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ANNUAL REPORT UMEZ

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Cover photo. THE GEORGE WASHINGTON BRIDGE BUS TERMINAL FROM BROADWAY AND 177TH STREET. Photo by Rosemary Santos. Background photo. MARIA, OWNER OF NUEVA ERA FLOWER SHOP. Photo courtesy of Grameen America.

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UPPER MANHATTAN EMPOWERMENT ZONE 2018 ANNUAL REPORT TABLE OF CONTENTS

MISSION UMEZ Mission Statement4

INVESTMENT AREAS UMEZ Investment Areas 

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INTRODUCTION A Message from UMEZ CEO & Board Chair

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COMMERCIAL DEVELOPMENT & SMALL BUSINESS INVESTMENTS George Washington Bridge Bus Terminal12 Locksmith Bar14

CULTURAL INVESTMENTS Sugar Hill Children's Museum of Art & Storytelling El Alto: Un Esfuerzo Grafico / The Heights: A Printmaking Endeavor by Word Up Community Bookshop Women in Flight by Andrea Arroyo The Harlem Chamber Players

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FINANCIALS Financial Report Breakdown FY 2018

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STAFF AND BOARDS UMEZ Staff & Boards

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CONTACT Connect with Us

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MISSION

UMEZ MISSION

THE UPPER MANHATTAN SUSTAINS THE ECONO OF ALL COMMUNITIES THROUGH JOB CREA ALLIANCES, STRATE AND SMALL BUSIN

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N STATEMENT

N EMPOWERMENT ZONE OMIC REVITALIZATION IN UPPER MANHATTAN ATION, CORPORATE EGIC INVESTMENTS, NESS ASSISTANCE.

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INVESTMENT AREAS

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Background photo. DERECK FORDJOUR'S PARADE AT THE SUGAR HILL CHILDREN'S MUSEUM OF ART & STORYTELLING. Photo by Michael Palma Mir.


UMEZ

INVESTMENT AREAS

COMMERCIAL DEVELOPMENT & BUSINESS INVESTMENTS

$127,000

SMALL BUSINESS INVESTMENTS

MICROLENDING

$250,000 or more

$50,000 to $250,000

Up to $5,000

UMEZ invests in real estate development initiatives that yield employment opportunities and economic growth for Upper Manhattan. UMEZ also provides loans of $250,000 or more for new and existing businesses in Upper Manhattan.

UMEZ’s Business Resource and Investment Service Center (BRISC) provides loans for small business formation and expansion. Small business loans are meant to create opportunities for local wealth creation and economic vitality in Upper Manhattan. BRISC also offers lines of credit for qualified small businesses.

UMEZ partners with local organizations to offer microloans, loans of up to $5,000, to entrepreneurs who are underserved by mainstream banking institutions.

CULTURAL INVESTMENTS

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT INVESTMENTS

Various grant categories

Various grant opportunities

UMEZ’s Cultural Investment Fund (CIF) invests in Upper Manhattan’s vibrant cultural landscape, which leads to more visitors, new jobs, and increased economic activity.

UMEZ invests in effective and measurable training and employment program models that directly connect Upper Manhattan residents to quality jobs with pathways to careers.

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INTRODUCTION

UMEZ

A MESSAGE FROM UMEZ CEO & BOARD CHAIR Blair M. Duncan & Joseph J. Johnson, III

Dear Friends:

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his year marked significant milestones in UMEZ’s operations. We completed a $5 million loan to fund the George Washington Bridge Bus Terminal, which will bring new retail experiences to Washington Heights, including outlets like Marshalls, Gap, a Fine Fare Supermarket, and small businesses on the lower level of the concourse. Community engagement was highlighted by the first group of 36 Upper Manhattan Arts Engagement awardees through our partnership with the Lower Manhattan Cultural Council, which provided $250,000 to Upper Manhattan artists and small nonprofits. We also assisted a long-standing Washington Heights restaurant, Locksmith Bar, with a small business loan to grow their business by building out the adjacent space.

