and the agency health care providers collaborate in the application of evidence-based nursing care to improve the health of community member. Critical thinking and knowledge of community resources are critical to the course.

*NUR 308: Adult Health II Professor: Doris Ugarriza • Course Description: This course focuses on the nursing management of the client throughout the adult life cycle who experiences alterations and/or adaptations in physiologic defense mechanisms. Teaching strategies to be utilized include lecture, discussion, critical thinking exercises. • Course Description: This clinical experience has a focus on the development and practice of basic communication, assessment, and psycho-motor skills which are utilized in the nursing care of clients. Students provide basic nursing care for clients in a long term care setting. • Service Learning Description: This clinical course is carried out in local area healthcare settings, hospitals, and long-term care facilities where the students and the agency health care providers collaborate in the application of evidence-based nursing care to improve the health of community member. Critical thinking and knowledge of community resources are critical to the course. *NUR 318: Maternal Health Nursing Professor: Natalia Villegas Rodriguez or Doris Ugarriza • Course Description: The emphasis of this course is on the use of the nursing process to assist women and infants in health promotion and to adapt to health alterations in pregnancy, birth, postpartum, neonatal adaptation to extra uterine life and the early newborn period, requiring care in secondary healthcare settings. Concepts of preconceptional health, genetics, teratology, ethical and legal issues in prenatal genetic screening and diagnoses, cultural sensitivity in childbearing practices and newborn care, current trends in labor and birth practices, family centered care and the use of evidenced based non pharmacological and pharmacological interventions for relief of discomforts and promotion of normal processes of pregnancy and birth are addressed. Also addressed are health disparities in multicultural healthcare settings related to socio-political-environmental nursing management in improving perinatal outcomes. • Service Learning Description: This clinical course is carried out in local area healthcare settings, hospitals, and long-term care facilities where the students and the agency health care providers collaborate in the application of evidence-based nursing care to improve the health of community member. Critical thinking and knowledge of community resources are critical to the course.

*NUR 320: Pediatric Health Nursing Professor: Doris Ugarriza • Course Description: The focus of this course is on the use of the nursing process to develop and implement nursing management strategies for children and their families experiencing acute, chronic, and critical multi-system health alterations within a multicultural context. Use of the nursing process to expand and develop appropriate clinical interventions as a member of the healthcare team. Students will build on foundational skills in critical thinking, collaboration, and leadership in the provision of nursing care. • Service Learning Description: This clinical course is carried out in local area healthcare settings, hospitals, and long-term care facilities where the students and the agency health care providers collaborate in the application of evidence-based nursing care to improve the health of community member. Critical thinking and knowledge of community resources are critical to the course.

*NUR 411: Adult Health III Professor: Doris Ugarriza • Course Description: The focus of this course is the nursing management of the patient throughout adulthood who experiences complex alterations and or adaptations/maladaptions in organ system function and the * Course offered Spring 2014


use of the nursing process to assist adult clients to adjust to complex multisystem related alterations/adaptations/maladaptions in the endocrine, cardiovascular, respiratory, immunological and hemopoietic, nervous, musculoskeletal, digestive, and renal urinary systems. Specific models are utilized to enhance the teaching of critical thinking. Research findings are utilized to support nursing interventions. Service Learning Description: This clinical course is carried out in local area healthcare settings, hospitals, and long-term care facilities where the students and the agency health care providers collaborate in the application of evidence-based nursing care to improve the health of community member. Critical thinking and knowledge of community resources are critical to the course.