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Photo left. BLAIR M. DUNCAN. Photo by MJ Photography. Photo right. JOSEPH J. JOHNSON, III. Photo courtesy of UMEZ.


“As we welcome Blair in his new role as CEO, on behalf of the Board of Directors, I want to take this opportunity to thank Kenneth J. Knuckles for his outstanding service to UMEZ since 2002.” Joseph J. Johnson, III Chair of the UMEZ Board of Directors

It was also a period of management transition as the Board of Directors undertook a search for the next CEO. UMEZ maintained a steady course during this period—in April 2018, Blair M. Duncan was selected as the next President & CEO, as the Board of Directors concluded a comprehensive search to find the successor of Ken Knuckles, who retired on June 30, 2018, after having served as UMEZ’s President & CEO for 15 years. We are excited about the future and know that UMEZ will continue to be impactful in East Harlem, Central Harlem, West Harlem, Washington Heights, and Inwood. In the coming year, we’ll deepen our engagement with the community to assist entrepreneurs by expanding our microlending programs and strengthening access to jobs for local residents. We are also looking forward to a successful second round of UMEZ’s Upper Manhattan Arts Engagement grants. It is an honor and privilege to lead UMEZ forward, and we are confident we will build on our past successes as we adapt to the changes in the communities we serve.

BLAIR M. DUNCAN Chief Executive Officer, UMEZ

JOSEPH J. JOHNSON, III Chair of the UMEZ Board of Directors

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COMMERCIAL DEVELOPMENT

“The George Washington Bridge Bus Terminal project is a successful public-private partnership between UMEZ, the Port Authority, and the New York City Regional Center that highlights how we create local jobs and improve the communities we serve.” Blair M. Duncan Chief Executive Officer, UMEZ

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Background photo. THE GEORGE WASHINGTON BRIDGE BUS TERMINAL FROM BROADWAY AND 177TH STREET. Photo by Rosemary Santos.

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COMMERCIAL DEVELOPMENT

GEORGE WASHINGTON BRIDGE BUS TERMINAL

Washington Heights $5 Million

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n 2018, UMEZ provided a $5 million loan to developers SJM and Slayton Ventures to renovate the George Washington Bridge Bus Terminal, a transportation hub located in Washington Heights. The historic terminal connects passengers between Manhattan and Northern New Jersey, and transports 5 million passengers annually. It sits between 178th and 179th Streets, between Fort Washington Avenue and Broadway. Once revered for its avant-garde modern structure, the terminal has been in a continuous state of disarray since first opening in 1963. Construction began in 2014 and the terminal is now open to the public. Bus operations have been consolidated to the rooftop level, allowing for the development of a new retail area, called the GWB Mercado, on the lower levels. The new development offers more than 100,000 square feet of retail space, with national retailers such as Blink Fitness, Marshalls, Gap, and Fine Fare Supermarket. The retail space will also be prioritizing a section for local businesses. CafĂŠ Buunni, a local coffee shop, will open a fourth location at the terminal.

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Background photo. THE GEORGE WASHINGTON BRIDGE BUS TERMINAL FROM BROADWAY AND 178TH STREET. Photo by Rosemary Santos.

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SMALL BUSINESS INVESTMENTS

LOCKSMITH BAR

Washington Heights $200,000

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n December of 2017, UMEZ’s Business Resource and Investment Service Center provided Oscar Napa and Joelle Ludwig with a $200,000 loan to expand the Locksmith Bar. Since opening in 2009, Locksmith has become a cherished establishment in Washington Heights. For nine years, it was a tiny space on Broadway, measuring 600 square feet. The first year of business was tough. There was little foot traffic in the area, and as Joelle puts it, “it was really scary in the beginning.” But soon, word spread and business began to boom. Locksmith quickly became one of the neighborhood’s prime locations. However, after a few years, its size became limiting and remaining profitable became a challenge. As a small bar that also served food, there were still managers, kitchen staff, and bartenders to pay. In 2017, the space next to Locksmith became available, and Joelle and Oscar realized it was time to expand.

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“When you get an opportunity to break through the wall, you have to take it.” Joelle Ludwig

Photo above. BURGER AND FRIES FROM LOCKSMITH'S MENU. Photo courtesy of Locksmith Bar. Photo right. LOCKSMITH BAR'S 600-SQUARE-FOOT ORIGINAL SPACE. Photo courtesy of Locksmith Bar.


“We are what [UMEZ] stands for. We’re the little guys who are looking to get bigger. [Oscar] grew up in the neighborhood…My son grew up in this bar. We are a family here.” Joelle Ludwig

With the $200,000 loan from UMEZ, Locksmith has more than doubled in size, helping its business grow tremendously. Joelle describes the expansion as “changing everything.” With their new space, they were able to host a Christmas party for one of Columbia University's departments. On the weekends, families can enjoy brunch in Locksmith’s newly expanded dining area. The space is now large enough to accommodate strollers and wheelchairs, something Joelle and Oscar are very proud of. Locksmith will celebrate its 10-year anniversary in 2019. 15


CULTURAL INVESTMENTS

“I think there’s something about the arts that…changes you. It may not be in a way that you realize, but you’re just exposed to something, and if you’re exposed to something beautiful or something that’s hard, it plays on your emotions and… it shifts your thinking.” Liz Player Executive and Artistic Director, The Harlem Chamber Players

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Background photo. BOOKSHELVES AT WORD UP COMMUNITY BOOKSHOP. Photo by Rosemary Santos.

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Background Photo. DERECK FORDJOUR STUDIO IMAGE. Photo by Michael Palma Mir. CULTURAL INVESTMENTS

“We are elated and extremely grateful to be recipients of support from UMEZ at this time. This very generous grant will help to strengthen our marketing, development, and overall administrative capacity, which are key factors in attracting new visitors, growing our programs, and sustaining Museum operations. We are proud to align with UMEZ's visionary and respected legacy in our work to directly benefit citizens in Harlem and throughout New York City.� Lauren Kelly Director and Chief Curator, Sugar Hill Children's Museum of Art & Storytelling

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SUGAR HILL CHILDREN'S MUSEUM OF ART & STORYTELLING West Harlem Up to $750,000

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n January of 2018, the Sugar Hill Children's Museum of Art & Storytelling received a capacity-building grant from UMEZ. The Museum’s mission is to provide a space where children and families grow and learn together through intergenerational dialogue with artists, art, and storytelling. It first opened in 2015 and occupies 17,000 square feet on the ground floor of the Sugar Hill Project. Designed by internationally acclaimed architect Sir David Adjaye, the Sugar Hill Project is a multi-use community revitalization project that integrates supportive housing, education, and art in the Sugar Hill area of West Harlem. It includes three light-filled galleries, workspaces for a resident artist and hands-on program activities, and varied gathering spaces for presentations. The Museum’s programs include art exhibitions, storytelling series, family programs, and arts education. The grant funds 11 full- and part-time employees, two consultants, and the continued development of its marketing materials and website. With UMEZ support, the Museum aims to expand its programs, attract new audiences, and increase earned income by funding staffing needs and expanding its digital presence.

Photo top right. CLOSE-UP FROM DERECK FORDJOUR'S PARADE AT THE MUSEUM. Photo by Michael Palma Mir. Photo bottom right. LEGACY GALLERY. Photo by Tim Lee.