*NUR 430: Leadership in Nursing Professor: Doris Ugarriza • Course Description: Theoretical and applied concepts of transition to the nursing role within the healthcare setting are explored in this course. The focus is on practice issues and responsibilities in contemporary professional nursing practice. Emphasis is placed on the transition to practice and nursing care systems with increasing responsibility through discussion of practice theory and styles, empowering, mentoring, managing change and striving for excellence. Seminar discussion topics will focus on the issues of successful transition to the practice environment as new nurse. *NUR 440: Population Focused Nursing Professor: Doris Ugarriza • Course Description: The focus is on population-focused nursing and community-oriented approaches to understanding and addressing major public health concerns across the life span. Emphasis is on assessing, planning, implementing and evaluating programs for a variety of communities both domestically and internationally. Health and disease is conceptualized as a complex interaction between individual, relationship, community, and socio-economic-politico level factors. Epidemiology, sociology, behavioral sciences and nursing theory and practice are integrated throughout. Special attention is given to addressing the unique needs of vulnerable populations and cultural groups, the elimination of health disparities, and social justice. • Service Learning Description: This clinical course is carried out in local area healthcare settings, hospitals, and long-term care facilities where the students and the agency health care providers collaborate in the application of evidence-based nursing care to improve the health of community member. Critical thinking and knowledge of community resources are critical to the course. *NUR 448: Psychiatric Mental Health Nursing Professor: Doris Ugarriza • Course Description: This course has a focus on psychiatric mental health nursing. Application of course concepts through experience and interactions with healthcare coalition groups are emphasized. Also, psychotherapeutic processes across the life span, planning nursing care for individuals, families, and communities with a variety of psychiatric and mental health problems in various settings (inpatient, outpatient, community) professional and therapeutic communication skills and techniques are addressed. In addition the influence of genetics, neurophysiology, and psychopharmacology on the development of psychiatric and mental health and the evolution of the role of the psychiatric nurse are discussed. Sociopolitico-economic aspects of nursing management are integrated throughout. • Service Learning Description: This clinical course is carried out in local area healthcare settings, hospitals, and long-term care facilities where the students and the agency health care providers collaborate in the application of evidence-based nursing care to improve the health of community member. Critical thinking and knowledge of community resources are critical to the course.

NUR 450: Role Synthesis Professor: Johis Ortega and Gloria Trujillo • Course Description: Theoretical and applied concepts of transition to the nursing role within the healthcare setting are explored in this course. The focus is on practice issues and responsibilities in contemporary professional nursing practice. Emphasis is placed on the transition to practice and nursing care systems with increasing responsibility through discussion of practice theory and styles, empowering, mentoring, * Course offered Spring 2014


managing change and striving for excellence. Seminar discussion topics will focus on the issues of successful transition to the practice environment as new nurse. Service Learning Description: This clinical course is carried out in local area healthcare settings, hospitals, and long-term care facilities where the students and the agency health care providers collaborate in the application of evidence-based nursing care to improve the health of community member. Critical thinking and knowledge of community resources are critical to the course.

*NUR 453: Role Transition Professor: Dorris Ugarriza • Course Description: Theoretical and applied concepts of transition to the nursing role within the healthcare setting are integrated in this course. The course is a synthesis of previously learned knowledge, incorporating the components of physiological, psychological, and developmental concerns in the care of the client. Seminar discussion topics have a focus on the issues of successful transition to the practice environment as a nurse generalist, with the ability to exercise clinical reasoning and evidence-based practice. NUR 499: Special Topics/Independent Study Professor: Faculty • Course/Service Learning Description: Students have the option of developing community-based participatory research.

NUR 623: Primary Healthcare of Infants and Children Professor: Todd Ambrosia • Course Description: Theoretical and clinical bases for advanced practice Nursing and management of infants and children. Emphasis is on strategies for health maintenance and prevention of health problems, and management of health alterations. • Service Learning Description: LEND Initiative: Leadership Education in Neurodevelopmental and Related Disabilities (LEND) programs provide long-term, graduate level interdisciplinary training as well as interdisciplinary services and care. The purpose of the LEND training program is to improve the health of infants, children, and adolescents with disabilities. They accomplish this by preparing trainees from diverse professional disciplines to assume leadership roles in their respective fields and by insuring high levels of interdisciplinary clinical competence. Students participate in affiliated clinics at the University of Miami and UM/Jackson Medical Centers. NUR 627: Primary Prenatal Healthcare of Women Professor: Jeanne Gottlieb • Course Description: Theoretical and clinical bases for providing primary prenatal care of women. Emphasis is on management strategies for promotion of transcultural health care needs according to the advanced practice role. • Service Learning Description: OB Education Program – UM Jackson Medical Center. Nurse-midwives work closely with women with minimal or no major health problems to ensure they receive excellent health care with a personal touch. Our nurse-midwives help with family planning, annual tests, and screenings, and care for women with low-risk pregnancies through labor, delivery, and post partum. Nurse-midwives also help women as they transition into motherhood, teaching them how to care for their newborns. NUR 628: Advanced Practice Nursing of the Adult I Professor: Elaine Kauschinger • Course Description: Theoretical and clinical bases for health care management of health alterations in the adult population. Emphasis on strategies for health maintenance and prevention of health problems, management of alterations, discharge planning, and rehabilitation of individuals and aggregate population. • Service Learning Description: Miami Hope Center. Students are involved in clinical experiences and volunteer opportunities within the various service areas of the Hope Center. The goal of Hope Center is to provide opportunities to individuals with disabilities so that they may grow physically, mentally, emotionally and socially to their fullest potential. We strive to maximize participation in the community through social activities, community living and employment.