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CULTURAL INVESTMENTS

2018 UMEZ ARTS ENGAGEMENT GRANTE Dance

Capoeira Center of New York, Inc., The Harlem Celebration of Capoeira Dances For A Variable Population, Inc., Dance and the Beauty of Age Festival General Mischief Dance Theatre, Universal Language Ranardo-Domeico Grays, Healing Works II Harlem Dance Club, HDC Amphitheater The Harlem Swing Dance Society, The Harlem Roots and Rhythm Urban Dance Festival Kotchegna Dance Company/Vado Diomande, Kekene XII (The Gathering XII) ModArts Dance Collective/Leah Smiley Tubbs, Moving to Change Torkomada, Inc., Raqs Revolution Matthew Westerby, The Harlem Project

Multidisciplinary & Literature

Dyckman Farmhouse Museum Alliance, Community Fall Festival Jazz Power Initiative, Engaging the Community in Jazz Arts Experiences: Intergenerational Jazz Jams Pan American Musical Art Research (PAMAR), Latin American Cultural Week 2018 Stefanie Nelson Dance Group, Alzheimer's Awareness Festival at Harlem Gatehouse Sarah Cameron Sunde, Across an Empty Lot: A Temporary Memorial to the Empty Space Yaffa Cultural Arts Inc., Stories for Change

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Background Photo. THE HARLEM CHAMBER PLAYERS AT THE SCHOMBURG CENTER FOR

RESEARCH IN BLACK CULTURE IN FEBRUARY OF 2018. Photo by Bob Curtis, courtesy of The Harlem Chamber Players.


EES Music

Cantanti Project, Cantamos: A Celebration of Spanish-Language Songs Cornerstone Chorale, Handel's Messiah in the Neighborhood East Winds, Japanese Music Programs Series El Taller Latino Americano, El Barrio Canta Su Historia/El Barrio Sings Its History Ensemble Échappé, A Season of Song: Part 1 The Harlem Chamber Players, Inc., The Harlem Chamber Players 2018 Season Harlem Presents, Inc., The Harlem Opera Festival Eric Lemmon, The Impossible Will Take a Little While loadbang, loadbang performs at The Crypt of The Church of the Intercession Washington Heights Chamber Orchestra, The Fall 2018 Concert Season

Theatre

American Slavery Project, American Slavery Project: Unheard Voices The Anthropologists, This Sinking Island New Heritage Theater Group, Harlem Shakespeare Festivals’ The Sable Series

Visual Arts, Media, & New Media

Andrea Arroyo, Women in Flight The Black School, Black Love Fest NY 2018 José Carlos Casado, I don't know why the caged bird sings, ah me, When her wing is bruised and her bosom sore, When she beats her bars and would be free Marne Lucas, Bardo ∞ Project Omanut: Jewish Uptown Arts, Sukkahwood Word Up Community Bookshop/Librería Comunitaria, El Alto: Un esfuerzo gráfico / The Heights: A Printmaking Endeavor

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CULTURAL INVESTMENTS

EL ALTO: UN ESFUERZO GRAFICO / THE HEIGHTS: A PRINTMAKING ENDEAVOR BY WORD UP COMMUNITY BOOKSHOP Washington Heights $9,500

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n 2018, Word Up Community Bookshop won a $9,500 Arts Engagement grant from UMEZ in order to launch El Alto: Un esfuerzo grafico / The Heights: A Printmaking Endeavor. The project is a commissioned portfolio of prints and group exhibition that asks visual artists who are longtime residents of Washington Heights and Inwood to capture, reflect, represent, interpret, and/or process the changing population and landscape of Washington Heights and Inwood today.

Photo top. BOOKSHELVES AT THE WORD UP COMMUNITY BOOKSHOP. Photo by Rosemary Santos. Photo bottom left. VERONICA LIU, FOUNDER OF WORD UP COMMUNITY BOOKSHOP. Photo by Rosemary Santos. Photo bottom right. PRINTS FROM EL ALTO: UN ESFUERZO GRAFICO / THE HEIGHTS: A PRINTMAKING ENDEAVOR. Photo by Rosemary Santos.

The project attracted a multigenerational, multidisciplinary group of 19 artists, whose prints were displayed on the bookshop’s walls. The artists plan to publish a book that documents the work and six-month-long process. They hope to exhibit the prints in various art spaces throughout the city.

ABOUT WORD UP Word Up Community Bookshop opened in 2011 as a pop-up shop across from the United Palace. Spearheaded by Veronica Liu, a writer and independent publisher who has lived in Washington Heights for 17 years, the bookshop was meant to operate for a period of 30 days. However, the demand for a community bookshop was so strong that it was hard for her to ignore it.

“At the grand opening, people were like, 'How can we keep this here forever?'” 22

Veronica Liu

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During its first year of operations, the bookshop became an integral part of the Washington Heights community. At its height, Word Up had 100 volunteers helping to run its operations.

In the summer of 2012, Word Up Community Bookshop began looking for a new location. Needing funds to lease and renovate a new space, they raised $60,000 through an Indiegogo campaign and raised another $10,000 offline.

Fast forward a few years and many open-mics, poetry readings, and musical events later, Word Up has become a beloved stop for Washington Heights and Inwood residents. The bookshop now claims 60+ neighborhood residents as part of its collective.

“[People] wanted just to sit at a place, casually, where there wasn’t the pressure to buy something—where you could just hang out and meet other people.”

Veronica Liu

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CULTURAL INVESTMENTS

WOMEN IN FLIGHT BY ANDREA ARROYO

East Harlem, Washington Heights $4,000

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ndrea Arroyo received a $4,000 UMEZ Arts Engagement grant for a series of outdoor exhibitions presented in three community gardens in Upper Manhattan. The project, Women in Flight, was a reflection on the various women who have inhabited the communities of Upper Manhattan. The exhibits featured site-specific artworks created with repurposed materials and mixed media, integrated within the natural environment of plants, grass, canopies, and other elements in each individual garden. Andrea describes her work as always highlighting women’s rights and women’s stories. She was born and raised in Mexico City, and moved to New York in the 1980s to pursue a career in contemporary dance. She earned a scholarship to study at the Merce Cunningham School, and after dancing professionally for a few years, she made the transition to the visual arts. Drawing and painting had long been parts of her life, but she had not seriously considered a career in the visual arts until a visit to the Visual Museum in London inspired a change. After displaying her work at a gallery in New York City, she was soon invited to have one show after another, and her career in the visual arts took off.

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Andrea is now an internationally renowned artist, with permanent works featured on the New York City subway, in local schools, and in institutions across the United States and in other parts of the world. Her work ranges from smaller, more intimate studio work to large-scale public art. She was first attracted to Washington Heights because of its large-sized pre-war apartments, which offered much light and room to house her art studio, office, library, and living space. She was also attracted to the neighborhood’s proximity to nature and its vibrant cultural life.

“I advocate for arts and

culture because those for me are not optional aspects of life or society. Everyone has a right to culture and art…Art, I think, is an equalizer. When you see a painting or a dance piece, you don’t necessarily know who made it, and it speaks to you either way.” Andrea Arroyo

Photo right. ANDREA ARROYO AT HER EXHIBIT, WOMEN IN FLIGHT. Photo courtesy of Andrea Arroyo.


“I think of Upper Manhattan, in terms of population, as a place that has been very fluid. A lot of immigrant communities have come, but I also think of the original women. The women who were originally here— from the first nations, the Lenape, the Algonquin. And for me it’s important to make those connections, connecting the original women from Manhattan all the way through colonial times, the women of the Harlem Renaissance, and all the way to now.” Andrea Arroyo

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CULTURAL INVESTMENTS

THE HARLEM CHAMBER PLAYERS

Central Harlem $10,000

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he Harlem Chamber Players is an ethnically diverse collective of professional musicians dedicated to bringing high-caliber, affordable, accessible, live classical music to the Harlem community. In 2018, The Harlem Chamber Players became one of UMEZ’s inaugural Arts Engagement grantees. With a $10,000 UMEZ Arts Engagement grant, The Harlem Chamber Players presented two live classical music concerts as part of their 2018-2019 concert season at the Broadway Presbyterian Church. Liz Player, the Executive and Artistic Director of The Harlem Chamber Players, began playing the clarinet at the age of 11 and became actively involved in chamber music as an adolescent. She became enamored with classical music and began learning as much as she could by visiting music stores and borrowing recordings from her local library. Though she loved music, her parents insisted she study something more traditional in college, prompting her to earn a bachelor’s degree in computer science. After a few years of working as a program analyst, she realized that something was missing from her life.