* Course offered Spring 2014


NUR 631: Advanced Practice Nursing of the Adult II Professor: Elaine Kauschinger • Course Description: Theoretical and clinical bases for health care management of health alterations in the adult population. Emphasis on strategies for health maintenance and prevention of health problems, management of alterations, discharge planning, and rehabilitation of individuals and aggregate population. • Service Learning Description: Miami Dade Medical Reserve Corps Training. Students engage in training and education related to emergency and disaster preparedness. MRC volunteers supplement existing local emergency and public health resources during times of community need, and include volunteers such as physicians, nurses, pharmacists, dentist, and epidemiologist, among other medical and public health professionals. Other community members, such as interpreters, chaplains, office workers and legal advisors, can fill other vital support positions.

NUR 647: Advanced Practice Nursing Integration Professor: Todd Ambrosia • Course Description: Integration of the components of the Advanced Practice Nursing role to analyze advanced practice issues. Integration of leadership and collaborative strategies into specialty specific advanced practice nursing. • Service Learning Description: Clinical In-Service Presentations. Students select an area of clinical interest and provide an educational in-service presentation to the clinical staff. Various agencies include outpatient and ambulatory care settings of local medical centers, private physician offices, and community health care centers.

NUR 658: Structure and Processes in Health Care Organizations and Health Care Policy Professor: Mary Hooshmand • Course Description: An exploration of health care organizations and health care policy, and how change is effected in both. Health care policy and planning to address health care disparities at the local, state, and federal levels will be explored. Organizational diagnosis, organizational change, and ethical dimensions of public policy formulations and implementation will be highlighted. • Service Learning Description: Group project creating Op Ed piece suitable for newspaper submission.

NUR 672: Capstone I Professor: Todd Ambrosia • Course Description: The capstone project is a required synthesizing initiative for students to apply theory, supported by evidence and expert knowledge of nursing practice, by completing a scholarly project of the student’s or agency’s choice. Students may design a practice change initiative under the direction of a faculty member and preceptor. • Service Learning Description: Working with community based agencies to plan innovations to improve health care delivery to patients and communities. Various agencies include hospitals, outpatient and ambulatory care settings of local medical centers, private physician offices, educational institutions, health care systems and community health care centers.

NUR 676: Practice Immersion I Professor: Faculty • Course Description: This course contains individually precepted learning experiences across the spectrum of nursing in a variety of settings. Students develop expertise within the scope of their nursing practice. • Service Learning Description: Various agencies include hospitals, outpatient and ambulatory care settings of local medical centers, private physician offices, educational institutions, health care systems and community health care centers. NUR 687: Capstone II Professor: JoAnn Trybulski • Course Description: This second capstone course is the implementation and evaluation of the project developed in Capstone I.

* Course offered Spring 2014


Service Learning Description: Working with community based agencies to implement innovations to improve health care delivery to patients and communities. Various agencies include hospitals, outpatient and ambulatory care settings of local medical centers, private physician offices, educational institutions, health care systems and community health care centers.

NUR 687: Practice Immersion II Professor: JoAnn Trybulski • Course Description: This course contains individually precepted learning experiences across the spectrum of nursing in a variety of settings. Students develop expertise within the scope of their nursing practice. • Service Learning Description: Working with agencies on projects to improve infrastructure or delivery systems. Working with agencies to provide educational offerings. Various agencies include hospitals, outpatient and ambulatory care settings of local medical centers, private physician offices, educational institutions, health care systems and community health care centers.

* Course offered Spring 2014


Academic Service-Learning