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Photo above. A CLOSE-UP OF THE HARLEM CHAMBER PLAYERS ORCHESTRA MEMBERS. Photo by Bob Curtis, courtesy of The Harlem Chamber Players.


In college, Liz had stopped playing the clarinet to focus on her studies. A couple of years later, Liz began taking lessons with renowned musician David Glaser and he encouraged her to earn a second degree in music. After earning her music degree from Queens College, she played as a soloist with the Queens College Orchestra and was offered the opportunity to be a substitute clarinetist for the Broadway show Finian’s Rainbow. According to Liz, Black and Latino musicians comprise only 4% of major symphony orchestras in the United States. Liz started The Harlem Chamber Players as a way to promote Black and Latino musicians in classical music.

“It was the only

Broadway gig I had… but my heart was more into chamber music and doing something more community oriented.” 27


FINANCIALS

FINANCIAL REPORT BREAKDOWN FY 2018

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FINANCIAL POSITION

2018

2017

Cash and Investments

55,166,560

58,228,509

Loans to Businesses and Affiliates

28,302,456

22,229,524

4,770,181

3,568,990

147,926

183,092

88,387,123

84,210,115

Assets

Grants Receivable and Other Assets Net Fixed Assets TOTAL ASSETS Liabilities and Net Assets Liabilities

1,476,112

1,423,029

Deferred Revenue

22,911,738

23,867,215

Total Liabilities

24,387,850

25,290,244

Net Assets

63,999,273

58,919,872

TOTAL LIABILITIES AND NET ASSETS

88,387,123

84,210,116

Interest and Other Revenue

1,855,556

1,151,864

Government Grant Support for Lending Activity

8,728,178

2,882,652

10,583,734

4,034,516

Grant Program Expenses

1,812,810

1,972,477

Program Service Expenses

2,475,182

2,389,706

Management and General Expenses

1,216,340

1,152,840

TOTAL EXPENSES

5,504,332

5,515,023

Receipts From Borrowers

1,376,761

954,480

Receipts From Funding Sources & Others

7,180,358

11,573,032

Payments to Suppliers & Employees

(3,585,551)

(3,437,281)

Payments to Subgrantees

(1,812,810)

(1,972,477)

3,158,758

7,117,754

(15,185)

0

(7,280,259)

(531,866)

1,146,506

1,049,287

(71,769)

(94,485)

(6,220,707)

422,936

Increase (Decrease) in Cash

(3,061,949)

7,540,690

BEGINNING CASH

58,228,509

50,687,819

ENDING CASH

55,166,560

58,228,509

ACTIVITIES Revenue and Support:

TOTAL REVENUE AND SUPPORT Expenses

CASH FLOWS From Operating Activities:

Net Cash Used in Operating Activities From Investing Activities: Purchase of Equip & Leasehold Loan Disbursements Loan Collections Other Activities (Net) Net Cash Provided by Investing Activities

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STAFF AND BOARDS

STAFF MEMBERS

Staff

KENNETH J. KNUCKLES President and CEO, Upper Manhattan Empowerment Zone Development Corporation through June 30, 2018

BLAIR M. DUNCAN President and CEO, Upper Manhattan Empowerment Zone Development Corporation effective July 1, 2018

ELLA JOHNSON Executive Assistant

FINANCE AND ADMINISTRATION GAFFAR MOHAMED Chief Financial Officer

GORDON LANE Information Technology Officer

AYESHA CODRINGTON Controller

BUSINESS INVESTMENTS JAIME GONZALEZ Senior Vice President of Business Investments

RODRIGO VILLAVICENCIO Assistant Controller

DANESSY PICO Office & Human Resources Manager

SHARON CHEEKS Receptionist

JOSEPH MIDDLETON Director of Community Partners & Loan Officer

CULTURAL INVESTMENTS VERDERY ROOSEVELT Senior Vice President

CHERYL ANHAVA

LEGAL ELIZABETH M. HARRIS General Counsel

CEDRIC SMITH Compliance Officer

SARA FARHALL Legal Analyst

Program Officer

LINDSEY CRANE Program Officer

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT YAHSHAANYAH HILL Director of Workforce Development

JOSE CALDERON 30

Program Officer


BOARD OF DIRECTORS

Boards

BRISC BOARD

NYEZ BOARD

LINDA SCOTT (CHAIR)

KEESA SCHREANE

ANTHONY Q. FLETCHER

Associate Corporate Secretary, JP Morgan Chase & Co.

Executive Producer and Host of You've Been Served Podcast

Attorney Member, Community Board 9

UMEZ BOARD

MAXINE GRIFFITH

JOSEPH J. JOHNSON, III (CHAIR)

AMIR KIRKWOOD

STEVEN BERRIOS Commercial Loan Officer, Carver Federal Savings Bank

CHRISTOPHER BROWN Partner, Mitchell Titus LLP

LISA DOWNING Founder and Owner, Connections Real Estate Services

GEOFFREY EATON President, NAACP MidManhattan Branch

JULIAN JAMES Vice President, BlackRock, Inc.

KENNETH J. KNUCKLES President and CEO, Upper Manhattan Empowerment Zone Development Corporation

CHARLES PATRICK, III Vice President, Bank of America Merrill Lynch

GARDNER RIVERA Managing Member, Paper City Investments

TORIAN ROBINSON Director of Development, Morehouse College

Senior Advisor to the President, Columbia University

Senior Vice President, Goldman Sachs & Co.

Chief Lending and Investment Officer, Opportunity Finance Network

NIKISHA ALCINDOR

MAURINE D. KNIGHTON

Executive Director of Business Development School of Professional Studies, Columbia University

Program Director for the Arts, Doris Duke Charitable Foundation

SHAHABUDDEEN A. ALLY

President and CEO, Upper Manhattan Empowerment Zone Development Corporation

Chair, Community Board 12

KEVIN G. CHAVERS Managing Director, BlackRock, Inc.

MAURICE COLEMAN Senior Vice President, Community Development Banking, Bank of America

KENNETH J. KNUCKLES

HARRIET R. MICHEL Former President, National Minority Supplier Development Council

REKHA NAMBIAR Partner, Mitchell Titus LLP

DIANE COLLIER

KEITH TAYLOR

Chair, Community Board 11

Member, Community Board 10

TERESA EYRING

CARMEN VASQUEZ

Executive Director, Theatre Communications Group

Former Deputy Executive Director, Hope Community, Inc.

HOWARD ZEMSKY (CHAIR) President and CEO, Empire State Development Corporation and Commissioner of the New York State Department of Economic Development

MARLENE CINTRON President, Bronx Overall Economic Development Corporation

REP. ADRIANO ESPAILLAT U.S. Representative, N.Y. 13th Congressional District

ALICIA GLEN Deputy Mayor for Housing and Economic Development, City of New York

KENNETH J. KNUCKLES President and CEO, Upper Manhattan Empowerment Zone Development Corporation

REP. JOSE E. SERRANO U.S. Representative, N.Y. 15th Congressional District

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CONTACT

CONNECT WITH US

Connect with UMEZ

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Photo right. REV MELIKA LEE WHITNEY INSTALLATION AT THE SUGAR HILL CHILDREN'S MUSEUM OF ART & STORYTELLING. Photo by Michael Palma Mir.


business investments email businessinvestments@umez.org cultural investments email culture@umez.org workforce development investments email workforcedevelopment@umez.org

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small business investments email brisc@umez.org

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For information about our:

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Upper Manhattan Empowerment Zone Development Corporation 55 West 125th Street, 11th Floor New York, NY 10027 (212) 410-0030 umez.org FOLLOW US ON TWITTER @UMEZ_DC CHECK OUT OUR NEW INSTAGRAM ACCOUNT @umezdc

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UMEZ 2018 Annual Report  

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